Issuu on Google+

Professional Development for

Educators

Regist ratio is open n

Contents

Registration form 21 Policies and Procedures 22 Graduate Certificates 2 Index of Course Offerings 3 Advanced Degree Programs 2 Start Dates 4 Art Education 5 Bilingual Education 5

Computer Science Ed 5 Education 5 Environmental Ed 7 English as a Second Language 8 Gifted Ed 10 Language Arts 11 Science Ed 15 Special Ed 17 Urban Ed 20

Summer 2012


Graduate certificates Hamline’s School of Education offers graduate-level certificates in a variety of relevant focus areas. Ideal as elective credits for the master of education program, certificates also are valuable tools for practicing teachers who wish to expand their skills or develop expertise in a specific area. Look for the icons below throughout the catalog to identify courses in our certificate programs. Visit www.hamline.edu/certificates for more information and full course listings for each certificate. Teachers of adult ESL,  credits 8 Examine course design, assessment, and the development of reading, writing, and oral skills with adult English language learners. For adult basic professionals.

 ollege Counseling, C 16 Credits This online program is designed to prepare any professional for counseling high school students with post-secondary planning and the admission process.

 utism spectrum A disorders, 13 credits Bring hope to students with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and their families, helping them to fully develop their education potential and become active participants in society. For teachers licensed in special education or related services.

Environmental education, 10 credits Design a program that meets your needs with coursework that may include study in ecology, natural history, teaching methods, field biology, and geology.

AESL

ASD

certificates and DegreEs |

2

 ook arts, B 11 credits Integrates both the visual and literary art forms through hands-on experience in different methods of making paper, paper decoration, and bookbinding from various cultures. BA

 hildren’s literature, C 10 credits Brings the power of literature and authentic reading into the classroom, where students can develop a love of literature. Topics range from the historical development of children’s literature to banned books, books for social justice, and methods to integrate literature into educational settings. CHLT

CC

ENV

Gifted education, 12 credits Prepares K–12 teachers, curriculum specialists, resource teachers, and administrators to foster the growth and success of gifted learners— students who are capable of high achievement when they receive differentiated and challenging instruction. GFT

 iteracy for the L teaching of reading and writing, 15 credits Enhance your understanding of the role of literacy learning across the curriculum. Develop practical theory for the effective teaching of language in literature-rich classrooms where students are supported and challenged to become complex and critical thinkers. For both beginning and experienced teachers. LIT

 SL for mainstream E teachers, 10 credits Explore the integration of ESL students into the classroom, second language acquisition, developing literacy skills, testing, evaluation, and the impact of language on society. For licensed K–12 teachers who seek direction in making sound educational decisions for English language learners.

 EFL Teaching English T as a foreign language, 8 credits Through an interactive and hands-on approach, discover the principles and practices of teaching English as a foreign language. Learn about teaching methods and techniques, then apply that learning by teaching a class of non-native English speakers.

 ther health O disabilities, 12 credits Gain an understanding of how medications, treatments, frequent doctor’s appointments, and repeated hospitalizations can impact students with chronic or acute health conditions that impact academic, behavioral, social, or emotional functioning. For licensed teachers, especially those working in special education or related services.

 rban teaching, U 10 credits Increase success with urban and urban-like learners by enhancing the effectiveness and resiliency of new teachers. Provides valuable information for experienced educators and other professionals working with learners from diverse social, economic, linguistic, and cultural backgrounds.

MESL

OHD

TEFL

URT

Traumatic brain injury,  credits 12 Explore the evaluation process, educational programming, and modifications for students with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)—the leading cause of disability in children and youth that affects many parts of the brain. Learn the importance of collaboration between hospitals, schools, families, medical providers, and community resources. TBI

Additional information Certificates: www.hamline.edu/certificates or 651-523-2900

For complete course information: www.hamline.edu/classschedules

Teaching English as a foreign language (TEFL): www.hamline.edu/esl or 651-523-2900

Suggestions for new courses: gcs@hamline.edu or 651-523-2477

Literacy and Learning interest: www.hamline.edu/literacy or 651-523-2600

Course packets: available at the campus bookstore To offer a certificate in your district or school: 651-523-2067


Index of Course Offerings EDUC 6092 Bullying Prevention Strategies: How Bystanders Can Change the Culture of the School EDUC 6210 Creating a Classroom Climate that Meets the Needs of All Students ENED 6085 Field Biology Research Methods SPED 7075 Introduction to Childhood Sleep Disorders BLENDED COURSES CSED 6032 Digital Fluency CSED 6040 Google Tools for Educators ENED 6010 Low Prop–No Prop Teambuilding ENED 6014 Patterns in Nature ENED 6085 Field Biology Research Methods ENED 6120 Canoe and Kayak Instruction and Trip Leading ESL 7519 Linguistics for Language Teachers ESL 7776 ESL Methods GTED 7607 Models and Strategies in Gifted Education SCED 6109 Field-based Research: Ecosystems SPED 7296 Assistive Technology OFF–CAMPUS COURSES EDUC 6097 Many Faces of Mexico in Minnesota: Understanding and Working with Recent Immigrants

ENED 6120 Canoe and Kayak Instruction and Trip Leading

ESL 7502 Language and Society

SPED 7075 Introduction to Childhood Sleep Disorders

SCED 6139 Riches of the Rainforest

ESL 7519 Linguistics for Language Teachers

SCED 6151 Birds and Bugs

ESL 7610 History of English

SPED 7083 Biomedical Aspects of Physical and Developmental Disabilities

SCED 6161 Plants, People, and Culture

ESL 7650 Basics of Modern English

SCED 7022 Polar Bears, Penguins, and Puffins

ESL 7660 Second Language Acquisition

SCED 7602 Birds of East Central Minnesota

ESL 7753 Testing and Evaluation of English Language Learners

MINNEAPOLIS COURSES

ESL 7755 Development of Literacy Skills

EDUC 6210 Creating a Classroom Climate that Meets the Needs of All Students

LANG 6062 Teaching Writing Using the Six Traits

ESL 6631 Introduction to the Adult English Language Learner: Developing Reading and Writing Skills

LANG 7504 Conferring with K–8 Writers LANG 7901 Foundations of Reading, K–12

GTED 7601 Who are the Gifted?

LANG 7902 Developing Elementary Readers, K–6

GTED 7606 Affective Needs of Gifted Students: Counseling Issues and Strategies

LANG 7903 Advancing Secondary Readers, 7–12 LANG 7904 Reading Assessment and Evaluation, K–12

ONLINE COURSES EDUC 7202 Understanding the College Admission Process

LANG 7905 Advanced Practicum in Reading Interventions

EDUC 7204 Special Populations in College Counseling

LANG 7906 Becoming Literacy Leaders

ESL 6611 Technology Enhanced Language Learning

PHED 6080 The Art and Science of College Athletics Recruiting

ESL 6612 Supporting and Advocating for English Language Learners

SPED 7072 Traumatic Brain Injury: Emotional/Behavioral Issues

ESL 6638 Assessment of the Adult English Language Learner

SPED 7084 Neurobiological Disorders SPED 7085 ADHD Learners SPED 7090 Introduction to Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder SPED 7091 Autism Spectrum Disorders: Introduction and Overview SPED 7094 Autism Spectrum Disorders: Identification, Assessment, and Planning SPED 7095 Autism Spectrum Disorders: Communication, Assessment, and Intervention Strategies SPED 7291 Autism Spectrum Disorders: Adolescents and Young Adults SPED 7292 Autism Spectrum Disorders: Early Identification and Intervention SPED 7295 Autism Spectrum Disorders: Applied Behavior Analysis URED 7720 Introduction to Urban Education and Reflective Teaching URED 7723 Managing the Urban Classroom URED 7724 Culturally Relevant Pedagogy: Teaching for Democratic and Diverse Classrooms

Advanced degree programs Master of Arts in Education (MAEd)

Active and reflective learning and a relevant curriculum. Available on campus and in learning communities statewide. Classes are held on evenings and weekends. Spring 2012 Learning Communities: Hamline Saint Paul campus, Hamline Minneapolis location (Hwys. 100 & 394), Apple Valley, St. Michael, Grand Rapids, Willmar, Rochester.

New! Master of Arts in Literacy Education (MALEd) A comprehensive focus on literacy instruction and leadership.

Continuing Studies courses can be taken on their own or as elective credits as part of a Hamline degree program.

Master of Arts in English as a Second Language (MAESL)

Leadership, advocacy, and investigation to build upon previous ESL, bilingual, or TEFL credentials.

Master of Arts in Education: Natural Science and Environmental Education (MAEd: NSEE) Become an informed, effective environmental and science educator and an active steward of the local environment.

Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT)

Designed for working adults seeking initial licensure. Induction Series: A new MAT degree completion option focused on critical reflective practice.

Doctorate in Education (EdD)

A multi-tiered, thematic program that emphasizes reflective practice and constructing personal meaning.

3 Section |

NEW COURSES


Start Dates 5/28/2012 SCED 6088 Climate Change SCED 6099 Space, Time, Motion SCED 6100 Earth Systems: Inside/ Out SCED 6105 Genetics, Genomics, Genethics SCED 6110 Link Dinosaurs/ Birds–Evol SCED 6113 Sharks and Rays– Ecology/Class/Evolution SCED 6115 The Ocean System SCED 6147 The Solar System SCED 6148 Evolution

Start Dates |

4

6/4/2012 EDUC 6052 Classroom Managers EDUC 7202 Understanding the College Admission Process (ONL) EDUC 7204 Special Populations in College Counseling ENED 6014 Patterns in Nature (HYB) ESL 6611 Technology Enhanced Language Learning ESL 6612 Supporting and Advocating for English Language Learners (ONL) ESL 6631 Introduction to the Adult English Language Learner: Developing Reading and Writing Skills ESL 7502 Language and Society ESL 7519 Linguistics for Language Teachers ESL 7650 Basics of Modern English ESL 7660 Second Language Acquisition (ONL) ESL 7753 Testing and Evaluation of English Language Learners ESL 7755 Development of Literacy Skills (ONL) PHED 6080 The Art and Science of College Athletic Recruiting SPED 7085 ADHD Learners SPED 7295 Autism Spectrum Disorders: Applied Behavior Analysis URED 7731 Interpersonal Dynamics: Racism 6/6/2012 ESL 7610 History of English ESL 8490 Research Methodology SPED 7296 Assistive Technology (HYB) SPED 7298 Autism Spectrum Disorders: Sensory Strategies URED 7720 Introduction to Urban Education and Reflective Teaching 6/7/2012 SPED 7083 Biomedical Aspects of Physical and Developmental Disabilities

6/8/2012 ESL 6638 Assessment Adult Eng Lang Lrnr (ONL) LANG 6101 Using Young Adult Literature with Secondary Students 6/9/2012 LANG 7901 Foundations of Reading, K–12 (ONL) 6/11/2012 LANG 7735 Learning to Read and Write EDUC 6210 Creating a Classroom Climate that Meets the Needs of All Students 6/18/2012 ENED 6085 Field Biology Research Methods (HYB) LANG 7135 Making Books with Children 6/25/2012 ARED 6012 Clay in the Classroom BIED 7740 Principles of Bilingual Education CSED 6040 Google Tools for Educators EDUC 6067 Leadership Coaching Skills for Educators EDUC 6097 Many Faces of Mexico in Minnesota: Understanding and Working with Recent Immigrants EDUC 6232 Smart Moves: Using Brain Gym in Your Classroom EDUC 6253 Want to Teach Reading and Math? Try Singing! GTED 7606 Affective Needs of Gifted Students: Counseling Issues and Strategies LANG 6079 Phonemic Awareness and Phonics in a Comprehensive Literacy Program LANG 7138 Making Books Mirror Cultures I LANG 7504 Conferring with K–8 Writers LANG 7904 Reading Assessment and Evaluation, K–12 LANG 7906 Becoming Literacy Leaders (ONL) SCED 6109 Field-based Research: Ecosystems SCED 7021 Astronomy for Teachers SPED 7075 Intro to Childhood Sleep Disorders SPED 7084 Neurobiological Disorders

SPED 7090 Intro to Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder SPED 7091 Autism Spectrum Disorders: Introduction and Overview SPED 7094 Autism Spectrum Disorders: Identification, Assessment, and Planning SPED 7291 Autism Spectrum Disorders: Adolescents and Young Adults SPED 7292 Autism Spectrum Disorders: Early Identification and Intervention SPED 7294 Autism Spectrum Disorders: Effective Consulting Skills URED 7723 Managing the Urban Classroom 6/26/2012 ESL 7976 ESL Methods LANG 7905 Advanced Practicum in Reading Interventions LANG 7198 The Cream of the Crop: Award-winning Titles for Children and Young Adults 6/27/2012 GTED 7607 Models and Strategies for Gifted Education (HYB) SCED 6139 Riches of the Rainforest SPED 7299 Effective Paraprofessionals 7/2/2012 ENED 6010 Low Prop-No Prop Teambuilding (HYB) SCED 6114 In the Field with Spiders SCED 6117 Diversity of Fishes SCED 6159 Water: Environmental Science 7/9/2012 LANG 7901 Foundations of Reading, K–12 7/16/2012 CSED 6032 Digital Fluency EDUC 6145 Girls and Boys Learn Differently ENED 6120 Canoe and Kayak Instruction and Trip Leading GTED 6011 Using Clustering to Meet the Needs of Gifted Students LANG 6076 Phonetic Awareness and Phonics: K–3 LANG 7137 Papermaking and Paper Decoration LANG 7194 Banned and Challenged Books: From Aristotle to the Wizards of Hogwarts LANG 7712 Summer Literacy Institute 2012

LANG 7906 Becoming Literacy Leaders SCED 6151 Birds and Bugs SCED 7022 Polar Bears, Penguins, and Puffins SPED 7293 Autism Spectrum Disorders: Asperger Syndrome URED 7724 Culturally Relevant Pedagogy: Teaching for Democratic and Diverse Classrooms 7/17/2012 EDUC 6092 Bullying Prevention Strategies: How Empowering the Bystanders Can Change the Culture of School LANG 7510 Teachers as Writers K–12 SPED 7297 Legal Issues in Special Education 7/18/2012 SPED 7072 Traumatic Brain Injury: Emotional/Behavioral Issues 7/19/2012 LANG 7903 Advancing Secondary Readers, 7–12 SPED 7092 Autism Spectrum Disorders: Proactive Behavior Management 7/21/2012 ESL 0790 ESL/BIED Practicum Seminar 7/26/2012 ESL 6612 Advocating for English Language Learners 7/27/2012 LANG 7902 Developing Elementary Readers, K–6 7/30/2012 GTED 6030 Teaching Talented Readers SCED 7040 Biotechnology Teacher Institute 8/6/2012 EDUC 7084 Discipline for Classroom Community ESL 6610 ESL Learner Mainstream Classroom LANG 6041 A Learning Community to Discover the Best Novels for Grades 3–8 LANG 6062 Teaching Writing Using the Six Traits SPED 7095 Autism Spectrum Disorders: Communication, Assessment, and Intervention Strategies 8/7/2012 LANG 7508 Poetry: A Writer’s Soul Mate SCED 6161 Plants, People, and Culture


Class descriptions Clay in the Classroom ARED 6012–58237

Kids love clay. Pick up some basic techniques and project ideas. Learn how to work with clay as an art medium. Practice basic techniques and explore classroom projects using clay. Make clay pots, animals, and tiles. Receive instruction in air–drying techniques. Bring your choice of objects (shells, twigs, old forks, keys, buttons) to make designs in clay, a few small plastic bags, a large empty box, and latex or vinyl gloves if you have sensitive skin. Target audience: educators K–6. 1 semester credit. Enrollment limit: 12. Three sessions: Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 8 a.m.–12 p.m. June 25, July 11, 13. Giddens/ Alumni Learning Center 224W. Cost: $255.

online content in new ways. Learn digital literacy skills needed to navigate current and emerging information environments, such as search techniques, RSS aggregation, computer programming, web analytics, and fluency in technology-enabled forms of social communication. Examine the roles of podcasting, vodcasting, and web design in creating and conveying meaning. Explore alternative definitions of literacy, and discuss their implications for teaching and learning. Target audience: educators K–12. 2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 12. Online dates: July 16–August 25. Three sessions: Fridays, 8:30 a.m.–4 p.m. Friday, 1–2 p.m. July 20, 27, August 17. East Hall 12. Cost: $510.

Instructor: Marcia L. Soderman–Olson has been an artist–in–residence in more than 20 Saint Paul Schools. A painter and former museum educator, she has extensive experience as a college instructor of art and art history.

Instructor: Carl Anderson is a technology integration specialist for Goodhue Public Schools and an adjunct teacher for Minnesota Connections Academy. His research interests include project-based learning, alternative education, emerging technologies, distance learning, and digital equity.

Bilingual Education

Google Tools for Educators CSED 6040–58242 Blended

Principles of Bilingual Education BIED 7740–58408

Look at active models of bilingual/bicultural education and the effect of parental and community involvement. Study the areas of controversy and develop a personal belief statement for bilingual education. Apply the theory to a case study of a particular bilingual/bicultural education program. Target audience: bilingual/bicultural teachers. 3 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 20. Eight sessions: Mondays, Wednesdays, 4:30–9 p.m. June 25, 27, July 2, 4, 9, 11, 16, 18. Giddens/ Alumni Learning Center 108W. Cost: $1,080. Instructor: Mary Diaz has worked extensively in ESL, bilingual education, and linguistic/ cultural diversity. A longtime advocate for English language learners, she has provided technical assistance and professional development for educators across the region.

Computer Science Education Digital Fluency CSED 6032–58241 Blended

Does being literate mean just knowing how to read and write? The internet is radically changing how we find and use information, communicate, and learn. Today’s students, immersed in a fluid world of social media and participatory technologies, are assessing, consuming, and creating

Discover amazing tools available to students, teachers, and educational institutions that are looking for collaboration and communication tools. Many teachers use Google search, but Google also provides dozens of other free tools for educators. Explore how Google tools can be used to enhance any classroom for teacher productivity and student learning. Learn how to access and collaborate using Google Docs, Maps, Earth, Sites, and Search. This class will revolutionize your personal and professional life. Target audience: educators, media specialists K–12. 2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 12. Online dates: June 25–August 3. Two sessions: Mondays, 8:30 a.m.–12 p.m. July 2,16. East Hall 12. Cost: $510. Instructor: Molly Schroeder is an elementary technology integration specialist for Edina Public Schools with a background in elementary education, educational technology, and gifted education. A Google Certified Teacher, Molly frequently presents on how to integrate Google Apps into the classroom.

Education Classroom Managers EDUC 6052–58243 Online

Keep your classroom operating for productive learning with this energetic approach to behavior management. Discuss classroom organization, routines, and strategies

to reduce disruptions and increase instructional time. Learn ways to establish and maintain control and then move students to self–control. Explore specific techniques for dealing with students who challenge classroom rules and procedures. Interact online with other teachers to share ideas and insights. Note: Please register one week prior to course start date to ensure receipt of any information that may be sent. Online login and course information at www.hamline.edu/ education/online. Target audience: educators K–12. 2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: June 4–July 15. Cost: $510. Instructors: With 16 years experience as an elementary school principal, Rosemary Lawrence also has extensive experience as a staff development trainer and instructor in classroom management. Susan Jackson is an experienced high school English teacher and a staff development trainer.

Leadership Coaching Skills for Educators EDUC 6067–58244

Empower colleagues and students to reach higher levels of achievement while improving the overall school climate. Coaching skills enable educators to bring out the best in others and themselves by building better relationships, listening deeply to others, and asking open–ended, solution focused questions non-judgmentally. Educators will also learn to support others in identifying their hidden beliefs, values, strengths, and goals as well as strategies to determine what is getting in the way of achieving goals and how to move through those barriers to success. In this interactive course, educators will begin to integrate coaching skills (based on the International Coach Federation’s core coaching competencies) immediately into their professional practice. Participants will receive feedback, guidance, and opportunities to reflect on their coaching practices. Target audience: educators K–12. 2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 20. Three sessions: Monday–Wednesday, 8:30 a.m.–4 p.m. June 25, 26, 27. Giddens/Alumni Learning Center 102E. Cost: $510. Instructor: Nancy Hellander Pung has been a metro-area educator for the past 20 years in a variety of roles: classroom teacher, mentor, and learning community coordinator. Nancy currently teaches coaching skills to educators and specializes in coaching at–risk students.

5 Art | Bilingual | Computer sciencE | Education |

Art Education


Bullying Prevention Strategies: How Empowering the Bystanders Can Change the Culture of the School EDUC 6092–58501

This course is intended for educators and administrators to provide an in-depth study of bullying behavior in children and adolescents. Gain a strong knowledge base around bully and cyber bullying behavior and identify strategies to change school culture. A strong emphasis will be placed on research-based strategies to empower the bystander and give adults common language to address bullying. 2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 24. Six sessions: Tuesday–Thursday, 9 a.m.–12 p.m. July 17, 18, 19, 24, 25, 26. Cost: $510. Instructor: Cheryl Green is a nationally certified Olweus Bullying Prevention Trainer.

Many Faces of Mexico in Minnesota: Understanding and working with recent immigrants EDUC 6097–58504 Off Campus

Education |

6

This multi–faceted, interactive course is designed to take the student from the historical roots of Mexican immigration into Minnesota to present-day issues that are being encountered by Mexican immigrants in our schools and communities. We will visit a Latino-led agency and school to hear from immigrants about their needs, worries, and contributions; examine current economic, political, and cultural realities; identify and respond to myths and stereotypes; and develop strategies and tools to cover your professional needs. Develop awareness, build understanding, and form a personal action plan. The class is taught via role–play, small group, paired activities, and communitybuilding methodology that can be readily adapted into participants’ lesson plans, seminars, or community work. Classes are held onsite at the former Resource Center of the Americas in Minneapolis. Highly recommended for those whose work includes recent Mexican immigrants. 2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 24. Four sessions: Monday–Thursday, 9 a.m.–3 p.m. June 25, 26, 27, 28. Off-campus location: La Conexion de las Americas, Room 20, 3019 Minnehaha Avenue, Minneapolis. Cost: $510. Instructors: Jan Kurtz, Spanish and Latin American studies instructor at Central Lakes College in Brainerd, created the Many Faces of Mexico course. She has worked with Central American refugees, been a counselor to international students, organized community cultural events, and does public speaking. Meredith Sommers, one of the founders of the Resource Center of the Americas (now merged with La Conexion), coauthored the book, Many Faces of Mexico, which she has used as a base for seminars and courses related to the Latino population. Meredith

is active in related volunteer work, teaching English to immigrants, and doing visitations in detention centers.

Girls and Boys Do Learn Differently EDUC 6145–58245

Pink or blue, GI Joe or Barbie: are stereotypes manufactured in our culture or in our genes? Join this exploration of the challenges, often complicated by gender, that teachers face each day. Investigate current and historical literature surrounding what researchers, scientists, and writers have learned about gender differences. Note: Can be used toward the certificate in gifted education. Target audience: educators K–12. 2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 20. Four sessions: Monday–Thursday, 8:30 a.m.–4 p.m. July 16, 17, 18, 19. Robbins Science Center 12. Cost: $510. Instructor: Bill Keilty retired from his position as coordinator of gifted programs in the Spring Lake Park Schools, but later returned. He coordinates the Lighthouse Program, a program for the highly gifted that draws students from around the metro-area. In addition to facilitating an MAEd learning community at Hamline, he has taught in the EdD program and does consulting work in schools in Minnesota and across the nation.

Creating a Classroom Climate that Meets the Needs of All Students EDUC 6210–58561

This course will provide the student with knowledge of how trauma impacts the brain and learning, how relationships can be established with children who have experienced trauma, how to create classrooms that are conducive to a sense of belonging and community for all students, including those who have special needs (disabilities, experiences of trauma, etc.), and it will provide the student with many skills and tools with which to create such a classroom climate. 3 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 24. Five sessions: Monday–Thursday, June 11–June 14, 8 a.m.–5 p.m., Friday, June 15, 8 a.m.–12 p.m. Cost: $765. Instructors: Lynn Marrs, Jo Ann Strachan

Smart Moves: Using Brain Gym in Your Classroom EDUC 6232–58246

According to Paul Dennison, founder of Brain Gym, “movement is the door to learning.” Brain Gym consists of 26 simple, specific movements that increase focus, enhance creativity, allow one to become grounded and centered, improve sensorial skills (listening, vision, communication, eye-hand coordination), and more. In this experiential class, learn the movements, the five-step learning process, and basic theory of brain organization that supports the work.

Target audience: educators P–adult. 2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 20. Four sessions: Monday–Thursday, 8:30 a.m.–4 p.m. June 25, 26, 27, 28. Giddens/ Alumni Learning Center 110W. Cost: $560. Instructor: Cindy Goldade is a licensed Brain Gym instructor with over 800 hours of training. Past owner/teacher of a Montessori School for 3–6 year olds, she facilitates Brain Gym introductions and courses throughout Minnesota and is director of operations for Brain Gym (R) International.

Want to Teach Reading and Math? Try Singing! EDUC 6253–58247

Learn highly interactive strategies and collaboratively create lessons to cross–train the brain and dramatically raise achievement by practicing math and reading skills through singing, playing games, and research–based Affirming Parallel Concepts™. Lincoln was #1 in the increase in phonemic awareness from fall to winter… of ALL the Minneapolis schools. Target audience: educators pre K–6. 1 semester credit. Enrollment limit: 20. Four sessions: Monday–Thursday, 9 a.m.–12 p.m. June 25, 26, 27, 28. Giddens/Alumni Learning Center 141S. Cost: $255. Instructors: Elizabeth Olson is a recently retired Minneapolis Public Schools music teacher and is a frequent state and national presenter. She created, researched, and published the Affirming Parallel Concepts™ model. Ann C. Kay is the director of the Center for Lifelong Music Making, dedicated to fostering a musically able and active population. She is a former music educator and instructor of music teachers.

Discipline for Classroom Community EDUC 7084–58249

Managing behavior may be the most challenging dilemma facing teachers and principals today. Explore a holistic approach to discipline where children grow in their ability to manage their own behavior. Discover how to establish a firm yet nurturing classroom environment that encourages and teaches children responsibility and self-respect. The results will be more cooperative students, happier school personnel, and increased learning. Target audience: teachers K–12, special educators, administrators. 2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 20. Four sessions: Monday–Thursday, 8:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m. August 6, 7, 8, 9. Klas Center 205. Cost: $510. Instructors: Jeff Fink has been a Saint Paul teacher for more than 30 years in both regular and special education classrooms. He now serves as a full-time instructor in the Hamline School of Education. Jon Halpern is a school counselor for the Blake School in Minneapolis. An educator


Understanding the College Admission Process EDUC 7202–58542 Online

CC

This course provides counselors with information to assist their students/clients in applying to post-secondary institutions. When students/clients understand career options, they are able to narrow college options. In this course students will understand the various post-secondary options, learn about admission criteria, and gain knowledge on how to choose a college, identify the elements of a college application, and have the tools to create a college admission program. Target audience: junior, middle, and high school counselors; career center specialists; teachers of career classes; individuals interested in developing an independent college counseling practice. 3 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 20. Online Dates: June 4–August 5. Cost: $765. Instructor: Michelle Roatch. See under EDUC 7201.

Special Populations in CC College Counseling EDUC 7204–58440 Online

Examine current issues pertaining to special populations within college admission counseling. Focus on college counseling special groups including under-represented students (students of color, first generation, low socio–economical status), undocumented students, students with disabilities, home school students, and adult learners. Learn about college access programs, such as AVID, Upward Bound, Admission Possible, and TRIO. T arget audience: junior high, middle, and high school counselors; career center specialists and teachers of career classes; individuals interested in developing an independent college counseling practice. 3 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 20. Online Dates: June 4–August 5. Cost: $765. Instructor: Michelle Roatch. See under EDUC 7201.

Environmental Education Rivers Institute St. Croix River Institute June 25–27, 2012 Mississippi River Institute July 23–25, 2012

Our natural affinity to water makes rivers and watersheds a useful and familiar context for teaching and learning. Join us this summer, as Hamline’s Center for Global Environmental Education (CGEE)

presents its acclaimed Rivers Institute, a three-day field-based professional development opportunity that inspires, educates, and prepares K–12 teachers to engage students in STEM disciplines through hands-on, inquiry-based investigations at local watersheds. Standards-informed Rivers Institutes are designed to increase teachers’ science content knowledge and investigation skills and help area educators translate their professional experiences into meaningful, engaging classroom investigations.

Target audience: educators K–5.

Note: Free for educators—educational mini grant provided. Three full days of experiential instruction and lunches; a $100 mini grant upon completion of required components; 21 CEUs (including hours in the areas of reading preparation and technology); The Waters to the Sea multimedia tool and additional resources for your classroom; the option to purchase two graduate-level credits at the reduced rate of $150/credit.

Field Biology Research Methods ENED 6085–58527 Blended

Note: Piperline registration is NOT available for this course. For application and registration information, go to www.hamline.edu/ rivers-institute.

Low Prop-No Prop Teambuilding ENED 6010–58498 Blended

Teambuilding is a fun way to teach life skills like communication, cooperation, confidence, creativity, conflict resolution and decision making. It helps students learn valuable problem-solving skills. Learn activities that provide students opportunities to push beyond their comfort zones and grow and develop in a safe and enjoyable environment. Learn facilitation techniques, process/debriefing skills, and activities that require little to no equipment. Easily integrate these skills into already existing curricula. Target audience: educators K–adult. 2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 30. Online dates: July 2–July 13. Two sessions: Saturday, 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Sunday, 12–5 p.m. July 7, 8. Cost: $510. Instructor: Joel Light is a biology associate at Northwestern College and former naturalist. He has experience leading and developing environmental education programs and teaching biology and other natural sciences.

Patterns in Nature ENED 6014–58503 Blended

Experience activities to observe and identify natural patterns in plants and animals in our environment. Plants and animals have adapted in many ways for survival, and this course provides opportunities to explore and investigate them. Be introduced to: forest and tree structure, bird body structure and adaptations, animal signs and tracks, insect and plant interactions, and more. Activities will include nature journaling, nature photography, indoor and outdoor labs, and more.

2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 24. Online dates: June 4–June 30. Three sessions: Monday–Wednesday, 8 a.m.–4:30 p.m. June 11, 12, 13. Off-campus location: Environmental Education Center at Robert Ney Park Reserve, 5212 73rd St. N, Maple Lake, MN. Cost: $510. Instructor: David Grack has taught middle and high school biology and works as a summer naturalist/community education teacher with elementary students. His bird activity book was published in 2007.

This course will focus on techniques and equipment used in field biology research. Participants will learn how to collect and record population data for different area species, determine water quality, and discover different methods for sampling wildlife areas. Examples would include and not be limited to fish seining, small mammal live trapping, insect diversity studies, sturber bottom sampling, aquatic macroinvertebrate sampling, and bird surveys. They will spend all day in the wilds of Wisconsin and Minnesota exploring different habitats like rivers, wetlands, forest, pine barrens, and prairies. There will even be opportunity for nocturnal sampling. Students will learn how to navigate through the woods with topographic maps and compasses. Projects will be field oriented and will require data collection. The course will be conducted through a five-day field study expedition in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area in northern Minnesota. We will be camping overnight and canoeing each day. An additional fee for permits, rental, equipment and supplies up to $400.00 3 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 8. Online dates: June 18–June 22. Overnight camping trip: June 25–June 29, Boundary Waters Canoe Area. Cost: $765. Instructor: Joel Light. See under ENED 6010.

Canoe and Kayak Instruction and Trip Leading ENED 6120–58510 Blended

Get on the water in canoes and kayaks— explore, enjoy, learn. Canoeing and kayaking are terrific ways to expose students and visitors to the natural world. Learn basic skills to canoe and kayak safely and effectively (strokes, rescues, trip leading, and logistics) and how to introduce others to these skills. Participate in online discussions before getting around and on the water, then it’s into canoes and kayaks for training and paddling in the Rice Creek Chain of Lakes Park Reserve. This is a get wet, hands-on experiential course; absolutely no experience necessary. Target audience: educators K–adult. 2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 8. Online dates: July 16–August 3. Three sessions:

7 Environmental |

for more than 25 years, he has also served as a teacher, psychometrist, and adjunct professor.


Friday, 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Bush Memorial Library 205. Saturday, 8 a.m.–6 p.m. Sunday, 11 a.m–5 p.m. July 27, 28, 29. Rice Creek Chain of Lakes Park Reserve. Cost: $545. Instructor: Joel Light. See under ENED 6010.

English as a Second Language English as a Second Language ESL/BIED Practicum Seminar ESL 0790–58426

Prerequisite to ESL 7790, this seminar informs second license teachers, prior to the supervised teaching experience, of expectations and procedures required for a successful practicum experience. The seminar also addresses the TESOL standards, portfolios, and models of ESL/ BIED instruction. Target audience: ESL/BIED educators K–12. 0 semester credit. Enrollment limit: 35. One session: Saturday, 8:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. July 21. East Hall 106. Cost: $0.

English as a Second Language |

8

Instructor: Ann Mabbott, professor in the second language teaching and learning program at Hamline, has been associated with ESL since childhood, when she arrived as an immigrant student. She has a wide range of experience as an ESL teacher and teacher educator.

The ELL in the Mainstream MESL Classroom: Sheltered Instruction ESL 6610–58500

Study the theory and techniques related to sheltered instruction. Ensure that all students (especially ELLs) can access grade-level content and state standards. Included in the courses is an introduction to second language acquisition and learning as well as the eight components of SIOP (R) (Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol). Target audience: educators K–12. 1 semester credit. Enrollment limit: 24. Three sessions: Monday–Wednesday, 8:30 a.m.–4 p.m. August 6, 7, 8. Bush Memorial Library 302. Cost: $255. Instructors: Janelle Fischler teaches ESL in the North Saint Paul–Maplewood–Oakdale School District and has worked with secondary students for 15 years in the areas of ESL, speech and language pathology, and music instruction. Muriel Bianchi is an ESL Teacher at Weaver Elementary School in the North Saint Paul– Maplewood–Oakdale School District. Her background is in special education, working with developmentally delayed students and speech and language pathology.

Technology Enhanced Language Learning ESL 6611–58252 Online

Use technology as a tool to enhance ESL/ EFL teaching and learning. Develop an understanding of how current technologies can enhance the ESL/EFL language curriculum. Learn how to effectively integrate educational technology tools into the language classroom using interactive websites, blogs, wikis, audio/video, mobile apps, cloud, and software applications with a focus on good pedagogy. Analyze current research and best practices in the field, view sample practical applications of educational technology, share your ideas and reflections with colleagues, and create lesson plans and projects integrating technologies into your own classroom curriculum. Target audience: ESL/EFL educators, higher ed, K–12, adult. 2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 22. Online dates: June 4–July 13. Cost: $510. Instructors: Karin Goettsch works in organizational training and development. She has taught in various adult ESL and teacher training programs for more than 10 years, including providing educational technology training and instruction. Nima Salehi has taught ESL abroad and in the U.S. for more than 15 years in high school, university, and adult education settings. She has provided technology enhanced learning training to educators since 1997 and now works as an instructional designer of online courses.

Advocating for English Language Learners ESL 6612–58519 A Online ESL 6612–58529 B

Are you advocating for students, programs, and professional status? Learn to enlist support from administrators, parents, community, lawmakers, and the media. Through a series of readings, guest speakers, discussions, and assignments, learn how to speak and write about issues with authority, how to identify and organize potential supporters, and how to take practical steps toward changing policies and attitudes that affect ELLs, programs, and teachers. Target audience: teachers of ESL/bilingual K–adult; others who advocate for ESL/bilingual students in a school setting. 2 semester credits. Two sections. Section A: Enrollment limit: 24. Online dates: June 4–July 15. Cost: $510. Section B: Enrollment limit: 24. Five sessions: Tuesdays, Thursdays, 4:30–8:30 p.m. July 26, 31, August 2, 7, 9. Cost: $510. Instructors: Section A: Amy Hewett–Olatunde has worked in the field of ESL for more than 13 years in secondary, undergraduate, and graduate capacities. She has taught ESL at LEAP High School for more

than a decade, post–secondary English for international and recent refugee populations, and is an instructor and student teacher supervisor for several graduate teacher–preparation programs. Section B: As an instructor specializing in teacher–preparation, Michelle Benegas has experience teaching ESL and Spanish at the secondary and college levels in addition to her work in teacher preparation. She is currently studying curriculum and instruction –second languages and cultures education at the doctoral level.

TEFL Certificate Course ESL 6620–58548

TEFL

Experience another culture while living and working overseas after earning a Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL) certificate. Gain hands-on experience, spending more than 40 hours teaching, observing, and giving feedback in a classroom with English language learners. Our nationally recognized program was established in 1991 and more than 1,200 Hamline graduates have taught in more than 40 countries worldwide. Join them! Note: Application is required for participation in this program. Please visit www. hamline.edu/tefl for course details and an online application. 8 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 18. Twenty-two sessions: Monday–Friday, 9:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m. July 5–31, August 1, 2, 3. Cost: $3,350. Instructors: Julia Reimer, associate professor, teaches in the TEFL, ESL adult certificate, and MAESL programs at Hamline. She has taught ESL and EFL in Minnesota and Spain for over 15 years. Suzanne McCurdy has taught in the TEFL program since 2002. She has taught ESL in Minnesota and EFL in Japan, and currently works as an ESL instructional support consultant in Saint Paul.

Introduction to the Adult English Language Learner: Developing Reading and Writing Skills ESL 6631–58539

AESL

How do adult learners acquire a second language? What is involved in the development of literacy skills? Explore the basic concepts of second language acquisition and the development of literacy skills. Discuss how languages are learned and the implications for classroom instruction. Explore the impact of previous education and key factors affecting how adult refugee and immigrant students learn. Target audience: ESL teachers of adult learners. If you are new to the field of adult ESL and are planning to follow the entire sequence of courses, you must start with ESL 6631 or 6634. (For those who have taken other courses in the adult ESL sequence, this course is a combination of ESL 6030 and 6032. Please direct questions to Betsy Parrish at 651–523–2853.)


Instructor: Patsy Vinogradov teaches adult ESL and is an adjunct faculty member in Hamline’s TEFL and adult certificate programs. She has taught ESL and EFL in a variety of settings since 1994.

Assessment of the Adult AESL English Language Learner ESL 6638–58540 Online

Focus on the basic principles of testing and evaluation and how assessment is related to curriculum. Learn how to conduct valid and reliable assessment of ESL learners. Develop authentic assessment tools for academic and workplace settings. Discuss entrance and exit criteria for ESL programs and how to assess student progress. Explore the politics of testing and assessment. For online section: online login and course information at www.hamline.edu/gseonline. Target audience: ESL teachers of adult learners. 2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 24. Online dates: June 8–July 12. Cost: $510. Instructor: Todd Wagner is the assessment and evaluation specialist for adult basic education at the Minnesota Department of Children, Families, and Learning.

Language and Society MESL ESL 7502–58420 A Online ESL 7502–58409 B

Focus on the varieties of language and how they reflect social patterns. Explore the importance of language in all our interactions. Examine the social nature of language, and how language reflects social situations. Study the issues of language and social class, ethnic group, and gender, as well as topics in language and nationality, language and geography, and the social nature of writing. Learn to pay particular attention to the social–linguistic situations of second language learners, as well as the sociolinguistics of language in the classroom. Includes an overview of English grammar designed for teachers of ESL grades K–12. Target audience: language arts, modern language, administrators, and ESL teachers, K–adult. Oonline section: Please register one week prior to course start date to ensure receipt of any information that may be sent. Online login and course information at www.hamline.edu/education/online. 4 semester credits. Three sections. Section A: Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: June 4–August 25. Cost: $1440. Section B: Enrollment limit: 24. Nine sessions: Mondays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, 4–9 p.m. June 4–21. East Hall 4. Cost: $1440. Instructors: Section A: Elizabeth Will has taught high school French, social studies, and elementary ESL in Sitka, Alaska. She has

experience in a school district with a strong Native American population where there are ongoing efforts to integrate culture and revitalize language. Section B: Mary Diaz has worked extensively in ESL, bilingual education, and linguistic/ cultural diversity. A longtime advocate for English language learners, she has provided technical assistance and professional development for educators at conferences and on–site in schools across the region.

Linguistics for Language Teachers ESL 7519–58423 A Online ESL 7519–58425 B Blended

This is a broad, applied introduction to the study of language including morphology (word forms), syntax (sentence structure), semantics (meaning), and phonetics/ phonology (pronunciation), as well as the social and cognitive dimensions of language. Study the application of linguistic skills to language instruction and the use of technology in teaching, in addition to an introduction to graduate-level research and Internet skills in a two-hour in-class library orientation. Target audience: ESL and bilingual/bicultural teachers K–Adult. Online section: Please register one week prior to course start date to ensure receipt of any information that may be sent. Online login and course information at www.hamline.edu/education/online. 4 semester credits. Two sections. Section A: Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: June 4– August 25. Cost: $1440. Section B: Enrollment limit: 24. Online dates: June 4, 2012 – July 4, 2012. Fifteen sessions: Tuesdays, Thursdays, 5–9 p.m. July 5– 31, August 2–23. Giddens/Alumni Learning Center 106W. Cost: $1440. Instructors: Section A: Jacki Trademan has been a teacher educator and ESL teacher for nearly 20 years, mainly in the Chicago area. She lives in Evanston, Illinois, and has been an adjunct faculty member at Hamline since 2006. Section B: Andreas Schramm has taught linguistics, ESL, and composition courses. His teaching is strongly influenced by his experiences as a bilingual and an English language learner.

History of English ESL 7610–58410 A ESL 7610–58419 B Online

Have you wondered why the English language has such a bizarre spelling system, so many exceptions to its grammar rules, and the largest vocabulary of any modern world language? Discover the answers by studying the development and forms of the English language from Anglo–Saxon beginnings to present–day standard English and varieties of English. Understand the sociocultural and linguistic forces that cause language to undergo constant change.

Target audience: language arts and ESL teachers, K–Adult. Online section: Please register one week prior to course start date to ensure receipt of any information that may be sent. Online login and course information at www.hamline.edu/education/online. 1 semester credit. Two sections. Section A: Enrollment limit: 24. Four sessions: Monday, Wednesdays, Friday, 5:00–9:00pm. June 6, 8, 11, 13. Giddens/Alumni Learning Center 203E. Cost: $360. Section B: Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: July 16–August 5. Cost: $360. Instructors: Section A: Kathryn Heinze, associate professor at Hamline, teaches in the ESL licensure and MAESL programs. She has over 30 years of experience in ESL as a teacher, curriculum developer, and teacher educator. Section B: Andreas Schramm. See biographical sketch under ESL 7519.

Basics of Modern English ESL 7650–58514 A Online ESL 7650–58424 B

An overview of English grammar designed for teachers of ESL grades K–Adult. Develop an understanding of the basics of English grammar both descriptively and pedagogically, particularly in areas that cause difficulties for learners of English as a second language. Improve your skills at error analysis and your ability to effectively incorporate grammar instruction into your classroom in a way that is meaningful and interesting to your learners. Note: Should be taken after or concurrently with a linguistics course. Online section: Please register one week prior to course start date to ensure receipt of any information that may be sent. Online login and course information at www.hamline.edu/education/online. Target audience: teachers K–Adult. 4 semester credits. Two sections. Section A: Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: June 4– August 25. Cost: $1,440. Section B: Enrollment limit: 24. Thirteen sessions: Mondays, Wednesdays, 5–9 p.m. June 4–27, July 2–16. Giddens/Alumni Learning Center 246W. Cost: $1,440. Instructor: Sections A and B: Feride Erku is a linguist who has taught at Hamline and the University of Minnesota. Syntax, technical communications, the impact of culture

Adult Basic Education (ABE) Certificate

NEW

at Ham

ESL 6631 is a required course for both the new ABE Certificate and the nationally recognized Adult ESL Certificate. Start earning your certificate by taking ESL 6631 this summer!

line

9 English as a Second Language |

2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 20. Eight sessions: Mondays, Wednesdays, 5:30 p.m.–8:30 p.m. June 4–27. Cost: $510.


and ethnicity on language, and second language acquisition are among her areas of interest.

Second Language Acquisition ESL 7660–58421 A Online ESL 7660–58422 B

How do students learn a second language? Examine the factors that affect how languages are learned––age, environment, academic background, motivation, and developmental processes. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the language learning process and being able to communicate this process to administrators, teachers, and parents. Current research issues will also be addressed, with opportunities for teachers to apply theory to practice. Note: Should be taken after or concurrently with a linguistics course. Target audience: ESL and bilingual/bicultural education teachers K–Adult. For online section: Please register one week prior to course start date to ensure receipt of any information that may be sent. Online login and course information at www.hamline.edu/education/online.

English as a second language | Gifted |

10

3 semester credits. Two sections. Section A: Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: June 4– August 5. Cost: $1,080. Section B: Enrollment limit: 24. Nine sessions: Thursdays, 5–9 p.m. June 7, 14, 21, 28, July 5, 12, 19, 26, August 2. Giddens/Alumni Learning Center 245W. Cost: $1,080. Instructors: Section A: Anne DeMuth has taught in the ESL licensure program at Hamline since its inception. She also teaches high school history in Fairbanks, Alaska, and has taught English in all its forms to students of all ages in the U.S. and overseas. Section B: Bonnie Swierzbin has taught ESL at the Minnesota English Center, the Minnesota Agricultural Students Trainee program, and the Humphrey Institute Fellows program at the University of Minnesota. Her research interests include second language acquisition of referring forms and grammar– content integration in instruction.

Testing and Evaluation of MESL English Language Learners ESL 7753–58417 Online

Examine the complex issues of assessment, testing, and evaluation of ELLs in both ESL and mainstream classrooms. Develop an understanding of the policies, procedures, and instruments used in assessing English language proficiency and the academic competency of ELLs. Learn how to use appropriate assessment to improve student performance and how to advocate for students in testing situations. Target audience: teachers K–12. Online section: Please register one week prior to course start date to ensure receipt of any information that may be sent. Online

login and course information at www.hamline.edu/education/online. 2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: June 4–July 15. Cost: $720. Instructor: Leigh Schleicher is an ELL education specialist in the Office of Federal Programs at the Minnesota Department of Education. She has worked as a teacher and teacher trainer in language education from Vladivostok to Saint Paul.

Development of Literacy Skills ESL 7755–58416 A Online ESL 7755–58418 B

MESL

Literacy development is crucial for the academic success of ELLs. Expand your understanding of emergent literacy and gain a working knowledge of literacy development for second language learners. Explore best practices for vocabulary development, comprehension strategy instruction, and questioning. Learn how to develop standards-based lessons for all stages of reading. Target audience: teachers K–12. Online section: Please register one week prior to course start date to ensure receipt of any information that may be sent. Online login and course information at www.hamline.edu/education/online. 3 semester credits. Two sections. Section A: Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: June 4– August 5. Cost: $1,080. Section B: Enrollment limit: 24. Twelve sessions: Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8 a.m.–12 p.m.. June 26, 28, July 3–31, August 2. Giddens/Alumni Learning Center 106W. Cost: $1,080. Instructors: Section A: Nicole Dardis has worked as a primary teacher for over 13 years and has served as reading coordinator at a charter school that services immigrant and refugee students with a population of 98% ELLs. She is an education specialist with the Minnesota Department of Education. Section B: Lisa Robb has nearly 20 years of teaching experience with ESL students. She has worked in both primary and secondary settings, with both mainstream and ESL students. She did her undergraduate work at the University of Illinois, and received both a master’s degree and ESL licensure at Hamline.

ESL Methods ESL 7776–58428 Blended

Explore the intersection of theory and practice. Examine the historical and contemporary methods in ESL instruction. Review the role of linguistics and second language acquisition in teaching language. Develop standards-based lessons that focus on teaching all modalities of language through the content. Practice aligning standards, objectives, assessment, and activities for a variety of language proficiencies to ensure purposeful instruction. Engage in reflective practice with video

and tuning protocols. Methods should be taken at the end of the licensure course sequence. Target audience: ESL licensure candidates. Online section: Please register one week prior to course start date to ensure receipt of any information that may be sent. Online login and course information at www.hamline.edu/education/online. 4 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 24. Online dates: June 4–25. Sixteen sessions: Tuesdays, Thursdays, 5–9 p.m.June 26, 28, July 3–31, August 2–16. Robbins Science Center 12. Cost: $1,440. Instructors: Lisa Robb. See under ESL 7755.

Gifted Education Using Clustering to Meet the Needs of Gifted Students GTED 6011–58505

GFT

This workshop will focus on using clustering to meet the needs of gifted students. We will cover a wide variety of topics related to clustering, including the nature and needs of gifted children, research on the need for cluster grouping and differentiated instruction, practical application of such strategies as preassessment, flexible grouping, compacting, tiering, questioning, and choice menus, as well as numerous examples and samples of these strategies at all grade levels and in a variety of subject areas. Students will have opportunities to apply their learning by designing differentiated lessons that can be used with students in their classrooms. Target Audience: educators K–12. 1 semester credit. Enrollment limit: 20. Three sessions: Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 8:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. July 16, 18, 20. Klas Center 208. Cost: $360. Instructors: Jo Tate is gifted services coordinator in Stillwater Schools. Kathryn Marget has worked in gifted education for nearly 20 years as a teacher, resource specialist, and district program coordinator. She currently works as a gifted middle school resource teacher and district coordinator for North Saint Paul/Maplewood/Oakdale schools.

Challenging Talented Readers GTED 6030–58533

GFT

This course equips teachers with current research from the education field regarding the learning and instruction needs of advanced readers from both neuroscience and educational perspectives. Teachers will develop a toolkit of instructional strategies and learning environment considerations and initial identification of appropriate assessment language and processes. 1 semester credit. Enrollment limit: 24. Three sessions: Monday, Wednesday, Friday,


Instructor: Tina Van Erp

Who are the Gifted? GTED 7601–58255

GFT

Explore the rationale for serving gifted learners. Consider affective, cognitive, and other characteristics of advanced learners. Learn the importance of identifying their strengths and needs. Address the characteristics of gifted learners from diverse populations, including students of color, English language learners, early childhood, learning disabled, and underachievers. Note: Can be used as a required course toward the certificate in gifted education. The same required text is used in all gifted certificate courses. Target audience: educators, gifted coordinators, administrators K–12. 2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 20. Four sessions: Monday, Tuesdays, Thursday, 8:30 a.m.–4 p.m. June 25, 26, July 10, 12. Hamline University Minneapolis 36. Cost: $720. Instructor: Bill Keilty. See under EDUC 614558245.

Affective Needs of Gifted GFT Students: Counseling Issues and Strategies GTED 7606–58256

Giftedness has emotional and social implications, beyond the obvious intellectual and academic ones. Gifted students often experience a ”lack of fit” in school and social environments, resulting in common issues: super-sensitivity, social exclusion, stress, perfectionism, even underachievement. Timely proactive service may avoid such difficulties. Examine asynchronous development, intensity, and introversion in the gifted, and leave with tools to identify concerns and to assess the impact of classroom climate on gifted learners. Gain ideas for curricular modifications to address affective concerns. This is one of the core classes for the certificate in gifted education. Course credits also qualify toward a MA in education.

Models and Strategies in GFT Gifted Education GTED 7607–58257 Blended

Is the curriculum we offer gifted learners rigorous enough? Participate in an overview of strategies and models for differentiating, tiering, compacting the curriculum, and adding depth and complexity for the gifted learner. Explore instructional models to develop challenging, interdisciplinary learning. Current research on grouping is included. This is one of the core classes for the certificate in gifted education. Online login and course information at www. hamline.edu/education/online. Target audience: educators, gifted coordinators, administrators K–12. 2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: June 27–July 25. One session: Wednesday, 8:30 a.m.–4 p.m. June 27. Hamline University Minneapolis 49. Cost: $720. Instructor: Sue Feigal–Hitch has coordinated programs for gifted students for 30 years and is currently the coordinator of the Hamline’s gifted certificate program. She has presented workshops and consulted with districts around the state and presented at regional and state conferences.

Language Arts A Learning Community to Discover the Best Novels for Grades 3–8 LANG 6041–58512

Target audience: educators, counselors, gifted coordinators, administrators K–12.

This learning community, designed for elementary and middle school teachers and media specialists, will explore the best chapter books for students in grades 3–8. Participants will work toward determining which books would best suit their own unique student groups. Books discussed will be predominantly those that have won The American Library Association’s Newbery and Printz Medals. Participants will begin an annotated journal appropriate to their unique student audience and compile book lists in a format of their choice: digital or paper. Specifically we will investigate GoogleDocs and LibraryThing as tools. Together we will explore recommended online book review websites to help compile appropriate reading lists.

2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 20. Four sessions: Monday–Wednesday, 8:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m. July 17–25. Hamline University Minneapolis 30. Cost: $720.

1 semester credit. Enrollment limit: 20. Four sessions: Mondays, Tuesdays, 9 a.m.–12 p.m. August 6, 7, 13, 14. Drew Science Center 307. Cost: $255.

Instructor: Judy Semler, now retired, coordinated gifted programming, most recently for Hopkins Schools. A former school staff member with the Rimm Summer Underachievement Institutes, she also worked with Family Achievement Clinic staff. She consults with school districts and families with underachieving students.

Instructor: Marla Hall

Teaching Writing Using LIT the Six Traits LANG 6062–58258 A LANG 6062–58259 B Online

Use the Six Traits model for teaching and assessing writing. K–college teachers across Minnesota and the nation are using the Six Traits model of writing to guide writing

instruction and assessment. Learn how to use this model with your students. Develop a working knowledge of the traits of ideas, organization, voice, word choice, sentence fluency, and conventions. Through handson learning activities, practice assessing for the traits and gain ideas for implementation in your classroom. Note: Can be used toward the literacy certificate for the teaching of reading and writing and/or the certificate in writing. Target audience: educators K–8. 1 semester credit. Two sections. Section A: Enrollment limit: 20. Three sessions: Monday–Wednesday, 9 a.m.–1 p.m. August 6, 7, 8. Giddens/Alumni Learning Center 224W. Cost: $255. Section B: Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: June 4–24. Cost: $255. Instructors: Section A: Laura Halldin is the gifted education coordinator for the Buffalo Schools and teaches in the Hamline MAEd program. She has taught grades 3-6, was a K–12 staff development coordinator, and a K–12 curriculum support specialist. Section B: Jennifer Carlson, assistant professor at Hamline, teaches K–12 reading license courses in the teacher education department and language arts courses in the continuing studies department. Her interest in children’s literature and reading has led her to present locally, nationally, and internationally, and she has just published her first book on multimedia text sets.

Phonetic Awareness and Phonics: K–3 LANG 6076–58260

Strengthen your skills teaching primary readers. Study empirical research from the National Reading Panel and best practices in teaching K–2 reading to gain deeper knowledge of the instructional strategies needed to teach phonemic awareness and phonics more effectively. Examine researchbased assessment tools including benchmarks, screening, progress monitoring, and diagnostics including informal reading inventories. Learn about the critical aspects of curriculum-based assessments such as running records, to determine the phonemic awareness, readiness, and phonetic skills of beginning readers. Target audience: educators K–2. 1 semester credit. Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: July 16–August 3. One session: Monday, 1–4 p.m. July 16. Bush Memorial Library 305. Cost: $255. Instructor: Cooksey Smith is currently a reading consultant, having worked as a reading specialist and classroom teacher in Minnesota, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin for 23 years. She has been an instructor in reading methods at the University of Minnesota and Hamline and has provided in–service training to teachers in school districts across the country.

11 Gifted | Language aRts |

9 a.m.–1 p.m. July 30, August 1, 3. Giddens/ Alumni Learning Center 245W. Cost: $360.


Target audience: educators, media specialists, art instructors, special educators K–12.

Phonemic Awareness and LIT Phonics in a Comprehensive Literacy Program LANG 6079–58261

What are phonemic awareness and phonics and how do they relate? How do both fit into a comprehensive literacy program and what are effective and efficient ways to teach them? Explore the definitions, elements, teaching methods, and assessments of phonemic awareness and phonics. Target audience: educators P–6. 1 semester credit. Enrollment limit: 20. Three sessions: Mondays, Thursday, 8:30 a.m.–12 p.m. June 25, 28, July 2. Giddens/ Alumni Learning Center 104E. Cost: $255. Instructor: Jeanne Eisenbarth has a variety of experience in education. She has been a classroom teacher, reading teacher, coordinator of gifted and talented education, instructional specialist, teacher trainer, elementary principal, and an independent literacy consultant.

Using Young Adult Literature with Secondary Students LANG 6101–58262

Language arts |

12

LIT

Motivate your high school students to read. Spend two days exploring young adult novels that students are successfully reading (and discussing, critically reviewing, and analyzing). Learn ideas for incorporating novels into your curriculum or simply discover new titles to suggest to your students. Empower and inspire your students by exploring innovative classroom ideas for including young adult fiction, nonfiction, poetry, short stories, graphic novels, audio books, reading aloud, multi– genre texts, and writing. Can be used toward the children’s literature certificate and/or the literacy certificate for the teaching of reading and writing. Target audience: educators, media specialists, special educators, administrators, 7–12. 2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 20. Four sessions: Fridays, 5–9 p.m.Saturdays, 8:30 a.m.–4 p.m. June 8, 9, 15, 16. Bush Memorial Library 302. Cost: $510. Instructor: Kim Powers.

Making Books with Children LANG 7135–58263

BA

Bookmaking is a logical component of holistic, integrated learning and an effective motivator. During hands-on sessions, use many different binding forms that are adaptable for all grades and applicable to all curriculum areas. Extended classroom uses for binding techniques are also demonstrated. Please bring a paper scissors; other materials are provided. Note: Can be used toward the certificate in book arts.

2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 16. Four sessions: Monday–Thursday, 8:30 a.m.–4 p.m. June 18, 19, 20, 21. Giddens/ Alumni Learning Center 218W. Cost: $510. Instructor: Lisa Compton, artist and educator, has experience at all educational levels in the arts and humanities. Her sculptural journals and 2–D journal pages combine art with the literary process and have been displayed at MCBA and Perpich Center for the Arts, as well as published in Bound and Lettered. Active in national book arts groups and research, she was part of the Shereen LaPlantz ‘Dream Team’ of book artists.

Papermaking and Paper Decoration

BA

LANG 7137–58264

Enrich children’s literacy development with hands-on experiences. Children can extend their knowledge about paper, books, recycling, and art by making their own paper and exploring multiple methods of paper decoration. Experiment with different papermaking techniques. Work with various methods of decorating paper. Models from children’s literature provide ideas for literacy expansions and for children producing their own books and greetings. Note: Can be used toward the certificate in book arts. Target audience: educators, librarians, art instructors, special educators K–12. 2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 16. Four sessions: Monday–Thursday, 8:30 a.m.–4 p.m. July 16, 17, 18, 19. Giddens/ Alumni Learning Center 218W. Cost: $510. Instructors: Katrina McCarthy taught first grade for 10 years in Saint Paul Public Schools and has been a regular presenter at Hamline’s Summer Literacy Institute. A teacher and workshop facilitator, she is active in a national book arts group, has studied with noted book artists including Shareen LaPlantz, and has been published in Bound and Lettered. Kim Powers.

Making Books Mirror Cultures I LANG 7138–5826

BA

What forms of “book” have existed in other cultures, in other times? Throughout history, people from different cultures have kept records and preserved ideas in different ways. Although it is not possible to duplicate exactly the forms of “book” that have existed in the past, we can respectfully and creatively use them as models for recording our own ideas. Through hands-on activities, learn book making techniques that mirror cultures from around the world. Target audience: educators, media specialists, art instructors, special educators, K–12.

2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 16. Four sessions: Monday–Thursday, 8:30 a.m.–4 p.m. June 25, 26, 27, 28. Giddens/ Alumni Learning Center 218W. Cost: $510. Instructor: Lisa Compton. See under LANG 7135-58263.

Banned and Challenged Books: From Aristotle to the Wizards of Hogwarts LANG 7194–58266 [CHLT]

What makes a banned book controversial? From the times of Aristotle to the publishing arrival of Harry Potter, books have been questioned, challenged, censored, burned, and banned. Personal and group criteria have been used to “rid” society of controversial views of objectionable content, such as pornography, new age religion, heresies, inappropriate language, alternative lifestyles. Examine challenged and banned books, court cases, censorship issues, and reconsideration forms. Become more knowledgeable and aware of the history of challenged and banned books––a book promoter, not book banner. Prerequisite: Read The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn prior to course start date. Target audience: educators, media specialists, book enthusiasts. 1 semester credit. Enrollment limit: 20. Four sessions: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, 8:30 a.m.–12 p.m.. July 16, 17, 19, 20. Giddens/Alumni Learning Center 104E. Cost: $255. Instructor: Joan Arndt is a retired elementary media specialist who has a special interest in promoting books to teachers and students alike. She has taught at Hamline for 30 years.

The Cream of the Crop: CHLT Award–Winning Titles for Children and Young Adults LANG 7198–58549

Major literary prizes have been awarded for both children and young adult book titles since the inception of the Newbery Medal in 1922. Become acquainted with the history of literary awards, their sponsors, their criteria, and the retrospective and current winners. Target audience: educators K–12. 1 semester credit. Enrollment limit: 20. Four sessions: Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, 9a.m.–12 p.m. June 26, 27, 28, 29. Cost: $255. Instructor: Joan Arndt is a retired elementary media specialist who has an interest in promoting books to teachers and students alike. She has taught at Hamline for 30 years.

Conferring with K–8 Writers LANG 7504–58267 Online

Examine purposeful and predictable structures of writing conferences. Discuss the roles of teacher and student in the writing conference. Learn ways to respond


Note: Can be used toward certificate in Writing. Please register one week prior to course start date to ensure receipt of information that may be sent. Online loging and course information at www.hamline.edu/gseonline. Target audience: educators K–8. 1 semester credit. Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: June 25–July 15. Cost: $255. Instructor: Donna Hauger, former literacy trainer for the Rosemount–Apple Valley– Eagan Schools, has more than 30 years of elementary teaching experience. She has also worked as a Reading Recovery teacher and literacy consultant.

poetry: a writer’s soul mate LANG 7508–58268

Tap into your students’ poetic souls. Spend time listening to poetic language, interacting with its evocative power, composing original poems, and using poetic devices delivered through strategies adapted from Georgia Heard and Regie Routman. Integrate poetry in non–traditional ways to change it from a unit to a routine ingredient woven into your curriculum. Note: Can be used toward writing certificate. Target audience: educators K–8. 1 semester credit. Enrollment limit: 20. Four sessions: Tuesdays, Thursdays, 1p.m.–4p.m. August 7, 9, 14, 16. Giddens/Alumni Learning Center 204E. Cost: $255. Instructor: Patti Greene, K–12 reading coordinator for Prior Lake–Savage Schools, has been in education for 27 years. She has served as a literacy consultant for neighboring school districts and serves on the Summer Literacy Institute Committee at Hamline.

Teachers as Writers, Writers as Teachers LANG 7510–58269

In a comfortable setting, work on your own creative writing projects and explore your individual writing process. Through creative writing assignments, sharing, and reflecting with others, you will not only work on your own writing process, but will develop a better understanding of the writing process of your students. This is not a writing theory class as much as it is a writing process class in which you can explore who you are as both a writer and a teacher of writing. Note: Can be used toward the certificate in writing. Target audience: educators K–12. 1 semester credit. Enrollment limit: 20. Three sessions: Tuesdays, 8:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. July 17, 24, 31. Bush Memorial Library 305. Cost: $255. Instructor: Joan Wolf is a teacher and a writer. She has taught grades 2–8 in the

Mounds View Schools and various forms of writing to children and adults. The author of numerous teacher resource books, she is also the author of the young adult novel, Someone Named Eva.

Summer Literacy Institute 2012 LANG 7712–58537

LIT

The 2012 Summer Literacy Institute (K–6) will include nationally-renowned speakers Sharon Taberski, Greg Tang, Katie Wood Ray, and Lester Laminack. Break–out sessions and symposiums will be facilitated by area practitioners and notable children’s authors. 2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 300. Four sessions: Monday–Thursday, 8:30 a.m.– 3:15 p.m. July 16, 17, 18, 19. Sundin Music Hall. Cost: $550 on or before 5 p.m. Friday, June 1, or $600 after Friday, June 1. There is also an audit only section available. Instructors: Marcia Rockwood is an assistant professor in the Hamline’s teacher education department. She currently works with student teachers and new teacher induction, and teaches a variety of literacy courses at Hamline. Terri Christenson is an assistant professor in the Hamline School of Education. She coordinates the K–12 reading license program and the Summer Literacy Institute, and she teaches in the master of arts in literacy education program.

Learning to Read and Write LANG 7735–58271

LIT

Young children are increasingly expected to read and write fluently, making knowledge of emergent literacy vital. Gain practical ideas to help 5–8 year olds learn to read and write within a developmentally appropriate framework. Learn strategies currently used in urban settings and how they can be adapted to meet the needs of your students. Discuss ideas for shared reading, guided reading, and independent reading at both home and school. Explore writer’s workshop, interactive (shared) writing, and authentic ways to incorporate writing into everyday life. Look at various assessment (evaluation) techniques. Try strategies suggested in class, and share what worked with your own students. Note: Can be used toward the literacy certificate for the teaching of reading and Writing. Target audience: teachers P–2. 2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 20. Four sessions: Monday–Thursday, 8:30 a.m.–4 p.m. June 11, 12, 13, 14. Giddens/Alumni Learning Center 103E. Cost: $510. Instructor: Ann Griffin is a first-grade teacher in Saint Paul Schools. She has presented at the Hamline Summer Literacy Institutes and is an active advocate for best practices in teaching literacy.

Foundations of Reading, K–12 LANG 7901–58329 A LANG 7901–58330 B Online LANG 7901–58331 C Online

LIT

This course provides a theoretical, historical and evidence–based perspective on reading instruction. Students will explore a wide range of literacy research and investigate how these studies impact reading instruction in their own teaching lives. Course will include the examination, discussion, and application of the following foundational topics: emergent reading skills, word recognition, vocabulary, fluency, comprehension, writing to advanced reading development, and electronic and professional resources to support literacy. (Formerly known as LANG 7801: Foundations of Reading, K–12.) 3 semester credits. Three sections. Section A: Enrollment limit: 24. Nine sessions: Mondays, Wednesdays, 1 p.m.–5 p.m. June 25, 27, July 9, 11, 16, 18, 23, 25, 30. Klas Center 208. Cost: $1,080. Section B: Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: June 9–August 5. Cost: $1,080. Section C: Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: June 25–August 20. Cost: $1,080. Instructors: Section A: Debbie Bell has 30 years of teaching experience. She has taught university classes and is currently a reading instruction specialist for the Center of Professional Development in the Saint Paul Public Schools. Section B: Dawn Hansen is a reading teacher in the Hopkins Schools. She is a former officer in the Minnesota Reading Association and Twin Cities Area Reading Council. Section C: Teajai Anderson Schmidt is a reading instruction specialist at the Saint Paul Public Schools Center for Curriculum, Instruction, and Professional Development. As a K–12 literacy consultant, Teajai leads workshops for various school districts, reading organizations, and the National Center on Education and the Economy.

Developing Elementary LIT Readers, K–6 LANG 7902–58332 A LANG 7902–58333 B Online

This course is designed to prepare teachers of reading to promote and sustain reading competencies of elementary learners. Teachers of reading will investigate the reading process and the many strategies that are appropriate for classroom implementation. Teachers will also explore literature resources, with an emphasis on children’s literature, that support elementary students reading development. Upon completion, teachers will be able to select and incorporate instructional strategies into the curriculum and model reading strategies for students in their classrooms. Field Experience: 2 hours; Determine the strengths and needs of a young reader and develop a specific plan for instruction.

13 Language Arts |

effectively to student writing. Analyze conversations with students during writing workshop. Develop management systems to support conferring.


Prerequisite: LANG 7901. 2 semester credits. Two sections. Section A: Enrollment limit: 24. Six sessions: Tuesdays, Fridays, 1–5 p.m. July 17, 24, 27, 31, August 3, 10. Bush Memorial Library 306. Cost: $720. Section B: Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: June 9–July 15. Cost: $720. Instructors: Section A: Kevin McGee has been working for Eden Prairie Schools for the past 18 years. Currently he is the educational coordinator at Eagle Heights Spanish Immersion School. Section B: Donna Hauger, former literacy trainer for the Rosemount-Apple ValleyEagan Schools, has more than 30 years of elementary teaching experience. She has also worked as a Reading Recovery teacher and literacy consultant.

Advancing Secondary LIT Readers, 7–12 LANG 7903–58334 A LANG 7903–58335 B Online

Language Arts |

14

This course will investigate the reading process and strategies appropriate for use with secondary learners at the middle and high school levels. Students will learn about current methods, theories, and materials used in secondary literature instruction. Explore literature resources that emphasize fiction, nonfiction, and technical literature to support 7–12 development in reading. Prerequisite: LANG 7901. Field Experience: 3 hours; Become familiar with the attitudes, behaviors, and thinking of two adolescents and identify specific instructional recommendations to accommodate the maturation, development, literacy interests, gender, cultural, and linguistic differences of these two students. (Formerly known as LANG 7803: Secondary Literature and Strategies, 7–12.) 2 semester credits. Two sections. Section A: Enrollment limit: 24. Six sessions: Monday, Thursdays, 1–5 p.m. July 19, 26, August 2, 6, 9, 16. Bush Memorial Library 301. Cost: $720. Section B: Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: June 25–August 6. Cost: $720. Instructors: Section A: Stephanie Reid currently teaches eighth grade in River Falls, Wisconsin, but harkens from England where she earned her bachelor and master degrees in English literature from Cambridge University and a postgraduate teaching degree from Oxford University. She received a K–12 reading license and master of arts in Education from Hamline. Section B: Karen Moroz, an experienced secondary integrated language arts teacher and former literacy coach, is a faculty member at Hamline.

Reading Assessment and LIT Evaluation, K–12 LANG 7904–58337 A LANG 7904–58375 B Online

This course explores the selection, administration, scoring, and interpretation of a variety of individual and group reading assessment tools. Principles of assessment provide the foundation for field experiences with assessment. The purposes, strengths, and limitations of each assessment instrument will be examined. In this course, teachers will learn to use assessment information in planning and evaluating reading instruction, with a focus on differentiated classroom instruction; they will also learn to effectively communicate the results of assessments to a range of audiences. Field experience: 15 hours; Use a variety of reading assessment tools with students at both the elementary and secondary level. Prerequisites: LANG 7901; LANG 7902; LANG 7903. 3 semester credits. Two sections. Section A: Enrollment limit: 24. Nine sessions: Mondays, Wednesdays, 1–5 p.m. June 25, 27, July 9–30. Bush Memorial Library 306. Cost: $1080. Section B: Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: June 25–August 20. Cost: $1080. Instructors: Section A: Rachel Gens teaches 3rd grade in Bloomington. She has also taught second grade and Title I, and has served as a literacy coordinator. Section B: Julie Schneider is the early literacy interventionist for the Orono Public Schools. She has served as a classroom teacher, reading specialist, and literacy consultant for more than 10 years.

Advanced Practicum in LIT Reading Interventions LANG 7905–58338 A LANG 7905–58376 B Online

This course is designed for practitioners who will be responsible for developing and administering reading intervention programs for students experiencing difficulties in reading. The course will focus on four main aspects of reading intervention: 1) the nature and causes of reading difficulties; 2) the application of assessment instruments and results to develop assessment–based intervention; 3) research– based intervention models; 4) design, planning, and implementation of effective reading interventions for individuals and small groups. Field experience: 15 hours; develop and implement an assessment–based intervention plan designed to meet the instructional needs of a student or small group of students experiencing reading difficulties. Prerequisites: LANG 7901; LANG 7902; LANG 7903; LANG 7904.

3 semester credits. Two sections. Section A: Enrollment limit: 24. Nine sessions: Tuesdays, Thursdays, 1–5 p.m. June 26, 28, July 10–31. Drew Science Center 318. Cost: $1080. Section B: Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: June 9–August 5. Cost: $1080. Instructors: Section A: Jennifer McCarty Plucker, a reading teacher at Eastview High School in Apple Valley, has immersed herself in the study, research, and classrooms of striving readers. She is a strong advocate for striving readers and best practice in literacy instruction throughout the curriculum. Section B: Beth Pearson, a literacy specialist in the Orono Schools, has been a classroom teacher in the elementary grades and currently works with struggling readers. She is also involved in professional development and teacher training and collaboration.

Becoming Literacy Leaders LANG 7906–58340 LANG 7906–58372 Online

LIT

This course focuses on various leadership roles in literacy education—reading teacher, reading specialist, and literacy coach. The dimensions of each role will be explored and compared. Major topics studied will include: using district and school assessment data to determine student needs; creating a literacy vision for your school; assisting teachers in instructional organization, management, and strategies; selecting appropriate core and supplemental materials; and developing and implementing a year-long professional development plan (PDP). Prerequisites: LANG 7901; LANG 7902; LANG 7903. 2 semester credits. Two sections. Section A: Enrollment limit: 24. Six sessions: Mondays, 5–9 p.m. July 16, 23, 30, August 6, 13, 20. Room TBD. Cost: $720. Section B: Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: June 25–August 5. Cost: $720. Instructors: Section A: Jeanne Eisenbarth has a variety of experience in education. She has been a classroom teacher, reading teacher, coordinator of gifted and talented education, instructional specialist, teacher trainer, elementary principal, and an independent literacy consultant. Section B: Donna Hauger, former literacy trainer for the Rosemount-Apple ValleyEagan Schools, has more than 30 years of elementary teaching experience. She has also worked as a Reading Recovery teacher and literacy consultant.

Physical Education The Art and Science of College Athletic Recruiting PHED 6080–58427 Online

This course will expose all individuals who recruit to the art and science of the college athletic recruiting process. Even though there is no “one-way-fits-all” approach to college athletic recruiting, there are some


3 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 8. Online dates: June 4–August 5. Cost: $765. Instructor: Steve Brennan, founder and president of Peak Performance Consultants, brings a wealth of experience, excitement, and creativity to the field of motivation and education. The former college basketball coach and current adjunct professor at the University of Nebraska–Omaha and Hamline University has masters degrees in educational administration and sports psychology, and a doctorate in performance and health psychology. Steve also is the president and CEO of The Center for Performance Enhancement Research and Education™ (CPERE).

Science Education Field-based Research: Ecosystems SCED 6109–58534 Blended

Survey forest types and Investigate food webs and trophic levels in a prairie community. Collection, processing, interpretation and presentation of field data are the focu,s of this course. The interrelationship of all living things to each other and to the environment will provide the content as students make decisions about methods, develop hypotheses, vary experimental conditions, and conduct field studies. Teachers will take part in collecting data in Minnesota natural habitats, analyzing data,

and will gain experience in communicating results and working on individual fieldbased research questions. Target Audience: Educators K–12. 2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 24. Online dates: June 25–July 27. Three sessions: Monday–Wednesday, 8 a.m.–4:30 p.m. July 9, 10, 11. Off-campus location: Environmental Education Center at Robert Ney Park Reserve 5212 73rd St. NW, Maple Lake, MN 55358. Cost: $510. Instructor: David Grack has taught middle and high school biology and works as a summer naturalist/community education teacher with elementary students. His bird activity book was published in 2007.

Riches of the Rainforest SCED 6139–58515 Off campus

With Como Park Zoo and Conservatory’s Tropical Encounters exhibit as our backdrop, learn about the riches of the Rainforest during this interactive class. Explore exhibits and meet tropical animals up close, discover intricate connections between the plants, animals, and people of the Rainforest, and learn about sustainable practices. Leave this class with ideas and activities designed to teach your students about this vital ecosystem and how it can be sustained. Target audience: educators K–12.

1 semester credit. Enrollment limit: 15. Three sessions: Wednesday–Friday, 8:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. June 27, 28, 29. Off-campus location: Como Park and Conservatory, 1225 Estabrook Dr, Saint Paul. Cost: $255. Instructor: Stephanie Kappel, school and group programs coordinator at the Como Park Zoo and Conservatory, is a biologist with extensive experience working in middle and high schools.

Birds and Bugs SCED 6151–58508

Take birds and bugs into the classroom. Develop activities to help students learn the basics of ecology through experiential lessons on birds and bugs, tying ecological concepts like habitat, niche, biomes, and populations in relation to projects. Learn about lessons and projects in bird identification and how the birds are connected to their habitats and each other. Bug collections, models, and activities enhance learning about insect identification, metamorphosis, and niche classification. Teach a more meaningful ecology or biome unit by integrating the study of birds and bugs. Target audience: educators 2–12. 2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 25. Three sessions: Monday–Wednesday, 8 a.m.–4:30 p.m. July 16, 17, 18. Off-campus location: Environmental Education Center at Robert Ney Park Reserve, 5212 73rd St. NW, Maple Lake, MN 55358. Cost: $510. progra

ms

Professional Development for Minnesota Teachers of Science More information and applications for these events can be found online at: www.hamline.edu/teacher-institutes Biotechnology/Microbiology for Teachers in the Classroom (BioTIC) The BioTIC Institute brings middle and high school biology teachers up-to-speed on the rapid advancements in biotech research, careers, applications, and issues while providing inquiry modeling/ practice and curriculum enrichment that support standards related to cell structure, disease, genetics, and biotechnology. Four graduate credits, meals, stipend, and housing (for those outside the Metro area) provided. July 30–August 3 and August 6–10, 2012, at Hamline University, Saint Paul. WaterWorks!: A Drinking Water Institute for Educators Enrich your water curriculum, investigate drinking water quality and chemistry, learn about inquiry-based models for your classroom, and find resources within your community. This three-day, hands-on workshop allows grade 4–9 science teachers to come away with new teaching ideas and information from expert presenters about how safe,

reliable drinking water is delivered to your community as well as drinking water issues facing Minnesota. Meals and resource binder provided. Choose between two graduate credits or stipend—both will require your attendance at a followup Saturday in fall 2012 (date to be determined by the group). Housing is not provided. Join the list of 250 teachers that have participated in WaterWorks! over the last 11 years. August 6–8, 2012, St. Cloud Technical College, St. Cloud, MN. Chem4All and Physics4All Summer Institutes for Teachers Bringing science teachers together to review standards, concepts, strategies, and resources for teaching Chemistry and Physics to a new demographic of students. Hamline University presents Chem4All and Physics4All–summer 2012 professional development workshops for science teachers to actively gain new skills and knowledge for effectively teaching chemistry and physics to all students. Hamline University has received funding

FREE throug h Hamlin e

from the 3M Foundation to bring experienced and “newly-assigned” teachers together for a week of concept review, design of laboratory experiences, useful resources, effective teaching strategies, and curriculum planning— everything a “first-year” chemistry or physics teacher needs. No cost for teachers. Programs are funded by the 3M Foundation and include free room and board for non-metro teachers, free parking, lunch provided each day, an interactive visit with scientists at the 3M Innovation Center, resources, and 30 hours of CE credit. (Optional 2-credit course available, but not supported by the grant.) Two regional Saturday follow-up sessions during the 2012-13 school year will be available. Chem4All Summer Institutes (choose one): July 9–13, 2012 OR July 23–27, 2012 at Hamline University, Saint Paul. Physics4All Summer Institute: August 6–10, 2012, at Hamline University, Saint Paul.

15 physical | Science |

prerequisite skills and knowledge that all recruiters should possess.


Instructor: David Grack has taught middle and high school biology and works as a summer naturalist/community education teacher with elementary students. His bird activity book was published in 2007.

Plants, People, and Culture SCED 6161–58517 Off campus

Uncover the mysterious connection between plants, people, and culture. Essential to human survival, plants provide oxygen, transportation, food, shelter, medicine, myth, and ritual to people around the world. Using the vast and unique plant collection of the Marjorie McNeely Conservatory, journey through the gardens to discover some of the important roles plants play in the environment and human societies. Leave this class with ideas and resources to help you introduce students to the exciting fields of economic botany and ethnobotany. Target audience: educators K–12. 1 credit. Enrollment limit: 15. Three sessions: Tuesday–Thursday, 8:30a.m.–12:30 p.m. August 7, 8, 9. Off-campus location: Como Park

and Conservatory, 1225 Estabrook Dr, Saint Paul. Cost: $255. Instructor: Stephanie Kappel. See under SCED 6139.

Astronomy for Teachers SCED 7021–58288

A standards–based course for teachers excited to learn more about the universe, the solar system, and the astronomy they teach. Experience the basics of observational astronomy as you gain a multitude of strategies to excite students about the universe. Tour the night sky, explore seasonal constellation changes, the life cycle of stars, and the members of our solar system. Build an astrolab, plot the path of the sun, and use a toilet plunger to demonstrate the rotation of the Earth. With the use of “star hops” and STARLAB, learn how to navigate your way through the sky to identify stars and constellations. Discover activities that teach the planets, phases of the moon, the solar system, and constellations. Investigate recent discoveries pertaining to the Kuiper Belt, Ort Cloud, and Aurora Borealis. Teaching activities are geared

towards the middle school space science standard, but can be adapted to elementary or high school. Note: Possible equivalency for required coursework in 5–8 science licensure. Target audience: educators K–12. 2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 25. Four sessions: Monday–Thursday, 8:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m. June 25, 26, 27, 28. Giddens/Alumni Learning Center 245W. Cost: $510. Instructor: Jeff Ranta is an astronomy and biology teacher at Stillwater Area High School. he has taught astronomy to students of all ages for more than 20 years.

Polar Bears, Penguins, and Puffins SCED 7022–58516 Off Campus

Gain a broad introduction to the habitat, anatomy, cultural importance, and conservation initiatives of these polar animals. Spend some time observing the animals in their exhibits to learn more about husbandry in the zoo. Explore a variety of practical classroom activities designed to inspire your students to learn more about these furry and feathery friends.

Partnering with the American Museum of Natural History Science |

16

Summer 2012 Courses

For all AMNH courses: Semester credits: 3 Cost: $843 Target audience: educators 6–adult Registration deadline: 2 weeks prior to start date Two different sessions: A: May 28–July 8 B: July 2–August 12

Genetics, Genomics, Genethics

The Ocean System

SCED 6105–58274 A SCED 6105–58282 B Learn about the newest genome research and the ethical issues raised by genetic enhancements, modified foods, and cloning.

SCED 6115–58278 A SCED 6115–58283 B Why is the ocean so big, so salty? How does it work? Start with simple questions and get to the complexity that is the ocean.

Diversity of Fishes

Climate Change

The Link Between Dinosaurs and Birds SCED 6110–58275 A Did dinosaurs really become extinct 65 million years ago? Overwhelming evidence suggests that one branch of the dinosaur family tree managed to survive, and that we see living dinosaurs every day.

SCED 6088–58506 A SCED 6088–58507 B Take a closer look at how human activity continues to shape our global climate.

Space, Time, Motion SCED 6099–58272 A Fascinated observers have always grappled with questions concerning the physical origin, workings, and behavior of the universe.

Earth Systems:Inside/Out SCED 6100–58273 A SCED 6100–58281 B Feel like you’re standing on solid ground? In fact, the Earth and its atmosphere form a dynamic system in a state of constant flux.

Sharks and Rays SCED 6113–58276 A Sharks and rays: amazing creatures long misunderstood. Study fossils and living sharks and rays to find out how they’re related, how they navigate in the dark seas, and other extraordinary sensory and reproductive features shared by sharks and rays.

In the Field with Spiders SCED 6114–58277 B Do you know you’re never more than six feet away from a spider?

SCED 6117–58284 B Fishes make up half of all vertebrate species alive today, and live everywhere from mountain streams to ocean depths.

The Solar System SCED 6147–58279 A SCED 6147–58285 B Get to know our local neighborhood in space, the solar system.

Evolution SCED 6148–58280 A SCED 6148–58286 B Evolution is the fundamental concept that underlies all life sciences and continues to contribute to advances in medicine, public health, and conservation.

Water: Environmental Science SCED 6159–58287 B Central to all ecosystems, water is essential to life as we know it. Considering its location, condition, and use, water is a critical environmental issue.


1 semester credit. Enrollment limit: 15. Three sessions: Monday–Wednesday, 8:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. July 16, 17, 18. Off-campus location: Como Park and Conservatory, 1225 Estabrook Dr, Saint Paul. Cost: $255. Instructor: Stephanie Kappel. See under SCED 6139.

Birds of East Central Minnesota SCED 7602–58443 Off campus

Birding at its best at the Audubon Center of the North Woods. Birds and Habitat is a course held in conjunction with the Audubon Center’s annual birding festival. During the weekend students explore the varied habitats of Pine County with expert birders, listen to lectures by some of the most prominent researchers and authors in birding, and immerse in an exploration of avian diversity. Pine County is the convergence of the deciduous, coniferous, and prairie biomes and the varied natural communities lead to wonderful variations in breeding birds. Hear songs, see nesting territories, and learn to identify territory and habitat. Cost includes meals and lodging. Target audience: educators K–12. 1 semester credit. Enrollment limit: 20. Off-campus location: Audubon Center of the North Woods, Sandstone, MN 55072. Cost: $285. Instructor: Bryan Wood is the coexecutive director of the Audubon Center of the North Woods where he teaches post-secondary programs focused on field biology and ecology. Bryan has led field study expeditions to national, regional, and state parks, forests, rivers, and trails throughout the upper Midwest.

Special Education Traumatic Brain Injury 101 SPED 7071-58565 [TBI]

TBI

Gain a better understanding of brain injury—its impact on school-age children how this affects in classrooms. Study selected information in neuroanatomy, what happens when the brain is injured, measures used to label the severity of an injury, and the recovery process. Discuss how a brain injury affects the entire family and the importance of working collaboratively with medical and community agencies. Explore instructional strategies to employ in classroom settings. Become familiar with the Minnesota special education criteria for traumatic brain injury (TBI). Note: can be used toward the certificate in traumatic brain injury. Target audience: educators K–12; special educators, administrators, related service personnel.

2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: July 16–August 25. Cost: $720. Instructor: Jennie Polson is a physical health disabilities/traumatic brain injury consultant and assistive technology coordinator for Rochester Schools. She has 17 years experience working with learners with emotional behavioral disorders, learning disabilities, and various other medical conditions.

Traumatic Brain Injury: TBI Emotional/Behavioral Issues SPED 7072–58289 Online

Understand the neuroanatomy of an injured brain and how students may deal with resulting emotional and behavioral issues. Examine the current research for TBI cases in the areas of medication therapy, sexuality, chemical dependency, friendships, depression, and challenging behaviors. Review specifics for identifying, evaluating, and observing behaviors and discuss the use of specific strategies for changing those behaviors. Note: Can be used toward TBI Certificate. Target audience: educators, special educators K–12, school nurses, school psychologists. 1 semester credit. Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: July 18–July 31. Cost: $360. Instructor: To be announced.

Introduction to Childhood Sleep Disorders SPED 7075-58567 Online

OHD

TBI

This is an introductory course that will examine childhood sleep disorders. Students can expect to learn basic information about childhood insomnia, sleep apnea, restless leg syndrome, night terrors, and bedwetting. Students will learn about the causes and increased risk factors that contribute to sleep disorders in children. Basic interventions, treatment options, and strategies appropriate for children with sleep related disorders will also be discussed in this course. This course will also discuss the impact of childhood sleep disorders on parents and caregivers. 1 semester credit. Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: June 25–July 15. Cost: $360. Instructor: Jerrod Brown is the Treatment Director at Pathways Counseling Center in Saint Paul where he oversees programs in Adult Rehabilitative Mental Health Services, Problem Gambling Treatment, and Forensic Mental Health. He is also the Founder and CEO of the American Institute for the Advancement of Forensic Studies.

Biomedical Aspects of OHD TBI Physical and Developmental Disabilities SPED 7083–58290 Online

Become familiar with the medical aspects and terminology used when working with students with physical and health disabilities. Knowledge and skills covered include genetics and heredity, pediatric pharmacology, and secondary health care issues accompanying various syndromes, birth defects, and medical diagnoses. Collaboration among families, medical providers, and school personnel will be emphasized. Note: Required course for certificates in other health disabilities and traumatic brain injury. Online login and course information at www.hamline.edu/gseonline. Target audience: educators, special educators birth–21, school nurses, psychologists, therapists, and related service personnel. 2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: June 7–July 12. Cost: $720. Instructor: Judi Larson Azar, physical/health disabilities program facilitator for Minneapolis Schools, has 30 years experience in special education. She has presented at state and national conferences, developed and taught graduate course work, and worked with the Minnesota Department of Education to write both the OHD and TBI criteria and manuals.

Neurobiological Disorders SPED 7084–58291 Online

OHD

TBI

Gain an understanding of neurobiological disorders (NBD) and their effects on educational performance. Through the use of texts and web–based information, study the history of NBD, criteria and definitions, common diagnoses, service options, and the roles of team members through the evaluation and implementation process. Required text: Kids in the Syndrome Mix by Martin Kutscher and Alphabet Kids: From ADD to Zellweger Syndrome by Robbie Wolliver. Note: Can be used toward the certificates in other health disabilities and traumatic brain injury. Target audience: educators, special educators K–12, related service personnel. 2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: June 25–August 5. Cost: $720. Instructor: Jennie Polson. See under SPED 7071.

ADHD Learners OHD SPED 7085–58292 Online

Develop skills to understand the diagnosis of AD/HD, including recent brain research. Learn the impact that AD/HD has on a student’s social, academic, and psychological functioning and practical strategies to assist him/her in the classroom. Discuss:

17 Science | special |

Target audience: educators K–12.


differentiating AD/HD from other disorders, brain–based research, special education and 504 accommodations, social skills, organizational skills, and academic modifications. Note: Can be used toward the Certificate in other health disabilities. Target audience: educators, special educators K–12. 1 semester credit. Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: June 4–June 24. Cost: $360. Instructor: Jennie Polson. See under SPED 7084.

Introduction to Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder SPED 7090- 58566 Online

special |

18

This course introduces students to Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD). This course will explore the impact of FASD on society and the individual living with the disorder. Upon completion, students should be able to recognize the basic diagnostic and clinical features associated with FASD. Students will also examine the risk factors, warning signs, and the primary and secondary challenges associated with FASD. This course will also go into detail about the history, terminology, and statistics of FASD. Students will also learn about various resources available in Minnesota and the United States related to FASD and effective strategies and intervention appropriate for professionals. 1 semester credit. Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: August 6–August 25. Cost: $360. Instructor: Jerrod Brown. See under 7075.

Autism Spectrum Disorders: Introduction and Overview SPED 7091–58293 SPED 7091–58294 Online

ASD

The incidence of autism spectrum disorders has increased significantly, and schools are charged with creating appropriate programs. Examine autism and Asperger Syndrome, educational criteria, identification and assessment, personal perspectives, teaching strategies, and family issues. Discuss specific research related to autism and educational practices. Address the effects of autism on families, as well as how to include the family in educational planning. Note: Required first course toward the certificate in autism spectrum disorders, or can be taken as a stand-alone course. Target audience: educators, administrators, autism resource specialists, special educators P–12, and related services personnel. Online section: Please register one week prior to course start date to ensure receipt of any information that may be sent. Online login and course information at www.hamline.edu/gseonline.

2 semester credits. Two sections. Section A: Enrollment limit: 20. Four sessions: Monday, Tuesday, Thursdays, 8:30 a.m.–4 p.m. June 25, 28, July 3, 5. Giddens/Alumni Learning Center 101E. Cost: $720. Section B: Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: June 25–August 5. Cost: $720. Instructors: Section A: To be announced. Section B: Kim LaCasse is an autism teacher/consultant for the White Bear Lake Schools at the middle school level.

Autism Spectrum Disorders: ASD Proactive Behavior Management SPED 7092–58295

OHD

Too often students with autism are “treated” with behavior management strategies that expect the student to understand another person’s perspective. The emergence of scientific information regarding behavior and brain function should compel us to rethink many of our preconceived ideas about challenging behaviors and the strategies we choose to change them. Examine behavior management philosophy and practical strategies and skills for writing proactive behavior management plans for students on the autism spectrum. Collaborative problem solving will be covered in depth. The family perspective and participation in the proactive behavior management process will be woven throughout the course. Prerequisite: SPED 7091. Note: Can be used toward the certificate in autism spectrum disorders and/or the certificate in other health disabilities. Online login and course information at www.hamline.edu/gseonline. Target audience: educators, administrators, autism resource specialists, special educators P–12, and related services personnel. 1 semester credit. Enrollment limit: 20. Two sessions: Thursdays, 8:30 a.m.–4 p.m. July 19, August 2. Bush Memorial Library 305. Cost: $360. Instructor: Holly Schmidt has worked for the past 20 years with students with a wide variety of needs on the autism spectrum. She currently works as a resource teacher with fully-included K–12 students in the Rosemount-Apple Valley-Eagan Schools.

based on results obtained from testing an individual to which you have access. Prerequisite: SPED 7091. Note: Can be used toward the certificate in autism spectrum disorders. Online login and course information at www.hamline. edu/gseonline. Target audience: educators, administrators, autism resource specialists, special educators P–12, and related services personnel. 2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: June 25–August 5. Cost: $720. Instructor: Debra Peters works for the Northfield and Faribault School Districts as well as the Minnesota State Academies for the Deaf/Hard of Hearing and Blind/Visually Impaired. She has more than 25 years of experience in the area of autism, as both a speech/language pathologist and an autism resource specialist.

Autism Spectrum Disorders: ASD Communication, Assessment, and Intervention Strategies SPED 7095–58297 Online

Envision a framework for the delivery of communication assessment and intervention services in the educational setting. Gain an overview of communication characteristics and difficulties often associated with autism spectrum disorders. Review current tools and strategies used to assess speech, language, and interaction skills. Use assessment results to identify needs and develop intervention plans. Explore a variety of intervention strategies aimed at building receptive and expressive language and social communication skills of children functioning at a variety of levels along the continuum of ASD. Prerequisite: SPED 7091. Note: Must have access to a student for assessment purposes. Can be used toward the certificate in autism spectrum disorders. Online login and course information at www.hamline.edu/education/online. Target audience: educators, administrators, autism resource specialists, special educators P–12, and related services personnel. 1 semester credit. Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: August 6–August 25. Cost: $360. Instructor: Jill Kuzma

Autism Spectrum Disorders: ASD Identification, Assessment, and Planning SPED 7094–58296 Online

Autism Spectrum Disorders: ASD Adolescents and Young Adults SPED 7291–58298 Online

Become competent in the identification and assessment of individuals with autism spectrum disorders. Review Minnesota state criteria for the process of identification, assessment and educational planning for student,s with autism spectrum disorders. Effectively select, utilize, and report results using appropriate tools for evaluation of autism spectrum disorders. Write your own comprehensive evaluation report

Build independence and self-advocacy skills in young adults with ASD––use the gifts and compensate for the challenges. If higher functioning students with ASD have not been identified until adolescence, they may have missed out on early intervention and appropriate programming. Learn the characteristics, issues, and strategies involved in the education and support of adolescents and young adults across the spectrum of ASD. Explore educational


Pre–requisite: SPED 7091 ASD—Introduction and Overview. Target audience: educators, special educators P–12. Online section: Please register one week prior to course start date to ensure receipt of any information that may be sent. Online course and login information at www.hamline.edu/gseonline. 1 semester credit. Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: June 25–July 15. Cost: $360. Instructor: Janet Hanson, speech/language pathologist and autism resource specialist for Hastings Schools, is a member of the Minnesota State Autism Network and South Metro Sub-regional Network.

Autism Spectrum Disorders: ASD Early Identification and Intervention SPED 7292–58299 Online

Focus on the unique issues that arise when a young child is first identified with an autism spectrum disorder. Explore instruments to identify autism, varied therapies, current research, program options and strategies, and resources in early childhood. Emphasis is on the impact of autism on the family and utilizing approaches that meet individual family needs. Note: Can be used toward the certificate in autism spectrum disorders. Online login and course information at www.hamline.edu/ gseonline. Target audience: special educators P–12. 1 semester credit. Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: June 25–July 15. Cost: $360. Instructor: Anne Dudley, early childhood autism resource specialist, teaches preschoolers with autism spectrum disorders in North Saint Paul and is the district early childhood autism consultant. She has facilitated support groups for parents of children with ASD for many years, and is a member of the Minnesota State Autism Network.

Autism Spectrum Disorders: Asperger Syndrome SPED 7293–58300

ASD

Increase your understanding of Asperger Syndrome. Recognizing differences in learning and perception is essential to successfully teaching individuals with AS. Explore areas of assessment and planning for challenges unique to these students. Topics will include planning for social and behavioral successes and the impact of AS on the family. Note: Can be used toward the certificate in autism spectrum disorders.

Target audience: educators, administrators, autism resource specialists, special educators P–12, and related services personnel. Online section: Please register one week prior to course start date to ensure receipt of any materials that may be sent. Online login and course information at www.hamline.edu/ gseonline. 1 semester credit. Enrollment limit: 20. Two sessions: Mondays, 8:30 a.m.–4 p.m. July 16, 23. Giddens/Alumni Learning Center 224W. Cost: $360. Instructor: To be announced.

Autism Spectrum ASD TBI OHD Disorders: Effective Consulting Skills SPED 7294–58301

Facilitate a positive change and growth pattern in your role as consultant to other professionals. Examine critical elements of consulting in an educational environment. Specific examples of possible problems one may encounter will be addressed as well as ideas for troubleshooting. Note: This culminating course is for those currently in a consultative role or planning to become a consultant. Can be used toward the certificate in autism spectrum disorders.

psychology, she has worked with children and adolescents with special needs and their families in their homes and natural environments, helping incorporate behavioral strategies into daily routines.

Assistive Technology ASD SPED 7296–58303 Blended

TBI

OHD

Gain hands-on experience with assistive technology (AT) tools used by students with special needs. Explore the areas of computer access, augmentative communication, and curriculum adaptations. Learn a philosophy of intervention and how to consider students’ basic AT needs. Handson experience will be provided for the following hardware/software: Neo, Writer, Fusion, Boardmaker, Intellikeys, Classroom Suite (includes Intellipics Studio, IntelliTalk and Intellimathics), Intellikeys Overlay Maker, Tech Speak 32, Kidspiration, Kurzweil 3000, SOLO Literacy Suite (includes Co:Writer, Write:Outloud, DraftBuilder). Note: Can be used toward the ASD, OHD and TBI certificates.

Target audience: special educators P–12.

Target audience: Regular/special educators, occupational therapists, educational speech pathologists, and others working with special needs students.

1 semester credit. Enrollment limit: 20. Two sessions: Monday, Wednesday, 8:30 a.m.–4 p.m. June 25, 27. Klas Center 206. Cost: $360.

2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 9. Online dates: June 6–July 15. Two sessions: Wednesdays, 5–9 p.m. June 6, 13. East Hall 12. Cost: $720.

Instructor: Debra Peters. See bio under SPED 7094-58296

Instructor: Risë Nybakke, in her 25th year with Minneapolis Public Schools, is computer specialist for the district’s Assistive Technology Center, a special education teacher, and a RESNA certified assistive technology provider.

Autism Spectrum Disorders: Applied Behavior Analysis SPED 7295–58302 Online

ASD

Learn and implement the principles of Applied Behavior Analysis. The principles of ABA have been found to be successful in teaching children with autism, as well as useful in teaching skills to all students. Learn to break skills into smaller parts (allowing repeated practice), teach one sub–skill at a time, provide prompting and fading, and use reinforcement procedures. Discuss application of these strategies for instruction in both individual and classroom instruction. Online section: Please register one week prior to course start date to ensure receipt of information that may be sent. Online login and course information at www.hamline.edu/ gseonline. Can be used toward the certificate in autism spectrum disorders. Prerequisite: SPED 7091. Target audience: special educators P–12, and related services.

Legal Issues in ASD Special Education SPED 7297–58304

TBI

What legal issues might affect your work and how can possible legal problems be avoided? Gain a basic knowledge of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) 2004, the Regulations implementing that Act, MN special education laws, and the Rules implementing those laws as well as a brief overview of Section 504 and FERPA. Through discussions of case studies and complaint decisions, examine how these laws impact the teaching profession. Gain experience with common issues that are likely to arise in your work and become a stronger educator and advocate. Can be used toward the certificate in autism spectrum disorders and/or the certificate in other health disabilities.

1 semester credit. Enrollment limit: 20. Online dates: June 4–June 24. Cost: $360.

Target audience: educators, administrators, special educators P–12, and related services personnel.

Instructor: Kristin Baden has taught special education in the Anoka Hennepin Early Intervention Program for over 15 years. Trained in special education and counseling and

1 semester credit. Enrollment limit: 20. Four sessions: Tuesdays, 8:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. Tuesday, 1 p.m.–5 p.m.. July 17, 24, 31.

19 special |

strategies, programming options, resources, and supports to facilitate transitions to postsecondary settings: day programs, college, employment, and independent living. Can be used toward the ASD Certificate.


Giddens/Alumni Learning Center 223W. Cost: $360.

Urban Education

Instructor: Gary Lewis is director of student services for Northfield Public Schools. Gary has worked in the field of school counseling, school psychology and special education administration for over 35 years.

Introduction to Urban Education and Reflective Teaching URED 7720–58308 Online

Autism Spectrum Disorders: Sensory Strategies SPED 7298–58305

ASD

Focus on a key component in the ASD population: the sensory system. In this hands-on class, experience your own sensory systems. Gain insight about the basic physiologic functioning of the sensory system and how it operates in the ASD population. Explore a variety of sensory strategies. Note: Can be used toward the certificate in autism spectrum disorders. Target audience: special educators P–12, and related services.

Special | Urban |

20

URT

Review current, research–based urban education theories. Reflect on how to apply these theories in the classroom and incorporate them into everyday classroom strategies. This introductory course will assist the teacher in examining urban and cultural implications for teaching. Note: Required course for the certificate in urban education. Target audience: educators P–12. Attention: Teachers and educators with three or fewer years of experience may be eligibile for a scholarship tuition rate for URED courses. Contact Hamline University’s Center for Excellence in Urban Teaching for more information: urbanteaching@hamline. edu or 651-523-2416. Scholarships are not granted once the course has started.

1 semester credit. Enrollment limit: 12. Three sessions: Wednesday, 5–9 p.m. Tuesday, Thursday, 8:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. June 6, 12, 14. East Hall 7. Cost: $360.

2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 15. Online dates: June 6–July 11. Cost: $510.

Instructor: Wendi Buck

Managing the Urban Classroom URED 7723–58310 Online

Effective ASD TBI Paraprofessionals SPED 7299–58306

OHD

Focus on the training, supervising, and ongoing monitoring of instructional support personnel in both special education and inclusive classrooms. Teachers often manage several paraprofessionals in a variety of settings. It is important that they understand your beliefs and visions for the students and learn the essential components of communication and team building to foster positive support in a respectful, thriving classroom culture. Create an effective, ongoing training plan that respects individual perspectives, learning styles and needs, and a monitoring system that is efficient, practical, and respectful. Become familiar with qualitative and quantitative data collection to create systems for teaching and supporting paraprofessionals to prepare them to be active, competent, community members. Target audience: educators, administrators, autism resource specialists, special educators P–12, and related services personnel. 1 semester credit. Enrollment limit: 20. Two sessions: Wednesdays, 1–8 p.m. June 27, July 11. Giddens/Alumni Learning Center 204E. Cost: $360. Instructor: Janet Hanson, speech/language pathologist and autism resource specialist for Hastings Schools, is a member of the Minnesota State Autism Network and South Metro Sub-regional Network.

cultural knowledge and integrating higher order thinking skills, problem solving strategies, motivation, and multiple intelligences into planning for instruction. Note: Required course for the certificate in urban education. Target audience: educators P–12. Attention: Teachers and educators with three or fewer years of experience may be eligibile for a scholarship tuition rate for URED courses. Contact Hamline’s Center for Excellence in Urban Teaching for more information: urbanteaching@hamline.edu or 651–523–2416. 2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 15. Online dates: July 16–August 25. Cost: $510. Instructor: Stacie Stanley is an elementary school principal in Roseville Area Schools and has worked as a classroom teacher, math specialist, math coach, and curriculum and staff development specialist.

Interpersonal Dynamics: Racism URED 7731–58314

URT

Gain fresh ideas for responding to the daily challenges of maintaining an effective learning environment. Learn creative classroom management strategies, practical ideas for developing a community of learners, and effective techniques for increasing students’ participation in learning.

An intensive conversation on the dynamics of racism and how it personally affects adults and learners. The study circle dialogues are interactive and instructive through reflective engagement, readings, and videos. The quality and integrity of the dialogues depend upon commitments to honest, open, and respectful speech; to remain in conversation; and to mutual development and transformation. It requires physical, emotional, and intellectual presence. This course will enhance your knowledge base and equip you for social action.

Note: Required course for the certificate in urban teaching.

Note: Required course for the Certificate in urban education.

Target audience: educators P–12.

Target audience: educators P–12, community persons, nonprofit staff and others.

Instructor: Nikole Logan. URT

Attention: Teachers and educators with three or fewer years of experience may be eligibile for a scholarship tuition rate for URED courses. Contact Hamline’s Center for Excellence in Urban Teaching for more information: urbanteaching@hamline.edu or 651–523–2416. 2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 15. Online dates: June 25–August 3. Cost: $510. Instructor: Krista Ottino has worked in the Saint Paul Public Schools for 18 years as a of homeless shelter liaison, first grade teacher, third grade teacher, curriculum content coach, and behavior coach.

Culturally Relevant Pedagogy: Teaching for Democratic and Diverse Classrooms URED 7724–58312 Online

URT

Hear authentic voices and make cross–cultural connections with leaders of many cultures. Expand your multicultural knowledge and add to your repertoire of cross–cultural strategies to connect with students in classrooms of today. Explore and create organizers for including new

Attention: Teachers and educators with three or fewer years of experience may be eligibile for a scholarship tuition rate for URED courses. Contact Hamline University’s Center for Excellence in Urban Teaching for more information: urbanteaching@hamline. edu or 651–523–2416. 2 semester credits. Enrollment limit: 15. Seven sessions: Mondays, 4:30 p.m.–7:30 p.m. June 4, 11, 18, 25, July 9, 16, 23. Giddens/Alumni Learning Center 218W. Cost: $510. Instructor: Anthony Nocella focuses on critical urban education, peace and conflict studies, inclusive social justice education, ecopedagogy, transformative justice, critical criminology, youth culture, dis–ability studies/pedagogy, queer theory, feminist theory, critical race theory, critical pedagogy, anarchist studies, critical animal studies, and hip–hop studies.


Register online www.hamline.edu/registration Call Student Administrative Services at 651-523-3000 with registration questions. Phone registration not accepted.

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT FOR EDUCATORS REGISTRATION FORM This form is for professional development for educators courses only

Online sections: Please register one week prior to course start date to ensure receipt of any course information that may be sent. Online login and course information is at www.hamline.edu/education/online.

Return completed form: • by fax to 651-523-2585 • by mail to Hamline University, Graduate Registration, MS-A1750, 1536 Hewitt Ave., Saint Paul, MN 55101-1218 • in person to Student Administrative Services, 1st Floor, East Hall Hamline ID/Social Security Number Preferred email (required) Name

Address

Last First

Street City

Home phone

Cell phone

Date of birth

Gender:

Month/day/year

Are you a teacher?

Yes

Middle State

Zip

Work phone Female

Male

No District

If yes, Subject/Grade Level

School

How many years teaching

Enrollment Status: I am admitted to a Hamline program in (list)

I last took a course at Hamline in (year) If I enrolled under a different name, what name?

Educational background (list college/university attended, years of attendance, and degree earned):

Please register me in the following course(s): TERM: Fall

Winter/Spring

2013

Year:

2012

Subject and course code (e. g., LANG 7905)

Location and start date

Credits

Summer

5-digit CRN (e. g., 12737)

Course Cost $

Course title

Audit* (check if yes):

*Audit: Professional development students may register for an audit, but must still pay full tuition. Students who audit a course will not receive academic credit for the course. Students must note the audit at time of registration (see check box above). The decision to audit is irreversible. Students intending to audit must submit a registration form to Registration and Records (Law Grad 113) no later than the first day of the course.

Payment: Tuition is due and payable by the first class session. A $20 fee will be charged for all returned checks. Check for $_______________ is enclosed, payable to Hamline University Electronic online payment through Piperline. Please see www.hamline.edu/billing for more information. Electronic payment options: • ACH e-check payments for no fee—you will need your bank routing and account numbers. • Credit card payments via MasterCard, Discover, or American Express with a 2.75% convenience fee. (Please note that Visa is not accepted.)

Registration |

21

I have never taken a course at Hamline


Policies and procedures Registration and Course Information Who May Register School staff members (teachers, counselors, etc.) and other professionals. You do not have to be admitted to a degree program at Hamline, but you must have completed a bachelor’s degree. Students currently enrolled in any Hamline degree or licensure program should contact the program office with questions about section for which to register. How to Register Information about how to register for classes online is available in the Online Registration Guide at www. hamline.edu/ gcsreg. Alternatively, complete the form in this catalog, clip and mail, or fax to 651-523-2585. Or, register in person at the student administrative services office, room 113E, East Hall, Monday–Friday, 9 a.m.–6 p.m., Saturday 8 a.m.–12 p.m. Courses fill quickly; please register early.

Policies and Procedures |

22

Verifying Your Registration Use your Hamline ID and PIN to log in to Hamline’s secure website, Piperline, at www.hamline.edu/piperline. NOTE: If you registered via a paper form, a letter containing your Hamline ID and PIN will be mailed to you. You will receive this letter within two weeks of Hamline’s receipt of your registration unless you are also admitted to a degree or licensure program at Hamline. Once in Piperline, view the courses for which you are registered by selecting Student Services, Registration, Student Detail Schedule. Print a copy of your class schedule for access to library services. Any course changes (schedule, location, instructor) will be noted in Piperline; check www.hamline. edu/classschedules as your course start date approaches. Phone 651-523-2600 if you have questions about obtaining course information via Piperline. Attendance Policy Attendance is expected at all classes. Students who need to miss a class must contact the instructor in advance. Course Cancellation If a course has not reached the minimum enrollment seven days prior to the first class session, the course will be cancelled and students will be notified via email. For information about class cancellation due to winter storms, call 651-523-5555, or Hamline Office of Safety and Security: 651523-2100, or listen to WCCO radio (830 AM).

Course Numbers All courses numbered 6000 and above are offered for graduate credit. Credit/Audit Courses listed in this catalog are given in semester credit hours. You may register to audit, but you must still pay full tuition unless otherwise noted. Audit registrations must be submitted via paper form prior to the first class session. Once registered for credit, you may not switch to audit after the first class session. The decision to audit is irreversible. Credit Transfer and Use Graduate credit may be used by students enrolled in a Hamline graduate program in partial fulfillment of degree requirements. Such credit is usually transferable to other colleges and universities, but the decision rests solely with the other institution. Accreditation Hamline is fully accredited at the masters and first professional degree level by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. The School of Education is accredited by NCATE, the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education. Grades Students have the option of choosing a letter grade or Pass/No Pass. Students currently enrolled in a Hamline degree or licensure program must opt for letter grades. You must identify your preference at the first class session. Final grades are available through Piperline once the instructor has submitted them; you will not receive a paper copy of your grades in the mail. To check your grades each term, use your Piperline ID and PIN to login to the secure area in Piperline (www.hamline.edu/piperline), select Student Services, Student Records, Final Grades. Once a final grade is posted, it cannot be changed unless an instructor or clerical error has occurred. If you wish to appeal a grade, you must do so within a month of receiving it. First contact the instructor. If the matter remains unresolved, you may appeal to the program dean and, then, to the vice president for academic and student affairs. The decision of the vice president for academic and student affairs is final. Incomplete Grade With an instructor’s approval, a student may take an incomplete (“I”) in a course. An “I” will be given only in circumstances that are beyond the control of the student. An “I” cannot be granted for failing or uncompleted work (a substantial portion of the work must

have already been completed). An instructor must update an “I” to a final grade within four months after the end of the registration term (or by August 31 if the student intends to graduate in the summer). Otherwise, the “I” will convert to an “F” grade. If an “I” has been converted to an “F,” the student may complete the necessary course work, at the instructor’s discretion, within one year in accordance with the grade change policy. The student may not complete course work after that time. Transcripts An official transcript may be ordered online at www. hamline.edu/transcript. Alternatively, you may submit a signed request to: Hamline University, Transcripts, MS A1750, 1536 Hewitt Ave., Saint Paul, MN 55104-1284. There is no charge for official transcripts. Check Piperline to make sure all your grades have been posted before requesting a transcript. No transcript or grade will be released unless all financial obligations to Hamline have been met.

Course Information on Piperline

To check current enrollment in any course, check the online class schedule in Piperline (www.hamline.edu/classschedules) and follow the links to Graduate Professional Development. Required course materials will be listed here, as well as any course changes that may occur. Check Piperline class schedules as your course start date approaches.

Tuition and Payment Information Tuition Tuition for general coursework is $255/ semester credit. Tuition for coursework leading to licensure and some certificates is $360/semester credit. Additional fees may be included for materials, box lunch, or other course expenses. See the course listings for specific tuition amounts. Payment Course costs will be listed in Piperline at www.hamline.edu/classschedules. Follow the links to Graduate Professional Development and click on the course title. Tuition is due and payable in full by the first class session. All student bills will be sent only in the form of an E-Bill. You can access these bills by following these steps: Login to Piperline, Student Services, Student Records, Online


The specific ways available to pay your student account include: • Online E-Check option, accessed via Piperline (no fee) • American Express, Discover, and MasterCard payments accepted only online through the CashNet SmartPay system, accessed via Piperline. A non-refundable 2.75% convenience fee will be assessed. VISA is not accepted. • Cash or check payments will continue to be accepted at the cashier’s window in East Hall, Room 113E, Monday–Friday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.; check payments may also be mailed to: Hamline University Student Accounts, MS-A1770 1536 Hewitt Ave. Saint Paul, MN 55104 Refunds/Drops To drop a class, complete a GCS Drop/ Withdraw Form (available at: www.hamline. edu/registrar/forms) and fax to 651-5232585 or drop off in person at the Student Administrative Services Office (SAS), room 113E, East Hall, Monday–Friday, 9 a.m.–6 p.m. Alternatively, you may email a drop request containing the information required on the GCS Drop/Withdraw Form to registrar@hamline.edu. The effective date is the date SAS receives the drop/withdraw request. Drop/Withdraw Policies Tuition, materials, and fees are 100% refunded prior to the last day of the drop period. After that time students must withdraw from the course and the percent of tuition refunded will be based on the number of days elapsed since the first class session; materials and fees are non-refundable; and a grade of W will be assigned. To determine the last day to drop your class, visit the registration website at: www. hamline.edu/gcsreg. Late Payment In the event that payment for the course is late, a finance charge of eight percent (8%) per year is incurred on the balance due. Grades and transcripts will also be put on hold. When payment is received, the holds will be released.

Other Information Textbooks and Course Packets If a course requires a textbook or a course packet, notification will appear on the online class schedule in Piperline (www.hamline. edu/classschedules). Follow the links to Graduate Professional Development. Check this information for each of your courses. For Saint Paul courses, course packets and textbooks will be available in the Saint Paul campus bookstore the first day of class. For Minneapolis campus courses, course packets and textbooks will be available in the Minneapolis campus bookstore. Off-campus and online reading licensure courses and all other online courses purchase books online from the Hamline University Bookstore at www.hamlineuniversitybookstore.com. Please purchase books before the first class session. For current bookstore hours, see www.hamlineuniversitybookstore.com. Campus Services Bush Library: available to registered students. Login to the Secure Area in Piperline and confirm your schedule (www.hamline.edu/ piperline). Print a copy of your class schedule for access to library services. For hours, see www.hamline.edu/bushlibrary. Dining Service: available in Sorin Hall Cafeteria for full meals and Klas Center for a la carte food services. For Dining Service hours, see www. hamline.edu/dining. Parking: In all lots, permits are enforced M–F, 8 a.m–4 p.m., September–May. Parking is free in all lots after 4 p.m. and on weekends. See www.hamline.edu/parking. Services for Students with Disabilities: Hamline is committed to ensuring all qualified students equal access to academic and extra-curricular programming. Hamline is obligated to make reasonable accommodations in programs and activities to provide equal access to qualified persons with disabilities. A qualified person with a disability is a person who can satisfy academic and technical standards requisite to admission or participation in the recipient’s educational program or activity. For further information, contact the Office of Disability Services at 651-523-2204. Our Mailing List To receive our catalogs and mailings, call 651-523-2900. To change your current mailing address, call 651-523-3000. Login to Piperline: www.hamline.edu/piperline.

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act Statement The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1974, as amended, was designed to protect the privacy of education records and to provide guidelines for the correction of inaccurate or misleading data through informal and formal hearings. Hamline intends to comply fully with the Act. Students who have questions or wish to take action with respect to any of the FERPA statements below should do so with the Registrar. For Hamline’s complete FERPA statement, consult www.hamline.edu/ ferpa. FERPA affords students certain rights regarding their education records that include the right to: 1. Inspect and review their education records within 45 days of Hamline receiving the request. 2. Request an amendment to education records that they believe are inaccurate or misleading. 3. Limit disclosures of personally identifiable information (known as Directory Information) contained in their education records. 4. File a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by Hamline University to comply with the rights of FERPA. As required by FERPA, Hamline designates the following categories of student information as public or Directory Information: Name, address, email address, telephone number, dates of attendance, class, full-time or part-time status, photographs taken and maintained by the university for various purposes, previous institutions attended, major and minor fields of study, awards and honors (including dean’s list), degrees and dates conferred, past and present participation in officially recognized sports and activities, athlete physical factors (height, weight), date and place of birth. Hamline may disclose such information for any purpose at its discretion. Under FERPA, currently enrolled students may withhold disclosure of Directory Information by notifying the registrar. Student non-notification to withhold Directory Information indicates individual approval for disclosure. Education records are released only upon written request of the student or when mandated by law.

23 Policies and procedures |

E-Bill, and E-Payment System. Failure to receive a billing statement does not relieve the student from financial obligation.


Please circulate

Nonprofit org u.s. postage paid Hamline University

1536 Hewitt Avenue Saint Paul, MN 55104-1284

hamline university

Summer Literacy Institute

for K–6 EDUCATORS

rethinking literacy July 16–19, 2012

Featured speakers

Lester Laminack is a notable children’s book author and a distinguished teaching consultant.

Katie Wood Ray is a prominent educator and researcher in the field of writing education.

Greg Tang

is an author and innovator of delightful methods for teaching math to students of all ages.

Sharon Taberski is a nationally recognized literacy educator, author, and presenter.

For more information see page 13, or visit www.hamline.edu/sli.


Summer 2012 Professional Development for Educators