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Professional Development for

Educators

Regist ratio is open n

Spring 2013

View online at www.hamline.edu/spring2013classes.

Hamline University School of Education


Aim Higher in 2013

The new year is right around the corner… what will you be doing to advance your career in the coming year? Whether you’re looking to take a class or start your doctorate or anything in between, Hamline has the program to meet your needs, offered in a way that is convenient to your life. Are you looking for…?

A summer literacy workshop? Mark your calendars for Hamline’s 23rd Summer Literacy Institute on July 15-18, 2013. See more info at www.hamline.edu/sli.

Minneapolis-based courses? No need to cross the river with these courses offered at Hamline’s St. Louis Park location. EDUC 6145 Girls & Boys Do Learn Differently EDUC 6197 Differentiated Instruction for ALL Learners (D.I.A.L.) GTED 7609 Gifted Education Program Models

An out-of-the-classroom

adventure?

Offered with the Audubon Center of the North Woods: ENED 6105 Wolf and Lynx Ecological Experiences in Northern Minnesota ENED 7682 Wolf Ecology SCED 7671 Minnesota Forests ENED 7739 Sustainable Energy and Food Systems SCED 7685 Spring Flora Offered with the Como Zoo and Conservatory: SCED 6119 Great Apes SCED 6018 Bats: Creatures of the Night Offered by Hamline: ENED 6275 Winter Aquatics ENED 7635 Nature Drawing & Journaling SCED 6158 Identifying Minnesota Trees and Shrubs: Tricks, Tips, Techniques

Online courses?

Offered by instructors trained in online education, these classes offer students convenience and flexibility. Blended (partially online): EDUC 6062 Mobile Learning EDUC 6197 Differentiated Instruction for ALL Learners ESL 6631 Intro to ELLS ESL 7753 Testing and Evaluation of ELLS ENED 6275 Winter Aquatics SCED 6158 Identifying Minnesota Trees and Shrubs: Tricks, Tips, Techniques Online: EDUC 6092 Bullying Prevention Strategies EDUC 7201 Counseling the College Bound Student EDUC 7202 Understanding the College Admission Process EDUC 7206 Practicum in College Counseling ESL 6636 Course Design for Adult ESL Classes ESL 6638 Assessment of the Adult ELL

ESL 7502 Language & Society ESL 7519 Linguistics for Language Teachers ESL 7650 Basics of Modern English ESL 7660 Second Language Acquisition ESL 7753 Testing and Evaluation of English Language Learners ESL 7776 ESL Methods LANG 6078 Fluency Measures to Help Struggling Readers LANG 7901 Foundations of Reading, K-12 LANG 7902 Developing Elementary Readers, K-6 LANG 7903 Advancing Secondary Readers, 7-12 LANG 7904 Reading Assessment and Evaluation LANG 7905 Practicum in Reading Interventions LANG 7906 Becoming Literacy Leaders

PHED 6080 The Art and Science of College Athletic Recruiting SCED 6115 The Ocean System SCED 6105 Genetics, Genomics, Genethics SCED 6148 Evolution SCED 6099 Space, Time, and Motion SCED 6088 Climate Change SCED 6147 The Solar System SCED 6100 Earth Systems: Inside/Out SCED 6159 Water: Environmental Science SCED 6117 Diversity of Fishes SPED 7055 Childhood Psychopathology SPED 7077 Sleep Disorders in Children with Disabilities SPED 7084 Neurobiological Disorders SPED 7091 Intro to ASD SPED 7092 ASD: Proactive Behavior Management

SPED 7094 ASD: Identification, Assessment, & Planning SPED 7096 ASD: Teaching Strategies for Learners with ASD SPED 7292 Autism Spectrum Disorders: Early Identification & Intervention SPED 7293 ASD: Asperger Syndrome SPED 7295 ASD: Applied Behavior Analysis SPED 7297 Legal Issues in Special Education URED 7722 Framework for Teaching: Changing Paradigm URED 7723 Managing the Urban Classroom URED 7725 Linking Communities to Classrooms URED 7731 Interpersonal Dynamics: Racism


Courses that start on a specific date?

If your schedule is a driving factor, check out this list of courses by start date.

1/3/2012 LANG 7906 Becoming Literacy Leaders ESL 7610 History of English ESL 7753 Testing and Evaluation of ESL 1/8/2012 GTED 6245 Inquiry for Gifted Students 1/28/2012 SCED 6088 Climate Change SCED 6099 Space, Time, and Motion SCED 6105 Genetics, Genomics, Genethics SCED 6115 The Ocean System SCED 6147 The Solar System SCED 6148 Evolution 1/30/2012 EDUC 6062 Mobile Learning EDUC 7201 Counseling the College Bound Student EDUC 7206 College Counseling Practicum ENED 6275 Winter Aquatics ESL 6638 Assessment of the Adult ELL ESL 7502 Language and Society ESL 7519 Linguistics for Language Teachers ESL 7650 Basics of Modern English ESL 7660 Second Language Acquisition ESL 7753 Testing and Evaluation of ELLs ESL 7776 ESL Methods GTED 7607 Models and Strategies in Gifted Ed SPED 7092 Proactive Behavior Management PHED 6080 The Art and Science of College Athletic Recruiting SPED 7094 ASD: Identification, Assessment, and Planning

HOW TO USE THIS GUIDE

SPED 7292 ASD: Early Identification & Intervention URED 7722 Framework for Teaching: Changing Paradigm URED 7725 Linking Communities to Classrooms URED 7731 Interpersonal Dynamics of Racism 1/31/2012 ESL 7650 Basics of Modern English 2/1/2012 LANG 7136 More Making Books with Children SPED 7094 ASD: Identification, Assessment, and Planning 2/2/2012 GTED 7615 Supporting Achievement for Gifted Students ESL 7502 Language and Society LANG 7901 Foundations of Reading, K-12 LANG 7903 Advancing Secondary Readers, 7-12 LANG 7904 Reading Assessment and Evaluation LANG 7905 Practicum in Reading Interventions 2/4/2012 ESL 7755 Development of Literacy Skills 2/5/2012 ESL 6620 TEFL Certificate ESL 7660 Second Language Acquisition EDUC 6232 Using Brain Gym in Your Classroom LANG 7902 Developing Elementary Readers, K-6 2/6/2012 GTED 7609 Gifted Education Program Models 2/8/2012 SCED 7862 The Wolf: Issues and Actions

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PLANNING WORKBOOK:

How to find the class that fits your needs.

Search for classes by location, online availability, start date, or certificate.

2/28/2012 EDUC 6092 Bullying Prevention Strategies EDUC 7202 Understanding the College Admission Process ESL 6636 Course Design for Adult ESL Classes SPED 7084 Neurobiological Disorders SPED 7091 Intro to ASD SPED 7096 ASD: Teaching Strategies SPED 7297 Legal Issues in Special Education LANG 6078 Fluency Measures to Help Struggling Readers 3/1/2012 LANG 7140 Books Mirror Culture II 3/2/2012 ENED 6019 Discussing Environmental Issues LANG 7906 Becoming Literacy Leaders SCED 6119 Great Apes 3/4/2012 LANG 7904 Reading Assessment and Evaluation 3/6/2012 LANG 7901 Foundations of Reading, K-12 LANG 7905 Practicum in Reading Interventions 3/8/2012 SCED 7671 Minnesota Forests 3/18/2012 SCED 6100 Earth Systems SCED 6105 Genetics, Genomics, Genethics SCED 6115 The Ocean System SCED 6117 Diversity of Fishes SCED 6147 The Solar System SCED 6148 Evolution SCED 6159 Water: Environmental Science

5–14 COURSE GUIDE:

The classes offered in Spring 2013.

15–17

REGISTRATION FORM, POLICIES, PROCEDURES, AND ONLINE LEARNING FAQs.

3/21/2012 EDUC 6145 Boys and Girls Learn Differently EDUC 6197 Differentiated Instruction for All Learners SCED 6158 Identifying Minnesota Trees and Shrubs SPED 7055 Childhood Psycholopathology SPED 7293 ASD: Asperger Syndrome URED 7723 Managing the Urban Classroom 3/23/2012 LANG 7902 Developing Elementary Readers, K-6 SCED 6018 Bats: Creatures of the Night 3/25/2012 ESL 6638 Assessment of Adult ELL 3/26/2012 LANG 7903 Advancing Secondary Readers, 7-12 3/28/2012 ESL 6631 Intro to the Adult ELL 4/5/2012 ENED 7739 Sustainable Energy and Food Systems 4/18/2012 ESL 7610 History of English SPED 7295 ASD: Applied Behavior Analysis SPED 7077 Sleep Disorders in Children with Disabilities 4/22/2012 GTED 6030 Challenging Talented Readers 4/23/2012 SCED 6150 Incorporating a Science Notebook 4/27/2012 ENED 7635 Nature Drawing and Journaling 5/10/2012 SCED 7685 Spring Flora

A complete list of all courses organized by topic:

Education 5 Environmental Education 6 English as a Second Language 6 Gifted Education 8 Language Arts 9 Physical Education 11 Science Education 11 Special Education 12 Urban Education 14

1 WORKBOOK |

1/2/2012 ENED 6105 Wolf and Lynx Ecological Experiences


CERTIFICATES

Are you looking for a class that could build into a certificate? Hamline’s certificate programs are valuable tools for practicing teachers who wish to expand their skills or develop expertise in a specific area. They are also ideal as elective credits for Hamline’s master’s programs. The required (R) and elective (E) courses being offered this spring 2013 are listed below. Visit www.hamline.edu/ certificates to learn more.

AESL

ONLINE

Teachers of adult ESL Examine course design, assessment, and the development of reading, writing, and oral skills with adult English language learners. For adult basic professionals.

workbook |

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ESL 6631 Intro to the Adult ELL: Reading and Writing Skills (R) ESL 6636 Course Design for ESL Classes (R) ESL 6638 Assessment of the Adult ELL (R)

ASD

ONLINE

Autism spectrum disorders Bring hope to students with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and their families, helping them to fully develop their education potential and become active participants in society. For teachers licensed in special education or related services. SPED 7091 ASD: Intro and Overview (R) SPED 7092 Proactive Behavior Management (R) SPED 7094 ASD: Identify, Assessment, and Planning (R)

SPED 7096 Teaching Strategies (R) SPED 7293 ASD: Asperger Syndrome (R) SPED 7292 ASD: Early Identification and Intervention (E) SPED 7295 ASD: Applied Behavior Analysis (E) SPED 7297 Legal Issues in Special Education (E)

BA



Book arts Integrates both the visual and literary art forms through hands-on experience in different methods of making paper, paper decoration, and bookbinding from various cultures. LANG 7136 More Making Books with Children (R) LANG 7140 Books Mirror Cultures II (R)

GFT

Gifted education Prepares K–12 teachers, curriculum specialists, resource teachers, and administrators to foster the growth and success of gifted learners—students who are capable of high achievement when they receive differentiated and challenging instruction. EDUC 6145 Boys and Girls Learn Differently (E) GTED 6245 Inquiry for Gifted Students (E) GTED 7609 Gifted Education Program Models (R) GTED 6030 Challenging Talented Readers (E) GTED 7607 Differential Instructional Models and Strategies in Gifted Education (R)

MESL CC

ONLINE

College counseling This online program is designed to prepare any professional for counseling high school students with post-secondary planning and the admission process. EDUC 7201 Counseling the College Bound Student (R) EDUC 7202 College Admission Process (R) EDUC 7206 Practicum (R)

ONLINE

ESL for mainstream teachers Explore the integration of ESL students into the classroom, second language acquisition, developing literacy skills, testing, evaluation, and the impact of language on society. For licensed K–12 teachers who seek direction in making sound educational decisions for English language learners. ESL 7502 Language and Society (R)

ESL 7753 Testing and Evaluation of English Language Learners (R) ESL 7755 Development of Literacy Skills (R)

OHD

Other health disabilities Gain an understanding of how medications, treatments, frequent doctor’s appointments, and repeated hospitalizations can impact students with chronic or acute health conditions that impact academic, behavioral, social, or emotional functioning. For licensed teachers, especially those working in special education or related services. SPED 7055 Childhood Psychopathology (E) SPED 7077 Sleep Disorders in Children with Disabilities (E) SPED 7084 Neurobiological Disorders (R) SPED 7092 ASD Proactive Behavior Management (E)

TBI



Traumatic brain injury Explore the evaluation process, educational programming, and modifications for students with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)—the leading cause of disability in children and youth that affects many parts of the brain. Learn the importance of collaboration


DID YOU KNOW? Most Hamline master’s, certificate, and licensure programs begin every term. There’s still time to apply to start this spring! See the complete list of programs on the back page of this catalog, and visit www.hamline.edu/education to find out more, request information, find information session dates, or apply.

between hospitals, schools, families, medical providers, and community resources.

addition to the initial 8-credit TEFL Certificate course. ESL 6620 TEFL (R)

SPED 7055 Childhood Psychopathology (E) SPED 7077 Sleep Disorders in Children with Disabilities (E) SPED 7084 Neurobiological Disorders (R) SPED 7297 Legal Issues in Special Education (E)

ESL 7519 Linguistics for Language Teachers (R) ESL 7660 Scond Language Acquisition (R) ESL 7650 Basics of Modern English (R)

URT TEFL



TEFL Teaching English as a Foreign Language Through an interactive and hands-on approach, discover the principles and practices of teaching English as a foreign language. Learn about teaching methods and techniques, then apply that learning by teaching a class of non-native English speakers. ESL 6620 TEFL (R) adv

TEFL

ONLINE



Advanced TEFL For those who wish to learn more about language theory and linguistics, an Advanced TEFL Certificate is granted to individuals completing the following courses, in

ONLINE

Urban teaching Increase success with urban and urban-like learners by enhancing the effectiveness and resiliency of new teachers. Provides valuable information for experienced educators and other professionals working with learners from diverse social, economic, linguistic, and cultural backgrounds. URED 7731 Interpersonal Dynamics of Racism (R) URED 7725 Linking Urban Communities to Classrooms (R) URED 7723 Managing the Urban Classroom (R)

ENV

ONLINE

Environmental education Design a program that meets your needs with coursework that may include study in ecology, natural history, teaching methods, field biology, and geology. ENED 6105 Wolf and Predatory Ecology (January!) ENED 7682 Wolf Ecology SCED 7671 MN Forests ENED 7739 Sustainable Energy and Food Systems

Build upon your credits

Hamline’s courses and programs are designed to build upon one another. Hamline certificates often count as electives in Hamline master’s degree programs; and you can earn your administrative principal’s license as part of a doctorate. If you’ve taken a Hamline class and want to see what credit you’ve already earned that could be applied to a program, call 651-523-2600 or email education@hamline.edu SCED 7685 Spring Flora SCED 6119 Great Apes SCED 6018 Bats: Creatures of the Night SCED 6115 The Ocean System SCED 6105 Genetics, Genomics, Genethics SCED 6148 Evolution SCED 6099 Space, Time, and Motion SCED 6088 Climate Change SCED 6147 The Solar System SCED 6100 Earth Systems: Inside/Out SCED 6159 Water: Enviro Science SCED 6117 Diversity of Fishes ENED 7635 Nature Drawing and Journaling ENED 6275 Winter Aquatics (Offered partially on campus, and partially off) SCED 6158 Identify MN Trees/ Shrubs ENED 6019 Discussing Environmental Issues SCED 6150 Incorporating a Science Notebook

CHLT

ONLINE



Children’s literature Brings the power of literature and authentic reading into the classroom, where students can develop a love of literature. Topics range from the historical development of children’s literature to banned books, books for social justice, and methods to integrate literature into educational settings. LANG 7901 Foundations of Reading, K-12 LANG 7902 Developing Elementary Readers, K-6 LANG 7903 Advancing Secondary Readers, 7-12

LANG 7904 Reading Assessment and Evaluation, K-12 LANG 7906 Becoming Literacy Leaders

LIT

ONLINE



Literacy for the teaching of reading and writing Enhance your understanding of the role of literacy learning across the curriculum. Develop practical theory for the effective teaching of language in literature-rich classrooms where students are supported and challenged to become complex and critical thinkers. For both beginning and experienced teachers. LANG 6078 Fluency Measures to Help Struggling Readers LANG 7140 Books Mirror Cultures II LANG 7906 Becoming Literacy Leaders LANG 7901 Foundations of Reading, K-12 ONLINE & On-Campus LANG 7902 Developing Elementary Readers, K-6 LANG 7903 Advancing Secondary Readers, 7-12 LANG 7904 Reading Assessment and Evaluation, K-12

3 workbook |

Start in spring, summer, and fall


Partner with Us!

BY THE END OF 2013 YOU COULD:

Have completed a certificate program or added an additional license

Be half or a third of the way through a master’s or administrative licensure program

Have started your doctorate

Get started now!

Visit www.hamline.edu/education for complete information on all programs and how to apply. Or give us a call or email at 651-523-2900 or gradprog@hamline.edu

workbook |

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What’s great about online courses? All types of students—not just those who consider themselves “techie”—enjoy and succeed in online classrooms. Online learning is as rigorous as a traditional class. Hamline has been offering online courses for more than 10 years. All courses are taught by experienced Hamline School of Education faculty, so you will receive the same excellent course content and outcomes that you would expect in an on-campus course. Online courses are often smaller so professors know individual students and their work. They can give more one-on-one attention to students—and online students are more likely to actively participate. You’ll build a sense of community and camaraderie with your classmates through online chats, assignments, readings, and discussions. Online learning is convenient, saving you commute time so that traffic and weather don’t get in the way of your learning. Taking an online course expands your professional resume, making you better equipped to use technology in the classroom and access online teaching tools.

For more info, visit

www.hamline.edu/education/online

Partners are . . . • Teachers • Schools • Districts • Nonprofit Organizations • Parent Groups • Community Organizations

Work with us to … • Teach courses or workshops • Offer a school or district site for professional development • Co-sponsor graduate-level courses, certificates, and programs • Identify new trends and needs in professional education • Collaborate with nearby schools and districts to offer courses and programs • Advise on new and existing professional development programs for educators in many fields • Cooperate with teachers, schools, and districts across the nation to share projects and ideas.

How? Send an email to Carol Mayer, Chair of Continuing Studies, at cmayer@hamline.edu today!

Additional Information Certificates 651-523-2600 or www.hamline.edu/certificates Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL) 651-523-2900 or www.hamline.edu/tefl Literacy and Learning interest 651-523-2600 or www.hamline.edu/literacy For complete course information www.hamline. edu/classschedules Suggestions for new courses gcs@hamline.edu Course packets, textbooks available at the campus bookstore


Course descriptions Mobile Learning: An Introduction EDUC 6062-37583 Blended

As we approach over a billion and a half devices that are expected to have mobile broadband Internet access, it prompts us to consider the kinds of innovation that mobile devices offer to learning. Learners can interact with resources anytime and anywhere. This makes learning personal, powerful, and situated as learners and instructors can communicate in real time. In this course, we will focus on the interactions, design, research, and integration of effective mobile learning environments. 2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: Jan. 30–Mar. 16. Two face-toface sessions: Sat., Feb. 2, Mar. 16, 9 a.m– 1 p.m. Bush Memorial Library 10. Tuition: $510. Instructor: Michael Mazyck is an educator and president of ECM Instructional Systems. He is an educational consultant and technology presenter approaching two decades of experience in the research, design, development, and use of technology in P–16 education.

Bullying Prevention Strategies: How Empowering the Bystanders Can Change the Culture of the School EDUC 6092-37588 Online

This course is will provide an in-depth study of bullying behavior in children and adolescents. The focus will be on gaining a strong knowledge base around bully and cyber bullying behavior in order to identify strategies to change the culture of the school as it relates to bullying. A strong emphasis will be placed on research-based strategies to empower the bystander and give adults common language to address bullying. 2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: Feb. 28–Apr. 17. Tuition: $510. Instructor: Cheryl Greene has been a classroom teacher for over 20 years. In addition to teaching, she has been an intervention coordinator, a district-wide educational specialist, and a high school basketball coach. As a nationally certified Olweus Bullying Prevention Specialist, Cheryl works with schools and districts to implement system-wide change around bullying.

Girls and Boys Do Learn Differently

GFT

EDUC 6145-37641 Minneapolis

Pink or blue, GI Joe or Barbie: are stereotypes manufactured in our culture or in our genes? Join this exploration of the challenges, often complicated by gender, that teachers face

each day. Investigate current and historical literature surrounding what researchers, scientists, and writers have learned about gender differences. Target audience: educators K–12. 2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 24. Eight sessions: Tue., Thurs., Mar. 21–Apr. 11, 4:30–8:30 p.m.; Sat., Mar. 30, 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m. Hamline University Minneapolis 32. Tuition: $510. Instructor: Bill Keilty retired from his position as coordinator of gifted programs in the Spring Lake Park Schools, but returned to coordinate the Lighthouse Program for the Highly Gifted. He has facilitated an MAEd learning community at Hamline and also taught in the EdD program.

Differentiated Instruction for ALL Learners (D.I.A.L.) EDUC 6197-37638 Blended

DIAL I — Building Common Language and Concepts. Structured to meet the needs of the busy educator, participants in this course meet face-to-face and online to engage in collegial discussions. Learn practical strategies and applications to differentiate instruction and explore topics including multiple intelligences, gender issues, inclusion in the differentiated classroom, thinking skills, collegial coaching and professional reflection. Target audience: teachers, curriculum specialists K–12. 2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: Mar. 21–May 11. Three face-toface sessions: Tue., Mar. 26, Apr. 23, 5–8 p.m.; Sat., Apr. 13, 9 a.m.–3 p.m. Hamline University Minneapolis 32. Tuition: $510. Instructors: Sue Feigal-Hitch has coordinated programs for gifted students for 30 years and is currently the faculty coordinator of the Gifted Education Certificate program at Hamline University. Nancy Guldberg has worked in teaching and educational administration for over 32 years. She is the former director of instructional technology for Eden Prairie Schools and is currently working as a consultant to districts integrating technology into classrooms.

Smart Moves: Using Brain Gym in Your Classroom EDUC 6232-37639 Saint Paul

According to Paul Dennison, founder of Brain Gym, “Movement is the door to learning.” Brain Gym consists of 26 simple, specific movements that increase focus, enhance creativity, allow one to become grounded and centered, and improve sensorial skills. In this experiential class, learn the movements, the five-step learning process, and basic theory of

brain organization that supports the work of Brain Gym. Target audience: educators P–adult. 2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 24. Six sessions: Tue., Feb. 5–Mar. 12, 5–9 p.m. East Hall 106. Tuition: $510. Course materials fee: $50. Instructor: Cindy Goldade is a licensed Brain Gym instructor with over 800 hours of training. She facilitates Brain Gym introductions and courses throughout Minnesota and is director of operations Brain Gym ® International.

Fundamentals of Counseling the College Bound Student

CC

EDUC 7201-37611 Online

This introductory course is designed to provide students with an overview of the College Admission Counseling program. Topics to be covered include the need for post-secondary education in today’s world, types of education options and training, K–12 college awareness, counseling special populations, identification of key players in college counseling and their roles and responsibilities, ethics and best practices, creating a college going culture, organizing a college and career counseling office/center.

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Target audience: junior, middle and high school counselors; career center specialists; teachers of career classes; individuals interested in developing an independent college counseling practice.

Education |

Education

3 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: Jan. 30–Apr. 17. Tuition: $765. Instructor: Michelle Roatch has been a high school guidance counselor since 1991 and is currently a high school college counselor for Chaska High School. She is also an educational consultant for CollegeConnections Plus.

Understanding the College Admission Process

CC

EDUC 7202-37613 Online

This course is designed to provide counselors information to prepare and assist their own students/clients in applying to postsecondary institutions. When students/ clients understand career options, they are able to narrow college options. In this course students will understand the various post-secondary options, learn the admission criteria, gain knowledge on how to choose a college, and have the tools to create a college admission program. Target audience: See EDUC 7201 3 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: Feb. 28–May 11. Tuition: $765. Instructor: Michelle Roatch. See under EDUC 7201.


Practicum in College Counseling

CC

EDUC 7206-37612 Online

The Practicum portion of the certificate program will permit students to exercise course application with appropriate student/ client age group. Students must complete 65 hours of supervised fieldwork in a local counseling venue. Fieldwork must consist of individual counseling and/or a preapproved project. They also must complete the 12-week online portion of the course in which practicum experiences are shared with colleagues and reviewed by the instructor. The volunteer hours may be combined with a research project, but at least 45 hours must be completed on-site. This course will also help you acquire the knowledge and resources to advise students, families and re-entry adults seeking financial support for a range of postsecondary pursuits. 4 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: Jan. 30–May 11. Tuition: $1,020. Instructor: Michelle Roatch. See under EDUC 7201.

Environmental Education Discussing Environmental Issues Education | Environmental Education | English as a second language |

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responses of wildlife to natural and artificial disturbances, and human functions involved in managing wildlife. Wildlife research techniques, data acquisition and analysis, and management practices are covered. Participants should be in good physical condition and able to travel a minimum of 5 miles per day in winter conditions on foot, snowshoes, or cross country skis. Winter travel instruction will be provided. Target audience: educators, naturalists, environmental educators. 4 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 15. Wed., Jan. 2, 7 a.m.–Sun., Jan. 20, 8 a.m. Off campus location: Audubon Center of the North Woods, Sandstone, MN and Lutsen, MN. Tuition: $1,020. Meals and Lodging: $1,695. Instructor: Bryan Wood is the co-executive director of the Audubon Center of the North Woods where he teaches post-secondary programs focused on field biology and ecology. Bryan has led field study expeditions to national, regional, and state parks, forests, rivers, and trails throughout the upper Midwest.

Winter Aquatics

ENV

ENED 6275-37631 Blended ENV

ENED 6019-37630 Saint Paul

Get ‘em talking! Discussions about environmental topics lead to awareness and action. Learn to implement discussion-based assignments focusing on local and global environmental issues. Design curriculum based on gathering information, work with a decision making model, and examine values important in environmental decision-making. This course will help teachers provide opportunities for students to research, formulate opinions based on evidence, share ideas, and reflect on discussions and research, all tools students need to make informed decisions. Target audience: educators 5–12, teaching science, environmental studies, social studies, communication, speech, or English.

Winter is a great time to investigate the water around us. Water takes on many forms and influences the lives and behaviors of plants, animals, and humans alike. This course combines human winter activities with snow, ice, and life below the ice. We will construct a quinzhee (snow shelter), investigate layers in a snow pack, examine life below the ice, and create an avalanche. Course content will include both indoor and outdoor experiences as well as an online component. Target audience: teachers K–12, naturalists, environmental educators. 2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: Jan. 30–Feb. 15. Two faceto-face sessions: Sat., Feb. 16, 8 a.m.–4:30 p.m.; Sun., Feb. 17, 1–5 p.m. Off campus location: Robert Ney Memorial Park Reserve, Maple Lake, MN. Tuition: $510.

1 semester credit. Enrollment limit: 24. Two sessions: Sat., Mar. 2, 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m. Sun., Mar. 3,1–5 p.m. Bush Memorial Library 301. Tuition: $255.

Instructor: David Grack. See under ENED 6019.

Instructor: David Grack has taught middle and high school biology and works as a summer naturalist/community education teacher with elementary students. His bird activity book was published in 2007.

ENED 7635-37632 Off campus

Wolf and Lynx Ecological ENV Experiences in Northern Minnesota ENED 6105-22085 Off campus (January)

Focus on the ecology of gray wolf, lynx, white-tailed deer, and the animals associated with these predators or prey. Travel in the backcountry while tracking and observing wildlife. Be introduced to habitats, the

Nature Drawing and Journaling

ENV

Nature journaling can open doors to interdisciplinary studies in your classroom. Experience activities uniquely suited to developing the powers of observation. Use nature identification books. Review drawing techniques easily taught and used by anyone. Discover some great journal starter exercises. Explore links between sketching, writing, and indentifying that awaken curiousity and deepen knowledge about the environment. Bring a lunch. Target audience: teachers K–12; environmental and art educators.

1 semester credit. Enrollment limit: 24. Two sessions: Sat., Apr. 27, 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Sun., Apr. 28, 10 a.m.–2 p.m. Off campus location: Minnesota Valley National Wildlife Refuge, Bloomington, MN. Tuition: $225. Course materials fee: $20. Instructor: Pam O’Brien has worked as a naturalist, environmental education program coordinator, and marketing communication manager.

Sustainable Foods and Energy Systems

ENV

ENED 7739-37587 Off campus

This course looks at how humans use energy and ways we can reduce our environmental impact through energy conservation, efficiency, and renewable energy production. During this weekend course based at the Audubon center, students will gain firsthand experience with these areas by examining measures that the Audubon Center does on these fronts. This course also looks at the food systems of society, along with the environmental and economic impacts. We will examine how we can move to sustainable food systems through behavior changes towards local, organic, community shared models, including a visit to a local, organic community shared agriculture (CSA) farm. Note: Lodging and meals included. 2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 24. Fri., Apr. 5, 5:30 p.m.–Sun., Apr. 7, 2 p.m. Off campus location: Audubon Center of the North Woods, Sandstone, MN. Tuition: $510. Meals and lodging: $75. Instructor: Bryan Wood. See under ENED 6105.

English as a Second Language TEFL Certificate

TEFL

ESL 6620-37567 Saint Paul

Live your dream, teach overseas! Experience another culture while living and working overseas after earning a Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL) certificate. Gain hands-on experience, spending over 40 hours teaching, observing, and giving feedback in a classroom with English language learners. Our nationally recognized program was established in 1991 and over 1200 Hamline graduates have taught in more than 40 countries worldwide. Join them! Note: Application is required for participation in this program. Please visit www.hamline.edu/tefl for course details and an online application. 8 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 24. Thirty-four sessions: Tue., Thurs., Feb. 5– May 9, 5:30–8:30 p.m.; Sat., Feb. 23, Mar. 2, 16, Apr. 6, 13, and 27, 9 a.m.–3 p.m. Drew Science Center 31. Tuition: $3,484. Instructors: Betsy Parrish, professor and coordinator of the Adult ESL/TEFL


Julia Reimer, associate professor, teaches in the TEFL, ESL Adult Certificate, and MAESL programs at Hamline. She has taught ESL and EFL in Minnesota and Spain for over 15 years.

Introduction to the Adult English Language Learner: Developing Reading and Writing Skills AESL ESL 6631-37636 Blended

How do adult learners acquire a second language? What is involved in the development of literacy skills? Explore the basic concepts of second language acquisition and the development of literacy skills. Discuss how languages are learned, and the implications for classroom instruction. Explore the impact of previous education and key factors affecting how adult refugee and immigrant students learn. If you are new to the field of adult ESL and are planning to follow the entire sequence of courses, you must start with ESL 6631 or 6634. (Please direct questions to Betsy Parrish at 651-523-2853.) Target audience: ESL teachers of adult learners. 2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: Mar. 28–Apr. 2. Five faceto-face sessions: Wed., Apr. 3, 24, May 1, 5:30–8:30 p.m.; Sat., Apr. 13, 27, 9 a.m.– 3:30 p.m. Bush Memorial Library 302. Tuition: $510. Instructor: Patsy Vinogradov teaches adult ESL and is an adjunct faculty member in the TEFL and Adult Certificate programs at Hamline. She has been teaching ESL and EFL in a variety of settings since 1994.

Course Design for Adult ESL Classes ESL 6636-37635 Online

AESL

How can ESL teachers develop courses to meet a variety of language and learning needs? ESL students come to programs for a variety of reasons: some need English for the workplace; some need survival English; others may want to study in a community college or university. Explore the principles of needs assessment and course design, and learn the tools to develop courses which are tailored to the language and learning needs of your students. Create curricula and materials for use in your own program. Target audience: ESL teachers of adult learners. 2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: Feb. 28–Apr. 17. Tuition: $510. Instructor: Karin Goettsch currently works in organizational training and development. She has taught in various adult ESL and teacher training programs for over 10 years, including providing educational technology training and instruction.

Assessment of the Adult English Language Learner AESL ESL 6638-37661 A Saint Paul ESL 6638-37662 B Online

Focus on the basic principles of testing and evaluation, and how assessment is related to curriculum. Learn how to conduct valid and reliable formal and informal assessment of ESL learners. Develop authentic assessment tools for academic and workplace settings. Discuss entrance and exit criteria for ESL programs and how to assess student progress. Explore the politics of testing and assessment. Target audience: ESL teachers of adult learners. Two sessions: 2 credits. Section A: Enrollment limit: 24. Seven sessions: Mon., Mar. 25–May 6, 5–9 p.m. GLC 246W. Tuition: $510 Section B: Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: Jan. 30–Mar. 20. Tuition: $510. Instructor: Section A & B: Todd Wagner is the assessment and evaluation specialist for Adult Basic Education at the Minnesota Department of Children, Families, & Learning.

Language and Society

MESL

ESL 7502-37216 A Saint Paul ESL 7502-37217 B Online

Focus on the varieties of language and how they reflect social patterns. Explore the importance of language in all our interactions. Study the issues of language and social class, ethnic group, and gender, as well as topics in language and nationality, language and geography, and the social nature of writing. Learn to pay particular attention to the social-linguistic situations of second language learners (i.e., those who are not native speakers of a socially dominant language or dialect) as well as the sociolinguistics of language in the classroom. Includes an overview of English grammar designed for teachers of ESL grades K–12. Target audience: language arts, modern language, administrators, and ESL teachers, K–adult. Two sections: 4 semester credits. Section A: Enrollment limit: 24. Ten sessions: Sat., Feb. 2–Mar. 30, 8 a.m.–1 p.m.; Sat., Apr. 6, 8 a.m.–4 p.m. Bush Memorial Library 302. Tuition: $1,496. Section B: Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: Jan. 30–May 11. Tuition: $1,496. Instructors: Section A: Mary Diaz has worked extensively in ESL, bilingual education, and linguistic/cultural diversity. She has provided technical assistance and professional development for educators at conferences and in schools across the region. Section B: Anne DeMuth has taught in the ESL licensure program at Hamline since its inception. She also teaches high school history in Fairbanks, Alaska, and has taught English in all its forms to students of all ages in the US and overseas.

Linguistics for Language Teachers ESL 7519-37218 A Saint Paul ESL 7519-37219 B Online

adv

TEFL

This is a broad, applied introduction to the study of language including morphology (word forms), syntax (sentence structure), semantics (meaning), and phonetics/ phonology (pronunciation), as well as the social and cognitive dimensions of language. Study the application of linguistic skills to language instruction and the use of technology in teaching, in addition to an introduction to graduate-level research and Internet skills in a two-hour in-class library orientation. Target audience: ESL and bilingual/bicultural teachers K–Adult. Two sections: 4 semester credits. Section A: Enrollment limit: 24. Fourteen sessions: Wed., Jan. 30–Apr. 24, 5–9 p.m. Bush Memorial Library 306. Tuition: $1,496. Section B: Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: Jan. 30–May 11. Tuition: $1,496. Instructors: Section A: Kathryn Heinze, associate professor at Hamline, teaches in the ESL licensure and MAESL programs. She has over 30 years of experience in ESL as a teacher, curriculum developer, and teacher educator. Section B: Andreas Schramm, associate professor at Hamline, has taught linguistics, ESL, and composition courses. His teaching is strongly influenced by his experiences as a bilingual and an English language learner.

A History of English ESL 7610-22055 A Online (January) ESL 7610-37220 B Saint Paul

Have you wondered why the English language has such a bizarre spelling system, so many exceptions to its grammar rules, and the largest vocabulary of any modern world language? Discover the answers by studying the development and forms of the English language from Anglo-Saxon beginnings to present-day standard English and varieties of English. Understand the sociocultural and linguistic forces that cause language to undergo constant change. Target audience: language arts and ESL teachers, K–Adult. Two sections: 1 semester credit. Section A: Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: Jan. 2–25. Tuition: $374. Section B: Enrollment limit: 24. Three sessions: Thurs., Apr. 18­–May 9, 5–9 p.m. East Hall 4. Tuition: $374. Instructors: Section A: Andreas Schramm. See under ESL 7519. Section B: Kathryn Heinze. See under ESL 7519.

7 English as a Second Language |

Certificate Programs at Hamline, has been an ESL teacher, teacher educator, writer, and consultant for the past 25 years.


ESL 7753-22068 A Blended (January)

practice with video and tuning protocols. Methods should be taken at the end of the licensure course sequence.

An overview of English grammar designed for teachers of ESL grades K–Adult. Develop an understanding of the basics of English grammar both descriptively and pedagogically, particularly in areas that cause difficulties for learners of English as a second language. Improve your skills at error analysis and your ability to effectively incorporate grammar instruction into your classroom in a way that is meaningful and interesting to your learners.

ESL 7753-37225 B Online

Target audience: ESL licensure candidates.

Examine the complex issues of assessment, testing, and evaluation of ELLs, in both ESL and mainstream classrooms. Develop an understanding of the policies, procedures and instruments used in assessing English language proficiency and the academic competency of ELLs. Learn how to use appropriate assessment to improve student performance and how to advocate for students in testing situations.

Two sections: 4 semester credits. Section A: Enrollment limit: 24. Thirteen sessions: Wed., Jan. 30–Apr. 24, 5–9 p.m. Klas Center 205. Tuition: $1,496. Section B: Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: Jan. 30–May 11. Tuition: $1,496.

Note: Should be taken after or concurrently with a linguistics course.

Target audience: teachers K–12.

Basics of Modern English

Testing and Evaluation of English Language Learners MESL

adv

TEFL

ESL 7650-37221 A Saint Paul ESL 7650-37222 B Online

Target audience: teachers K–Adult. Two sections: 4 semester credits. Section A: Enrollment limit: 24. Fourteen sessions: Thurs., Jan. 31–May 2, 5–9 p.m. East Hall 5. Tuition: $1,496. Section B: Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: Jan. 30–May 11. Tuition: $1,496. Instructors: Section A: Cynthia Lundgren, assistant professor at Hamline, has been teaching ESL for 25 years in the United States and overseas. Her special interests are reflective practice and the development of cultural sensitivity.

English as a Second Language | GIFTED EDUCATION |

8

Section B: Jacki Trademan has been a teacher educator and ESL teacher for nearly 20 years, mainly in the Chicago area.

Second Language Acquisition

adv

Two sections: 2 semester credits. Section A: Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: Jan. 2–25. Three face-to-face sessions: Tues., Jan. 8–22, 5–9 p.m. Klas Center 206. Tuition: $748. Section B: Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: Jan. 30–Mar. 20. Tuition: $748. Instructors: Section A: Ruslana Westerlund has experience teaching ESL both in the Ukraine and in Minnesota. Her special interests include ESL teaching methodology and linguistics. Section B: Leigh Schleicher is an ELL education specialist in the Office of Federal Programs at the Minnesota Department of Education. She has worked as a teacher and teacher trainer in language education from Vladivostok to Saint Paul.

TEFL

ESL 7660-37223 A Saint Paul ESL 7660-37224 B Online

How do students learn a second language? Examine the factors that affect how languages are learned—age, environment, academic background, motivation, and developmental processes. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the language learning process and being able to communicate this process to administrators, teachers, and parents. Current research issues will also be addressed, with opportunities for teachers to apply theory to practice.

Development of Literacy Skills

MESL

ESL 7755-37226 Saint Paul

Literacy development is crucial for the academic success of ELLs. Expand your understanding of emergent literacy and gain a working knowledge of literacy development for second language learners. Explore best practices for vocabulary development, comprehension strategy instruction, and questioning. Learn how to develop standardsbased lessons for all stages of reading. Target audience: teachers K–12.

Note: Should be taken after or concurrently with a linguistics course.

3 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 24. Eleven sessions: Mon., Feb. 4–Apr. 15, 5–9 p.m. East Hall 4. Tuition: $1,122.

Target audience: ESL and bilingual/ bicultural education teachers K–Adult.

Instructor: Cynthia Lundgren. See under ESL 7650.

Two sections: 3 semester credits. Section A: Enrollment limit: 24. Ten sessions: Tue., Feb. 5–Apr. 9, 5–9 p.m. East Hall 4. Tuition: $1,122. Section B: Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: Jan. 30–May 11. Tuition: $1,122. Instructors: Section A: Kathryn Heinze. See under ESL 7519. Section B: Anne DeMuth. See under ESL 7502.

ESL Methods ESL 7776-37227 A Saint Paul ESL 7776-37228 B Online

Explore the intersection of theory and practice. Examine the historical and contemporary methods in ESL instruction. Review the role of linguistics and second language acquisition in teaching language.Develop standards-based lessons that focus on teaching all modalities of language through the content. Practice aligning standards, objectives, assessment, and activities for a variety of language proficiencies to ensure purposeful instruction. Engage in reflective

Instructors: Section A: Cynthia Lundgren. See under ESL 7650. Section B: Lisa Robb has nearly 20 years of teaching experience with ESL students. She has worked in both primary and secondary settings, with both mainstream and ESL students.

Gifted Education Challenging Talented Readers

GFT

GTED 6030-37584 Saint Paul

Challenging Talented Readers equips teachers with current research from the education field regarding the learning and instruction needs of advanced readers from both neuroscience and educational perspectives. Teachers will choose and develop a toolkit of instructional strategies and learning environment considerations relevant to their classroom and teaching practice needs. 1 semester credit. Enrollment limit: 24. Four sessions: Mon., Wed., Apr. 22–May 1, 5:30–8:30 p.m. Drew Science Center 6. Tuition: $255. Instructor: Tina Van Erp is a gifted education specialist at Woodbury Middle School and South Washington County Schools. She has spent the last seven years developing and implementing curriculum and instructional strategies for high-ability elementary and middle school readers.

Inquiry for Gifted Students

GFT

GTED 6245-22116 Off campus (January)

Inquiry as an approach to learning explores the natural or material world and leads to asking questions and making discoveries in the search of new understandings. Gain an understanding of the features of classroom inquiry and how to implement inquiry-based instruction into your classroom. Experience and examine the types of inquiry models and the art of questioning in the classroom to maximize student learning. Target audience: classroom teachers K–5. 2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 24. Seven sessions: Tue. and Thurs., Jan. 8–24, 5–8 p.m.; Sat. Jan. 19, 8:30–2:30 p.m. Location: Buffalo, MN. Tuition: $748 Instructor: Bill Keilty. See under EDUC 6145.


GTED 7607-37721 Blended, Off campus

Is the curriculum we offer gifted learners rigorous enough? Participate in an overview of strategies and models for differentiating, tiering, compacting the curriculum, and adding depth and complexity for the gifted learner. Explore instructional models to develop challenging, interdisciplinary learning. Current research on grouping is included. Target audience: educator, gifted coordinators, and administrators K–12. 2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 24. Online dates: Jan. 30–Mar. 20. Two face-toface sessions: Sat., Mar. 2, 9 a.m.–3 p.m.; Tue., Mar. 19, 5–8 p.m. Off campus location: Buffalo, MN. Tuition: $748. Instructor: See under EDUC 6197.

Gifted Education Program Models GTED 7609-37637 Minneapolis

GFT

Learn how to create the best program with the resources available. Explore models that effectively serve gifted and talented learners within the regular classroom and those services that extend beyond the classroom setting. Address the design of both district wide and school programs. Target audience: educators, gifted coordinators, administrators K–12. 2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 24. Seven sessions: Wed., Thurs., 4:30–8:30 p.m. Feb. 6, 13, 20, 21, 27, 28, Sat., 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m. Mar. 2. Hamline University Minneapolis 32. Cost: $748. Instructor: Bill Keilty. See under EDUC 6145.

Supporting the Achievement of Gifted Students GTED 7615-37642 Saint Paul

Although gifted students are commonly thought to have the academic world “by the tail,” that’s often not the case. The gifted differ significantly from more typical age peers, causing dissonance in their school and home settings, surprisingly resulting in less than expected success. Learn strategies for use in the classroom and communication techniques with parents while addressing systemic changes supportive of promoting achievement for all students. Target audience: Teachers of the gifted, other classroom staff, administrators, school psychologists, counselors, support staff. 2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 24. Five sessions: Sat., Feb. 2–Mar. 2, 8:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m.; Wed., Feb. 13, Mar. 6, 20, 5–8:30 p.m. Giddens/Alumni Learning Center 247S. Tuition: $748. Instructor: Judy Semler, now retired, coordinated gifted programming most recently for Hopkins Schools. A former school staff member with the Rimm Summer Underachievement Institutes, she also worked with Family Achievement Clinic staff.

Language Arts Fluency Measures and Instruction to Help Struggling Readers

LIT

Target audience: educators, media specialists, art instructors, special educators K–12

LANG 6078-37723 Online

Fluency involves reading rate, accuracy, expression, and perseverance, and it is a key aspect of reading instruction that is often overlooked in instruction. Learn to address the needs of students who are unable to read words quickly, automatically, and accurately enough to enable them to comprehend what they read. Examine the research base and gain hands-on ideas for fluency assessment—tools such as benchmark, screening, placement, and progress monitoring—and instructional strategies to promote fluency. Target audience: educators K–12. 1 semester credit. Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: Feb. 28–Mar. 20. Tuition: $255. Instructor: Cooksey Smith is currently a reading consultant, having worked as a reading specialist and classroom teacher for 23 years. She has provided in-service training to teachers in school districts across the country.

More Making Books with Children

BA

LANG 7136-37627 Saint Paul

Gain additional bookmaking skills to enhance your classroom curriculum. Book arts are highly motivating to readers and writers, and have multiple applications across the integrated curriculum. A brief survey of the history and techniques of bookbinding precedes hands-on sessions. Many innovative bindings, as well as a hard cover journal, are covered. Bring a paper scissors. Target audience: K–12 teachers, media specialists, art instructors, special educators. 2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 20. Four sessions: Fri., Feb. 1, 8, 5–9 p.m.; Sat., Feb. 2, 9, 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Giddens/Alumni Learning Center 224W. Tuition: $510. Course materials fee: $30. Instructor: Kimberly Powers received her MA from Saint Mary’s University. She completed the Books Arts Certificate from Hamline University and has been using book making with her students ever since. She has been teaching for the past 13 years and is a team leader for the Young Adults’ Choices Project.

Books Mirror Cultures II

BA

will stimulate new writing themes and book structure ideas to encourage writing and reading throughout the curriculum.

LIT

LANG 7140–37799 Saint Paul

Expand on current writing, bookbinding, and cultural awareness in the classroom. Introduce your students to historical book structures and their cultural significance through exciting hands-on activities. Text format and symbolic significance help students understand the mysteries of unfamiliar cultures. Classroom book creations

2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 16. Four sessions: Fri., 5–9 p.m. Sat., 8:30–4:30 p.m. Mar. 1–9. East Hall 5. Tuition: $510. Course materials fee: $35 Instructor: To be determined.

Foundations of Reading, K–12 LANG 7901-37229 A Saint Paul LANG 7901-37230 B Online

LIT

CHLT

This course provides a theoretical, historical, and evidence-based perspective on reading instruction. Students will explore a wide range of literacy research and investigate how these studies impact reading instruction in their own teaching lives. This course will include the examination, discussion and application of the following foundational topics: 1) emergent reading skills, 2) word recognition, 3) vocabulary, 4) fluency, 5) comprehension, 6) writing to advanced reading development, and 7) electronic and professional resources to support literacy. Two sections: 3 semester credits. Section A: Enrollment limit: 24. Nine sessions: Wed., Mar. 6–20, Apr. 3–May 8, 5–9 p.m. Drew Science Center 318. Tuition: $1,122. Section B: Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: Feb. 2–Apr. 13. Tuition: $1,122. Note: The online section of this course is hosted in Moodle with support from Learning House and has an additional fee of $58.33/credit or $174.99. Instructors: Section A: Karen Moroz, an experienced secondary integrated language arts teacher and former literacy coach, is a core faculty member at Hamline University. Section B: Debbie Bell has been a classroom teacher, literacy coach and reading specialist. She currently serves as a district Reading Instruction Specialist with the St. Paul Public Schools, and an independent literacy consultant.

Developing Elementary Readers, K–6 LANG 7902-37231 A Saint Paul LANG 7902-37232 B Online

LIT

CHLT

This course is designed to prepare teachers of reading to promote and sustain reading competencies of elementary learners. Teachers of reading will investigate the reading process and the many strategies that are appropriate for classroom implementation. Teachers will also explore literature resources, with an emphasis on children’s literature, that support elementary students reading development. Upon completion, teachers will be able to select and incorporate instructional strategies into the curriculum; and model reading strategies for students in their classrooms. Field Experience: 2 hours. Determine the strengths and needs of a young reader and

9 GIFTED EDUCATION | LANGUAGE ARTS |

Differentiation: Models & Strategies in Gifted Education GFT


develop a specific plan for instruction. Prerequisite: LANG 7901 Foundations of Reading, K–12. Two sections: 2 semester credits. Section A: Enrollment limit: 24. Six sessions: Tue., Feb. 5–Mar. 12, 5–9 p.m. Robbins Science Center 220. Tuition: $748. Section B: Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: Mar. 23–May 11. Tuition: $748. Note: The online section of this course is hosted in Moodle with support from Learning House and has an additional fee of $58.33/credit or $116.66. Instructors: Section A: Kevin McGee currently serves Eden Prairie Schools as the Educational Coordinator of Eagle Heights Spanish Immersion. He is a graduate of the Reading Licensure Program at Hamline and he completed his doctorate at the University of St. Thomas in the field of Critical Pedagogy. Section B: Beth Pearson, a literacy specialist in the Orono Schools, has been a classroom teacher in the elementary grades and currently works with struggling readers. She is also involved in professional development and teacher training and collaboration.

Advancing Secondary Readers, 7–12 LANG 7903-37233 A Saint Paul LANG 7903-37234 B Online Language Arts |

10

LIT

CHLT

This course will investigate the reading process and strategies appropriate for use with secondary learners at the middle and high school levels. Students will learn about current methods, theories and materials used in secondary literature instruction. Explore literature resources that emphasize fiction, nonfiction and technical literature to support 7–12 development in reading. Field Experience: 3 hours. Become familiar with the attitudes, behaviors and thinking of two adolescents and identify specific instructional recommendations to accommodate the maturation, development, literacy interests, gender, cultural and linguistic differences of these two students. Prerequisite: LANG 7901 Foundations of Reading, K–12. Two sections: 2 semester credits. Section A: Enrollment limit: 24. Seven sessions: Tue., Mar. 26–May 7, 5–9 p.m. Robbins Science Center 220. Tuition: $748. Section B: Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: Feb. 2–Mar. 16. Tuition: $748. Note: The online section of this course is hosted in Moodle with support from Learning House and has an additional fee of $58.33/credit or $116.66. Instructors: Section A: Jennifer Carlson, assistant professor in the Hamline School of Education, teaches K–12 Reading License and Language Arts courses. Her interest in children’s literature and reading has led her to present locally, nationally, and internationally, and she has just published her first book on multimedia text sets.

Section B: Stephanie Reid harkens from England where she earned her bachelor and master degrees in English Literature from Cambridge University and her postgraduate teaching degree from Oxford University. She received her K–12 Reading License and Master of Arts in Education from Hamline University.

Reading Assessment and Evaluation, K–12

LIT

CHLT

LANG 7904-37235 A Saint Paul LANG 7904-37236 B Online

This course explores the selection, administration, scoring and interpretation of a variety of individual and group reading assessment tools. Principles of assessment provide the foundation for field experiences with assessment. The purposes, strengths, and limitations of each assessment instrument will be examined. In this course, teachers will learn to use assessment information in planning and evaluating reading instruction, with a focus on differentiated classroom instruction; they will also learn to effectively communicate the results of assessments to a range of audiences. Field Experience: 15 hours. Use a variety of reading assessment tools with students at both the elementary and secondary level. Prerequisites: LANG 7901 Foundations of Reading, K–12; LANG 7902 Developing Elementary Readers, K–6; LANG 7903 Advancing Secondary Readers, 7–12. Two sections: 3 semester credits. Section A: Enrollment limit: 24. Nine sessions: Mon., Mar. 4–18, Apr. 1–May 6, 5–9 p.m. Drew Science Center 307. Tuition: $1,122. Section B: Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: Feb. 2–Apr. 13. Tuition: $1,122. Note: The online section of this course is hosted in Moodle with support from Learning House and has an additional fee of $58.33/credit or $174.99. Instructors: Section A: Julianne Scullen, EdS., currently serves as the Teaching and Learning Specialist for Secondary Reading in Anoka-Hennepin public schools. She is a past president of the Minnesota Reading Association and past president of the Minnesota Secondary Reading Interest Council. Section B: Lisa Krall taught reading for 12 years in the Minnetonka Public Schools. Most recently she has studied elementary schools successful in raising student reading achievement and researched early literacy indicators.

Advanced Practicum in Reading Interventions LANG 7905-37237 A Saint Paul LANG 7905-37238 B Online

This course is designed for practitioners who will be responsible for developing and administering reading intervention programs for students experiencing difficulties in

reading. The course will focus on four main aspects of reading intervention: 1) the nature and causes of reading difficulties; 2) the application of assessment instruments and results to develop assessment-based intervention; 3) research-based intervention models; 4) design, planning, and implementation of effective reading interventions for individuals and small groups. Field Experience: 15 hours. Develop and implement an assessment-based intervention plan designed to meet the instructional needs of a student or small group of students experiencing reading difficulties. Prerequisites: LANG 7901 Foundations of Reading, K–12; LANG 7902 Developing Elementary Readers, K–6; LANG 7903 Advancing Secondary Readers, 7–12; LANG 7904 Reading Assessment and Evaluation, K–12. Two sections: 3 semester credits. Section A: Enrollment limit: 24. Nine sessions: Wed., Mar. 6–20, Apr. 3–May 8, 5–9 p.m. Drew Science Center 4. Tuition: $1,122. Section B: Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: Feb. 2–Apr. 13. Tuition: $1,122. Note: The online section of this course is hosted in Moodle with support from Learning House and has an additional fee of $58.33/credit or $174.99. Instructors: Section A: Jennifer McCarty Plucker received her EdD in Educational Leadership with research focused on adolescent engagement and accelerated literacy growth. She is currently a K–12 Intervention Specialist for ISD 196, an independent literacy consultant, and will serve as president of the Minnesota Reading Association for 2012–13. Section B: Donna Hauger teaches literacy courses online. She has been a classroom teacher, Reading Recovery teacher, literacy trainer, and literacy consultant.

Becoming Literacy Leaders

LIT

CHLT

LANG 7906-22084 A Saint Paul (January) LANG 7906-37240 B Online

This course focuses on various leadership roles in literacy education—reading teacher, reading specialist and literacy coach. The dimensions of each role will be explored and compared. Major topics studied will include: using district and school assessment data to determine student needs; creating a literacy vision for your school; assisting teachers in instructional organization, management, and strategies; selecting appropriate core and supplemental materials; and developing and implementing a year-long professional development plan (PDP). Prerequisites: LANG 7901 Foundations of Reading, K–12; LANG 7902 Developing Elementary Readers, K–6; LANG 7903 Advancing Secondary Readers, 7–12, LANG 7904 Reading Assessment and Evaluation, K–12. Two sections: 2 semester credits. Section A: Enrollment limit: 24. Five sessions: Thurs., Jan. 3–24, 5–9 p.m.; Sat., Jan. 12,


8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m. Bush Memorial Library 302. Tuition: $748. Section B: Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: Mar. 2–Apr. 17. Tuition: $748.

Physical Education

Science Education Bats: Creatures of the Night

Note: The online section of this course is hosted in Moodle with support from Learning House and has an additional fee of $58.33/credit or $116.66.

The Art and Science of College Athletic Recruiting PHED 6080-37663 Online

Bats are the keystone species of the ecosystem in which they live. Learn about the historical relationships between bats and cultures of the world. Dispel common myths about these creatures of the night as you explore a variety of practical classroom activities. Gain familiarity with conservation efforts worldwide, and meet the resident bats of Como Park Zoo & Conservatory.

Instructors: Section A: Randy Koch, principal at Earle Brown School for 10 years, has experience teaching all grades 1–6. As principal, he has developed an assessment framework, aligned the reading curriculum to best practices, and given numerous professional development in-services. Section B: Jon Kahle has been a classroom teacher for over 20 years and is currently literacy specialist at Central Middle School in Eden Prairie.

The purpose of this course is to expose all individuals who recruit to the art and science of the college athletic recruiting process. Even though there is no “one-way-fits-all” approach to college athletic recruiting, there are some prerequisite skills and knowledge that all recruiters should possess. 3 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: Jan. 30–Apr. 17. Tuition: $765 Instructor: Dr. Steve Brennan is the president of Peak Performance Consultants and The Best College Recruiter in Omaha, Nebraska. He is a former basketball coach and the author of “The Recruiters Bible—Third Edition.” Steve has been conducting a national seminar for college coaches called ‘The Recruiters Institute’ since 1993.

ENV

SCED 6018-37628 Off campus

Target audience: teachers K–12. 1 semester credit. Enrollment limit: 15. Two sessions: Sat., Mar. 23, 8 a.m.–4:30 p.m. Sun., Mar. 24,12–4 p.m. Off campus location: Como Park Zoo & Conservatory. Tuition: $255. Instructor: Stephanie Kappel, School and Group Programs coordinator at the Como

Online science courses from the American Museum of Natural History, in partnership with Hamline University – Spring 2013 Courses All American Museum of Natural History courses:

The Ocean System

ENV

SCED 6115-37787 A SCED 6115-37781 B Why is the ocean so big? Why is it salty? How deep is it? How does the ocean work? Starting with these simple questions, this seminar investigates this complex system by looking at the way its components—the atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere and biosphere—interact. Genetics, Genomics, Genethics ENV SCED 6105-37775 A SCED 6105-37786 B This course emphasizes the relation between the underlying science of genetics, the study of genomes (genomics), and the social, ethical, and legal issues that this work gives rise to genethics. Evolution ENV SCED 6148-37776 A SCED 6148-37785 B This course draws on the Museum’s longstanding leadership in the fields of paleontology, geology, systematics, and molecular biology to tell a modern story of evolution.

Registration deadline: 2 weeks prior to start date Two different sessions: A: January 28–March 10 B: March 18–April 28 Space, Time, and Motion ENV SCED 6099-37777 A Scientist-authored essays, online interaction, videos, and web resources enable learners to trace the historic path of discovery and explore implications of technology for society, energy production in stars, black holes, the Big Bang and the role of the scientist in modern society. Climate Change ENV SCED 6088-37778 A The course explores evidence for changes in ocean temperature, sea level and acidity due to global warming. Students will learn how climate change today is different from past climate cycles and how satellites and other technologies are revealing the global signals of a changing climate. The Solar System ENV SCED 6147-37780 A SCED 6147-37784 B This course provides an overview of what we know about the Solar System: how it began and evolved, its components and their properties, and how these elements interact as a system. Each week features

original essays authored by Neil deGrasse Tyson and Denton Ebel—two distinguished curators of the Museum. Earth Systems: Inside/Out ENV SCED 6100-37779 B This course delves into the geologic record in order to understand how our dynamic planet evolved and what processes continue to shape it. Water: Environmental Science ENV SCED 6159-37782 B Water shapes our planet on every level, from the chemical properties of the H2O molecule to its central role in global climate. Poised to be to the 21st century what oil was to the 20th, water is also a critical environmental issue. Diversity of Fishes ENV SCED 6117-37783 B With well over 24,000 species alive today, the world’s fishes comprise by far the largest and most diverse of all vertebrate groups. This seminar provides an introduction to this incredible diversity and looks at how scientists study fishes.

11 Language aRts | PHYSICAL EDUCATION | science education |

Semester credits: 3 Tuition: $873 Target audience: educators 6–adult


Park Zoo & Conservatory, is a biologist with extensive experience working in middle and high schools.

Great Apes

ENV

SCED 6119-37629 Off campus

Up close with Como Park Zoo’s great apes... People have long been fascinated by great apes. Investigate the many conservation issues that surround these primates, from the bush meat crisis and pet trade to the current species-survival plans. Learn the influences of geography in their survival, and explore great ape history in literature and folklore. Discover ways to integrate great apes into your curricula, while getting an up-close look at Como’s primate ambassadors! Enhance your observation skills while experiencing primate enrichment. Target audience: educators K–12. 1 semester credit. Enrollment limit: 15. Two sessions: Sat., Mar. 2, 8 a.m.–4:30 p.m. Sun., Mar. 3, 12–4 p.m. Off campus location: Como Park Zoo & Conservatory. Tuition: $255. Instructor: Stephanie Kappel. See under SCED 6018.

Incorporating a Science Notebook into Hands-on Elementary Science SCED 6150-37610 Saint Paul Science Education | Special education |

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ENV

How does a science notebook help students make meaning out of the hands-on science kit lessons? Research and best practice tell us that students learn more if they are able to reflect on lessons. Doing activities is not enough if students aren’t given opportunities to relate the new learning to prior knowledge. Learn about best practice in science, see a demonstration of a model lesson, and have time to incorporate new knowledge into practice. Witness how using a science notebook reinforces the content of lessons, assists in meeting national and Minnesota science standards, and improves literacy skills of students. Target audience: educators K–12. 1 semester credit. Enrollment limit: 24. Four sessions: Tue., Thurs., Apr. 23–May 2, 5:30–8:30 p.m. Klas Center 205. Tuition: $255. Instructor: Jill Anderson has worked for the Bloomington School District for the past 12 years as an elementary teacher. She previously taught for eight years in Del Rio, Texas where she taught first, second, and fifth grade.

Identifying Minnesota Trees and Shrubs: Tricks, Tips, Techniques

ENV

SCED 6158-37633 Blended, Off campus

Come and explore Minnesota’s oldest living beings. Explore the forest, learning the different ways trees and shrubs can be identified. Get up close and personal with these fascinating organisms as you work with

dichotomous keys, field guides, forest communities, and forest activities. Gain skills, knowledge, and techniques with tree and shrub identification that you can incorporate into your classes. The information and skills learned in this course will last a lifetime. Target audience: educators K–12. 1 semester credit. Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: Mar. 21–Apr. 17. Two face-toface sessions: Sat., Mar. 30, 8 a.m.–4:30 p.m. Bush Memorial Library 301. Sun., Mar. 31, 12–4 p.m. Off campus location: Fort Snelling State Park. Tuition: $255. Instructor: Joel Light is a biology associate at Northwestern College and former naturalist. He has experience leading and developing environmental education programs and teaching biology and other natural sciences.

Minnesota Forests

ENV

SCED 7671-37586 Off campus

Minnesota is known for its forests, and with good reason: it is the confluence of two major forest biomes, the deciduous and coniferous. Learn what makes a tree, how to identify different species, the natural and human history of Minnesota’s diverse forest communities, forest management, and animal and human forest use. The forests we see today are the results of many decisions— by humans and other animals, whether to cut, whether to eat. One goal of the course is to understand what we see, based on the history of diverse actions and plan our management on the basis of many options. Our field days will coincide with maple syruping season at the Audubon Center; learn about the process and participate in the selection and tapping of trees and collecting and cooking sap (nature willing). Practice tree identification skills and view actual forest management. Target audience: educators, interpreters K–12. 2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 24. Fri., Mar. 8, 6:30 p.m.–Sun., Mar. 10, 4 p.m. Off campus location: Audubon Center of the North Woods, Sandstone, MN. Tuition: $510. Meals and lodging: $75. Instructor: Bryan Wood. See under ENED 6105.

The Wolf: Issues and Actions SCED 7682-37585 Off campus

ENV

The wolf is one of the most charismatic and polarizing animals to walk the earth. At one time it was the most widely dispersed land mammal in the world, and is still found throughout the northern hemisphere. Wolves have been reintroduced into Yellowstone National Park and were recently delisted from Endangered Species status in Minnesota. This course will give an overview of wolf ecology, behaviors and adaptations, as well as investigate the human interactions and issues related to the wolf. This course

will include a visit to the Wildlife Science Center in Forest Lake, MN to observe captive wolves. Be ready to be outside on Sat. and Sun. as we learn to read animal tracks and sign in known wolf territories. Target audience: teachers K–12. 2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 24. Fri., Feb. 8, 6:30 p.m.–Sun., Feb. 10, 4 p.m. Off campus location: Audubon Center of the North Woods, Sandstone, MN. Tuition: $510. Meals and lodging: $100 Instructor: Bryan Wood. See under ENED 6105.

Spring Flora

ENV

SCED 7685-37589 Off campus

After a white or brown, cold and dark winter period, we all crave the beautiful color of spring flowers. Wander to a variety of plant communities, identify species, look at adaptations, and explore the diversity of plants and natural communities. Look closely at each bloom, and learn how to identify the flowers in your area. In this hands-on course, witness the birds singing in the trees, flowers blooming on the ground, and be enriched by life around us. Target audience: educators, naturalists, environmental educators. 1 semester credit. Enrollment limit: 24. Fri., May 10, 6:30 p.m.–Sat., May 11, 4 p.m. Off campus location: Audubon Center of the North Woods, Sandstone, MN. Tuition: $255. Meals and lodging: $40. Instructor: Bryan Wood. See under ENED 6105.

Special Education Childhood Psychopathology

OHD

TBI

SPED 7055-37800 Online

Childhood psychopathology comes in many forms and creates a unique set of problems for parents, educators, and treatment providers. This class examines various forms of psychopathology, such as oppositional defiant disorder, anxiety disorders, attachment disorder, and conduct disorder. It looks at possible causes, ways the disorders are impacted by the environment, as well as treatment options. Students will leave the class more knowledgeable in ways to recognize and address children with these disorders. 1 semester credit. Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: Mar. 21–Apr. 17. Tuition: $374. Instructors: Jerrod Brown is the Treatment Director at Pathways Counseling Center in Saint Paul, MN where he oversees an Adult Rehabilitative Mental Health Services program. Jerrod is also the CEO of the American Institute for the Advancement of Forensic Studies.


families, as well as how to include the family in educational planning.

Sleep Disorders in Children with Cognitive Disabilities OHD

Instructor: Kim LaCasse is currently an autism teacher/consultant for the White Bear Lake Schools at the middle school level.

TBI

SPED 7077-37801 Online

This is an advanced course that will look at the direct relationship between sleep disorders and cognitive disabilities in children. Particular focus will be place on sleep disorders in children who are diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Autism Spectrum Disorders, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders, and Traumatic Brain Injuries. Students can expect to learn why so many children with cognitive disabilities also struggle with a variety of sleep related problems. Students will also be introduced to secondary conditions that may increase sleep problems in children with cognitive disabilities. Basic strategies will be introduced that are appropriate for family members and caregivers to utilize with their child impacted with cognitive disabilities and sleep related difficulties. 1 semester credit. Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: Apr. 18-May 11. Tuition: $374. Instructors: Jerrod Brown. See under SPED 7055. Rachel Tiede. See under SPED 7055.

Neurobiological Disorders

OHD

TBI

SPED 7084-37617 Online

Gain an understanding of neurobiological disorders (NBD) and their effects on educational performance. Through the use of texts and web-based information, study the history of NBD, criteria and definitions, common diagnoses, service options, and the roles of team members through the evaluation and implementation process. 2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: Feb. 28–Apr. 17. Tuition: $748. Instructor: Jennie Polson is a physical health disabilities/traumatic brain injury consultant and assistive technology coordinator for Rochester Schools. She has 17 years experience working with learners with emotional behavioral disorders, learning disabilities, and other medical conditions.

Autism Spectrum Disorders: Introduction and Overview

ASD

SPED 7091-37626 Online

The incidence of autism spectrum disorders has increased significantly, and schools are charged with creating appropriate programs. Examine autism and Asperger Syndrome, educational criteria, identification and assessment, personal perspectives, teaching strategies, and family issues. Discuss specific research related to autism and educational practices. Address the effects of autism on

Target audience: educators, administrators, autism resource specialists, special educators P–12, and related services personnel. 2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: Feb. 28–Apr. 17. Tuition: $748.

Autism Spectrum Disorders: OHD Proactive Behavior Management

ASD

SPED 7092-37625 Online

Too often students with autism are “treated” with behavior management strategies that expect the student to understand another person’s perspective. The emergence of scientific information regarding behavior and brain function should compel us to rethink many of our preconceived ideas about challenging behaviors and the strategies we choose to change them. Examine behavior management philosophy, practical strategies and skills for writing proactive behavior management plans for students on the autism spectrum. The family perspective and participation in the proactive behavior management process will be woven throughout the course. Prerequisite: SPED 7091 ASD: Introduction and Overview. Target audience: See under SPED 7091. 1 semester credit. Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: Jan. 30–Feb. 27. Tuition: $374. Instructor: Holly Schmidt has been working with students on the autism spectrum for over 25 years, working with students in kindergarten through transition ages. She has worked in classrooms with students that have significant needs, and also worked as a district wide resource teacher of students with less significant support needs.

Autism Spectrum Disorders: Identification, Assessment, and Planning ASD

ASD

SPED 7094-37623 A Saint Paul SPED 7094-37624 B Online

Become competent in the identification and assessment of individuals with autism spectrum disorders. Review Minnesota state criteria for the process of identification, assessment and educational planning for students with autism spectrum disorders. Effectively select, utilize, and report results using appropriate tools for evaluation of autism spectrum disorders. Write your own comprehensive evaluation report based on results obtained from testing an individual to which you have access. Prerequisite: SPED 7091 ASD: Introduction and Overview. Target audience: See under SPED 7091. Two sections: 2 semester credits. Section A: Enrollment limit: 24. Four sessions: Fri., Feb. 1, 22, 5–9 p.m. Sat., Feb. 2, 23, 9 a.m.–5 p.m. East Hall 4. Tuition: $748. Course materials

fee: $10. Section B: Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: Jan. 30–Mar. 20. Tuition: $748. Course materials fee: $10. Instructors: Section A: Julie Martzke is a school psychologist, working with P–12 students in the public schools. As an autism resource consultant, she works with regular and special education staff, parents, and community organizations. Section B: Debra Peters works for the Northfield and Faribault School Districts as well as the Minnesota State Academies for the Deaf/Hard of Hearing and Blind/ Visually Impaired. She has over 25 years of experience in the area of Autism, as both a speech/language pathologist and an autism resource specialist.

Autism Spectrum Disorders: Teaching Strategies for Learners with ASD ASD SPED 7096-37622 Online

Explore a variety of current methods used in teaching learners with autism spectrum disorders. Apply selected strategies through writing appropriate goals and objectives, selecting effective teaching strategies, data collection, implementation and evaluation. The strategies learned can be applied to home and community skills in addition to in the classroom. Prerequisites: SPED 7091 ASD: Introduction and Overview, 7092 ASD: Proactive Behavior Management, 7094 ASD: Assessment, and Planning. Target audience: general educators, special educators P–12, and related services personnel as well as community agency personnel who work with individuals with ASD. 2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: Feb. 28–Apr. 17. Tuition: $748. Instructor: Donna Miller is an autism resource specialist for Wayzata Public Schools and an active member of the Minnesota State Autism Network.

Autism Spectrum Disorders: ASD Early Identification and Intervention SPED 7292-37619 Online

Focus on the unique issues that arise when a young child is first identified with an autism spectrum disorder. Explore instruments to identify autism, varied therapies, current research, program options and strategies, and resources in early childhood. Emphasis is on the impact of autism on the family and utilizing approaches that meet individual family needs. Target audience: special educators P–12. 1 semester credit. Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: Jan. 30–Feb. 27. Tuition: $374. Instructor: Anne Dudley, early childhood autism resource specialist, teaches preschoolers with autism spectrum disorders in North Saint Paul and is the district early childhood autism consultant.

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Rachel Tiede is an Adult Rehabilitative Mental Health professional with Pathways Counseling Center in Saint Paul and a volunteer forensic researcher for The American Institute for the Advancement of Forensic Studies. She has an MA in Elementary Education.


Autism Spectrum Disorders: Asperger Syndrome

ASD

SPED 7293-37620 Online

Increase your understanding of the unique nature of Asperger Syndrome. Recognizing differences in learning and perception are essential to successfully teaching individuals with AS. Explore areas of assessment and planning for challenges unique to these students. Topics will include planning for social and behavioral successes, and the impact of ASD on the family. Target audience: See under SPED 7091. 1 semester credit. Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: Mar. 21–Apr. 17. Tuition: $374. Instructor: Jill Kuzma, M.A., is a SpeechLanguage Pathologist whose scope of research and practice spans 16 years working exclusively with individuals on the autism spectrum, specializing in the areas of social cognition, emotion awareness and management , organization, and repetitive and expressive language skills. Get to know Jill at http://jillkuzma.wordpress.com.

Autism Spectrum Disorders: Applied Behavior Analysis

ASD

SPED 7295-37618 Online

special education | Urban Education |

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Learn and implement the principles of Applied Behavior Analysis. The principles of ABA have been found to be successful in teaching children with autism, as well as useful in teaching skills to all students. Learn to break skills into smaller parts (allowing repeated practice), teach one sub-skill at a time, provide prompting and fading, and use reinforcement procedures. Discuss application of these strategies for instruction in both individual and classroom instruction. Prerequisite: SPED 7091 ASD: Introduction and Overview. Target audience: special educators P–12, and related services. 1 semester credit. Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: Apr. 18–May 11. Tuition: $374. Instructor: Kristin Baden has taught special education in the Anoka Hennepin Early Intervention Program for over 15 years. Trained in special education, counseling, and psychology, she has worked with special needs children and adolescents and their families in their homes, helping incorporate behavioral strategies into daily routines.

Legal Issues in Special Education SPED 7297-37719 Online

OHD

ASD

What legal issues might affect your work and how can possible legal problems be avoided? Gain a basic knowledge of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) 2004, the regulations implementing that act, MN special education laws and the rules implementing those laws as well as a brief overview of Section 504 and

FERPA. Through discussions of case studies and complaint decisions, examine how these laws impact the teaching profession. Gain experience with common issues that are likely to arise in your work and become a stronger educator and advocate. 1 semester credit. Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: Feb. 28–Mar. 20. Tuition: $374. Target audience: educators, administrators, special educators P–12, and related services personnel. Instructor: Gary Lewis is Director of Student Services for Northfield Public Schools. Gary has worked in the field of school counseling, school psychology and special education administration for over 35 years.

URED 7725-37615 Online

URT

Learning can be meaningful, engaging, and permanent when made contextual. Develop a knowledge base regarding historical, socioeconomic and political factors impacting urban schools. Build upon the rich and diverse out-of-school experiences of urban learners through readings, lesson plan development, reflection, and interaction with families and communities. Leave with instructional strategies and resources for your school site. Six additional community hours required. Target audience: teachers K–12. 2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: Jan. 30–Mar. 20. Tuition: $510.

Urban Education Framework for Teaching: Changing Paradigms URED 7722-37590 Online

Learn multiple research-based theoretical frameworks that increase teacher resiliency and utilize teacher experience to develop cultural competence. Focus on strategies that build upon the strengths of urban learners, build community, and enhance student motivation and capability. Examine the convergence of culture and cognitive development through personal experiences, group projects and personal introspection. Target audience: educators P–12. Note: This course meets the Minnesota Human Relations requirement for licensure. 4 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: Jan. 30–May 11. Tuition: $1,020. Instructor: Anthony Nocella focuses on critical urban education, peace and conflict studies, inclusive social justice education, ecopedagogy, transformative justice, critical criminology, youth culture, disability studies/ pedagogy, anarchist studies, critical animal studies, and hip-hop studies.

Managing the Urban Classroom

Linking Communities to Classrooms: Contextualizing Student Learning

URT

URED 7723-37616 Online

Instructor: Nikole Logan has been an educator with the Saint Paul Public schools for over 13 years, as well as an adjunct faculty member with Hamline University for seven years. As an urban learner and teacher, Nikole has a passion for nurturing empowerment in students and families.

Interpersonal Dynamics: Racism

URT

URED 7731-37614 Online

An intensive conversation on the dynamics of racism and how it affects adults and learners personally. The study circle dialogues are interactive and instructive through reflective engagement, readings and videos. The quality and integrity of the dialogues depend upon commitments to honest, open and respectful speech; to remain in conversation; and to mutual development and transformation. It requires physical, emotional and intellectual presence. This course will enhance your knowledge base and equip you for social action. Target audience: educators P–12, community persons, nonprofit staff, and others. 2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: Jan. 30–Mar. 20. Tuition: $510. Instructor: Anthony Nocella. See under URED 7722.

Gain fresh ideas for responding to the daily challenges of maintaining an effective learning environment. Learn creative classroom management strategies, practical ideas for developing a community of learners, and effective techniques for increasing students’ participation in learning. Target audience: educators P–12. 2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: Mar. 21–May 11. Tuition: $510. Instructor: Krista Ottino has taught in the St. Paul Public Schools for 20 years in the positions of homeless shelter liason, elementary teacher, curriculum content coach, and behavior coach. She currently teaches fourth grade at Hazel Park Preparatory Academy.

Scholarships may be available for students taking URED courses. Call or email 651-523-2600 or gcs@hamline.edu for additional information.


Register online www.hamline.edu/registration Call Student Administrative Services at 651-523-3000 with registration questions. Phone registration not accepted.

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT FOR EDUCATORS REGISTRATION FORM This form is for professional development for educators courses only

Online sections: Please register one week prior to course start date to ensure receipt of any course information that may be sent. Online login and course information is at www.hamline.edu/education/online.

Return completed form: • by fax to 651-523-2585 • by mail to Hamline University, Graduate Registration, MS-A1750, 1536 Hewitt Ave., Saint Paul, MN 55101-1218 • in person to Student Administrative Services, 1st Floor, East Hall Hamline ID/Social Security Number Preferred email (required) Name

Address

Last

First

Street

City

Home phone

Cell phone

Date of birth

Gender:

Month/day/year

Are you a teacher?

Yes

Middle State

Zip

Work phone Female

Male

No District

If yes, Subject/Grade Level

School

How many years teaching

Enrollment Status: I am admitted to a Hamline program in (list)

I last took a course at Hamline in (year) If I enrolled under a different name, what name?

Educational background (list college/university attended, years of attendance, and degree earned):

Please register me in the following course(s): TERM: Fall

Winter/Spring

2014

Year:

2013

Subject and course code (e. g., LANG 7905)

Location and start date

Credits

Summer

5-digit CRN (e. g., 12737)

Course Cost $

Course title

Audit* (check if yes):

*Audit: Professional development students may register for an audit, but must still pay full tuition. Students who audit a course will not receive academic credit for the course. Students must note the audit at time of registration (see check box above). The decision to audit is irreversible. Students intending to audit must submit a registration form to Registration and Records (Law Grad 113) no later than the first day of the course.

Payment: Tuition is due and payable by the first class session. A $20 fee will be charged for all returned checks. Check for $_______________ is enclosed, payable to Hamline University. (Do not send payment directly to the School of Education). Electronic online payment through Piperline. Please see www.hamline.edu/billing for more information. Electronic payment options: • ACH e-check payments for no fee—you will need your bank routing and account numbers. • Credit card payments via MasterCard, Discover, or American Express with a 2.75% convenience fee. (Please note that Visa is not accepted.)

Registration |

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I have never taken a course at Hamline


Policies and procedures Registration and Course Information Who May Register School staff members (teachers, counselors, etc.) and other professionals. You do not have to be admitted to a degree program at Hamline, but you must have completed a bachelor’s degree. Students currently enrolled in any Hamline degree or licensure program should contact the program office with questions about which course to register for. How to Register Information about how to register for classes online is available in the Online Registration Guide at www.hamline.edu/gcsreg. Alternatively, complete the form in this catalog, clip and mail, or fax to 651-5232585. Or, register in person at the Student Administrative Services office, room 113E, East Hall, Mon.–Fri., 9 a.m.–6 p.m., Sat. 8 a.m.–12 p.m. Courses fill quickly; please register early.

Policies and Procedures |

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Verifying Your Registration Use your Hamline ID and PIN to log in to Hamline’s secure website, Piperline, at www.hamline.edu/piperline. NOTE: If you registered via a paper form, a letter containing your Hamline ID and PIN will be mailed to you. You will receive this letter within two weeks of Hamline’s receipt of your registration unless you are also admitted to a degree or licensure program at Hamline. Once in Piperline, view the courses for which you are registered by selecting Student Services, Registration, Student Detail Schedule. Print a copy of your class schedule for access to library services. Any course changes (schedule, location, instructor) will be noted in Piperline; check www.hamline. edu/classschedules as your course start date approaches. Phone 651-523-2600 if you have questions about obtaining course information via Piperline. Course Cancellation If a course has not reached the minimum enrollment seven days prior to the first class session, the course will be cancelled and students will be notified via email. For information about class cancellation due to winter storms, call 651-523-5555, or Hamline Office of Safety and Security: 651-523-2100, or listen to WCCO radio (830 AM).

Credit/Audit Courses listed in this catalog are given in semester credit hours. You may register to audit, but you must still pay full tuition unless otherwise noted. Audit registrations must be submitted via paper form prior to the first class session. Once registered for credit, you may not switch to audit after the first class session. The decision to audit is irreversible. Credit Transfer and Use Graduate credit may be used by students enrolled in a Hamline graduate program in partial fulfillment of degree requirements. Such credit is usually transferable to other colleges and universities, but the decision rests solely with the other institution. Grades Students have the option of choosing a letter grade or Pass/No Pass. Students currently enrolled in a Hamline degree or licensure program must opt for letter grades. You must identify your preference at the first class session. Final grades are available through Piperline once the instructor has submitted them; you will not receive a paper copy of your grades in the mail. To check your grades each term, use your Piperline ID and PIN to login to the secure area in Piperline (www.hamline.edu/piperline), select Student Services, Student Records, Final Grades. Once a final grade is posted, it cannot be changed unless an instructor or clerical error has occurred. If you wish to appeal a grade, you must do so within a month of receiving it. First contact the instructor. If the matter remains unresolved, you may appeal to the program dean and, then, to the Provost. The decision of the provost is final. Incomplete Grade With an instructor’s approval, a student may take an incomplete (“I”) in a course. An “I” will be given only in circumstances that are beyond the control of the student. An “I” cannot be granted for failing or uncompleted work (a substantial portion of the work must have already been completed). An instructor must update an “I” to a final grade within four months after the end of the registration term. Otherwise, the “I” will convert to an “F” grade. If an “I” has been converted to an “F,” the student may complete the necessary course work, at the instructor’s discretion, within one year in accordance with the grade change policy. The student may not complete course work after that time.

Transcripts An official transcript may be ordered online at www. hamline.edu/transcript. Alternatively, you may submit a signed request to: Hamline University, Transcripts, MS A1750, 1536 Hewitt Ave., Saint Paul, MN 55104-1284. There is no charge for official transcripts. Check Piperline to make sure all your grades have been posted before requesting a transcript. No transcript or grade will be released unless all financial obligations to Hamline have been met.

Course Information on Piperline

To check current enrollment in any course, check the online class schedule in Piperline (www.hamline.edu/classschedules) and follow the links to Graduate Professional Development. Any changes to your courses will be listed here. Check Piperline class schedules as your course start date approaches.

Tuition and Payment Information Tuition See the course listings for specific tuition amounts. Additional fees may be included for materials, box lunch, or other course expenses, and other university fees may also apply. Tuition may vary for those enrolled in other programs. Refunds/Drops To drop a class, complete a GCS Drop/ Withdrawal Form (available at: www. hamline.edu/registrar/forms) and fax to 651-523-2585 or drop off in person at the Student Administrative Services office (SAS), room 113E, East Hall, Mon.–Fri., 9 a.m.–6 p.m. Alternatively, you may email a drop request containing the information required on the GCS Drop/Withdrawal Form to registrar@hamline.edu. The effective date is the date SAS receives the drop/withdrawal request.


Drop/Withdraw Policies Tuition, materials, and fees are 100% refunded prior to the last day of the drop period. After that time students must withdraw from the course and the percent of tuition refunded will be based on the number of days elapsed since the first class session; materials and fees are non-refundable; and a grade of W will be assigned. To determine the last day to drop your class, visit the registration website at: www. hamline.edu/gcsreg-drop.

Other Information Textbooks and Course Packets Your course may require the purchase of a textbook or course packet. Visit the Hamline University Bookstore website (www.hamlineuniversitybookstore.com) to view the textbooks requirements for your course, to purchase materials, and to view current bookstore hours. Please purchase books before the first class session.

Campus Services Bush Library: available to registered students. Login to the Secure Area in Piperline and confirm your schedule (www.hamline.edu/ piperline). Print a copy of your class schedule for access to library services. For hours, see www.hamline.edu/bushlibrary. Dining Service: available in the Anderson Center for full meals and Klas Center for a la carte food services. For Dining Service hours, see www.hamline.edu/dining. Parking: In all lots, permits are enforced Mon.–Thur., 8 a.m.–8 p.m., Fri., 8 a.m.–4 p.m., Sept.–May. Parking is free on weekends. Permits are available for evening only students (after 4 p.m.) for $35 per semester. See www.hamline.edu/parking.

Services for Students with Disabilities: Hamline is committed to ensuring all qualified students equal access to academic and extra-curricular programming. Hamline is obligated to make reasonable accommodations in programs and activities to provide equal access to qualified persons with disabilities. A qualified person with a disability is a person who can satisfy academic and technical standards requisite to admission or participation in the recipient’s educational program or activity. For further information, contact the Disability Resources office at 651-523-2521. Our Mailing List To receive our catalogs and mailings, call 651-523-2900. To change your current mailing address, call 651-523-3000, or login to Piperline: www.hamline.edu/piperline.

Online learning FAQs What are the benefits of online learning? You can save commute time and money by learning from the comfort of your home. You can expand your professional skills by learning how to learn online, and you will have more options to participate actively with peers and professors, who will know you better due to increased online contact. Would online learning be a good fit for me? Online learning can be a good fit for most learners, especially those who have initiative and solid self-management skills. Is it hard to learn how to use the online classroom? Hamline University uses Blackboard and Moodle which are user-friendly learning platforms. Learning guides and support services are available for people new to online learning. Test drive an online course by visiting: learnonline.hamline.edu

Is online education high quality? All courses are taught by experienced Hamline School of Education faculty, so you will receive the same excellent course content and outcomes that you would expect in an on-campus course. When do classes meet? You will need to participate actively and regularly from the day the course begins. Online classes follow the same academic calendar as on-campus courses, but they usually do not have similar class times. That is, online learning is scaffolded to occur at multiple times during the week, and this is typically described in weekly schedules. How much time should I plan to spend outside of class? Plan to spend as much time with your online coursework as you would with an on campus course. Regular participation is required. Expect to spend 12 hours of time per credit each term for reading, research, writing, and projects outside of online class time. Example: If you are enrolled in a 4-credit course, expect to spend at least 48 hours of extra time for this work during a term.

Are online courses self-paced at Hamline? No. While you will not have designated class times as in a campus course, learning will be distributed throughout the week according to a schedule designed by the faculty member leading the course. How and when can I enroll in online courses? The registration process for online courses is identical to the process for on-campus courses. How will I be graded? Grading will be similar to on-campus courses. It will be established by the faculty member leading the course and explained in course materials. Will I ever have to visit the Hamline campus? No, online courses are entirely online. You will be able to access campus services online, including Bush Library. What is the computer requirement? For technology requirements, visit: learnonline.hamline.edu/admission/faq

online learning faqs |

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Please circulate

1536 Hewitt Avenue Saint Paul, MN 55104-1284

You’re always telling your students to aim higher.

Why don’t you? Did you know that Hamline School of Education offers 10 programs that can be completed entirely online? That’s right: you can wear your pajamas to class. Whether in-person or from afar, our professors are dedicated to providing quality interactive, personal support to students. Stay on the cutting edge of the field as you engage in creative thought, reflection, and partnership. Online programs include:

Masters Programs

• Master of Arts in Education • Master of Arts in Education: Natural Science and Environmental Education • Master of Arts in English as a Second Language • Master of Arts in Literacy Education

Certificates

• Autism Spectrum Disorders Certificate • Adult ESL Certificate • ESL for Mainstream Teachers Certificate • Certificate in College Admission Counseling • Environmental Education Certificate • Advanced TEFL Certificate • Urban Teaching Certificate

Licensure

•Bilingual/Bicultural Education Additional License K-12 • English as a Second Language Additional License (K-12) • Reading License (K-12) Licensure To learn more, visit our website, www.hamline.edu/education or contact our Office of Graduate Admission: 651-523-2900, gradprog@hamline.edu.

Nonprofit org u.s. postage paid Hamline University


Spring 2013 Professional Development for Educators