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the continental Spring 2012

Call of Duty: A Look at HCEMS

HOC Goes to Kenya

Comedy on Campus

Women's L acr os se 路 Bi g Br ot her s, Big Sist er s 路 School Spi r it


the continental a student-run magazine based at hamilton college REBECCA POMERANTZ editor in chief VIRGINIA WALSH & MATT LANGAN creative directors photography on the hill editor HEATHER KRIEGER talk of the town editor DANIELLE BURBY features editor CHARLOTTE HOUGH style editor SARA SHAUGHNESSY society editor SCOTT BLOSSER travel editor HANNAH GRACE O’CONNELL layout LEAH SORENSEN, CLAIRE KING, ANNE HILBURN, CATHARINE CRANDALL, CHARLOTTE HOUGH web advisor JASON WILKIN advertising director JACKIE WALD account managers JOSIE JONES, HANNAH HOAR editors at large CRYSTAL KIM, ANNE LOIZEAUX writers SARA SHAUGHNESSY, HEATHER KRIEGER, MADISON FORSANDER, ANNE LOIZEAUX, HANNAH

KLOECKNER, AMANDA NELSON, ALANA CHRISTOPHER, FRANKIE CARACCIOLO, CONNOR BROWN, ALEX GARVEY, CHARLOTTE HOUGH, REBECCA POMERANTZ, CRYSTAL KIM, SEAN SMITH, SCOTT BLOSSER, JOHN WULF, BLAIR CASEY, EMILY BALDERSTON, BEN SCHWARTZ, HANNAH GRACE O’CONNELL, EMILY DRINWATER, JOHN BOUDREAU photographers KRISTY BENDETTI, VICTORIA LIN, CLAIRE KING, ALLIE HOELTZEL, ALICJA ZAK, KARA SHANNON, EMILY HODES founder KATIE CHILDS founding editor KATE STINCHFIELD

letters to the editor E-mail contmag@hamilton.edu advertisers E-mail contmag@hamilton.edu sponsors a product of the Hamilton College Media Board


from the editors Dear Readers: The return of spring to the Hill reminds us all how much we truly love Hamilton (even those sophomores who are itching to go abroad next year). In our Spring Issue, we focus on great individuals on campus and how they contribute to their peers’ happiness on a daily basis. As we near commencement and the end of the school year, we remember a few individuals who were and continue to be special to the Hamilton community. In September 2011, the Senior Class announced that their class gift would be the Alex Paganelli Memorial Class of 2012 Research Endowment. This endowment will annually support a student interested in

table of contents

and friends helped to make the 1st Annual Pags Memorial Classic, in Paganelli’s hometown of Dover, Massachusetts, a success. The Classic celebrates his passion for both golf and lacrosse. More recently, some of Paganelli’s closest friends put together the on-campus Pags Memorial Weekend. The group dedicated a men’s home lacrosse game, tailgate, and party to their friend during the weekend of April 21st, 2012.

On the Cover Hamilton College Emergency Medical Services

In April, we lost a dear classmate, Joshua “Jicks” Hicks, ’09. Jicks embodied the Hamilton spirit with his incredibly warm and friendly demeanor. Jicks was active on campus, participating in a variety of organizations such as choir, Buffers, and E.L.S., and was an ardent student of Religious Studies. His impact was felt by almost everyone on campus. He had a smile and a kind word for anyone who passed by, and although his spirit will live in our memories, he will be truly missed. Whether you graduate this year or a few years down the road, we will all eventually have to leave the Hill, but some will never leave us. Remember to keep your friends close -- that’s the part of the Hill that will always remain. Enjoy your spring and summer and keep in touch!

On the Hill High Hopes for Hamilton Golf Uncharted Waters Women’s Lacrosse The Linowitz Chair

in this issue

Learn. page 6

2

the continental | spring 2012

Share. page 24

Style Spotted Girl, Look at that Body Menswear Essentials

Talk of the Town

Society

It Runs in the Family Musically Inclined More Hamilton Mysteries The Tieless Gentlemen Comedy on Campus

A Home at the Pub Take it or Leave it Blair vs. Hamilton Not at My Hamilton

Features

Travel

On the Job Call of Duty The Follow Through Want to know a Secret?

Hamilton’s NYC Program The Matt Brewery On the Road HOC Goes to Kenya

Explore. page 40

the continental | spring 2012

3


from the editors Dear Readers: The return of spring to the Hill reminds us all how much we truly love Hamilton (even those sophomores who are itching to go abroad next year). In our Spring Issue, we focus on great individuals on campus and how they contribute to their peers’ happiness on a daily basis. As we near commencement and the end of the school year, we remember a few individuals who were and continue to be special to the Hamilton community. In September 2011, the Senior Class announced that their class gift would be the Alex Paganelli Memorial Class of 2012 Research Endowment. This endowment will annually support a student interested in

table of contents

and friends helped to make the 1st Annual Pags Memorial Classic, in Paganelli’s hometown of Dover, Massachusetts, a success. The Classic celebrates his passion for both golf and lacrosse. More recently, some of Paganelli’s closest friends put together the on-campus Pags Memorial Weekend. The group dedicated a men’s home lacrosse game, tailgate, and party to their friend during the weekend of April 21st, 2012.

On the Cover Hamilton College Emergency Medical Services

In April, we lost a dear classmate, Joshua “Jicks” Hicks, ’09. Jicks embodied the Hamilton spirit with his incredibly warm and friendly demeanor. Jicks was active on campus, participating in a variety of organizations such as choir, Buffers, and E.L.S., and was an ardent student of Religious Studies. His impact was felt by almost everyone on campus. He had a smile and a kind word for anyone who passed by, and although his spirit will live in our memories, he will be truly missed. Whether you graduate this year or a few years down the road, we will all eventually have to leave the Hill, but some will never leave us. Remember to keep your friends close -- that’s the part of the Hill that will always remain. Enjoy your spring and summer and keep in touch!

On the Hill High Hopes for Hamilton Golf Uncharted Waters Women’s Lacrosse The Linowitz Chair

in this issue

Learn. page 6

2

the continental | spring 2012

Share. page 24

Style Spotted Girl, Look at that Body Menswear Essentials

Talk of the Town

Society

It Runs in the Family Musically Inclined More Hamilton Mysteries The Tieless Gentlemen Comedy on Campus

A Home at the Pub Take it or Leave it Blair vs. Hamilton Not at My Hamilton

Features

Travel

On the Job Call of Duty The Follow Through Want to know a Secret?

Hamilton’s NYC Program The Matt Brewery On the Road HOC Goes to Kenya

Explore. page 40

the continental | spring 2012

3


on the hill

on the hill

High Hopes for Hamilton Golf by Sara Shaughnessy ’14

This spring, Hamilton students should direct their attention and hopes towards one team in particular. It is the team that drives, chips, and putts behind the squash center and next to the College Men’s Golf Team. top to bottom, that I have been a part of at Hamilton,” said captain Scott Blosser ’12, who has played golf since he was old enough to pick up a club. Blosser believes that this season the team will continue to grow because “a lot of the freshmen have the ability and potential to develop into very strong players.” In particular, freshmen Bobby Hamill and Mac Pivirotto have demonstrated the ability to succeed under tournament pressure. Carter White ’14, a sophomore on the team, thinks the freshmen’s sheer motivation and drive to perfect their game will prove an incredible asset to the team this season. According to White, the freshmen have a determined work ethic, and this strong determination combined with their natural talent will make for an indestructible team. Though the team is young, All-American player Greg Scott ’14 explains that the younger players have the ability to “challenge the upperclassmen, which promotes healthy competition within the team and makes everyone stronger.” Scott said the golf ball doesn’t know how old you are, so if each of the freshman maintains a calm and collected temperament, experience shouldn’t pose too much of an issue for the Hamilton team.

4

the continental | spring 2012

Combined with the skilled and determined new freshmen, the players hope to surprise the other NESCAC schools with their ability to work together and set a positive mindset for the round. The team has many aspirations for the season, including both team and personal goals. White’s main goal this season is to focus on his own game rather than worrying about how his teammates are doing in the middle of a round. For Scott, taking an even more involved role as co-captain of the team will be his challenge. Leadership from the captains and returning team members will prove crucial as they compete in the NESCAC championship. Scott explains that Middlebury, Amherst, and Williams are their top competition and the three schools that they will compete against in hopes of making it to NCAA’s. Scott is from Middlebury, Vermont, so he enjoys playing against their school. How will these players be able to succeed after a long Hamilton winter has prevented them from practicing? Well, the snowy days have not diminished Hamill’s positive attitude. The freshman said that their two-week Spring break trip to Florida allowed them to “hone our skills after a golf-less Hamilton winter.” This positive outlook is not just characteristic of Hamill; the whole team expresses a sincere desire to succeed and improve. They realize that the game of golf is incredibly mental. “It’s easy to beat yourself up over a poor shot,” explains Blosser.

Photos courtesy of Scott Blosser ’12

Assistant Coach Bob Simon agrees with this and points out that many people view college sports as strictly physical, while in the sport of golf, “the mental side is at least as important as the physical side.” In the larger scheme of things, the necessity to keep a calm mental state has prepared the team to handle adversity and face life’s challenges. Blosser explains that in the midst of a failure, “You can choose to complain and sulk or keep your head up and focus on what you do next.” Though Coach Simon values competition and the success of his players, he also reminds us to step back and remember the fun involved in playing. Golf is a lifetime sport, and his favorite part is the friends you make in the process of playing a round, seeing as “you spend 3-4 hours playing with people.” He comments how one can travel anywhere and move to any town to play golf with a brand new set of

people in beautiful surroundings. For Coach Simon, the best part about coaching is getting to know the players and watching them improve, and this season, the team looks incredibly promising. Hopefully with the instruction of Coach Simon, the team can celebrate their successes as well as learn from their mistakes, keeping in mind Blosser’s perspective that “it only takes one good shot to make the entire round worthwhile.”

the continental | spring 2012

5


on the hill

on the hill

High Hopes for Hamilton Golf by Sara Shaughnessy ’14

This spring, Hamilton students should direct their attention and hopes towards one team in particular. It is the team that drives, chips, and putts behind the squash center and next to the College Men’s Golf Team. top to bottom, that I have been a part of at Hamilton,” said captain Scott Blosser ’12, who has played golf since he was old enough to pick up a club. Blosser believes that this season the team will continue to grow because “a lot of the freshmen have the ability and potential to develop into very strong players.” In particular, freshmen Bobby Hamill and Mac Pivirotto have demonstrated the ability to succeed under tournament pressure. Carter White ’14, a sophomore on the team, thinks the freshmen’s sheer motivation and drive to perfect their game will prove an incredible asset to the team this season. According to White, the freshmen have a determined work ethic, and this strong determination combined with their natural talent will make for an indestructible team. Though the team is young, All-American player Greg Scott ’14 explains that the younger players have the ability to “challenge the upperclassmen, which promotes healthy competition within the team and makes everyone stronger.” Scott said the golf ball doesn’t know how old you are, so if each of the freshman maintains a calm and collected temperament, experience shouldn’t pose too much of an issue for the Hamilton team.

4

the continental | spring 2012

Combined with the skilled and determined new freshmen, the players hope to surprise the other NESCAC schools with their ability to work together and set a positive mindset for the round. The team has many aspirations for the season, including both team and personal goals. White’s main goal this season is to focus on his own game rather than worrying about how his teammates are doing in the middle of a round. For Scott, taking an even more involved role as co-captain of the team will be his challenge. Leadership from the captains and returning team members will prove crucial as they compete in the NESCAC championship. Scott explains that Middlebury, Amherst, and Williams are their top competition and the three schools that they will compete against in hopes of making it to NCAA’s. Scott is from Middlebury, Vermont, so he enjoys playing against their school. How will these players be able to succeed after a long Hamilton winter has prevented them from practicing? Well, the snowy days have not diminished Hamill’s positive attitude. The freshman said that their two-week Spring break trip to Florida allowed them to “hone our skills after a golf-less Hamilton winter.” This positive outlook is not just characteristic of Hamill; the whole team expresses a sincere desire to succeed and improve. They realize that the game of golf is incredibly mental. “It’s easy to beat yourself up over a poor shot,” explains Blosser.

Photos courtesy of Scott Blosser ’12

Assistant Coach Bob Simon agrees with this and points out that many people view college sports as strictly physical, while in the sport of golf, “the mental side is at least as important as the physical side.” In the larger scheme of things, the necessity to keep a calm mental state has prepared the team to handle adversity and face life’s challenges. Blosser explains that in the midst of a failure, “You can choose to complain and sulk or keep your head up and focus on what you do next.” Though Coach Simon values competition and the success of his players, he also reminds us to step back and remember the fun involved in playing. Golf is a lifetime sport, and his favorite part is the friends you make in the process of playing a round, seeing as “you spend 3-4 hours playing with people.” He comments how one can travel anywhere and move to any town to play golf with a brand new set of

people in beautiful surroundings. For Coach Simon, the best part about coaching is getting to know the players and watching them improve, and this season, the team looks incredibly promising. Hopefully with the instruction of Coach Simon, the team can celebrate their successes as well as learn from their mistakes, keeping in mind Blosser’s perspective that “it only takes one good shot to make the entire round worthwhile.”

the continental | spring 2012

5


on the hill

on the hill

Uncharted Waters by Heather Krieger ’14

While most of us are enjoying glimpses of sunshine on the Hill, a few adventurous Hamilton students and professors are bundled up on the Nathaniel B. Hamilton ship in the icy Antarctic waters. Together, with a team of over 40 other scientists, they are on a six-week long expedition funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation. The purpose of this trip is to observe and collect data on the polar environment where the Larsen Ice Shelf, which collapsed in 2002, used to be. The expedition is made possible through the LARISSA (LARsen Ice Shelf System, Antarctica) initiative that seeks to investigate the implications of the changing Larsen Ice Shelf System. J.W. Johnson Family Professor of Environmental Studies, Eugene Domack, is a principal investigator for the LARISSA project. He and Associate Professor of Biology, Mike McCormick, are leading Andrew Serachick ’12, Manique Talaia-Murray ’12, Natalie Elking ’12, and recent graduate Liz Bucherri ’11 on the trip. While aboard the ship, they will be collecting sedimentary records and studying the Antarctic environment. According to Domack, the research will be a broad, interdisciplinary approach to study how the Larsen Ice Shelf is waxing and waning.

of undergraduates that Hamilton has sent to Antarctica. Domack began taking students with him in 1987, and since then he has encouraged over 100 students to travel with him. “I felt like it was a good way to get students involved in “There were opportunities that weren’t being taken advantage of, including researching climate change.” this trip is to “give students opportunities to do things globally that have a far reach.” Talaia-Murray agrees, and noted the scope of their trip, “It’s a lot of responsibility; this is a very adult undertaking.” This year’s project is bigger than expeditions in years past and involves research in disciplines ranging from glaciology to oceanography and marine geology. Two ships are travelling down to Antarctica and each ship’s team will actively work for twelve-hour shifts, making the expedition a roundthe-clock research project. In addition to conducting research, the Hamilton students still have to keep up with their coursework for the semester. Talaia-Murray mentioned the challenge of time management while aboard the ship, and Elking echoed that she was “anxious about the unexpected challenges” that they will

certainly encounter, including potential obstructions by sea ice. Despite the huge transition that the group will face, they are all incredibly excited about the opportunity. “It’s such a remote place that I never ever imagined going to in my entire life,” Elking remarked. “We’ve been preparing for this trip for so long, and I can’t wait to actually see the sediments, studying.” The Hamilton crew has an incredible they’ve been learning about in college. As Talaia-Murray said, “it’s hard to get work experience. It really cements your awareness of the processes involved, and it really brings everything together.”

Domack believes that “students of the caliber who come to Hamilton can do a good job in moving science forward.” While many students who have travelled with Domack remarked that he leads these trips “not so students go on into science, but so the students are aware fully of what science does for society. There’s a lot of planning, effort, cooperation, and hard work in the lab involved, and this trip gives students a about.” The Hamilton team plans to return on April 15, but until then you can follow their daily blog on the Hamilton webpage. Photos courtesy of Natalie Elking ’12 and Manique Talaia-Murray ’12

Above: (L to R) Bucherri ’11, Talaia-Murray ’12, Elking ’12, and Serachick ’12. Left: Talaia-Murray digs through the an ice core.

6

the continental | spring 2012

the continental | spring 2012

7


on the hill

on the hill

Uncharted Waters by Heather Krieger ’14

While most of us are enjoying glimpses of sunshine on the Hill, a few adventurous Hamilton students and professors are bundled up on the Nathaniel B. Hamilton ship in the icy Antarctic waters. Together, with a team of over 40 other scientists, they are on a six-week long expedition funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation. The purpose of this trip is to observe and collect data on the polar environment where the Larsen Ice Shelf, which collapsed in 2002, used to be. The expedition is made possible through the LARISSA (LARsen Ice Shelf System, Antarctica) initiative that seeks to investigate the implications of the changing Larsen Ice Shelf System. J.W. Johnson Family Professor of Environmental Studies, Eugene Domack, is a principal investigator for the LARISSA project. He and Associate Professor of Biology, Mike McCormick, are leading Andrew Serachick ’12, Manique Talaia-Murray ’12, Natalie Elking ’12, and recent graduate Liz Bucherri ’11 on the trip. While aboard the ship, they will be collecting sedimentary records and studying the Antarctic environment. According to Domack, the research will be a broad, interdisciplinary approach to study how the Larsen Ice Shelf is waxing and waning.

of undergraduates that Hamilton has sent to Antarctica. Domack began taking students with him in 1987, and since then he has encouraged over 100 students to travel with him. “I felt like it was a good way to get students involved in “There were opportunities that weren’t being taken advantage of, including researching climate change.” this trip is to “give students opportunities to do things globally that have a far reach.” Talaia-Murray agrees, and noted the scope of their trip, “It’s a lot of responsibility; this is a very adult undertaking.” This year’s project is bigger than expeditions in years past and involves research in disciplines ranging from glaciology to oceanography and marine geology. Two ships are travelling down to Antarctica and each ship’s team will actively work for twelve-hour shifts, making the expedition a roundthe-clock research project. In addition to conducting research, the Hamilton students still have to keep up with their coursework for the semester. Talaia-Murray mentioned the challenge of time management while aboard the ship, and Elking echoed that she was “anxious about the unexpected challenges” that they will

certainly encounter, including potential obstructions by sea ice. Despite the huge transition that the group will face, they are all incredibly excited about the opportunity. “It’s such a remote place that I never ever imagined going to in my entire life,” Elking remarked. “We’ve been preparing for this trip for so long, and I can’t wait to actually see the sediments, studying.” The Hamilton crew has an incredible they’ve been learning about in college. As Talaia-Murray said, “it’s hard to get work experience. It really cements your awareness of the processes involved, and it really brings everything together.”

Domack believes that “students of the caliber who come to Hamilton can do a good job in moving science forward.” While many students who have travelled with Domack remarked that he leads these trips “not so students go on into science, but so the students are aware fully of what science does for society. There’s a lot of planning, effort, cooperation, and hard work in the lab involved, and this trip gives students a about.” The Hamilton team plans to return on April 15, but until then you can follow their daily blog on the Hamilton webpage. Photos courtesy of Natalie Elking ’12 and Manique Talaia-Murray ’12

Above: (L to R) Bucherri ’11, Talaia-Murray ’12, Elking ’12, and Serachick ’12. Left: Talaia-Murray digs through the an ice core.

6

the continental | spring 2012

the continental | spring 2012

7


on the hill

on the hill

Women’s Lacrosse: Stronger Than Ever by Madison Forsander ’14

The Hamilton Women’s Lacrosse Team has a habit for achieving success. They’ve placed six times in the NCAA Division III in the past 12 years, most notably as champions in 2008 and runners-up in 2010. The team has enjoyed the championship title of the Liberty League since 2007 and holds six league regular season titles, all since 2000. Additionally, many of the team’s players have received individual honors: 22 players have been selected as All-Americans, and twelve players earned spots on CoSIDA’s all-academic team in 2011. All of these successes have primed the Women’s Lacrosse Team for its greatest challenge yet: entrance to the NESCAC league this season. The move follows Hamilton’s decision to transition all varsity athletic teams to the NESCAC, a conference in which half of Hamilton’s teams already compete. The NESCAC division, as one of the top athletic conferences in NCAA Division III, poses a formidable challenge. The NESCAC boasts six NCAA titles and and eight of its teams are ranked in the Lacrosse Magazine Top 20 preseason poll. However, the entrance to NESCAC could not have come at a more fortuitous time for Women’s Lacrosse; this year’s small team, stellar head coach, and close-knit group dynamic have prepped the team for the new competition. Long before the season starts, Women’s Lacrosse makes sure to make the freshmen players feel welcome and an important part of the team. The team starts an email thread at the beginning of the semester asking new players about their interests, sets up team mealtimes in Commons, and invites new players to together through Dynamic Fitness. Katie D’Antonio took me in as part of the team.”

Clinton community-members may hire the players for a few hours to perform odd jobs such as raking leaves. These group activities focus on building team relationships and unity, not practicing the sport itself. This ensures that players have time to explore other interests in the fall and enter the spring season prepared to meet challenges together. 8

the continental | spring 2012

Head Coach Patty Kloidt plays an instrumental role in shaping the team dynamic. Her players describe her as reasonable, a good motivator, and open to suggestions. “She guides us, but lets us make our own decisions,” said Paige Engeldrum ’13. This guidance helps players develop teamwork and adjust practices for staying in shape. the Continentals to 131 wins since coming to Hamilton. The Intercollegiate Women’s Lacrosse Coaches Association declared her the Division III coach of the year after leading Hamilton to the national title in 2008. Ellen Esterhay ’14 remared, “She’s the best coach I’ve ever played for.” Engeldrum added, “She’s our mom away from home.” This year, Women’s Lacrosse is exceptionally small, boasting only 24 players on the roster, allowing for unity and strength. In past years the lacrosse team would practice in groups of about six, divided by their small, everyone has had to learn new positions, which has built team communication-- an essential for Instead, “We all bring our own leadership style to the table” said Lauren Sokol ’12. The lack of division has contributed to a strongly bonded team. Sokol recalled a favorite moment in practice when the whole team did the electric slide. Moments like this showcase the team’s closeness and ability to have fun while still keeping on task. The players are excited to be moving up from the Liberty League to the NESCAC. Given their stellar record, it’s time the team had a chance to take on new opponents. The Women’s Lacrosse players are aware that their new rivals in the NESCAC will provide stiff competition and are eager to rise to the occasion. “We’re moving into uncharted territory,” Sokol optomistically proclaimed. Her teammates echo these sentiments of determination and excitement. D’Antonio summed it up: “I’m excited to have every day be a challenge.” the continental | spring 2012

9


on the hill

on the hill

Women’s Lacrosse: Stronger Than Ever by Madison Forsander ’14

The Hamilton Women’s Lacrosse Team has a habit for achieving success. They’ve placed six times in the NCAA Division III in the past 12 years, most notably as champions in 2008 and runners-up in 2010. The team has enjoyed the championship title of the Liberty League since 2007 and holds six league regular season titles, all since 2000. Additionally, many of the team’s players have received individual honors: 22 players have been selected as All-Americans, and twelve players earned spots on CoSIDA’s all-academic team in 2011. All of these successes have primed the Women’s Lacrosse Team for its greatest challenge yet: entrance to the NESCAC league this season. The move follows Hamilton’s decision to transition all varsity athletic teams to the NESCAC, a conference in which half of Hamilton’s teams already compete. The NESCAC division, as one of the top athletic conferences in NCAA Division III, poses a formidable challenge. The NESCAC boasts six NCAA titles and and eight of its teams are ranked in the Lacrosse Magazine Top 20 preseason poll. However, the entrance to NESCAC could not have come at a more fortuitous time for Women’s Lacrosse; this year’s small team, stellar head coach, and close-knit group dynamic have prepped the team for the new competition. Long before the season starts, Women’s Lacrosse makes sure to make the freshmen players feel welcome and an important part of the team. The team starts an email thread at the beginning of the semester asking new players about their interests, sets up team mealtimes in Commons, and invites new players to together through Dynamic Fitness. Katie D’Antonio took me in as part of the team.”

Clinton community-members may hire the players for a few hours to perform odd jobs such as raking leaves. These group activities focus on building team relationships and unity, not practicing the sport itself. This ensures that players have time to explore other interests in the fall and enter the spring season prepared to meet challenges together. 8

the continental | spring 2012

Head Coach Patty Kloidt plays an instrumental role in shaping the team dynamic. Her players describe her as reasonable, a good motivator, and open to suggestions. “She guides us, but lets us make our own decisions,” said Paige Engeldrum ’13. This guidance helps players develop teamwork and adjust practices for staying in shape. the Continentals to 131 wins since coming to Hamilton. The Intercollegiate Women’s Lacrosse Coaches Association declared her the Division III coach of the year after leading Hamilton to the national title in 2008. Ellen Esterhay ’14 remared, “She’s the best coach I’ve ever played for.” Engeldrum added, “She’s our mom away from home.” This year, Women’s Lacrosse is exceptionally small, boasting only 24 players on the roster, allowing for unity and strength. In past years the lacrosse team would practice in groups of about six, divided by their small, everyone has had to learn new positions, which has built team communication-- an essential for Instead, “We all bring our own leadership style to the table” said Lauren Sokol ’12. The lack of division has contributed to a strongly bonded team. Sokol recalled a favorite moment in practice when the whole team did the electric slide. Moments like this showcase the team’s closeness and ability to have fun while still keeping on task. The players are excited to be moving up from the Liberty League to the NESCAC. Given their stellar record, it’s time the team had a chance to take on new opponents. The Women’s Lacrosse players are aware that their new rivals in the NESCAC will provide stiff competition and are eager to rise to the occasion. “We’re moving into uncharted territory,” Sokol optomistically proclaimed. Her teammates echo these sentiments of determination and excitement. D’Antonio summed it up: “I’m excited to have every day be a challenge.” the continental | spring 2012

9


on the hill

The Linowitz Chair: Bringing Ambassadors to the Hill

by Anne Loizeaux ’12

Hamilton welcomes many distinguished visiting professors each academic year. The Linowitz Chair program in the Government Department normally hosts one such visiting expert every semester. This program has sponsored many visiting professors with fascinating backgrounds to teach subjects ranging from foreign policy to comparative politics to American government. The Chair was established in 1988 as a way to the Government Department. Sol M. Linowitz ’35 generously funded the endowment for the Chair. Current Hamilton professor, Ambassador Edward Walker ’62, a twotime Linowitz professor himself, called his friend Linowitz “a brilliant man,” and described the Chair as an “extremely viable program which provides an opportunity for students to see what it’s like outside [of the traditional academic environment].” Linowitz was a very involved student at Hamilton and he always remained fond of the school. He went on to be tremendously successful as an American diplomat, lawyer, and businessman.

to the outside world.” In 2010, the Linowitz program invited Ambassador Prudence Bushnell to teach a seminar-course on Africa. During her time in the Foreign Service, Bushnell served as Ambassador to Kenya and Guatemala and was also the Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs. Prior to her time in the Foreign Service, Bushnell worked as a management and leadership training professional. Before coming to Hamilton, Ambassador Bushnell had never taught a college class, but her experience running professional training sessions provided some background for her budding teaching career. Bushnell recalled, “The experience allowed me to create and experiment with non-traditional ways of learning.” Her curriculum included a rare combination of group presentations, and opinion writing. When asked to explain how her diplomatic experience informed her teaching, Ambassador Bushnell responded, “My background in sub-Saharan Africa and Foreign Service experience provided additional context and depth to what students were learning.” The value of courses taught by Linowitz professors is that they go beyond what one can learn in textbooks and provide real-world applications of academic concepts.

The Linowitz program has brought many distinguished people to the Photo courtesy of Hamilton College Media Relations Hill. Ambassador Walker served as a Linowitz Professor in 2003 and 2005 and is now the Christian A. Johnson Distinguished The Linowitz program has brought Hamilton many Professor in Global Political Theory. Walker worked distinguished professionals and academics in a in the US Foreign Service for over 30 years before retiring to run the Middle East Institute from 2001seminar courses different from traditional Hamilton 2006 and then beginning his teaching career at classes. As Ambassador Bushnell explained, “The Hamilton. Linowitz program allows students to look at a topic through a prism provided by a foreign affairs Walker’s courses provide students with an practitioner.” She later added, “I suspect that they incredible opportunity to learn from a man with value the opportunity.” Indeed, the courses taught real, practical experience as ambassador to many by visiting professors are some of the most popular Middle Eastern countries including the United and well-received courses at Hamilton. Students Arab Emirates, Egypt, and Israel. Through his are fortunate to have the opportunity to learn classes, Walker hopes to help students interpret from experienced professionals who beautifully information in a practical as well as academic complement the Hamilton education. manner. He stressed that Linowitz professors promote an academic atmosphere with a “window 10

the continental | spring 2012

The 2012 Senior Gift

Alex Paganelli Memorial Class of 2012 Research Endowment An endowment from which a grant will be awarded annually to a student conducting field research or holding an internship. Preference given (though not limited) to those with a focus in the natural sciences. By contributing to the Senior Gift you will help promote continuing success among Hamilton’s current and future students. 77% of the senior class has already given a gift, helping us meet the first three goals set by President Stewart, earning an additional $6,000 towards the endowment. Make a gift today to help us reach our next goal of 90% participation by May 4 to earn another $4,000! November 3, 2011 December 8, 2011 $1,000: 25% $2,000: 50% Achieved Achieved

March 9, 2012 $3,000: 75% Achieved

May 4, 2012 $4,000: 90%

Remember even a minimal gift of $5 goes a long way! With your support our class goal is to reach 98% participation is well within reach. Achieving this would not only put us ahead of the class of 2011, reaching only 93%, but would also be a new Hamilton record, beating the class of 2007, who holds the current record of 97.5% participation. Help show your support to Hamilton as well as to our unforgettable classmate, Alex Paganelli! http://www.hamilton.edu/alumni/annualgiving/seniorgift/home


on the hill

The Linowitz Chair: Bringing Ambassadors to the Hill

by Anne Loizeaux ’12

Hamilton welcomes many distinguished visiting professors each academic year. The Linowitz Chair program in the Government Department normally hosts one such visiting expert every semester. This program has sponsored many visiting professors with fascinating backgrounds to teach subjects ranging from foreign policy to comparative politics to American government. The Chair was established in 1988 as a way to the Government Department. Sol M. Linowitz ’35 generously funded the endowment for the Chair. Current Hamilton professor, Ambassador Edward Walker ’62, a twotime Linowitz professor himself, called his friend Linowitz “a brilliant man,” and described the Chair as an “extremely viable program which provides an opportunity for students to see what it’s like outside [of the traditional academic environment].” Linowitz was a very involved student at Hamilton and he always remained fond of the school. He went on to be tremendously successful as an American diplomat, lawyer, and businessman.

to the outside world.” In 2010, the Linowitz program invited Ambassador Prudence Bushnell to teach a seminar-course on Africa. During her time in the Foreign Service, Bushnell served as Ambassador to Kenya and Guatemala and was also the Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs. Prior to her time in the Foreign Service, Bushnell worked as a management and leadership training professional. Before coming to Hamilton, Ambassador Bushnell had never taught a college class, but her experience running professional training sessions provided some background for her budding teaching career. Bushnell recalled, “The experience allowed me to create and experiment with non-traditional ways of learning.” Her curriculum included a rare combination of group presentations, and opinion writing. When asked to explain how her diplomatic experience informed her teaching, Ambassador Bushnell responded, “My background in sub-Saharan Africa and Foreign Service experience provided additional context and depth to what students were learning.” The value of courses taught by Linowitz professors is that they go beyond what one can learn in textbooks and provide real-world applications of academic concepts.

The Linowitz program has brought many distinguished people to the Photo courtesy of Hamilton College Media Relations Hill. Ambassador Walker served as a Linowitz Professor in 2003 and 2005 and is now the Christian A. Johnson Distinguished The Linowitz program has brought Hamilton many Professor in Global Political Theory. Walker worked distinguished professionals and academics in a in the US Foreign Service for over 30 years before retiring to run the Middle East Institute from 2001seminar courses different from traditional Hamilton 2006 and then beginning his teaching career at classes. As Ambassador Bushnell explained, “The Hamilton. Linowitz program allows students to look at a topic through a prism provided by a foreign affairs Walker’s courses provide students with an practitioner.” She later added, “I suspect that they incredible opportunity to learn from a man with value the opportunity.” Indeed, the courses taught real, practical experience as ambassador to many by visiting professors are some of the most popular Middle Eastern countries including the United and well-received courses at Hamilton. Students Arab Emirates, Egypt, and Israel. Through his are fortunate to have the opportunity to learn classes, Walker hopes to help students interpret from experienced professionals who beautifully information in a practical as well as academic complement the Hamilton education. manner. He stressed that Linowitz professors promote an academic atmosphere with a “window 10

the continental | spring 2012

The 2012 Senior Gift

Alex Paganelli Memorial Class of 2012 Research Endowment An endowment from which a grant will be awarded annually to a student conducting field research or holding an internship. Preference given (though not limited) to those with a focus in the natural sciences. By contributing to the Senior Gift you will help promote continuing success among Hamilton’s current and future students. 77% of the senior class has already given a gift, helping us meet the first three goals set by President Stewart, earning an additional $6,000 towards the endowment. Make a gift today to help us reach our next goal of 90% participation by May 4 to earn another $4,000! November 3, 2011 December 8, 2011 $1,000: 25% $2,000: 50% Achieved Achieved

March 9, 2012 $3,000: 75% Achieved

May 4, 2012 $4,000: 90%

Remember even a minimal gift of $5 goes a long way! With your support our class goal is to reach 98% participation is well within reach. Achieving this would not only put us ahead of the class of 2011, reaching only 93%, but would also be a new Hamilton record, beating the class of 2007, who holds the current record of 97.5% participation. Help show your support to Hamilton as well as to our unforgettable classmate, Alex Paganelli! http://www.hamilton.edu/alumni/annualgiving/seniorgift/home


talk of the town

Musically Inclined

It Runs in the Family: An Interview with Wynn Van

Dusen ’15

talk of the town

by Hannah Kloeckner ’14 by Amanda Nelson ’12

I know we’ve all thought about it: what would it be like to be a famous actor? I wouldn’t

Leigh Pomeranz ’13 was only a freshman when Kasey Kaspar ’10 approached her, asking if she wanted to musically direct a cabaret production. Since then, Hamilton’s Believe in Broadway annually raises money for charities such as Relay for Life while giving students a chance to perform their favorite Broadway numbers.

on a yacht in St. Tropez, absentmindedly waving to the paparazzi. However, while celebrity status may be fanciful, Hamilton College does boast various famous alumni and many of our shameless daydreams, most Hamilton students are exceptionally modest and humble about any celebrity they may know. Wynn Van Dusen ’15 family’s countless Google hits. A friendly and very involved freshman, Van Dusen is a member of Yodapez, works as a tour guide, writes for Thumbs Up/Thumbs Down and a food blog for The Spectator, and is currently involved in the main-stage play Orestes 2.0. Despite her incredibly accomplished and active presence on campus, no one passing her on Martin’s Way would ever know her family’s celebrity status. nominated actress Carroll Baker, and her mother, Blanche Baker, won an Emmy. Having grown up in such an illustrious family, it is clear that Van Dusen knows a thing or two about fame. Nonetheless, Van Dusen is quick to point out that while her love for theater was instilled in her as a child, her family is much more than that, acting as a model of both endurance and passion. Her grandfather was a Holocaust survivor and her grandmother grew up in poverty; both managed to establish themselves and rise above their adversities as exemplars of true success. A lot of people in my family are involved in the arts, which means that any interest I show in anything theatrical or artistic has, for the most part, been supported. For example, my grandfather is an acting coach, so when I was 5 years old and cast in an ensemble role in some musical, he mailed me all of these acting books and exercises so that I could practice. Looking back, that’s completely insane, but such is my life. My family is a bit crazy, but they’ve always been incredibly supportive of me, which they remind me of it constantly.

I’m proud that she was able to stick up for herself. who were interesting and assertive, and I think she was rightfully picky in that way. As for how this my life yet, but I have a feeling I’m going to pursue some sort of combination of performance and writing. In the world of comedy writing, there are a lot more men than there are women. A lot of people still have to be convinced that girls are funny. So, if I end up venturing into that world, I sort of hope I inherited my grandmother’s ability assert herself and use her gender as a tool, as opposed to an obstacle. You are the 2009 and 2011 recipient of National Youth Theater Awards for outstanding featured actress and outstanding lead actress. Congrats! What can you tell me about these awards and your performances for them? National Youth Arts sends out representatives to different community theater groups across the country and make a point to recognize the some of the people involved; that’s where these awards come from. In high school, I did theater because it made me happy. I was never once motivated by the prospect of getting an award. I didn’t even know the National Youth Theater Awards existed until after I won one. I spent most of my high school life in rehearsals outside of school, so I didn’t have a ton of friends at my high school. No one really knew the side of me that performed. That award gave me something to show for all of the time

How have your grandmother’s roles as strong and

award I won in 2009 meant the most to me because

outlook on femininity?

lot of people seemed to think that I’m pretty open now, but beneath my loud personality and bad jokes is a very, very shy girl. In ’09 I was cast as this crazy old woman, and I had to lose all of my inhibitions and insecurities and just have fun with the part. It took some work, and opening night of the show was absolutely terrifying, but the payoff was huge, and to have NYA recognize that, felt great.

My grandmother played a lot of roles that went against the stereotype of the typical ingénue, and that makes me very proud. She often tells stories about people who assumed that she was a vapid blonde girl and, as a result, tried to scam her, so 12

Van Dusen and her mother asleep on set. Photo courtesy of Wynn Van Dusen.

the continental | spring 2012

During her time at Hamilton, Pomeranz has worked on four different productions.While she doesn’t sing in every musical number, Pomeranz’s presence and musical direction is evident in each song performed.

to produce Jason Robert Brown’s “Songs for a New World,” which a reviewer for the Spectator called simply “lovely.” The show raised over $700 for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. Pomeranz has discovered many unique challenges in musically directing an organized production rather than an individually determined revue. Believe in Broadway allows for the opportunity to “set up a program that possibly has a story line to it, or just the numbers we think will go nicely together,” giving the show’s directors more artistic freedom and the ability to choose songs that

Pomeranz who audition. said that the “Songs for a New performers World” proved that she works to be a challenge with for Believe in creatively in Broadway interpreting the range from directions of the people composer. “Each who have type of production experience brings a different with musical experience,” theater to Pomeranz said, “and amateur each has its perks.” performers, but all of the When asked about cast members her favorite memory have a love for from Believe in musical theater. Believe in Broadway 2011 cast members. Pomeranz is second from Broadway, Pomeranz “I had to learn said she is happiest Photo courtesy of Leigh Pomeranz to work with “knowing that the people who don’t have a lot of experience either cast is having a good time and our audience with musical theater or performing in front members enjoy their experience.” Pomeranz of audiences,” Pomeranz said. The variation in hopes that Believe in Broadway will continue on experience levels and the short amount of time as a Hamilton College tradition long after she between auditions (as well as working around has graduated so that other Hamilton students Hamilton students’ already busy schedules) can continue to have a wonderful experience certainly proved to be challenging aspects of while doing something positive for charity and musically directing these shows. their community. Even so, there’s a joy in helping amateur own characters to the performances and their own experiences,” Pomeranz said, “there are always incredibly good learning experiences throughout.”

Pomeranz hopes to pursue music directing after college. Whether she works with cabarets or full length productions, all you have to do is look at the work she has done at Hamilton to know that she will be incredibly successful in her endeavors.

Pomeranz also worked with Danielle Burby ’12 the continental | spring 2012

13


talk of the town

Musically Inclined

It Runs in the Family: An Interview with Wynn Van

Dusen ’15

talk of the town

by Hannah Kloeckner ’14 by Amanda Nelson ’12

I know we’ve all thought about it: what would it be like to be a famous actor? I wouldn’t

Leigh Pomeranz ’13 was only a freshman when Kasey Kaspar ’10 approached her, asking if she wanted to musically direct a cabaret production. Since then, Hamilton’s Believe in Broadway annually raises money for charities such as Relay for Life while giving students a chance to perform their favorite Broadway numbers.

on a yacht in St. Tropez, absentmindedly waving to the paparazzi. However, while celebrity status may be fanciful, Hamilton College does boast various famous alumni and many of our shameless daydreams, most Hamilton students are exceptionally modest and humble about any celebrity they may know. Wynn Van Dusen ’15 family’s countless Google hits. A friendly and very involved freshman, Van Dusen is a member of Yodapez, works as a tour guide, writes for Thumbs Up/Thumbs Down and a food blog for The Spectator, and is currently involved in the main-stage play Orestes 2.0. Despite her incredibly accomplished and active presence on campus, no one passing her on Martin’s Way would ever know her family’s celebrity status. nominated actress Carroll Baker, and her mother, Blanche Baker, won an Emmy. Having grown up in such an illustrious family, it is clear that Van Dusen knows a thing or two about fame. Nonetheless, Van Dusen is quick to point out that while her love for theater was instilled in her as a child, her family is much more than that, acting as a model of both endurance and passion. Her grandfather was a Holocaust survivor and her grandmother grew up in poverty; both managed to establish themselves and rise above their adversities as exemplars of true success. A lot of people in my family are involved in the arts, which means that any interest I show in anything theatrical or artistic has, for the most part, been supported. For example, my grandfather is an acting coach, so when I was 5 years old and cast in an ensemble role in some musical, he mailed me all of these acting books and exercises so that I could practice. Looking back, that’s completely insane, but such is my life. My family is a bit crazy, but they’ve always been incredibly supportive of me, which they remind me of it constantly.

I’m proud that she was able to stick up for herself. who were interesting and assertive, and I think she was rightfully picky in that way. As for how this my life yet, but I have a feeling I’m going to pursue some sort of combination of performance and writing. In the world of comedy writing, there are a lot more men than there are women. A lot of people still have to be convinced that girls are funny. So, if I end up venturing into that world, I sort of hope I inherited my grandmother’s ability assert herself and use her gender as a tool, as opposed to an obstacle. You are the 2009 and 2011 recipient of National Youth Theater Awards for outstanding featured actress and outstanding lead actress. Congrats! What can you tell me about these awards and your performances for them? National Youth Arts sends out representatives to different community theater groups across the country and make a point to recognize the some of the people involved; that’s where these awards come from. In high school, I did theater because it made me happy. I was never once motivated by the prospect of getting an award. I didn’t even know the National Youth Theater Awards existed until after I won one. I spent most of my high school life in rehearsals outside of school, so I didn’t have a ton of friends at my high school. No one really knew the side of me that performed. That award gave me something to show for all of the time

How have your grandmother’s roles as strong and

award I won in 2009 meant the most to me because

outlook on femininity?

lot of people seemed to think that I’m pretty open now, but beneath my loud personality and bad jokes is a very, very shy girl. In ’09 I was cast as this crazy old woman, and I had to lose all of my inhibitions and insecurities and just have fun with the part. It took some work, and opening night of the show was absolutely terrifying, but the payoff was huge, and to have NYA recognize that, felt great.

My grandmother played a lot of roles that went against the stereotype of the typical ingénue, and that makes me very proud. She often tells stories about people who assumed that she was a vapid blonde girl and, as a result, tried to scam her, so 12

Van Dusen and her mother asleep on set. Photo courtesy of Wynn Van Dusen.

the continental | spring 2012

During her time at Hamilton, Pomeranz has worked on four different productions.While she doesn’t sing in every musical number, Pomeranz’s presence and musical direction is evident in each song performed.

to produce Jason Robert Brown’s “Songs for a New World,” which a reviewer for the Spectator called simply “lovely.” The show raised over $700 for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. Pomeranz has discovered many unique challenges in musically directing an organized production rather than an individually determined revue. Believe in Broadway allows for the opportunity to “set up a program that possibly has a story line to it, or just the numbers we think will go nicely together,” giving the show’s directors more artistic freedom and the ability to choose songs that

Pomeranz who audition. said that the “Songs for a New performers World” proved that she works to be a challenge with for Believe in creatively in Broadway interpreting the range from directions of the people composer. “Each who have type of production experience brings a different with musical experience,” theater to Pomeranz said, “and amateur each has its perks.” performers, but all of the When asked about cast members her favorite memory have a love for from Believe in musical theater. Believe in Broadway 2011 cast members. Pomeranz is second from Broadway, Pomeranz “I had to learn said she is happiest Photo courtesy of Leigh Pomeranz to work with “knowing that the people who don’t have a lot of experience either cast is having a good time and our audience with musical theater or performing in front members enjoy their experience.” Pomeranz of audiences,” Pomeranz said. The variation in hopes that Believe in Broadway will continue on experience levels and the short amount of time as a Hamilton College tradition long after she between auditions (as well as working around has graduated so that other Hamilton students Hamilton students’ already busy schedules) can continue to have a wonderful experience certainly proved to be challenging aspects of while doing something positive for charity and musically directing these shows. their community. Even so, there’s a joy in helping amateur own characters to the performances and their own experiences,” Pomeranz said, “there are always incredibly good learning experiences throughout.”

Pomeranz hopes to pursue music directing after college. Whether she works with cabarets or full length productions, all you have to do is look at the work she has done at Hamilton to know that she will be incredibly successful in her endeavors.

Pomeranz also worked with Danielle Burby ’12 the continental | spring 2012

13


talk of the town

talk of the town

More Hamilton Mysteries by Alana Christopher ’14

Following the popularity of our fall feature on “What you didn’t know about Hamilton” here are a few more stories to pique your curiosity about our 200 year-old college.

Ghosts in the Theater Minor Theater, the oldest brick building on campus, existed as a library, a dormitory for visiting girls, and

Lauren Lanzotti ’14 who has worked as a stage manager for various productions in the theater has experienced much more than mysterious, echoing late in the theater painting sets. Around one in the morning, they heard mysterious laughter coming from the dressing rooms. When they entered, lights that Lanzotti knew had been switched off were on and the laughing continued with no visible source. That same night, Lanzotti entered the bathroom and found the water running without the taps turned on.

1961. Rumors of an unknown presence that lurks behind Minor’s brick façade have spread among students and faculty of the theater department. Many on and off. have felt an unexplainable presence in the building and paranormal activity has frightened more than one late-night stage worker. There are many different is this merely the creaks and malfunctions of an old accounts of the ghost’s doings, but one thing is consistent: the ghost only emerges late at night when building? the theater is almost empty.

Peculiar Origins

Carole Bellini-Sharpe has taught as a Professor of Theater at Kirkland and Hamilton Colleges for Hamilton students have all heard the rumors about almost 40 years. She refers the origin of the rock swing. It to the ghost as “Connie” or Photo by Peter Finger for Hamilton College is widely “Esmeralda” believed and has felt a that this ghostly escort popular while alone in feature in the theater at McEwen night walking was jointly behind her designed as she leaves by a the building. Hamilton While she has physics never seen the major and ghost herself, a Kirkland Bellini-Sharpe art major said, “some as a senior have seen…a project. However, in white, the rock perhaps swing has a nurse’s existed uniform, since passing along the very the secondbeginning of Kirkland Emily Winters College and was installed right The Minor Theater ’14, a crewmember at the scene shop in around the time McEwen itself was Minor Theater, admits the building has built. an incredibly haunted and creepy feel to it during the late hours of the night. Late at night, Winters Its creation certainly is mysterious, but the lack of has heard the ghost climb the stairs and make noises documentation surrounding its construction is even more surprising. There is no plaque or dedication any unexplainable noises heard in Minor are often anywhere in McEwen that indicates anything about attributed to the ghostly presence. the rock swing’s history. Even Kirkland College professors, such as Carole Bellini-Sharpe and Nancy 14

the continental | spring 2012

Where the materials that make up the pendulum came from is a much-contested mystery as well. While many at the college believe the 1000 pound rock was pulled from the Kirkland College construction site, Kevin Howells stated the truth in his letter, explaining that the rock was given to his father by Pete Palmer, an Earth-Science teacher at Morrisville-Eaton Middle School. The myth that the platform can rise to reach McEwen appears, unfortunately, to be false (although that shouldn’t stop us from Rock Swing, 1973. trying!)

and Peter Rabinowitz remember its existence before they arrived to teach on the Hill. Very few people on Hamilton’s campus remember its construction, though many remember its central feature of Kirkland College. “Here was a prominent and great space, a central gathering place because the mailboxes were right there, and it needed something, some focal point,” said Samuel Babbitt, Kirkland College’s only president when questioned about the history of the swing.

The McEwen

Paul W. Howells, a retired engineer from the Syracuse Research Corporation and the real person behind the existence of the rock swing, also saw what was lacking when he saw the empty space. Howells was the husband of Kirkland College Dean Kate Howells. During his retirement he took to designing a series of energy-exchange pendulums. “When he saw the empty space at Wellin Hall, he couldn’t resist building a large version of the ball and ring pendulum to place there,” his son Kevin Howells explained in a 2005 letter, which can be found in the College archives.

“The rock is meant to give visual and physical, perhaps even intellectual, pleasure,” Paul Howells writes in the description of his creation. Yet the McEwen Rock Swing is no longer merely an amusement for students or a physics experiment; it has grown and evolved as a symbol of the College itself. Few can remember a time before the rock swing inhabited the empty space in front of the stairs to McEwen, and almost every student since its creation has experienced the thrill of riding on the swing. it is a meeting and gathering place, a stop on every tour route, and an essential piece of Hamilton and Kirkland College’s history.

the continental | spring 2012

15


talk of the town

talk of the town

More Hamilton Mysteries by Alana Christopher ’14

Following the popularity of our fall feature on “What you didn’t know about Hamilton” here are a few more stories to pique your curiosity about our 200 year-old college.

Ghosts in the Theater Minor Theater, the oldest brick building on campus, existed as a library, a dormitory for visiting girls, and

Lauren Lanzotti ’14 who has worked as a stage manager for various productions in the theater has experienced much more than mysterious, echoing late in the theater painting sets. Around one in the morning, they heard mysterious laughter coming from the dressing rooms. When they entered, lights that Lanzotti knew had been switched off were on and the laughing continued with no visible source. That same night, Lanzotti entered the bathroom and found the water running without the taps turned on.

1961. Rumors of an unknown presence that lurks behind Minor’s brick façade have spread among students and faculty of the theater department. Many on and off. have felt an unexplainable presence in the building and paranormal activity has frightened more than one late-night stage worker. There are many different is this merely the creaks and malfunctions of an old accounts of the ghost’s doings, but one thing is consistent: the ghost only emerges late at night when building? the theater is almost empty.

Peculiar Origins

Carole Bellini-Sharpe has taught as a Professor of Theater at Kirkland and Hamilton Colleges for Hamilton students have all heard the rumors about almost 40 years. She refers the origin of the rock swing. It to the ghost as “Connie” or Photo by Peter Finger for Hamilton College is widely “Esmeralda” believed and has felt a that this ghostly escort popular while alone in feature in the theater at McEwen night walking was jointly behind her designed as she leaves by a the building. Hamilton While she has physics never seen the major and ghost herself, a Kirkland Bellini-Sharpe art major said, “some as a senior have seen…a project. However, in white, the rock perhaps swing has a nurse’s existed uniform, since passing along the very the secondbeginning of Kirkland Emily Winters College and was installed right The Minor Theater ’14, a crewmember at the scene shop in around the time McEwen itself was Minor Theater, admits the building has built. an incredibly haunted and creepy feel to it during the late hours of the night. Late at night, Winters Its creation certainly is mysterious, but the lack of has heard the ghost climb the stairs and make noises documentation surrounding its construction is even more surprising. There is no plaque or dedication any unexplainable noises heard in Minor are often anywhere in McEwen that indicates anything about attributed to the ghostly presence. the rock swing’s history. Even Kirkland College professors, such as Carole Bellini-Sharpe and Nancy 14

the continental | spring 2012

Where the materials that make up the pendulum came from is a much-contested mystery as well. While many at the college believe the 1000 pound rock was pulled from the Kirkland College construction site, Kevin Howells stated the truth in his letter, explaining that the rock was given to his father by Pete Palmer, an Earth-Science teacher at Morrisville-Eaton Middle School. The myth that the platform can rise to reach McEwen appears, unfortunately, to be false (although that shouldn’t stop us from Rock Swing, 1973. trying!)

and Peter Rabinowitz remember its existence before they arrived to teach on the Hill. Very few people on Hamilton’s campus remember its construction, though many remember its central feature of Kirkland College. “Here was a prominent and great space, a central gathering place because the mailboxes were right there, and it needed something, some focal point,” said Samuel Babbitt, Kirkland College’s only president when questioned about the history of the swing.

The McEwen

Paul W. Howells, a retired engineer from the Syracuse Research Corporation and the real person behind the existence of the rock swing, also saw what was lacking when he saw the empty space. Howells was the husband of Kirkland College Dean Kate Howells. During his retirement he took to designing a series of energy-exchange pendulums. “When he saw the empty space at Wellin Hall, he couldn’t resist building a large version of the ball and ring pendulum to place there,” his son Kevin Howells explained in a 2005 letter, which can be found in the College archives.

“The rock is meant to give visual and physical, perhaps even intellectual, pleasure,” Paul Howells writes in the description of his creation. Yet the McEwen Rock Swing is no longer merely an amusement for students or a physics experiment; it has grown and evolved as a symbol of the College itself. Few can remember a time before the rock swing inhabited the empty space in front of the stairs to McEwen, and almost every student since its creation has experienced the thrill of riding on the swing. it is a meeting and gathering place, a stop on every tour route, and an essential piece of Hamilton and Kirkland College’s history.

the continental | spring 2012

15


talk of the town

talk of the town

The Tieless Gentlemen: by Frankie Caracciolo ’13 We Hamiltonians party, nod-our-headsalong-to-the-beat, dance, hook up, and then, at some restive moments, tell our friends about our weekend. After a particularly special night out we can talk about how we found ourselves in the sounds of a student-musician.

You also have your pick of rocking bands such as

Sarge Kinlin ’15, Tae Wook Lucas Kang ’13, Marty Cain ’13, and Anthony Mathieu ’12 are four on campus. They create a network by providing students with new and rekindled connections to artists, types of music, and the creative process in situ. They serve as muses to the Hamilton student body because they inspire other students to pursue their own creative endeavors. Fortunately, there is something more than mere Debauchery & Good Times et al. to experience on the weekends at Hamilton. Presumably, most students go to shows or performances by nontheir time on the Hill. Sometimes the DJs, like Kinlin (DJ for Above the in seamlessly with the Annex

Cain and Kang’s fourpiece cover band with Daniel Feinberg ’12 and Henry Andreder ’12, I’m With You in Rockland. They perform in the cramped spaces of suite common rooms or on-campus houses. These concerts get so crowded that there is hardly any room to breathe, adding to the intimacy of the performance and exciting atmosphere. The band literally brings you within a hip gyration’s distance from Cain’s Vintage Schafur Jazz Guitar or Kang’s Fender Arctic White Stratacaster. And because of the small and niche aspect of all of these performances, there is never a bad seat from which to watch these musicians perform. All of these students are just a sample of the talent in the burgeoning student-musician community. These musicians are looking to provide us with experiences and entertainment that only a live and organic performance can provide.

décor to create a sense of intimate inclusion in a raving blend of body-moving music. At other times, a rapper’s braggadocio, such as ATM’s (Mathieu’s stage moniker), brings head16

the continental | spring 2012

After a certain point, the party is more than the music you hear, but if the student-musician can create an atmosphere where the listener is equally aware and unaware of how the music is affecting oneself, the paths to both pleasure and fun are all the more endowed and better for it. Hamilton’s student-musicians are artists with more than just a beat or two up their sleeves.

As Hamilton students, we are fortunate to have access to an incredible array of performances on campus, many of which are put on by our very an orchestra concert in Wellin Hall, a play in Minor Theater, or an open mic night in the Fillius Events Barn, there is bound to be an event worth attending. Although music and theater tend to receive the most attention from students, Hamilton is also home to a small but energetic studentrun comedy scene, featuring styles ranging from improv to satire to sketch humor.

“We actually do rehearse,” said member Brittany Tomkin ’12, “but it’s more like practicing for a sports team because no matter how much you practice, you never know what will happen in the game.” The world of Hamilton comedy appears poised to grow in the coming years with interest and membership in current groups increasing and new groups appearing on the scene. In the spring of 2011, Alex Wood ’12 and Will Schoder ’14 founded the Student Stand-Up Club in an effort to promote stand-up comedy on campus. “It’s clear that students want to see comedy on campus,” said Schoder, “it’s just a matter of

Comedy On Campus

In 1993, Nat Faxon ’97 founded Hamilton’s oldest comedy troupe, Bobby Peru. Faxon recently received the Academy Award for Best Writing (Adapted Screenplay) for his work on The Descendants. In by Connor Brown ’12 contrast to improv groups, Bobby Peru shows consist of sketches that the members of the troupe have written and rehearsed ahead of time. being a part of Bobby Peru is that it allows us to exercise our creativity through both writing and performing,” said member Kate Bennert ’12. The sketches often address elements of campus culture. For example, their song “Party in Bundy” (a parody of Miley Cyrus’ song “Party in the USA”) describes the debaucheries in the allcampus parties at Bundy Dining Hall. These wellconstructed and rehearsed comedy routines provide a fun and dynamic experience for performers and audience members alike.

involved.” The organization has since hosted two open mic nights where aspiring comedians could sign up and test their material in front of a student audience. Another new group is BuffComedy, the brainchild of Schoder and James Anesta ’14. Formed in the fall of 2011, BuffComedy combines live sketches with humorous videos to create a unique experience for the audience. Currently, Schoder and Anesta are busy writing material with plans time later this semester. an active comedy scene at Hamilton are obvious; on-campus events provide students and community members with entertainment as well as opportunities to relieve the daily tensions of college life and form connections with others based on a shared appreciation of humor. Bobby Peru member Jennifer Keefe ’12 believes that comedy also helps broaden students’ perspective inside the Hamilton “bubble.”

Hamilton’s improv troupe, Will Schoder ’14 warms up for an open “Some of the things we focus on in Yodapez, currently consists of mic night. eight members. They put on college that we think are important two or three shows each semester. During arguably now are really inconsequential in the grand scheme their most famous show called the “Taco Bell of things. Comedy lets us underline the absurdity of Show,” Yodapez provided audience members with certain aspects of college life and reminds us to not literally hundreds of tacos. Specializing in both take ourselves too seriously,” said Keefe. shortform and longform improv, the group’s shows are driven by interaction between the audience and the performers. Yodapez’s members must be able to think on their feet and adapt quickly on stage. the continental | spring 2012

17


talk of the town

talk of the town

The Tieless Gentlemen: by Frankie Caracciolo ’13 We Hamiltonians party, nod-our-headsalong-to-the-beat, dance, hook up, and then, at some restive moments, tell our friends about our weekend. After a particularly special night out we can talk about how we found ourselves in the sounds of a student-musician.

You also have your pick of rocking bands such as

Sarge Kinlin ’15, Tae Wook Lucas Kang ’13, Marty Cain ’13, and Anthony Mathieu ’12 are four on campus. They create a network by providing students with new and rekindled connections to artists, types of music, and the creative process in situ. They serve as muses to the Hamilton student body because they inspire other students to pursue their own creative endeavors. Fortunately, there is something more than mere Debauchery & Good Times et al. to experience on the weekends at Hamilton. Presumably, most students go to shows or performances by nontheir time on the Hill. Sometimes the DJs, like Kinlin (DJ for Above the in seamlessly with the Annex

Cain and Kang’s fourpiece cover band with Daniel Feinberg ’12 and Henry Andreder ’12, I’m With You in Rockland. They perform in the cramped spaces of suite common rooms or on-campus houses. These concerts get so crowded that there is hardly any room to breathe, adding to the intimacy of the performance and exciting atmosphere. The band literally brings you within a hip gyration’s distance from Cain’s Vintage Schafur Jazz Guitar or Kang’s Fender Arctic White Stratacaster. And because of the small and niche aspect of all of these performances, there is never a bad seat from which to watch these musicians perform. All of these students are just a sample of the talent in the burgeoning student-musician community. These musicians are looking to provide us with experiences and entertainment that only a live and organic performance can provide.

décor to create a sense of intimate inclusion in a raving blend of body-moving music. At other times, a rapper’s braggadocio, such as ATM’s (Mathieu’s stage moniker), brings head16

the continental | spring 2012

After a certain point, the party is more than the music you hear, but if the student-musician can create an atmosphere where the listener is equally aware and unaware of how the music is affecting oneself, the paths to both pleasure and fun are all the more endowed and better for it. Hamilton’s student-musicians are artists with more than just a beat or two up their sleeves.

As Hamilton students, we are fortunate to have access to an incredible array of performances on campus, many of which are put on by our very an orchestra concert in Wellin Hall, a play in Minor Theater, or an open mic night in the Fillius Events Barn, there is bound to be an event worth attending. Although music and theater tend to receive the most attention from students, Hamilton is also home to a small but energetic studentrun comedy scene, featuring styles ranging from improv to satire to sketch humor.

“We actually do rehearse,” said member Brittany Tomkin ’12, “but it’s more like practicing for a sports team because no matter how much you practice, you never know what will happen in the game.” The world of Hamilton comedy appears poised to grow in the coming years with interest and membership in current groups increasing and new groups appearing on the scene. In the spring of 2011, Alex Wood ’12 and Will Schoder ’14 founded the Student Stand-Up Club in an effort to promote stand-up comedy on campus. “It’s clear that students want to see comedy on campus,” said Schoder, “it’s just a matter of

Comedy On Campus

In 1993, Nat Faxon ’97 founded Hamilton’s oldest comedy troupe, Bobby Peru. Faxon recently received the Academy Award for Best Writing (Adapted Screenplay) for his work on The Descendants. In by Connor Brown ’12 contrast to improv groups, Bobby Peru shows consist of sketches that the members of the troupe have written and rehearsed ahead of time. being a part of Bobby Peru is that it allows us to exercise our creativity through both writing and performing,” said member Kate Bennert ’12. The sketches often address elements of campus culture. For example, their song “Party in Bundy” (a parody of Miley Cyrus’ song “Party in the USA”) describes the debaucheries in the allcampus parties at Bundy Dining Hall. These wellconstructed and rehearsed comedy routines provide a fun and dynamic experience for performers and audience members alike.

involved.” The organization has since hosted two open mic nights where aspiring comedians could sign up and test their material in front of a student audience. Another new group is BuffComedy, the brainchild of Schoder and James Anesta ’14. Formed in the fall of 2011, BuffComedy combines live sketches with humorous videos to create a unique experience for the audience. Currently, Schoder and Anesta are busy writing material with plans time later this semester. an active comedy scene at Hamilton are obvious; on-campus events provide students and community members with entertainment as well as opportunities to relieve the daily tensions of college life and form connections with others based on a shared appreciation of humor. Bobby Peru member Jennifer Keefe ’12 believes that comedy also helps broaden students’ perspective inside the Hamilton “bubble.”

Hamilton’s improv troupe, Will Schoder ’14 warms up for an open “Some of the things we focus on in Yodapez, currently consists of mic night. eight members. They put on college that we think are important two or three shows each semester. During arguably now are really inconsequential in the grand scheme their most famous show called the “Taco Bell of things. Comedy lets us underline the absurdity of Show,” Yodapez provided audience members with certain aspects of college life and reminds us to not literally hundreds of tacos. Specializing in both take ourselves too seriously,” said Keefe. shortform and longform improv, the group’s shows are driven by interaction between the audience and the performers. Yodapez’s members must be able to think on their feet and adapt quickly on stage. the continental | spring 2012

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features

features

On the Job: Students’ Job Options Expand by Alex Garvey ’13

When it comes to on-campus employment, designing websites and cultivating the campus landscape are not the students may believe that the only options are the same old, time-consuming on-campus jobs, it turns out that Hamilton has a vast array of jobs that are available for students who are willing to look. Two years ago, Riley Smith ’12 was hired to help create the Student Employment randomly assigned rather than posted on HamNET. “There was no way for students and employers to really connect. But now, students can simply log onto HamNET, submit their cover letters and resumes, and apply,” said Smith.

Smith, however, expressed a very different sentiment. According to Smith, there are an abundance of jobs available on campus. enough opportunities out there that all of our work-study students and the majority of all the other students should be able to have an on-campus job,” said Smith, “It’s actually the work-study students who are still looking

Interestingly enough, HamNET offers more than the jobs behind the counter or the wheel. In fact, Hamilton employers, as well

trying to confront right now.”

have been working with the Career Center to help make on-campus employment a worthwhile endeavor that students can put on their resumes. Smith believes on-campus employment should prepare students for the “real job market.”

The ITS Assistant Web Developer position is one example of a unique employment opportunity at Hamilton, and mirrors the responsibilities of any ‘real world’ internship. This job allows students to work directly with the ITS Web Services team to develop web applications, troubleshoot errors, administer

“By requiring students to submit a cover letter and resume, they understand that this is what the real world takes,” said Smith, “[Hamilton] Employers have also been trying to expand on their jobs to give students more responsibility. Now, many [on-campus] jobs that may seem like busy work on paper actually allow for a lot more student input, skill, and freedom.” However, according to Max Schnidman ’14, there seems to be another problem with on-campus employment that goes beyond a simple lack of trying. “I applied for over 20 jobs before landing the position I have now,” said Schnidman, “It’s very hard for freshmen especially to get jobs. Even this year, I’ve heard several freshmen express their woes over not being able to get on-campus employment.” 18

Greg Hyman ’13 agreed, “I’ve heard many students express the belief that there’s not enough on-campus employment available. A lot of people think that all the unique opportunities are reserved for work-study students, or that the average student is somehow disadvantaged when it comes to getting a job on-campus.”

the continental | spring 2012

ITS Assistant Web Developer

maintain the college web site. David Dey ’14 and Schnidman, both employed to work as Technology Ambassadors for the ITS department, said that their position serves as a “liaison between the student body and the department, because it is much easier for students to interact with someone of their same age group.” Dey and Schnidman’s responsibilities include communicating with the student body about campus technology through posters, newsletters, e-mails and articles. They also administer surveys to gauge student opinion about ITS and technology. “We gather improve student-ITS communication,” said Dey.

Schnidman, a Public Policy and Philosophy double major, claims that the job has helped him with “writing skills, presentations, statistics, and policy analysis.” Furthermore, Schnidman said the fact that the job calls for data analysis and updating ITS policies corresponds perfectly with his future interests. “I’ve learned how to coordinate with other people I’m working with, communicate with a boss, reach out to people outside a select group, and manage my time effectively,” said Dey.

Collections Assistant to the Registrar at the Emerson Gallery Kiernan Acquisto ’13, an Art History and Classics double major, currently works as the Collections Assistant to the Registrar at the Emerson Art Gallery. At the gallery, Acquisito catalogues or re-catalogues objects, moves them when necessary, helps with framing, and is responsible for knowing where things are, among other duties. Sometimes she gets to research objects’ histories. “I want to work in a museum, so the internship has provided me with a lot of valuable and relevant experience,” said Acquisto, “I’ve learned about how to take care of art and recognize the different kinds of art and types of paints or materials.” Acquisto said that the position has allowed her to work with everything from rare Gaudier-Brzeska statues to antiquities such as marble pieces, frescoes from Pompeii, and Greek vases. Therefore, for any student with an interest in art, archeology, artifacts, or a career in museums, this job offers invaluable

Other Opportunities

Human Resources, Financial Aid, and the Career Center in order to effectively manage on-campus student employment. According to Smith, “It’s a great position because it is completely student run. It has given me a great deal of real-world experience and responsibility.” another interesting opportunity, as it allows seniors to help shape the College’s future even after they are gone. Hamilton offers a wide range of employment opportunities that are readily available for those willing to look. The College’s Arboretum Intern, for example, is responsible for keeping up with Arboretum membership, and organizing Arboretum Advisory Committee meetings. Not only does this position allow for a great deal of responsibility and freedom on the part of the intern, but it also provides a meaningful outlet for students to get involved in the on-campus environment itself. For students with an interest in books or preservation, the Rare Books Library hires fascinating and unique opportunity in light of its impressive artifacts and inimitable Ezra Pound collection. For students with a pre-med, science, or sports medicine background, the Athletic Department hires Student First Responders who work out of the Athletic Training Room to prevent and help student injuries. While there may still be challenges ahead, student employment at Hamilton is far more available and diverse than initially meets the eye. For those willing to put in the extra effort, thanking them sooner than most students might think.

After speaking to Smith one-on-one, her job even seemed interesting. This position allows a student to work directly with members of the continental | spring 2012

19


features

features

On the Job: Students’ Job Options Expand by Alex Garvey ’13

When it comes to on-campus employment, designing websites and cultivating the campus landscape are not the students may believe that the only options are the same old, time-consuming on-campus jobs, it turns out that Hamilton has a vast array of jobs that are available for students who are willing to look. Two years ago, Riley Smith ’12 was hired to help create the Student Employment randomly assigned rather than posted on HamNET. “There was no way for students and employers to really connect. But now, students can simply log onto HamNET, submit their cover letters and resumes, and apply,” said Smith.

Smith, however, expressed a very different sentiment. According to Smith, there are an abundance of jobs available on campus. enough opportunities out there that all of our work-study students and the majority of all the other students should be able to have an on-campus job,” said Smith, “It’s actually the work-study students who are still looking

Interestingly enough, HamNET offers more than the jobs behind the counter or the wheel. In fact, Hamilton employers, as well

trying to confront right now.”

have been working with the Career Center to help make on-campus employment a worthwhile endeavor that students can put on their resumes. Smith believes on-campus employment should prepare students for the “real job market.”

The ITS Assistant Web Developer position is one example of a unique employment opportunity at Hamilton, and mirrors the responsibilities of any ‘real world’ internship. This job allows students to work directly with the ITS Web Services team to develop web applications, troubleshoot errors, administer

“By requiring students to submit a cover letter and resume, they understand that this is what the real world takes,” said Smith, “[Hamilton] Employers have also been trying to expand on their jobs to give students more responsibility. Now, many [on-campus] jobs that may seem like busy work on paper actually allow for a lot more student input, skill, and freedom.” However, according to Max Schnidman ’14, there seems to be another problem with on-campus employment that goes beyond a simple lack of trying. “I applied for over 20 jobs before landing the position I have now,” said Schnidman, “It’s very hard for freshmen especially to get jobs. Even this year, I’ve heard several freshmen express their woes over not being able to get on-campus employment.” 18

Greg Hyman ’13 agreed, “I’ve heard many students express the belief that there’s not enough on-campus employment available. A lot of people think that all the unique opportunities are reserved for work-study students, or that the average student is somehow disadvantaged when it comes to getting a job on-campus.”

the continental | spring 2012

ITS Assistant Web Developer

maintain the college web site. David Dey ’14 and Schnidman, both employed to work as Technology Ambassadors for the ITS department, said that their position serves as a “liaison between the student body and the department, because it is much easier for students to interact with someone of their same age group.” Dey and Schnidman’s responsibilities include communicating with the student body about campus technology through posters, newsletters, e-mails and articles. They also administer surveys to gauge student opinion about ITS and technology. “We gather improve student-ITS communication,” said Dey.

Schnidman, a Public Policy and Philosophy double major, claims that the job has helped him with “writing skills, presentations, statistics, and policy analysis.” Furthermore, Schnidman said the fact that the job calls for data analysis and updating ITS policies corresponds perfectly with his future interests. “I’ve learned how to coordinate with other people I’m working with, communicate with a boss, reach out to people outside a select group, and manage my time effectively,” said Dey.

Collections Assistant to the Registrar at the Emerson Gallery Kiernan Acquisto ’13, an Art History and Classics double major, currently works as the Collections Assistant to the Registrar at the Emerson Art Gallery. At the gallery, Acquisito catalogues or re-catalogues objects, moves them when necessary, helps with framing, and is responsible for knowing where things are, among other duties. Sometimes she gets to research objects’ histories. “I want to work in a museum, so the internship has provided me with a lot of valuable and relevant experience,” said Acquisto, “I’ve learned about how to take care of art and recognize the different kinds of art and types of paints or materials.” Acquisto said that the position has allowed her to work with everything from rare Gaudier-Brzeska statues to antiquities such as marble pieces, frescoes from Pompeii, and Greek vases. Therefore, for any student with an interest in art, archeology, artifacts, or a career in museums, this job offers invaluable

Other Opportunities

Human Resources, Financial Aid, and the Career Center in order to effectively manage on-campus student employment. According to Smith, “It’s a great position because it is completely student run. It has given me a great deal of real-world experience and responsibility.” another interesting opportunity, as it allows seniors to help shape the College’s future even after they are gone. Hamilton offers a wide range of employment opportunities that are readily available for those willing to look. The College’s Arboretum Intern, for example, is responsible for keeping up with Arboretum membership, and organizing Arboretum Advisory Committee meetings. Not only does this position allow for a great deal of responsibility and freedom on the part of the intern, but it also provides a meaningful outlet for students to get involved in the on-campus environment itself. For students with an interest in books or preservation, the Rare Books Library hires fascinating and unique opportunity in light of its impressive artifacts and inimitable Ezra Pound collection. For students with a pre-med, science, or sports medicine background, the Athletic Department hires Student First Responders who work out of the Athletic Training Room to prevent and help student injuries. While there may still be challenges ahead, student employment at Hamilton is far more available and diverse than initially meets the eye. For those willing to put in the extra effort, thanking them sooner than most students might think.

After speaking to Smith one-on-one, her job even seemed interesting. This position allows a student to work directly with members of the continental | spring 2012

19


features

features

by Charlotte Hough ’14 You may have seen them walking briskly across campus, carrying around small, bright orange bags. Inside these bags are a few things that the everyday student would not know how to use. Namely, the bags contain: clot pads, trauma shears, oral glucose, a rescue blanket, and a radio that tends to go off at inopportune times. Who are these strange characters, you might ask? They are volunteers for Hamilton’s EMT organization, Hamilton College Emergency Medical Service (HCEMS).

Due to a pledge they must make, EMTs cannot talk about what they do and who they help. As a result, many members of the Hamilton community seem to misjudge exactly what the job entails. “I think people tend to think that we’re school nurses or something like that,” said Susannah Spero ’13, “They think that we can pull out their splinters or give them a Band-Aid – something that you would call your mom for. But we’re trained to do more than that.” As Spero described, Hamilton EMTs are oxygen, help deliver babies and shock people back to life, among other things. But one of the most important skills, she said, is talking with patients. “A huge part of the job is interacting with the patient as a person,” she said, adding, “That’s one of the hardest things to do.” Speaking one-onone with patients is one of the things that interest Ashley Sutton ’13 most about calls, especially now that she’s a Psychology major. Though she originally wanted to go to medical school, she changed her mind when she got to Hamilton. “Throughout the course of my studies I decided I wanted to go into psychology,” said Sutton, that out because I’ve learned that on calls I’m often 20

the continental | spring 2012

much more interested in the psychological wellbeing of the patient than the actual medical situation.”

Another common misconception about Hamilton EMTs is that they are all premed. Though these EMTs’ majors do tend more often than not to be in the sciences, a them are not pre-med and joined for different reasons. James Stanell ’14 joined in part because he wanted to learn how to respond to medical emergencies. “I used to work at McDonald’s before I came to Hamilton. I worked in the drive through window right next to a busy intersection and I always saw car crashes,” he said, “I felt horrible seeing it and not being able to do anything. So that’s what kind of sparked my interest.” Spero was drawn to EMT volunteering as a different way to be involved on the Hill. “I think it’s a really unique way to be involved in the campus community,” she said. “I feel like a lot of students join clubs or teams but I wanted to do something that I’d never done before that was a little different.” But the real reason? “The orange bag is really fun to carry around,” she added with a laugh, joking, “I think that’s the secret reason why a lot of us want to be EMTs, but that’s not what we say in the interviews.”

when you’re taking the class together,” said Kruger. “When you’re spending at least seven or eight hours a week in the same room learning the same stuff it’s almost impossible not to forge some sort of a bond. And then there’s also something about being on call together. Waking up in the middle of the night together, and taking care of people that brings you closer together [with the other EMTs].”

the greater Clinton area, combines textbook learning with work in practical stations. It meets twice a week for two four-hour sessions. While studying for quizzes can be stressful, students often get comic relief through some of the practical exercises they had to do. When instructors run call scenarios with the class, students get to play roles that they wouldn’t the patient. As Sutton recounted, “The instructor will tell one of the students: ‘Well, you’re a 60-year-old-man that just had a stroke’ and you have to sit there and act like a 60-year-old man who had a stroke. Maybe one side of you is drooping and maybe you’re slurring your speech.” What was this like? “It’s kind of fun,” said Sutton. “I really liked being the patient because you get to like, ham it up.” When the EMTs-to-be had to stage such serious scenarios, a light-hearted attitude seemed to be almost necessary, according to Spero. “In the actual class there’s a lot of laughing and joking – EMTs as a type of person, whether they’re working for a college or certain type of agency, tend to have a pretty strong sense of humor,” Spero said. “You pretty much have to have a sense of humor if you’re going to do this job.”

situations.

be a scary and traumatic situation, I can not freak out and be able to take care of myself,” said Azdair. Sutton also faced a traumatic situation off the job and off campus when she and her Dad aided an elderly woman who had been victim to a hit-and-run. Driving to the beach, they stopped when they saw her lying on the side of the road. “All we could see was blood and her shoes in the middle of the street. My dad pulled over right she was okay,” said Sutton, “It was really good to know that you could actually be of use.” In addition to the medical skills, EMTs develop life skills that can be applied to any situation. from being an EMT, Lindsay Shankman ’12 said, “I think the big things are the personal skills. You grow as a person, and being what you know is right and standing up for that you develop as an EMT that can carry through into most anything.”

1. 2. 3. 4.

5.

Joining HCEMS isn’t just about the medical training – it’s also about the friends students make in the process. As James Kruger ’12 described, monthly meetings often go much longer than planned because the EMTs can’t stop talking to each other. So much of what they go through in training and on calls brings them closer together. “You really foster this sense of community

But when it comes down to it, the EMTs know how to switch to being serious and collected almost immediately. It’s a useful skill to be able to collect oneself when stressful situations arise, both on and off the job. Jamie Azdair ’13 faced such a moment when he went cliff jumping with friends in the fall and got a serious cut in his toe. He knew how to dress the wound from his EMT training, but also how to keep calm.

6. 7.

The emergency call goes through to Campus Safety. Campus Safety pages the three EMTs on call on their radios to let them know where the emergency is and what kind of emergency it is. EMTs quickly make their way to the emergency, either by walking or in a Campus Safety vehicle, if Campus Safety is able to pick them up. When they arrive at the scene, the EMTs assess the keep the scene clear in case there are bystanders trying to interfere. The EMTs determine if the patient needs further care that they themselves cannot provide. If so, the patient is transported via ambulance to St. Luke’s or St. Elizabeth’s Hospital. for HCEMS director Diann Lynch in a locked box. The EMTs radio Campus Safety to tell them they follow. the continental | spring 2012

21


features

features

by Charlotte Hough ’14 You may have seen them walking briskly across campus, carrying around small, bright orange bags. Inside these bags are a few things that the everyday student would not know how to use. Namely, the bags contain: clot pads, trauma shears, oral glucose, a rescue blanket, and a radio that tends to go off at inopportune times. Who are these strange characters, you might ask? They are volunteers for Hamilton’s EMT organization, Hamilton College Emergency Medical Service (HCEMS).

Due to a pledge they must make, EMTs cannot talk about what they do and who they help. As a result, many members of the Hamilton community seem to misjudge exactly what the job entails. “I think people tend to think that we’re school nurses or something like that,” said Susannah Spero ’13, “They think that we can pull out their splinters or give them a Band-Aid – something that you would call your mom for. But we’re trained to do more than that.” As Spero described, Hamilton EMTs are oxygen, help deliver babies and shock people back to life, among other things. But one of the most important skills, she said, is talking with patients. “A huge part of the job is interacting with the patient as a person,” she said, adding, “That’s one of the hardest things to do.” Speaking one-onone with patients is one of the things that interest Ashley Sutton ’13 most about calls, especially now that she’s a Psychology major. Though she originally wanted to go to medical school, she changed her mind when she got to Hamilton. “Throughout the course of my studies I decided I wanted to go into psychology,” said Sutton, that out because I’ve learned that on calls I’m often 20

the continental | spring 2012

much more interested in the psychological wellbeing of the patient than the actual medical situation.”

Another common misconception about Hamilton EMTs is that they are all premed. Though these EMTs’ majors do tend more often than not to be in the sciences, a them are not pre-med and joined for different reasons. James Stanell ’14 joined in part because he wanted to learn how to respond to medical emergencies. “I used to work at McDonald’s before I came to Hamilton. I worked in the drive through window right next to a busy intersection and I always saw car crashes,” he said, “I felt horrible seeing it and not being able to do anything. So that’s what kind of sparked my interest.” Spero was drawn to EMT volunteering as a different way to be involved on the Hill. “I think it’s a really unique way to be involved in the campus community,” she said. “I feel like a lot of students join clubs or teams but I wanted to do something that I’d never done before that was a little different.” But the real reason? “The orange bag is really fun to carry around,” she added with a laugh, joking, “I think that’s the secret reason why a lot of us want to be EMTs, but that’s not what we say in the interviews.”

when you’re taking the class together,” said Kruger. “When you’re spending at least seven or eight hours a week in the same room learning the same stuff it’s almost impossible not to forge some sort of a bond. And then there’s also something about being on call together. Waking up in the middle of the night together, and taking care of people that brings you closer together [with the other EMTs].”

the greater Clinton area, combines textbook learning with work in practical stations. It meets twice a week for two four-hour sessions. While studying for quizzes can be stressful, students often get comic relief through some of the practical exercises they had to do. When instructors run call scenarios with the class, students get to play roles that they wouldn’t the patient. As Sutton recounted, “The instructor will tell one of the students: ‘Well, you’re a 60-year-old-man that just had a stroke’ and you have to sit there and act like a 60-year-old man who had a stroke. Maybe one side of you is drooping and maybe you’re slurring your speech.” What was this like? “It’s kind of fun,” said Sutton. “I really liked being the patient because you get to like, ham it up.” When the EMTs-to-be had to stage such serious scenarios, a light-hearted attitude seemed to be almost necessary, according to Spero. “In the actual class there’s a lot of laughing and joking – EMTs as a type of person, whether they’re working for a college or certain type of agency, tend to have a pretty strong sense of humor,” Spero said. “You pretty much have to have a sense of humor if you’re going to do this job.”

situations.

be a scary and traumatic situation, I can not freak out and be able to take care of myself,” said Azdair. Sutton also faced a traumatic situation off the job and off campus when she and her Dad aided an elderly woman who had been victim to a hit-and-run. Driving to the beach, they stopped when they saw her lying on the side of the road. “All we could see was blood and her shoes in the middle of the street. My dad pulled over right she was okay,” said Sutton, “It was really good to know that you could actually be of use.” In addition to the medical skills, EMTs develop life skills that can be applied to any situation. from being an EMT, Lindsay Shankman ’12 said, “I think the big things are the personal skills. You grow as a person, and being what you know is right and standing up for that you develop as an EMT that can carry through into most anything.”

1. 2. 3. 4.

5.

Joining HCEMS isn’t just about the medical training – it’s also about the friends students make in the process. As James Kruger ’12 described, monthly meetings often go much longer than planned because the EMTs can’t stop talking to each other. So much of what they go through in training and on calls brings them closer together. “You really foster this sense of community

But when it comes down to it, the EMTs know how to switch to being serious and collected almost immediately. It’s a useful skill to be able to collect oneself when stressful situations arise, both on and off the job. Jamie Azdair ’13 faced such a moment when he went cliff jumping with friends in the fall and got a serious cut in his toe. He knew how to dress the wound from his EMT training, but also how to keep calm.

6. 7.

The emergency call goes through to Campus Safety. Campus Safety pages the three EMTs on call on their radios to let them know where the emergency is and what kind of emergency it is. EMTs quickly make their way to the emergency, either by walking or in a Campus Safety vehicle, if Campus Safety is able to pick them up. When they arrive at the scene, the EMTs assess the keep the scene clear in case there are bystanders trying to interfere. The EMTs determine if the patient needs further care that they themselves cannot provide. If so, the patient is transported via ambulance to St. Luke’s or St. Elizabeth’s Hospital. for HCEMS director Diann Lynch in a locked box. The EMTs radio Campus Safety to tell them they follow. the continental | spring 2012

21


features

features

The Follow Through

Hamilton Students Lend a Hand to the Big Brothers Big Sisters Program by Rebecca Pomerantz ’12

Free time is a rare commodity on the Hamilton campus. Some students leave the Hill once a week to do some shopping or to go out to dinner, but some take their extra time further. While the Big Brothers Big Sisters (BBBS) program is recognized in big cities across the country, few students are aware that some of their peers are involved in the organization just down the hill in Utica.

interest in the program, end up avoiding her phone calls and not following through. “I remember learning in my initial interview that UCP was frustrated that students weren’t being responsive…. Some didn’t show up to their match meetings and just left the families hanging,” Cauthen added in disbelief.

The Hamilton branch of BBBS, coordinated with the help of Upstate Cerebral Palsy (UCP), has grown over the past few years into a 40-student club. But don’t be mistaken, Hamilton’s

While it is a process to become involved in the program, the actual job is fairly straightforward and open. Cauthen notes that UCP asks for a bi-weekly update on the activities the pair does together, any mood, attitude or action changes, and any other

so a lot more responsibility rests on the studentcoordinators, Caitlin Livsey ’12 and Sarah Cauthen ’14.

much communication going on in these families, so we try to help facilitate it by monitoring our littles’

After getting through a long application process full of interviews, background checks, and risk children in the local area. The children in the program go to the same schools or same kinds of situations. For some of these children (or “littles”), their “bigs” are the only mentors they have. For those interested in psychology, urban studies, education, or those who want to get involved in the local community, BBBS can offer great rewards. The key to a successful mentor and BBBS chapter seems to be commitment. Livsey signed up at a being one of the few people to follow through on their interest. Cauthen had always wanted to be involved in BBBS in high school and once seeing Livsey’s commitment at Hamilton, decided she had to be a part of the program. Both Livsey and has been pretty easy to work together and share the responsibility. The Hamilton BBBS liaison at UCP, Cara Rowlands, shared that the most frustrating aspect of the

with the activities, as long as they meet with their littles at least three times a month. Livsey’s involvement grew continuously from the time she joined the program to when she became a coordinator in her sophomore year. She now works with twin boys named Jimmy and Michael. Working with twins poses some challenges, but it’s nothing that Livsey can’t handle as she’s worked with two kids before. Cauthen’s little is a boy named Justin. Cauthen and knew that she wanted to work with them. She especially admires Justin’s mom as she is, “taking night classes and really trying to improve her kids’ lives.” While it took a while for Justin to warm up to Cauthen, the two are very close now. Cauthen used to talk but once he opened up he never stopped. I’m glad I can be there for him as a Justin was recently placed in a special education class and Cauthen feels he does not belong there. ostracized. Cauthen explained, “There’s just not enough happening in the schools and hardly enough involvement from the parents.”

Livsey and her littles, Jimmy and Michael. 22

the continental | spring 2012

Because Cauthen and Livsey are friends and Livsey has a car, the two often do activities together with their littles. Working in a group also gives the littles positive socialization, one more role model to look up to, and some consistency in their lives. Cauthen will be working with Livsey’s littles once she graduates in May, so joint activities also help to build trust in their relationship.

Livsey and Cauthen said that their time with their littles does not only focus on mentoring, but is a lot of fun, too. UCP puts out a calendar each month with organization-wide activities and events and sometimes they offer tickets for discount admission to events. Bowling events have been a huge hit, as well as the deals for musicals. Cauthen explained, “We got deals on tickets for the circus and Shrek the Musical. The kids also really like the Christmas party and we love the Christmas party. At the Christmas party this year each child was given a stuffed animal from Santa and our boys picked out stuffed animals for their little brothers as well! ”

explained. The two talk about everything ranging from school for him to know he can call at anytime,” said Weir. Nick now calls Weir all the time for a casual chat. “He even asked me to go into his school for his role model day.” The two have gotten so close that Nick even asks Weir for girl advice. “He called me once because he wanted to ask a girl out on a date and needed help in his life,” Weir said. Weir has seen amazing changes in Nick’s

“The progression has been really cool to see him own activities and even pay out of their own become more outgoing and active. He is more pockets. “I sure of himself which is so feel like my nice to see.” But Nick isn’t money is well the only one who reaps spent,” Cauthen said, “It’s also Weir has learned a lot from our excuse the program as well. “The to do things program is eye-opening… it’s we normally amazing to see such different wouldn’t do… living conditions so close to like see kids’ Hamilton. Plus, I consider movies in Nick to be a good friend of theaters.” Livsey mine,” said Weir. and Cauthen even described a time With people like Weir in the that they brought mix, both Cauthen and Livsey their littles to feel the program is headed Commons and in the right direction. The the boys couldn’t two seem to be taking care of Weir with his little, Nick. contain their excitement. most problems they have had previous years, Cauthen laughed, “Justin just stared in awe at the and are always sure to advertise just what a big ice cream selection.” commitment the program is. Livesy said, “We know more about it now… how to run it, how to pick the Despite the fun Livsey and Cauthen have with their right people [to work with littles].” littles, they recognize a huge male absence in the Cauthen, who will continue to be the coordinator children involved in BBBS. Not only are many male continue to improve the program in the coming volunteers are female. Cauthen said, “More boys years. Cauthen shared only one caveat: “I really wish the program would have more funding from it’s something that we have to work on. Men have a both BBBS and Hamilton. If the program had more different way of talking about and handling things.” money, we could reach out to so many more kids, unfortunately some do not get a match.” Hopefully Kendall Weir ’12 is one of the few male Hamilton this problem can be resolved in the coming years as students involved in the program and has been a Hamilton recognizes how important the program to both bigs and littles. from case managers, but I decided to commit and it has just been awesome.” Weir’s little, Nick, is 13 years old and therefore a little older than many kids involved in the program. But the decreased age gap between the two has

Both Livsey and Cauthen believe that they are not only changing lives, but that they are becoming more aware and active citizens of the world. “It’s the best feeling to know we have an impact on their lives,” Cauthen said, “We see glimpses of the people they could be and that’s the coolest part.”

to see him once every week or two weeks,” Weir the continental | spring 2012

23


features

features

The Follow Through

Hamilton Students Lend a Hand to the Big Brothers Big Sisters Program by Rebecca Pomerantz ’12

Free time is a rare commodity on the Hamilton campus. Some students leave the Hill once a week to do some shopping or to go out to dinner, but some take their extra time further. While the Big Brothers Big Sisters (BBBS) program is recognized in big cities across the country, few students are aware that some of their peers are involved in the organization just down the hill in Utica.

interest in the program, end up avoiding her phone calls and not following through. “I remember learning in my initial interview that UCP was frustrated that students weren’t being responsive…. Some didn’t show up to their match meetings and just left the families hanging,” Cauthen added in disbelief.

The Hamilton branch of BBBS, coordinated with the help of Upstate Cerebral Palsy (UCP), has grown over the past few years into a 40-student club. But don’t be mistaken, Hamilton’s

While it is a process to become involved in the program, the actual job is fairly straightforward and open. Cauthen notes that UCP asks for a bi-weekly update on the activities the pair does together, any mood, attitude or action changes, and any other

so a lot more responsibility rests on the studentcoordinators, Caitlin Livsey ’12 and Sarah Cauthen ’14.

much communication going on in these families, so we try to help facilitate it by monitoring our littles’

After getting through a long application process full of interviews, background checks, and risk children in the local area. The children in the program go to the same schools or same kinds of situations. For some of these children (or “littles”), their “bigs” are the only mentors they have. For those interested in psychology, urban studies, education, or those who want to get involved in the local community, BBBS can offer great rewards. The key to a successful mentor and BBBS chapter seems to be commitment. Livsey signed up at a being one of the few people to follow through on their interest. Cauthen had always wanted to be involved in BBBS in high school and once seeing Livsey’s commitment at Hamilton, decided she had to be a part of the program. Both Livsey and has been pretty easy to work together and share the responsibility. The Hamilton BBBS liaison at UCP, Cara Rowlands, shared that the most frustrating aspect of the

with the activities, as long as they meet with their littles at least three times a month. Livsey’s involvement grew continuously from the time she joined the program to when she became a coordinator in her sophomore year. She now works with twin boys named Jimmy and Michael. Working with twins poses some challenges, but it’s nothing that Livsey can’t handle as she’s worked with two kids before. Cauthen’s little is a boy named Justin. Cauthen and knew that she wanted to work with them. She especially admires Justin’s mom as she is, “taking night classes and really trying to improve her kids’ lives.” While it took a while for Justin to warm up to Cauthen, the two are very close now. Cauthen used to talk but once he opened up he never stopped. I’m glad I can be there for him as a Justin was recently placed in a special education class and Cauthen feels he does not belong there. ostracized. Cauthen explained, “There’s just not enough happening in the schools and hardly enough involvement from the parents.”

Livsey and her littles, Jimmy and Michael. 22

the continental | spring 2012

Because Cauthen and Livsey are friends and Livsey has a car, the two often do activities together with their littles. Working in a group also gives the littles positive socialization, one more role model to look up to, and some consistency in their lives. Cauthen will be working with Livsey’s littles once she graduates in May, so joint activities also help to build trust in their relationship.

Livsey and Cauthen said that their time with their littles does not only focus on mentoring, but is a lot of fun, too. UCP puts out a calendar each month with organization-wide activities and events and sometimes they offer tickets for discount admission to events. Bowling events have been a huge hit, as well as the deals for musicals. Cauthen explained, “We got deals on tickets for the circus and Shrek the Musical. The kids also really like the Christmas party and we love the Christmas party. At the Christmas party this year each child was given a stuffed animal from Santa and our boys picked out stuffed animals for their little brothers as well! ”

explained. The two talk about everything ranging from school for him to know he can call at anytime,” said Weir. Nick now calls Weir all the time for a casual chat. “He even asked me to go into his school for his role model day.” The two have gotten so close that Nick even asks Weir for girl advice. “He called me once because he wanted to ask a girl out on a date and needed help in his life,” Weir said. Weir has seen amazing changes in Nick’s

“The progression has been really cool to see him own activities and even pay out of their own become more outgoing and active. He is more pockets. “I sure of himself which is so feel like my nice to see.” But Nick isn’t money is well the only one who reaps spent,” Cauthen said, “It’s also Weir has learned a lot from our excuse the program as well. “The to do things program is eye-opening… it’s we normally amazing to see such different wouldn’t do… living conditions so close to like see kids’ Hamilton. Plus, I consider movies in Nick to be a good friend of theaters.” Livsey mine,” said Weir. and Cauthen even described a time With people like Weir in the that they brought mix, both Cauthen and Livsey their littles to feel the program is headed Commons and in the right direction. The the boys couldn’t two seem to be taking care of Weir with his little, Nick. contain their excitement. most problems they have had previous years, Cauthen laughed, “Justin just stared in awe at the and are always sure to advertise just what a big ice cream selection.” commitment the program is. Livesy said, “We know more about it now… how to run it, how to pick the Despite the fun Livsey and Cauthen have with their right people [to work with littles].” littles, they recognize a huge male absence in the Cauthen, who will continue to be the coordinator children involved in BBBS. Not only are many male continue to improve the program in the coming volunteers are female. Cauthen said, “More boys years. Cauthen shared only one caveat: “I really wish the program would have more funding from it’s something that we have to work on. Men have a both BBBS and Hamilton. If the program had more different way of talking about and handling things.” money, we could reach out to so many more kids, unfortunately some do not get a match.” Hopefully Kendall Weir ’12 is one of the few male Hamilton this problem can be resolved in the coming years as students involved in the program and has been a Hamilton recognizes how important the program to both bigs and littles. from case managers, but I decided to commit and it has just been awesome.” Weir’s little, Nick, is 13 years old and therefore a little older than many kids involved in the program. But the decreased age gap between the two has

Both Livsey and Cauthen believe that they are not only changing lives, but that they are becoming more aware and active citizens of the world. “It’s the best feeling to know we have an impact on their lives,” Cauthen said, “We see glimpses of the people they could be and that’s the coolest part.”

to see him once every week or two weeks,” Weir the continental | spring 2012

23


features

features

Want To Know A Secret? by Crystal Kim ’15

transformation in the way we devise, protect, and– dare I mention?–divulge our secrets to one another. From whispering about crushes in middle school to confessing to your roommate that it really was you that ate her Nutella, the way we reveal our secrets Hill, the inception of a PostSecret movement marks a new way students communicate about issues salient both inside and outside of the Hamilton bubble. The national PostSecret movement began in January 2005 with Frank Warren who was inspired by a dream to create a community art project. Today, online and congregate by mailing postcards to Warren revealing their deepest secrets in an artistic manner and engaging in the online PostSecret Community. Warren books, maintains the is updated weekly with new secrets, and also gives lectures on college campuses. He donates a portion of suicide prevention organizations. PostSecret is especially popular among college students. Sarah Mandel ’15 said, “I think it’s so popular because of the anonymity of it all. People feel like they can say the truth and are completely uninhibited.” PostSecret was brought to the Hill by Jennifer Keefe ’12, who read one of Warren’s books. “I thought it would be fun to do in the wintertime when nothing’s going on and it gets depressing here,” she said. 24

the continental | spring 2012

Keefe began planning for PostSecret à la Hamilton in early fall 2011 by speaking to Noelle Niznik, Assistant Director for Student Engagement and Leadership, registering PostSecret as a new club, and inviting students to interest meetings. Eventually, she assembled a small team of three other individuals. Along with Niznik, Keefe collaborated with Amelia Root ’14 and Kathleen Herlihy ’14. The cold frost of February marked the launch of PostSecret at Hamilton. PostSecret reception was held in the Sadove Student Center. The community was invited

but powerful bond among students. Although at times students complain about the lack of diversity on campus, these secrets displayed a genuine glimpse into the individuality and unique situations of the people who inhabit this Hill. We forget that even though we all attend Hamilton, have hectic schedules, and together complain about the weather and food, we are very much a diverse community of individuals. PostSecret at Hamilton gives a voice to those who cannot relieve their burdens in any other way, silently reminding us to not be constantly judgmental of our fellow peers.

The unadulterated revelation of our deepest fears, queasy recollection of embarrassing moments, treasured memories of joy, and acceptance and overcoming of the obstacles in life seeks to connect the most alienated and different individuals at community.

From its small and humble roots, PostSecret at Hamilton will no doubt gain momentum and receive more community involvement as the project develops. Concerning the future of PostSecret at Hamilton, Keefe said,“Hopefully as the years pass, it

Some submissions to Hamilton’s PostSecret.

the submitted postcards and also enjoyed a performance by acoustic artist Micah. The compilation of postcards displayed in Sadove Student Center certainly brightened up the snowcoated campus, but also provided a much-needed refreshing perspective to real issues on and off campus. The submitted postcards showed more than simply the words of participants’ secrets and the accompanying drawings. The range of secrets submitted truly highlighted the raw intelligence, quirky wit, and creative sides of students at Hamilton. “The funny ones were very representative of the humor of Hamilton students, but many of them related to larger issues such as body images and eating disorders,” said Keefe. The latter type of postcards provided an eye-opener to real issues many students experience. Just a few words and a drawing on a white postcard displayed to students that everyone has their inner demons and embarrassing stories. Despite the anonymity of the students who submitted postcards, the project created an invisible the continental | spring 2012

25


features

features

Want To Know A Secret? by Crystal Kim ’15

transformation in the way we devise, protect, and– dare I mention?–divulge our secrets to one another. From whispering about crushes in middle school to confessing to your roommate that it really was you that ate her Nutella, the way we reveal our secrets Hill, the inception of a PostSecret movement marks a new way students communicate about issues salient both inside and outside of the Hamilton bubble. The national PostSecret movement began in January 2005 with Frank Warren who was inspired by a dream to create a community art project. Today, online and congregate by mailing postcards to Warren revealing their deepest secrets in an artistic manner and engaging in the online PostSecret Community. Warren books, maintains the is updated weekly with new secrets, and also gives lectures on college campuses. He donates a portion of suicide prevention organizations. PostSecret is especially popular among college students. Sarah Mandel ’15 said, “I think it’s so popular because of the anonymity of it all. People feel like they can say the truth and are completely uninhibited.” PostSecret was brought to the Hill by Jennifer Keefe ’12, who read one of Warren’s books. “I thought it would be fun to do in the wintertime when nothing’s going on and it gets depressing here,” she said. 24

the continental | spring 2012

Keefe began planning for PostSecret à la Hamilton in early fall 2011 by speaking to Noelle Niznik, Assistant Director for Student Engagement and Leadership, registering PostSecret as a new club, and inviting students to interest meetings. Eventually, she assembled a small team of three other individuals. Along with Niznik, Keefe collaborated with Amelia Root ’14 and Kathleen Herlihy ’14. The cold frost of February marked the launch of PostSecret at Hamilton. PostSecret reception was held in the Sadove Student Center. The community was invited

but powerful bond among students. Although at times students complain about the lack of diversity on campus, these secrets displayed a genuine glimpse into the individuality and unique situations of the people who inhabit this Hill. We forget that even though we all attend Hamilton, have hectic schedules, and together complain about the weather and food, we are very much a diverse community of individuals. PostSecret at Hamilton gives a voice to those who cannot relieve their burdens in any other way, silently reminding us to not be constantly judgmental of our fellow peers.

The unadulterated revelation of our deepest fears, queasy recollection of embarrassing moments, treasured memories of joy, and acceptance and overcoming of the obstacles in life seeks to connect the most alienated and different individuals at community.

From its small and humble roots, PostSecret at Hamilton will no doubt gain momentum and receive more community involvement as the project develops. Concerning the future of PostSecret at Hamilton, Keefe said,“Hopefully as the years pass, it

Some submissions to Hamilton’s PostSecret.

the submitted postcards and also enjoyed a performance by acoustic artist Micah. The compilation of postcards displayed in Sadove Student Center certainly brightened up the snowcoated campus, but also provided a much-needed refreshing perspective to real issues on and off campus. The submitted postcards showed more than simply the words of participants’ secrets and the accompanying drawings. The range of secrets submitted truly highlighted the raw intelligence, quirky wit, and creative sides of students at Hamilton. “The funny ones were very representative of the humor of Hamilton students, but many of them related to larger issues such as body images and eating disorders,” said Keefe. The latter type of postcards provided an eye-opener to real issues many students experience. Just a few words and a drawing on a white postcard displayed to students that everyone has their inner demons and embarrassing stories. Despite the anonymity of the students who submitted postcards, the project created an invisible the continental | spring 2012

25


style

style

Spotted: Zane Glauber ’12

Spotted: Claire Fitch ’12

26

the continental | spring 2012

the continental | spring 2012

27


style

style

Spotted: Zane Glauber ’12

Spotted: Claire Fitch ’12

26

the continental | spring 2012

the continental | spring 2012

27


style

by Sara Shaughnessy ’14 Hamilton students undoubtedly know how to dress and sport spring style while attending class, a group meeting, or a Saturday afternoon lacrosse game. But what do they wear during that morning elliptical workout or power yoga class? We selected a group of athletic Hamilton ladies who demonstrate their knowledge of trendy workout gear as they run, spin, and lift in neon, bright accents, and colorful stripes.

Allie Hoeltzel ’14 keeps her footwear practical but also fun. The light gray-blue of the sneaks make the turquoise laces

Menswear Essentials: Spring/Summer ’12

style

by Sean Smith ’15

Sleep, sun, and sand – it’s already springtime, but sooner than you realize, it will be summer. Before you throw on the same madras shorts and T-shirt, there are a few trends coming up this spring and summer that you can follow to stay cool in the heat. 1) I don’t mean your dad’s silly shirt he got for that trip to Hawaii. Small, detailed a winning combination. If that’s too extravagant for items such as pocket squares. 2) Get a pair of light washed jeans. Comically referred to as “Dad Wash Jeans,” light, almost stonewashed jeans are making a comeback. That being said, there are right and wrong ways to wear once at the ankle. They should have a hint of white wash while fading into a soft blue around the thigh/ knee area. The wrong way: they should not be acidwashed or speckled white and blue, nor should they

Hayden Kiessling ’12 concentrates on her mileage in her Nike neon pink tank with blue and white horizontal stripes running down the sides. She adds another hint of neon to the ensemble with her electric yellow sports watch.

these days mirror the trends on the runway as students work through their excercises in neon hues complemented by black pieces.

Alice Grant ’14 shows her love for stripes with her dark purple multi-color striped Lululemon top which she pairs with black shorts and a light blue headband. The scoopneck and racerback allow for ultimate comfort as Grant cranks out the miles to condition for the lacrosse season. 28

the continental | spring 2012

3) Spread your collars. Spread collar shirts are simply exquisite. Grab one in a light blue or white (you can never have enough white or blue shirts), and wear it with just about anything. Pair it with a Double you’re bound to impress any future employer at those upcoming internship interviews. Suitsupply and 4) Play with your colors. It’s time to whip out your colored chinos, polo shirts, and sneakers. Reds and blues are particularly popular this season. Challenge yourself to wear multiple shades of the same color – the monochromatic look is adventurous. If An American in Paris. He wears very neutral colors, but that red polo under the grey sweater certainly catches the eye. 5) Show some ankle. Don’t be shy – get rid of your socks and show a little skin. Whether you’re wearing a colorful pair of New Balance 574 for a comfortable, relaxed look or some Charles Philip Shanghai loafers for a professionalchic look, avoid wearing socks and cuff your pants a couple times. Mold these trends to your own personal styles that summer usually calls for. Any of these trends will help you look and feel great this spring and summer both on and off the Hill. Use the summer to experiment with fashion and create a new look, and come back in the fall ready to begin another school year as the new, fashionable you. the continental | spring 2012

29


style

by Sara Shaughnessy ’14 Hamilton students undoubtedly know how to dress and sport spring style while attending class, a group meeting, or a Saturday afternoon lacrosse game. But what do they wear during that morning elliptical workout or power yoga class? We selected a group of athletic Hamilton ladies who demonstrate their knowledge of trendy workout gear as they run, spin, and lift in neon, bright accents, and colorful stripes.

Allie Hoeltzel ’14 keeps her footwear practical but also fun. The light gray-blue of the sneaks make the turquoise laces

Menswear Essentials: Spring/Summer ’12

style

by Sean Smith ’15

Sleep, sun, and sand – it’s already springtime, but sooner than you realize, it will be summer. Before you throw on the same madras shorts and T-shirt, there are a few trends coming up this spring and summer that you can follow to stay cool in the heat. 1) I don’t mean your dad’s silly shirt he got for that trip to Hawaii. Small, detailed a winning combination. If that’s too extravagant for items such as pocket squares. 2) Get a pair of light washed jeans. Comically referred to as “Dad Wash Jeans,” light, almost stonewashed jeans are making a comeback. That being said, there are right and wrong ways to wear once at the ankle. They should have a hint of white wash while fading into a soft blue around the thigh/ knee area. The wrong way: they should not be acidwashed or speckled white and blue, nor should they

Hayden Kiessling ’12 concentrates on her mileage in her Nike neon pink tank with blue and white horizontal stripes running down the sides. She adds another hint of neon to the ensemble with her electric yellow sports watch.

these days mirror the trends on the runway as students work through their excercises in neon hues complemented by black pieces.

Alice Grant ’14 shows her love for stripes with her dark purple multi-color striped Lululemon top which she pairs with black shorts and a light blue headband. The scoopneck and racerback allow for ultimate comfort as Grant cranks out the miles to condition for the lacrosse season. 28

the continental | spring 2012

3) Spread your collars. Spread collar shirts are simply exquisite. Grab one in a light blue or white (you can never have enough white or blue shirts), and wear it with just about anything. Pair it with a Double you’re bound to impress any future employer at those upcoming internship interviews. Suitsupply and 4) Play with your colors. It’s time to whip out your colored chinos, polo shirts, and sneakers. Reds and blues are particularly popular this season. Challenge yourself to wear multiple shades of the same color – the monochromatic look is adventurous. If An American in Paris. He wears very neutral colors, but that red polo under the grey sweater certainly catches the eye. 5) Show some ankle. Don’t be shy – get rid of your socks and show a little skin. Whether you’re wearing a colorful pair of New Balance 574 for a comfortable, relaxed look or some Charles Philip Shanghai loafers for a professionalchic look, avoid wearing socks and cuff your pants a couple times. Mold these trends to your own personal styles that summer usually calls for. Any of these trends will help you look and feel great this spring and summer both on and off the Hill. Use the summer to experiment with fashion and create a new look, and come back in the fall ready to begin another school year as the new, fashionable you. the continental | spring 2012

29


society

society

A Home at the Pub by Scott Blosser ’12

What makes the Hamilton experience unique? Is it our open curriculum or our emphasis on writing and effective communication? What about our welcoming community and beautiful campus? While these are great lines to feed prospective students on a campus tour, the real heart of the Hamilton experience, in my humble opinion, sits unassumingly between the Annex and the Root Farmhouse. That’s right, I’m talking about our very own on-campus pub where on any given and faculty downing their favorite swill under the warm glow of the cozy wood interior. The Little Pub opened its doors in 1996 and has since become a centerpiece of the Hamilton social scene. Aside from offering the best atmosphere of Hamilton’s four dining halls (need I even mention the turkey bacon cranberry paninis?), the Pub caters to students looking to relax and enjoy their favorite libations among the company of friends. While the Pub often plays host to informal gatherings of students playing pool and lounging by the center of activity. students and faculty descend on the Pub for Trivia Night to test their limits of obscure knowledge and drink tasty beers at student-friendly prices. Paul Ryan ’02 started Trivia Night with Sharon Hitchcock in 2007 after attending Colgate’s version of trivia

30

the continental | spring 2012

night. In true Hamiltonian fashion, Ryan can do it, we can do it better. Ryan continues to run Trivia Night at Hamilton and outshine our less-erudite friends at Colgate. Another mainstay of the Pub is the biweekly Senior Pub Night, where the bartenders break out the mixed drinks while sentimental seniors belt out the lyrics of some overplayed pop song college students. Mary Lancaster ’12, a student bartender at the Pub, has a unique perspective on what things look like from the other side of the bar and has witnessed everything from casual conversations to epic make-out sessions. If you ask Lancaster why she loves the Pub, you will get a simple but profound answer: “because you don’t have to go far and because you are surrounded by all of your Hamilton friends.” Lancaster is right. What makes the Pub so great is not the building itself (which is perfect), but the students and faculty share their love of trivia with the rest of their close community. When I think back on my four years at Hamilton, those rowdy nights pushing past strangers at the VT and the Rok may blend together, but those lazy Wednesdays I spent at the Pub with my friends will stay in my memory. What has made my Hamilton experience unique is the people who I have shared the experience with and the Pub that has so often brought us together.

the continental | spring 2012

31


society

society

A Home at the Pub by Scott Blosser ’12

What makes the Hamilton experience unique? Is it our open curriculum or our emphasis on writing and effective communication? What about our welcoming community and beautiful campus? While these are great lines to feed prospective students on a campus tour, the real heart of the Hamilton experience, in my humble opinion, sits unassumingly between the Annex and the Root Farmhouse. That’s right, I’m talking about our very own on-campus pub where on any given and faculty downing their favorite swill under the warm glow of the cozy wood interior. The Little Pub opened its doors in 1996 and has since become a centerpiece of the Hamilton social scene. Aside from offering the best atmosphere of Hamilton’s four dining halls (need I even mention the turkey bacon cranberry paninis?), the Pub caters to students looking to relax and enjoy their favorite libations among the company of friends. While the Pub often plays host to informal gatherings of students playing pool and lounging by the center of activity. students and faculty descend on the Pub for Trivia Night to test their limits of obscure knowledge and drink tasty beers at student-friendly prices. Paul Ryan ’02 started Trivia Night with Sharon Hitchcock in 2007 after attending Colgate’s version of trivia

30

the continental | spring 2012

night. In true Hamiltonian fashion, Ryan can do it, we can do it better. Ryan continues to run Trivia Night at Hamilton and outshine our less-erudite friends at Colgate. Another mainstay of the Pub is the biweekly Senior Pub Night, where the bartenders break out the mixed drinks while sentimental seniors belt out the lyrics of some overplayed pop song college students. Mary Lancaster ’12, a student bartender at the Pub, has a unique perspective on what things look like from the other side of the bar and has witnessed everything from casual conversations to epic make-out sessions. If you ask Lancaster why she loves the Pub, you will get a simple but profound answer: “because you don’t have to go far and because you are surrounded by all of your Hamilton friends.” Lancaster is right. What makes the Pub so great is not the building itself (which is perfect), but the students and faculty share their love of trivia with the rest of their close community. When I think back on my four years at Hamilton, those rowdy nights pushing past strangers at the VT and the Rok may blend together, but those lazy Wednesdays I spent at the Pub with my friends will stay in my memory. What has made my Hamilton experience unique is the people who I have shared the experience with and the Pub that has so often brought us together.

the continental | spring 2012

31


society

society

Take It or Leave It: There are a few things I don’t like about Hamilton. The recycled curriculum, the fact that four mozzarella sticks constitutes a full diner meal, uninformed, overly vocal writers…the list goes on and on. But of all the upsets me more than the lack of school spirit. Last year, on a clear Saturday afternoon in February, the men’s hockey team hosted Wesleyan in typical Hamilton fashion, no one showed up. The Sage looked emptier than a Friday morning Africana Studies class. We lost 5-2. Saturday afternoon football crowds are smaller than the Commons omelet line. The baseball bleachers are so barren I can hear my mom converse with my girlfriend…while I’m playing. All across the athletic spectrum, parents and Clinton High School sports teams regularly outnumber Hamilton students at sporting events. Dog Pound passionately supports men’s basketball and creates an actual college environment. (Quick note: it says a lot about our administration that twenty guys require the stern attention of three campus safety There is also the Lobster Trap, a group of female athletes who wears pajamas and costumes and attends other women’s sporting events. But even if we combined those two organizations and brought them to every game, we’d still have smaller

32

the continental | spring 2012

Hamilton’s School Spirit Problem by John Wulf ’12

the perfect environment for the modern college student: dark, strange, and licentious. Also to be fair, I have sat amongst a few good when the women’s volleyball team offers free pizza or the weather is gorgeous, we’ll create a fun environment. But it doesn’t happen nearly as often as it should. Nor should it take a visiting NBA player to create a commotion and draw the attention of our president and Dean of Admissions. It should’ve been the two afternoon who received the attention. Anyway, the worst part about all the lethargy is its invasiveness. It’s a Hamilton psyche. It’s a part of our culture (whatever that culture is). We don’t have a good swine for a mascot. It’s safe to say that more people plan their weekend around the jitney schedule than the athletic one. And believe me, I understand school spirit manifests itself in different ways. I’m sure a portion of our student body wishes more people attended Yodapez, and another portion wishes more students read this magazine. But sports offer a unique opportunity. Every weekend we could come together, have a good time, and remember it the next morning. It’s a triple play! Until that happens, I’ll stay angry and angsty. I may be alone, and I may belong with the other nutjobs in The Spectator opinion asylum, but heck, it’s better than adding to the long list of students who hate campus safety (Did I mention I don’t like their fastidious parking policies? Please stop picking on my 1991 Buick Regal, Campo. It’s a freaking 1991 Buick Regal.)

the continental | spring 2012

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society

society

Take It or Leave It: There are a few things I don’t like about Hamilton. The recycled curriculum, the fact that four mozzarella sticks constitutes a full diner meal, uninformed, overly vocal writers…the list goes on and on. But of all the upsets me more than the lack of school spirit. Last year, on a clear Saturday afternoon in February, the men’s hockey team hosted Wesleyan in typical Hamilton fashion, no one showed up. The Sage looked emptier than a Friday morning Africana Studies class. We lost 5-2. Saturday afternoon football crowds are smaller than the Commons omelet line. The baseball bleachers are so barren I can hear my mom converse with my girlfriend…while I’m playing. All across the athletic spectrum, parents and Clinton High School sports teams regularly outnumber Hamilton students at sporting events. Dog Pound passionately supports men’s basketball and creates an actual college environment. (Quick note: it says a lot about our administration that twenty guys require the stern attention of three campus safety There is also the Lobster Trap, a group of female athletes who wears pajamas and costumes and attends other women’s sporting events. But even if we combined those two organizations and brought them to every game, we’d still have smaller

32

the continental | spring 2012

Hamilton’s School Spirit Problem by John Wulf ’12

the perfect environment for the modern college student: dark, strange, and licentious. Also to be fair, I have sat amongst a few good when the women’s volleyball team offers free pizza or the weather is gorgeous, we’ll create a fun environment. But it doesn’t happen nearly as often as it should. Nor should it take a visiting NBA player to create a commotion and draw the attention of our president and Dean of Admissions. It should’ve been the two afternoon who received the attention. Anyway, the worst part about all the lethargy is its invasiveness. It’s a Hamilton psyche. It’s a part of our culture (whatever that culture is). We don’t have a good swine for a mascot. It’s safe to say that more people plan their weekend around the jitney schedule than the athletic one. And believe me, I understand school spirit manifests itself in different ways. I’m sure a portion of our student body wishes more people attended Yodapez, and another portion wishes more students read this magazine. But sports offer a unique opportunity. Every weekend we could come together, have a good time, and remember it the next morning. It’s a triple play! Until that happens, I’ll stay angry and angsty. I may be alone, and I may belong with the other nutjobs in The Spectator opinion asylum, but heck, it’s better than adding to the long list of students who hate campus safety (Did I mention I don’t like their fastidious parking policies? Please stop picking on my 1991 Buick Regal, Campo. It’s a freaking 1991 Buick Regal.)

the continental | spring 2012

33


society

society

Blair vs. Hamilton:

Blair Casey Explores Hamilton’s Social Spaces

by Blair Casey ’13

not at my hamilton

by Emily Balderston ’14

had warned you that ELS basement is slipperier than the old Martin’s Way bridge? If you have ever yearned breakdown is here! ELS Basement parents who don’t care if you drink. No one is really dancing at the beginning and all the guys are standing around taking beer pong way too seriously. It’s dark, but not so dark that your friend can’t tell that it was you who just spilled beer on her new silk shirt. As the night goes on, everyone is treated to the immense physical room in a stray rolling chair. It is also conveniently located to combine your love of Aaron Carter throwbacks and vending machine pretzels. Kudos to you, ELS basement. Bundy Dining Hall As you descend the Hill and see a Bundy party from the outside, you realize the steam covering the windows resembles the car scene in Titanic. Thus, before you even arrive at Bundy, you know some really weird stuff is about to go down. All joking aside, Bundy Dining Hall is the social space that God forgot. If you have ever danced with someone in Bundy when the lights are off, there is a pretty good chance that you may have a baby on the way. If you want to go to a Halloween themed party, go to Colgate; if you want to see Elmo practically doing it with Luigi and a sexy bumblebee puking her soul out, swing by Bundy. Bundy is where friends become lovers, lovers become enemies, and some chick is always crying in the bathroom. Is it a social The Annex People go to Annex parties for the same reason that people watch Animal Planet: they suspect that their primal urges have a place in the modern world. During a recent visit to an Annex party, a girl wearing only a bra was grinding against a wall with a boy so hard it was impossible to tell if she was into him or just holding him prisoner. Upon realizing we were laughing at her, she charged towards us yelling “Yo why you laughin’. That ain’t right.” As Event Staff pulled her away from us, it occurred to me that what had transpired To that person I say this: if you don’t want to witness the shocking reality of human nature, steer clear of the Annex on a Saturday night. The Barn By day, the Events Barn is the site of cultured lectures, panels, and other events that you didn’t know were occurring because you deleted the email announcement from your phone without opening it. By night, however, the Barn has the power to transform itself into the sweatiest night of your life. With enough bright lights and bowls of free skittles, the Barn becomes a crazy New York nightclub with no bouncer and a crowd surfers and students hurling glow sticks at each other. The balcony is home to all the sexy people with God complexes who enjoy the birds-eye view of watching drunk students making mistakes. Basically, it is awesome. The Hub Unlike other social spaces, for some inexplicable reason, the Hub feels really classy. Maybe it’s the nearby laundry room. For whatever reason, dancing at the Hub never devolves into grinding, and the most offensive of PDA is saved for the terrace outside. Because of noise complaints from the upstairs hotel guests, there are no parties in the Hub on Thursday nights anymore, which is so depressing I can’t handle it. When I am an eccentric trustee in my twilight years and staying upstairs, I fully intend to throw on the Baha Men and encourage others to let the dogs out.

34

the continental | spring 2012

To me, nothing is worse than being faced with a Siberian scale snowstorm when you live in Bundy. It is uphill, far, torrential, and most importantly, so cold that within three minutes my face feels as if I attached it to an ice cube. Therefore, driving your car up College Hill Road on particularly chilly afternoons can be comforting. Subsequently, people can imagine my sadness and (irrational) anger when it was announced in the fall of 2011 that students were banned from parking in faculty lots at any time, even after four P.M. This new rule might have been the worst thing to happen at Hamilton since the diner replaced curly fries with bland potato slabs. You mean we have to walk places?

where students can park. I am not going to go so far as to say that Hamilton College purposely changed parking for no reason other than to make more money. How were they to know that students would disregard the rules and give up their (parents’) cash? Well, they had changed the rules previously, and possibly knew that tightening the ropes would squeeze out more capital. During the 2009-10 school year, students had to register their someone who lived Bundy would be registered to park in the Bundy lot and nowhere else during the hours during which faculty were on campus. This rule yielded 1302 tickets during the fall semester that year. Perhaps feeling as if those rules were unfair, the college changed the rules (park in any student lot, and anywhere after four), and the tickets distributed lowered by over 20%. It would only be a logical conclusion then, to assume that if rules were once again tightened, revenue would increase.

Although no explanation was provided for this new rule (maybe professors are into Commons Sunday brunch and were shafted from parking in visitors’ lots), an email was sent out to the student body informing us of the y ’12

be receive. “This change will James Gre artoon by C eliminate any confusion about the accessibility of faculty and staff lots for students, is because I am lazy. I want to step out of my car thereby reducing the number of parking tickets and be greeted by the door of Commons. Who issued,” read the email. All right, fair enough. doesn’t? I bet if the faculty suddenly had to park where we students do, they would not be pleased. Maybe students are too dim to understand where That being said, this article is not about my sluggish they can’t park their cars (Spoiler Alert: they can, and frankly bratty/weight-inducing attitude. It is they just don’t care!) But, minor assault on my about the manipulation the school is slyly pulling intelligence aside, if this change were going to help off through the parking rules. There seems to have my fellow students and me out, I guess it would been no legitimate reason to change parking. In be okay. An interesting and not so shocking thing fact, after four P.M., these lots sit open, and students happened: tickets went up. In the fall of 2010, 1019 trying to park in Ferg are forced to leave their cars tickets were issued. Last semester, Campus Safety on the grass (guilty). However, I urge the College to dished out 1403. Yes, that is roughly a 38% increase in think about the example they are setting by creating tickets. At $25 a ticket, this also means that Hamilton unnecessary rules. I could charge people entry every College went from earning (assuming all cars were time they enter my room, but that doesn’t make it registered) $25,475 to $35,075 purely by limiting right, or make me any more friends. the continental | spring 2012

35


society

society

Blair vs. Hamilton:

Blair Casey Explores Hamilton’s Social Spaces

by Blair Casey ’13

not at my hamilton

by Emily Balderston ’14

had warned you that ELS basement is slipperier than the old Martin’s Way bridge? If you have ever yearned breakdown is here! ELS Basement parents who don’t care if you drink. No one is really dancing at the beginning and all the guys are standing around taking beer pong way too seriously. It’s dark, but not so dark that your friend can’t tell that it was you who just spilled beer on her new silk shirt. As the night goes on, everyone is treated to the immense physical room in a stray rolling chair. It is also conveniently located to combine your love of Aaron Carter throwbacks and vending machine pretzels. Kudos to you, ELS basement. Bundy Dining Hall As you descend the Hill and see a Bundy party from the outside, you realize the steam covering the windows resembles the car scene in Titanic. Thus, before you even arrive at Bundy, you know some really weird stuff is about to go down. All joking aside, Bundy Dining Hall is the social space that God forgot. If you have ever danced with someone in Bundy when the lights are off, there is a pretty good chance that you may have a baby on the way. If you want to go to a Halloween themed party, go to Colgate; if you want to see Elmo practically doing it with Luigi and a sexy bumblebee puking her soul out, swing by Bundy. Bundy is where friends become lovers, lovers become enemies, and some chick is always crying in the bathroom. Is it a social The Annex People go to Annex parties for the same reason that people watch Animal Planet: they suspect that their primal urges have a place in the modern world. During a recent visit to an Annex party, a girl wearing only a bra was grinding against a wall with a boy so hard it was impossible to tell if she was into him or just holding him prisoner. Upon realizing we were laughing at her, she charged towards us yelling “Yo why you laughin’. That ain’t right.” As Event Staff pulled her away from us, it occurred to me that what had transpired To that person I say this: if you don’t want to witness the shocking reality of human nature, steer clear of the Annex on a Saturday night. The Barn By day, the Events Barn is the site of cultured lectures, panels, and other events that you didn’t know were occurring because you deleted the email announcement from your phone without opening it. By night, however, the Barn has the power to transform itself into the sweatiest night of your life. With enough bright lights and bowls of free skittles, the Barn becomes a crazy New York nightclub with no bouncer and a crowd surfers and students hurling glow sticks at each other. The balcony is home to all the sexy people with God complexes who enjoy the birds-eye view of watching drunk students making mistakes. Basically, it is awesome. The Hub Unlike other social spaces, for some inexplicable reason, the Hub feels really classy. Maybe it’s the nearby laundry room. For whatever reason, dancing at the Hub never devolves into grinding, and the most offensive of PDA is saved for the terrace outside. Because of noise complaints from the upstairs hotel guests, there are no parties in the Hub on Thursday nights anymore, which is so depressing I can’t handle it. When I am an eccentric trustee in my twilight years and staying upstairs, I fully intend to throw on the Baha Men and encourage others to let the dogs out.

34

the continental | spring 2012

To me, nothing is worse than being faced with a Siberian scale snowstorm when you live in Bundy. It is uphill, far, torrential, and most importantly, so cold that within three minutes my face feels as if I attached it to an ice cube. Therefore, driving your car up College Hill Road on particularly chilly afternoons can be comforting. Subsequently, people can imagine my sadness and (irrational) anger when it was announced in the fall of 2011 that students were banned from parking in faculty lots at any time, even after four P.M. This new rule might have been the worst thing to happen at Hamilton since the diner replaced curly fries with bland potato slabs. You mean we have to walk places?

where students can park. I am not going to go so far as to say that Hamilton College purposely changed parking for no reason other than to make more money. How were they to know that students would disregard the rules and give up their (parents’) cash? Well, they had changed the rules previously, and possibly knew that tightening the ropes would squeeze out more capital. During the 2009-10 school year, students had to register their someone who lived Bundy would be registered to park in the Bundy lot and nowhere else during the hours during which faculty were on campus. This rule yielded 1302 tickets during the fall semester that year. Perhaps feeling as if those rules were unfair, the college changed the rules (park in any student lot, and anywhere after four), and the tickets distributed lowered by over 20%. It would only be a logical conclusion then, to assume that if rules were once again tightened, revenue would increase.

Although no explanation was provided for this new rule (maybe professors are into Commons Sunday brunch and were shafted from parking in visitors’ lots), an email was sent out to the student body informing us of the y ’12

be receive. “This change will James Gre artoon by C eliminate any confusion about the accessibility of faculty and staff lots for students, is because I am lazy. I want to step out of my car thereby reducing the number of parking tickets and be greeted by the door of Commons. Who issued,” read the email. All right, fair enough. doesn’t? I bet if the faculty suddenly had to park where we students do, they would not be pleased. Maybe students are too dim to understand where That being said, this article is not about my sluggish they can’t park their cars (Spoiler Alert: they can, and frankly bratty/weight-inducing attitude. It is they just don’t care!) But, minor assault on my about the manipulation the school is slyly pulling intelligence aside, if this change were going to help off through the parking rules. There seems to have my fellow students and me out, I guess it would been no legitimate reason to change parking. In be okay. An interesting and not so shocking thing fact, after four P.M., these lots sit open, and students happened: tickets went up. In the fall of 2010, 1019 trying to park in Ferg are forced to leave their cars tickets were issued. Last semester, Campus Safety on the grass (guilty). However, I urge the College to dished out 1403. Yes, that is roughly a 38% increase in think about the example they are setting by creating tickets. At $25 a ticket, this also means that Hamilton unnecessary rules. I could charge people entry every College went from earning (assuming all cars were time they enter my room, but that doesn’t make it registered) $25,475 to $35,075 purely by limiting right, or make me any more friends. the continental | spring 2012

35


society

society

Bicentennial CLASS by Ben Schwartz ’12

1812-2012 200 Years 1812-2012 200 Years 1812-2012

According to Albert Einstein, “the value of an education in a liberal arts college is not the learning of many facts but the training of the mind to think of something that cannot be learned from textbooks.” Correct as the genius may be, he doesn’t account for the unique four years of your life” axiom. Maybe the tour guides are right about what makes students’ time on the Hill special. Hamilton students no doubt enjoy the academic freedom of the open curriculum. The fact that 98% of students live on campus certainly gives the student body a rare sense of community the stress of graduating and ensure that students retain that sense of community after they amenities help students both work and play effectively as well. But that’s all stuff you could glean from a college catalogue or information session. What about the elements of the Hamilton experience to which only those who have gone through it can speak? What about Bundy Dining Hall? What about Don’s Rok? What about the late night pilgrimage to the Diner? The delirious nights (or rather mornings) of studying with close friends? The administration calls it the South Side, but what about the Dark Side? School starts in August, but what about the long, grey winter? Maybe these are truly the features of the Hamilton experience that give real meaning and character to the “best four years” that students spend on the Hill. We asked the senior class

k d ve, drun “Free lo days, sanctionempus s a e c n , ess Wed ps, MY runkenn public d stead of real co safety inS.” FRIEND small miss the le to o t g in “I’m go ity... Being ab ilding communo almost any buperson walk int w at least one to all of and knoving next door there, li friends.” my best

36

the continental | spring 2012

“What sure toever else yo dancin leave time u do, make g in biz fo arre p r foolish laces.” “Do yo u!” “Never on cam miss an op kick ba pus (lectur portunity you ha ll game, et e, night out There ve too muc c.) because , day fo are enough h work. r both , just shours in the leep le ss.”

ty.” to par e v lo I “ hat lly all t kes a e r ’t a n “Life ishill out. It mable.” c y . . o . j s n seriou gs more e thin

tely absolu but I . s e i , t activi a part e new hich I am , I realize r o m to fw rying ches “Not t the clubs oion approa ther chanceFun t adore as gradua ot get ano Like to Do or now probably n ople Who “e-sports,”ying I will club for Pee, or play egretted tr ying join a s, or juggl ver once r tted NOT tr Thing ver! I’ve nehave regre whate hing, but I somet hing.” somet

“E profes verything! T he stu Streak sors, the dents ing Te s t a on! No am...the ff, the Glen , the , th lis pla same people ce else on t goes on an e d as Ham earth h as the ilton a what m nd ake it so incr they’re edible.” “The “The P and plaenvironmen ub.” t y h f ere is forgets ul. I feel h a rd lik the dahow to enjo e most of th-working y life in ily grin e d, but seize e the midworld H v e a st ry day m learn a as an ilton studen of nd adm op ts make ire the little portunity to our ex t h in gs perien ce spe that cial.”

CONGRATULATIONS CLASS OF 2012!

the continental | spring 2012

37


society

society

Bicentennial CLASS by Ben Schwartz ’12

1812-2012 200 Years 1812-2012 200 Years 1812-2012

According to Albert Einstein, “the value of an education in a liberal arts college is not the learning of many facts but the training of the mind to think of something that cannot be learned from textbooks.” Correct as the genius may be, he doesn’t account for the unique four years of your life” axiom. Maybe the tour guides are right about what makes students’ time on the Hill special. Hamilton students no doubt enjoy the academic freedom of the open curriculum. The fact that 98% of students live on campus certainly gives the student body a rare sense of community the stress of graduating and ensure that students retain that sense of community after they amenities help students both work and play effectively as well. But that’s all stuff you could glean from a college catalogue or information session. What about the elements of the Hamilton experience to which only those who have gone through it can speak? What about Bundy Dining Hall? What about Don’s Rok? What about the late night pilgrimage to the Diner? The delirious nights (or rather mornings) of studying with close friends? The administration calls it the South Side, but what about the Dark Side? School starts in August, but what about the long, grey winter? Maybe these are truly the features of the Hamilton experience that give real meaning and character to the “best four years” that students spend on the Hill. We asked the senior class

k d ve, drun “Free lo days, sanctionempus s a e c n , ess Wed ps, MY runkenn public d stead of real co safety inS.” FRIEND small miss the le to o t g in “I’m go ity... Being ab ilding communo almost any buperson walk int w at least one to all of and knoving next door there, li friends.” my best

36

the continental | spring 2012

“What sure toever else yo dancin leave time u do, make g in biz fo arre p r foolish laces.” “Do yo u!” “Never on cam miss an op kick ba pus (lectur portunity you ha ll game, et e, night out There ve too muc c.) because , day fo are enough h work. r both , just shours in the leep le ss.”

ty.” to par e v lo I “ hat lly all t kes a e r ’t a n “Life ishill out. It mable.” c y . . o . j s n seriou gs more e thin

tely absolu but I . s e i , t activi a part e new hich I am , I realize r o m to fw rying ches “Not t the clubs oion approa ther chanceFun t adore as gradua ot get ano Like to Do or now probably n ople Who “e-sports,”ying I will club for Pee, or play egretted tr ying join a s, or juggl ver once r tted NOT tr Thing ver! I’ve nehave regre whate hing, but I somet hing.” somet

“E profes verything! T he stu Streak sors, the dents ing Te s t a on! No am...the ff, the Glen , the , th lis pla same people ce else on t goes on an e d as Ham earth h as the ilton a what m nd ake it so incr they’re edible.” “The “The P and plaenvironmen ub.” t y h f ere is forgets ul. I feel h a rd lik the dahow to enjo e most of th-working y life in ily grin e d, but seize e the midworld H v e a st ry day m learn a as an ilton studen of nd adm op ts make ire the little portunity to our ex t h in gs perien ce spe that cial.”

CONGRATULATIONS CLASS OF 2012!

the continental | spring 2012

37


travel

travel

Hamilton’s NYC Program: Students explore “the city that never sleeps” while taking classes and participating in internships The city that never sleeps might feel a little too close to home to be considered a study abroad destination. However, Hamilton has created a oneof-a-kind opportunity for students to study, intern and live in New York City that makes it an excellent option for off-campus study. While New York City feels more like the inevitable destination for every Hamilton grad than an exotic study abroad locale, the City contains its own challenges and adventures for students with open minds.

the fall 2010 program, said.

was a challenge to have classes and a job and try to keep myself alive all at the same time,” Rebecca Pomerantz ’12, who participated in the spring 2011 program, laughed.

The internships are helpful for all students, but particularly for participants in the fall Economicsbased programs. “With the econ program, you get real, tangible business experience, since we don’t have business or investment at Hamilton,” Blosser said.

The fall program academics are focused on economics, while the spring program has a more rotational, interdisciplinary focus. Past spring programs have often revolved around the topic of globalization, combining it with areas such as media or philosophy. Students in the program gain four credits. Two credits come from classes taken with a Hamilton professor who also serves as the program director. Another credit comes from an internship of the student’s choosing. The fourth credit comes from an independent project, which is a collaborative effort between the student and a professor. The independent project usually consists of a 20-30-page paper that combines classwork and internship experience to come to a conclusion about the focus topic of the program. Small classes and extensive contact with the program director help create a learning experience even more “You learn a lot from the people you’re in class with. It’s more relaxed and there’s more of a variety of opinions and people than you might hear at Hamilton,” Steven Saurbier ’12, who participated in 38

the continental | spring 2012

Students are able to complete impressive internships with more ease during the “off cycle” fall and spring months. These Hamilton students have the advantage of being in the City when most college students are unable to work at internships. “The program lets you get a foot in the door with an internship during the academic year, then you do something else in the summer,” Scott Blosser ’12, who participated in the fall 2010 program, said.

“It’s a great stepping stone to learn how to live after of college,” Adam Kelsey ’13, who participated in out a career path, and there are so many Hamilton what to do.” The students in New York City this semester are part of a program focusing on “Health and Healthcare in a Global Society.” Led by Sociology Professor Dan Chambliss and Dr. Susan Morgan, students have explored diseases, healthcare, and current students in the City have already given the experience rave reviews. “I’ve experienced a lot more that I had ever expected here. The NYC program gave me countless opportunities, from seeing the opera and the philharmonic to working an amazing internship with a market research team at Group SJR,” Christie Crawford ’13 said. “I think that the rest of the NYC program kids will agree with me when I say that every other student at Hamilton rolled their eyes at us when we told them we were going ‘abroad’ to NYC, but I guarantee that a semester of traveling in Europe doesn’t even come close to the experience we have had this semester.”

Beyond the opportunities to study closely with professors and work with impressive companies, the City itself is one of the program’s greatest strengths. The City is a hub for the very subjects Hamilton students are studying. Living in New York City for a semester provides plenty of opportunities for students to explore both their academics and everything else the City has to offer. From visits to the Philharmonic and

Photos courtesy of Christie Crawford ’13

NYC Program Student Favorite Spots Liberty Market (next to the Hamilton apartments): Go for great, cheap breakfast! Brooklyn Flea Market (Fort Greene and Williamsburg): They even have a special food-related market in the summer called Smorgasburg. Bryant Park (42nd and 6th behind the Library): Great open lawns, a reading area, an outdoor bar, and lots of free events. The Village Tavern (East Village) Crif Dogs (Lower East Side): The best hot dog in the City. Aspen Social Club (Midtown): Delicious food in a ski-lodge themed restaurant.

Left: Students pose with statue at the New York Historical Society Museum & Library. Below: Students at the Below: NYC program students quickly adapt to life in the City.

Chambliss.

restaurants and museums around the city, the program sponsors a number of trips for students. The exclusive opportunities students receive would not be possible if not for the generosity and connections of Hamilton alumni. Students live near Battery Park in Lower Manhattan in gorgeous apartments with views of the Statue of Liberty. From there, many explore with gusto all the culinary, entertainment, and social experiences the City has to offer. The independence afforded to students is a welcome change to some from the isolation of Hamilton. the continental | spring 2012

39


travel

travel

Hamilton’s NYC Program: Students explore “the city that never sleeps” while taking classes and participating in internships The city that never sleeps might feel a little too close to home to be considered a study abroad destination. However, Hamilton has created a oneof-a-kind opportunity for students to study, intern and live in New York City that makes it an excellent option for off-campus study. While New York City feels more like the inevitable destination for every Hamilton grad than an exotic study abroad locale, the City contains its own challenges and adventures for students with open minds.

the fall 2010 program, said.

was a challenge to have classes and a job and try to keep myself alive all at the same time,” Rebecca Pomerantz ’12, who participated in the spring 2011 program, laughed.

The internships are helpful for all students, but particularly for participants in the fall Economicsbased programs. “With the econ program, you get real, tangible business experience, since we don’t have business or investment at Hamilton,” Blosser said.

The fall program academics are focused on economics, while the spring program has a more rotational, interdisciplinary focus. Past spring programs have often revolved around the topic of globalization, combining it with areas such as media or philosophy. Students in the program gain four credits. Two credits come from classes taken with a Hamilton professor who also serves as the program director. Another credit comes from an internship of the student’s choosing. The fourth credit comes from an independent project, which is a collaborative effort between the student and a professor. The independent project usually consists of a 20-30-page paper that combines classwork and internship experience to come to a conclusion about the focus topic of the program. Small classes and extensive contact with the program director help create a learning experience even more “You learn a lot from the people you’re in class with. It’s more relaxed and there’s more of a variety of opinions and people than you might hear at Hamilton,” Steven Saurbier ’12, who participated in 38

the continental | spring 2012

Students are able to complete impressive internships with more ease during the “off cycle” fall and spring months. These Hamilton students have the advantage of being in the City when most college students are unable to work at internships. “The program lets you get a foot in the door with an internship during the academic year, then you do something else in the summer,” Scott Blosser ’12, who participated in the fall 2010 program, said.

“It’s a great stepping stone to learn how to live after of college,” Adam Kelsey ’13, who participated in out a career path, and there are so many Hamilton what to do.” The students in New York City this semester are part of a program focusing on “Health and Healthcare in a Global Society.” Led by Sociology Professor Dan Chambliss and Dr. Susan Morgan, students have explored diseases, healthcare, and current students in the City have already given the experience rave reviews. “I’ve experienced a lot more that I had ever expected here. The NYC program gave me countless opportunities, from seeing the opera and the philharmonic to working an amazing internship with a market research team at Group SJR,” Christie Crawford ’13 said. “I think that the rest of the NYC program kids will agree with me when I say that every other student at Hamilton rolled their eyes at us when we told them we were going ‘abroad’ to NYC, but I guarantee that a semester of traveling in Europe doesn’t even come close to the experience we have had this semester.”

Beyond the opportunities to study closely with professors and work with impressive companies, the City itself is one of the program’s greatest strengths. The City is a hub for the very subjects Hamilton students are studying. Living in New York City for a semester provides plenty of opportunities for students to explore both their academics and everything else the City has to offer. From visits to the Philharmonic and

Photos courtesy of Christie Crawford ’13

NYC Program Student Favorite Spots Liberty Market (next to the Hamilton apartments): Go for great, cheap breakfast! Brooklyn Flea Market (Fort Greene and Williamsburg): They even have a special food-related market in the summer called Smorgasburg. Bryant Park (42nd and 6th behind the Library): Great open lawns, a reading area, an outdoor bar, and lots of free events. The Village Tavern (East Village) Crif Dogs (Lower East Side): The best hot dog in the City. Aspen Social Club (Midtown): Delicious food in a ski-lodge themed restaurant.

Left: Students pose with statue at the New York Historical Society Museum & Library. Below: Students at the Below: NYC program students quickly adapt to life in the City.

Chambliss.

restaurants and museums around the city, the program sponsors a number of trips for students. The exclusive opportunities students receive would not be possible if not for the generosity and connections of Hamilton alumni. Students live near Battery Park in Lower Manhattan in gorgeous apartments with views of the Statue of Liberty. From there, many explore with gusto all the culinary, entertainment, and social experiences the City has to offer. The independence afforded to students is a welcome change to some from the isolation of Hamilton. the continental | spring 2012

39


The Matt Brewery:

travel

A College Student’s Dream and a Utica Tradition Not many college students are fortunate enough to have a renowned brewery close to campus. But Hamilton’s close proximity to the Matt Brewery, home to the ever-popular Saranac and Utica Club beers, is a destination where students can embrace local, delicious beer (or soft drinks, for under-21ers). The Matt from its German roots to the spirit of the crafted beer that is enjoyed in over twenty states. Saranac may be one of the most popular beer brands on the Hamilton campus, but the brand is relatively new in the company’s history. “Saranac is a brand that started in 1985 when my grandfather saw the craft brewing sector of the business growing. Prior to that, our main brands were Matt’s Premium and Utica Club,” Talpey Matt ’12 said.

40

The Saranac line features a core group of beers that are available year-round as well as a selection of seasonal beers. The core group includes the Pale Ale, IPA, Adirondack Lager, Black Forest, and Black & Tan. Each beer has an alcohol content hovering slightly above 5% but each is made a little differently. Black & Tan and Black Forest are made in the style of German beer, a nod to the Matt family’s German roots, while Adirondack Lager is made with “pure Adirondack water” in celebration of the region.

prohibition. We were in stores three hours after the bill passed (which is funny because it takes about three weeks to make a beer),” Matt said.

A twist on the IPA (India Pale Ale) is currently a popular seasonal seller. The White IPA takes the traditional IPA taste in “a whole new direction by adding the refreshing fruitiness of orange peel & coriander and the softening characters of wheat malt and oats.” According to Shriver Gilroy ’14, who worked as a tour guide at the brewery last summer, the White IPA is “blowing up like crazy, especially at Hamilton.” IPAs are an acquired taste, said Gilroy, “but everyone seems to love this one.” Matt said the White IPA is also his current favorite.

The brewing company has been in the Matt family since 1888, when founder F.X. Matt immigrated to the United States from Germany at 18 years old. The Matt family has a wealth of stories about the company’s founder, who lived to the age

include the India Copper Ale, Bohemian Pilsner, Lake Effect Lager, and the sweet Vanilla Stout, which combines caramel and chocolate malts. Past favorites include the Chocolate Lager, Summer

fourth generations of the Matt family continue to run the brewery. While it is a family business, family members do not work at the brewery until they reach their 30th birthday.

website, these and other popular past seasonal beers “tend to reappear depending on the season.”

“We have a big family, and it is our belief that if you make people go somewhere else, they will earn their stripes and also bring back something unique to the family business,” Matt said.

tours, visitors walk through the brewing process before being treated to a taste of many different beers. Visitors under 21 are still welcome to take the tour, but receive

The brewery is a popular destination

tastes of the brewing company’s many soda drinks at the end. The tour costs $5 and is a popular weekend activity for Hamilton students. After the tour, be sure to check out the gift shop, which sells everything from Utica Club T-shirts to hilarious beer steins.

by enjoying a Saranac soft drink or seasonal beer.

Gilroy described his experience as a tour guide at the Matt Brewery as the “best summer job I think I’ll ever have.” “The brewery is a really fun place to be. Everyone there loves what they do and loves beer. The best part for me was hanging out with the brewers, who come up to the bar at the tour center every Friday after they get off work and hang out. They would always talk to us about new beers,” Gilroy said. include Saranac Thursdays, a popular summer concert series. “Proceeds go to charity, so who can say no to a beer when you’re drinking for a good cause?” Gilroy said. Many of the brewery’s activities support and highlight the local area, but none are as obvious as the Saranac beer line’s celebration of the Adirondacks. According to the brewery website, the Iroquois word “Saranac” means “cluster of stars” (Hamilton students will also remember Saranac Lake from a popular Adirondack Adventure canoeing trip). As stated on the site, the brewery “borrow[s] that name in the spirit with which it was created. We brew our Saranac line of beers from and the grains that grow in its unspoiled soil.”

Photos by Emily Hodes ’12

The Matt Brewing Company is a landmark of the region, so a visit to the brewery is an experience that should be on the bucket list for every Hamilton student. There’s no better way

the continental | spring 2012

41


The Matt Brewery:

travel

A College Student’s Dream and a Utica Tradition Not many college students are fortunate enough to have a renowned brewery close to campus. But Hamilton’s close proximity to the Matt Brewery, home to the ever-popular Saranac and Utica Club beers, is a destination where students can embrace local, delicious beer (or soft drinks, for under-21ers). The Matt from its German roots to the spirit of the crafted beer that is enjoyed in over twenty states. Saranac may be one of the most popular beer brands on the Hamilton campus, but the brand is relatively new in the company’s history. “Saranac is a brand that started in 1985 when my grandfather saw the craft brewing sector of the business growing. Prior to that, our main brands were Matt’s Premium and Utica Club,” Talpey Matt ’12 said.

40

The Saranac line features a core group of beers that are available year-round as well as a selection of seasonal beers. The core group includes the Pale Ale, IPA, Adirondack Lager, Black Forest, and Black & Tan. Each beer has an alcohol content hovering slightly above 5% but each is made a little differently. Black & Tan and Black Forest are made in the style of German beer, a nod to the Matt family’s German roots, while Adirondack Lager is made with “pure Adirondack water” in celebration of the region.

prohibition. We were in stores three hours after the bill passed (which is funny because it takes about three weeks to make a beer),” Matt said.

A twist on the IPA (India Pale Ale) is currently a popular seasonal seller. The White IPA takes the traditional IPA taste in “a whole new direction by adding the refreshing fruitiness of orange peel & coriander and the softening characters of wheat malt and oats.” According to Shriver Gilroy ’14, who worked as a tour guide at the brewery last summer, the White IPA is “blowing up like crazy, especially at Hamilton.” IPAs are an acquired taste, said Gilroy, “but everyone seems to love this one.” Matt said the White IPA is also his current favorite.

The brewing company has been in the Matt family since 1888, when founder F.X. Matt immigrated to the United States from Germany at 18 years old. The Matt family has a wealth of stories about the company’s founder, who lived to the age

include the India Copper Ale, Bohemian Pilsner, Lake Effect Lager, and the sweet Vanilla Stout, which combines caramel and chocolate malts. Past favorites include the Chocolate Lager, Summer

fourth generations of the Matt family continue to run the brewery. While it is a family business, family members do not work at the brewery until they reach their 30th birthday.

website, these and other popular past seasonal beers “tend to reappear depending on the season.”

“We have a big family, and it is our belief that if you make people go somewhere else, they will earn their stripes and also bring back something unique to the family business,” Matt said.

tours, visitors walk through the brewing process before being treated to a taste of many different beers. Visitors under 21 are still welcome to take the tour, but receive

The brewery is a popular destination

tastes of the brewing company’s many soda drinks at the end. The tour costs $5 and is a popular weekend activity for Hamilton students. After the tour, be sure to check out the gift shop, which sells everything from Utica Club T-shirts to hilarious beer steins.

by enjoying a Saranac soft drink or seasonal beer.

Gilroy described his experience as a tour guide at the Matt Brewery as the “best summer job I think I’ll ever have.” “The brewery is a really fun place to be. Everyone there loves what they do and loves beer. The best part for me was hanging out with the brewers, who come up to the bar at the tour center every Friday after they get off work and hang out. They would always talk to us about new beers,” Gilroy said. include Saranac Thursdays, a popular summer concert series. “Proceeds go to charity, so who can say no to a beer when you’re drinking for a good cause?” Gilroy said. Many of the brewery’s activities support and highlight the local area, but none are as obvious as the Saranac beer line’s celebration of the Adirondacks. According to the brewery website, the Iroquois word “Saranac” means “cluster of stars” (Hamilton students will also remember Saranac Lake from a popular Adirondack Adventure canoeing trip). As stated on the site, the brewery “borrow[s] that name in the spirit with which it was created. We brew our Saranac line of beers from and the grains that grow in its unspoiled soil.”

Photos by Emily Hodes ’12

The Matt Brewing Company is a landmark of the region, so a visit to the brewery is an experience that should be on the bucket list for every Hamilton student. There’s no better way

the continental | spring 2012

41


travel

travel

A

t four o’clock, you walk into the gym and, per usual, every single treadmill is occupied. Before you go and try your luck watching Ellen or the Kardashians on the elliptical, consider this: why not run outside on one of Hamilton College’s many hidden running routes? Understandably, the infamous Clinton weather keeps everyone but the most adventurous inside the athletic facilities all winter. But as spring appears, get out of the gym and run some of these hidden gems on campus.

On the Road: ThE Best RUNNING ROUTES ON CAMPUS for this Spring by Emily Drinkwater ’14

3

Upper Loop has some overlaps with the G Road Loop, but, at six miles long, it is a slightly longer run. While this route may have more hills than the Lower Loop, the gorgeous views on Valley View Road make runners after mastering the Lower Loop.

Lower Loop, also known as the

G Road Loop, is one of the most commonly run routes around campus. At 4.2 miles long, it is not too strenuous, but still rewarding upon completion. Even elementary runners should check out Lower Loop due to its lack of extreme hills and its accessibility from campus. Keep in mind that the G Road loop can be rather windy due

1

also provides a very scenic view while you run. Despite the sometimes-blustery conditions, Lower Loop is a very doable four-mile run.

2

the Apple Orchard Loop, a 5.5 mile run down the hill, through the apple trees (hence the route’s name). Although at this time of year the apple trees are unfortunately barren, they are beautiful in the fall. The biggest is its last leg. But if you can look past the intimidation of running up rewarding run, especially for Bundy residents who only have to run up half the hill to get back to their dorm.

42

the continental | spring 2012

Lastly, the Reservoir Loop separates the casual from the dedicated runners. Not only is it a whopping seven miles, but it also takes you on tough Reservoir Road and up some of Clinton’s most enormous hills. Despite these obstacles, the Reservoir Loop is exceedingly rewarding for those brave souls who conquer it. Peter Kosgei ’11 said that this route “gave me my legs.” Although only

4

more challenging and only for Hamilton’s most the along with the other routes, you are truly an elite Hamilton runner.

the continental | spring 2012

43


travel

travel

A

t four o’clock, you walk into the gym and, per usual, every single treadmill is occupied. Before you go and try your luck watching Ellen or the Kardashians on the elliptical, consider this: why not run outside on one of Hamilton College’s many hidden running routes? Understandably, the infamous Clinton weather keeps everyone but the most adventurous inside the athletic facilities all winter. But as spring appears, get out of the gym and run some of these hidden gems on campus.

On the Road: ThE Best RUNNING ROUTES ON CAMPUS for this Spring by Emily Drinkwater ’14

3

Upper Loop has some overlaps with the G Road Loop, but, at six miles long, it is a slightly longer run. While this route may have more hills than the Lower Loop, the gorgeous views on Valley View Road make runners after mastering the Lower Loop.

Lower Loop, also known as the

G Road Loop, is one of the most commonly run routes around campus. At 4.2 miles long, it is not too strenuous, but still rewarding upon completion. Even elementary runners should check out Lower Loop due to its lack of extreme hills and its accessibility from campus. Keep in mind that the G Road loop can be rather windy due

1

also provides a very scenic view while you run. Despite the sometimes-blustery conditions, Lower Loop is a very doable four-mile run.

2

the Apple Orchard Loop, a 5.5 mile run down the hill, through the apple trees (hence the route’s name). Although at this time of year the apple trees are unfortunately barren, they are beautiful in the fall. The biggest is its last leg. But if you can look past the intimidation of running up rewarding run, especially for Bundy residents who only have to run up half the hill to get back to their dorm.

42

the continental | spring 2012

Lastly, the Reservoir Loop separates the casual from the dedicated runners. Not only is it a whopping seven miles, but it also takes you on tough Reservoir Road and up some of Clinton’s most enormous hills. Despite these obstacles, the Reservoir Loop is exceedingly rewarding for those brave souls who conquer it. Peter Kosgei ’11 said that this route “gave me my legs.” Although only

4

more challenging and only for Hamilton’s most the along with the other routes, you are truly an elite Hamilton runner.

the continental | spring 2012

43


travel

HOC goes to Kenya

travel

Photos by Hannah Kloeckner ’14, Amelia Mattern ’12, and Nick Costantino ’12

By John Boudreau ’14 was remarkably hardy. Guides even selected a more advanced route to challenge the climbers. day of their two-week trip, while driving to a nearby chimpanzee sanctuary, the members were held up

“It was an experience like I’ve never had before,” said Hannah Kloeckner ’14, “I like being active and being outside, but this was intense.”

“The lions knew they were being annoying,”

Any sort of nausea they felt before melted away when the group reached the mountain’s deserted

said, “but you can’t really nudge a lion out of the road.”

broke over the horizon, the Kenyan savannah lit up below them.

In the end, the van circumvented the lions. That

“When you get up there,” said Kloeckner, “it’s all worth it. I was speechless.”

for the rest of the trip – it would be an incredibly exciting journey in one of the world’s richest troves of nature and culture. “I’ve always wanted to go to Africa,” said Jane organizing a trip, I jumped at the chance.” When they arrived, the students were struck by the Kenyan people’s pervasive sense of environmental stewardship. The group’s game wardens and guides exhibited a deep respect for the variety of natural life from road-dwelling lions to thousands of distinct species of birds. The results of conservation were on full display during the group’s multi-day ascent of Mount Kenya, the second-highest point in Africa. According to Amelia Mattern ’12, the group “hiked in pure beauty” the entire time. The trip up the mountain, however, was not without members encountered altitude sickness. Although high altitude for other trip members. Despite the nausea some experienced, the group as a whole

44

the continental | spring 2012

Although summiting Mount Kenya was undeniably one of the highlights of the trip, the time the students spent with the Maasai people of the Maasai Mara National Reserve was just as exciting. and seeing how they have maintained their unique cultural identity while integrating Western practices was really inspiring,” saod Nicholas Constantino ’12. Mattern highlighted the unique Maasai fusion of tradition and progress by sharing a brief anecdote: she was out on the savannah with two young Maasai men who were carrying their traditional accoutrements, including a large knife called a simi. At one point on their trek, however, both men whipped out their cell phones to take a picture. “I felt like I was in a Nokia commercial!” said Mattern. The trip has inspired many of the students to return to Africa, whether as members of the Peace Corps or simply as sightseers. Several students credited the trip with increasing their global awareness and awakening a desire for travel, but Mattern perhaps puts it most candidly. “It sounds cheesy, but it was life-changing,” she said.

Article adapted from a news story on hamilton.edu.

the continental | spring 2012

45


travel

HOC goes to Kenya

travel

Photos by Hannah Kloeckner ’14, Amelia Mattern ’12, and Nick Costantino ’12

By John Boudreau ’14 was remarkably hardy. Guides even selected a more advanced route to challenge the climbers. day of their two-week trip, while driving to a nearby chimpanzee sanctuary, the members were held up

“It was an experience like I’ve never had before,” said Hannah Kloeckner ’14, “I like being active and being outside, but this was intense.”

“The lions knew they were being annoying,”

Any sort of nausea they felt before melted away when the group reached the mountain’s deserted

said, “but you can’t really nudge a lion out of the road.”

broke over the horizon, the Kenyan savannah lit up below them.

In the end, the van circumvented the lions. That

“When you get up there,” said Kloeckner, “it’s all worth it. I was speechless.”

for the rest of the trip – it would be an incredibly exciting journey in one of the world’s richest troves of nature and culture. “I’ve always wanted to go to Africa,” said Jane organizing a trip, I jumped at the chance.” When they arrived, the students were struck by the Kenyan people’s pervasive sense of environmental stewardship. The group’s game wardens and guides exhibited a deep respect for the variety of natural life from road-dwelling lions to thousands of distinct species of birds. The results of conservation were on full display during the group’s multi-day ascent of Mount Kenya, the second-highest point in Africa. According to Amelia Mattern ’12, the group “hiked in pure beauty” the entire time. The trip up the mountain, however, was not without members encountered altitude sickness. Although high altitude for other trip members. Despite the nausea some experienced, the group as a whole

44

the continental | spring 2012

Although summiting Mount Kenya was undeniably one of the highlights of the trip, the time the students spent with the Maasai people of the Maasai Mara National Reserve was just as exciting. and seeing how they have maintained their unique cultural identity while integrating Western practices was really inspiring,” saod Nicholas Constantino ’12. Mattern highlighted the unique Maasai fusion of tradition and progress by sharing a brief anecdote: she was out on the savannah with two young Maasai men who were carrying their traditional accoutrements, including a large knife called a simi. At one point on their trek, however, both men whipped out their cell phones to take a picture. “I felt like I was in a Nokia commercial!” said Mattern. The trip has inspired many of the students to return to Africa, whether as members of the Peace Corps or simply as sightseers. Several students credited the trip with increasing their global awareness and awakening a desire for travel, but Mattern perhaps puts it most candidly. “It sounds cheesy, but it was life-changing,” she said.

Article adapted from a news story on hamilton.edu.

the continental | spring 2012

45


Hamilton Cribs

Runners Up:

We asked all students for entries to our annual Hamilton Cribs Contest, showcasing the best rooms on campus. Here are our winners of the 2012 contest.

12

’ Taub w e r And

The Winners: Andrew Nichols ’14 and Ben Anderson ’14

James Crafa ’12

46

the continental | spring 2012

the continental | spring 2012

47


Hamilton Cribs

Runners Up:

We asked all students for entries to our annual Hamilton Cribs Contest, showcasing the best rooms on campus. Here are our winners of the 2012 contest.

12

’ Taub w e r And

The Winners: Andrew Nichols ’14 and Ben Anderson ’14

James Crafa ’12

46

the continental | spring 2012

the continental | spring 2012

47


Featuring Specialty Hamilton College Items! Clinton Coasters

Hooked Wool Pillows

New Tailgaters!

8FTU1BSL3PX $MJOUPOrBMJMJO[IPNF!HNBJMDPN r5VFTEBZ4BUVSEBZ 48

the continental | spring 2012

the continental | spring 2012

49


Featuring Specialty Hamilton College Items! Clinton Coasters

Hooked Wool Pillows

New Tailgaters!

8FTU1BSL3PX $MJOUPOrBMJMJO[IPNF!HNBJMDPN r5VFTEBZ4BUVSEBZ 48

the continental | spring 2012

the continental | spring 2012

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the continental advertise for the 2012-2013 issues email: contmag@hamilton.edu

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the continental | spring 2012

the continental | spring 2012

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the continental advertise for the 2012-2013 issues email: contmag@hamilton.edu

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the continental | spring 2012

the continental | spring 2012

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Parting Note

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the continental | spring 2012

Satirical map of the Hamilton campus in The Royal Gaboon, May 1929

the continental | spring 2012

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Parting Note

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the continental | spring 2012

Satirical map of the Hamilton campus in The Royal Gaboon, May 1929

the continental | spring 2012

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Parting Note

Cartoon from The Royal Gaboon, November 1935

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the continental | spring 2012


Spring 2012  

The Spring 2012 edition of the Hamilton Continental

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