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physics and astronomy

philosophy

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physics and astronomy

Professors Bloom, Cheyne, McDermott; Associate Professors Keohane, Thurman; Visiting Assistant Professor Auner Chair: Hugh O. Thurman III The requirements for a major in Physics are 34 hours, including Physics 131, 132, 151, 152, 233, 244, 331, 332, either Physics 106 or 243, and either Physics 351 or 352. Of the remaining 9 hours, 3 credits must be at the 200-level or above and 3 credits must be at the 300-level or above. A major in Physics must complete Math 141, 142, and 242. The requirements for a major in Engineering Physics are 36 hours, including Physics 101, 106, 131, 132, 151, 152, 215, 243, 244, 331, 451, and 452. The remaining 6 hours must be at the 200 level or higher. A major in Engineering Physics must complete Math 141, 142, 242, 231, and 243. A major in Engineering Physics must complete either Physics 220 or Computer Science 261. A student may not major in both Physics and Engineering Physics. Physics majors seeking Distinction in Physics must complete Physics 461-462 and may not use these courses to fulfill elective hours in the major. Engineering Physics majors seeking Distinction in Engineering Physics must complete Physics 461-462 as a replacement for Physics 451-452 and meet all requirements as defined by the department. The requirements for a minor in Astronomy are 18 hours, including Astronomy 110, 151, 210, and 310; and Physics 131, 132, 151, and 152. Physics or Chemistry majors who take the Physics courses and elect to complete the Astronomy minor may only count Physics 131, 132, 151, and 152 in both the major and the Astronomy minor. For more information about the department, see its web page.

ASTRONOMY ASTRONOMY 110. (3) INTRODUCTION TO ASTRONOMY. An examination of astronomy: its methods and history, and the origin and development of the solar system, the galaxy, and the universe. Prerequisite: none. Corequisite: Astronomy 151. Offered: each semester. ASTRONOMY 125. (3) LIFE IN THE UNIVERSE. This course concentrates on the astronomical and biological conditions which have made possible the development of life on Earth. Our knowledge of the cosmos is critically examined to estimate the probabilities for life to arise elsewhere. Methods of searching for intelligent extraterrestrial life are reviewed. This is a one-semester course intended for the non-physicalscience major. Prerequisite: none. Offered: every other fall semester of odd-numbered years. ASTRONOMY 210. (3) OBSERVATIONAL ASTRONOMY. A comprehensive introduction to observational astronomy, the course begins with the study of the greatest observations of the 20th century, followed by modern data analysis techniques on both spacebased and ground-based data sets. The students have full access to the College telescope, as well as access to shared observing facilities. Prerequisite: Astronomy 110/151. Offered: fall semester of oddnumbered years. ASTRONOMY 310. (3) ASTROPHYSICS. The study of the physics of astronomical processes in order to understand what can be learned from the radiations observed from astronomical objects. Detectors and detection techniques are also examined. Cross-listed: Same class as Physics 310. Prerequisites: Physics 132 and Mathematics 142. Offered: spring semester of oddnumbered years.

Profile for Hampden-Sydney College

Academic Catalogue 2019-20  

Academic Catalogue 2019-20  

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