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the continental

Autumn 2011

Professor Isserman: the Book, the Interview, the Story

LEGENDS OF THE HILL Bicentennial History Highlights

Beyond the VT 路 What You Didn't Know About Hamilton 路 Middle Eastern Travels


the continental

Autumn 2011

Professor Isserman: the Book, the Interview, the Story

LEGENDS OF THE HILL Bicentennial History Highlights

Beyond the VT 路 What You Didn't Know About Hamilton 路 Middle Eastern Travels


The 2012 Senior Gift Alex Paganelli Memorial Class of 2012 Research Endowment An endowment from which a grant will be awarded annually to a student conducting field research or holding an internship. Preference given (though not limited) to those with a focus in the natural sciences.

The Photo Issue

COOPed Up In The CoOp

Alex Paganelli was an incredible student and athlete in the Hamilton College community. He was a prominent member of the Men’s Lacrosse Team and a chemistry major intending to attend medical school. In the fall of 2010, Alex studied abroad in Turks and Caicos, conducting field research on marine life. He was an important member of the 2012 class as a teammate, friend, and student. His absence will always leave a noticeable hole, especially for our seniors. The senior gift, a research endowment, is a way for Alex to continue to live in our hearts and minds on the Hill. With this endowment, Alex will continue to spread the warmth and wealth as he did while here at Hamilton, helping students of similar interests achieve parallel success and recognition. In order to remember Alex and to promote continuing success among Hamilton’s current and future students, the Senior Gift Committee is hoping to make the following participation goals in order to establish this commemorating endowment. November 5, 2011 25%

December 10, 2011 50%

March 11, 2012 75%

May 6, 2012 90%

Remember that no amount is too small! As Alex’s classmates, we owe it to him to do our very best to reach over 98% participation! Reaching 98%, ideally 100%, would put us ahead of the class of 2011 who only reached only 93%, as well as the Hamilton record of 97.6%, set by the class of 2007. Help show your support to Hamilton as well as to our unforgettable classmate, Alex Paganelli!


the continental a student-run magazine based at hamilton college

“Taylor, Stratton, and Forrest ’13 in front of South, Apr ’13”

on the cover

REBECCA POMERANTZ editor in chief

from the hamilton college archives the student body of 1931 in front of south dorm.

SOPHIE HAYS creative director

We also uncovered a photo album that belonged to Harold H. Smith, class of 1913. Clockwise from above: “Before the bookshop on paint night in Fall 1911.” The comencement Parade of 1912. “Feed of freshmen delegation of ELS held in 18 South during winter of 1909-10.” “Feed given by 1916--Library of Emerson Hall.”

director of photography SAM TOOLE news editor CHRISTIE CRAWFORD entertainment editor DANIELLE BURBY features editor CHARLOTTE HOUGH style editor SARAH SHAUGHNESSY society editor SCOTT BLOSSER travel editor HANNAH GRACE O’CONNELL

Above: “Smith desk in 16 South” Below: “Fulton ’16 at his desk in 21 South”

layout MATT LANGAN, VIRGINIA WALSH, KAYE KAGOAN, HANNAH GRACE O’CONNELL, CHRIS LABORA web advisor CHRIS MADDOX advertising director JACKIE WALD account managers BECCA MACK, JOSIE JONES editors at large HEATHER KRIEGER, ANNE LOIZEAUX writers KNUTE GAILOR, SCOTT BLOSSER, STEVEN SAURBIER, ANNA PAIKERT, PEARL SHIN,

SARA SHAUGHNESSY, JULIA JARROLD, SADE OYALOWO, HANNAH KLOECKNER, KATE BENNERT, ABBY GOOGLE, BLAIR CASEY, MEG PENGUE, SOPHIE HAYS, MADISON FORSANDER, CHRISTIE CRAWFORD, ARMAL ASGHAR, GRACE O’CONNELL, RACHEL BOYLAN, ANDREW MENGES, KATIE HUTCHINS, TREVOR HOWE, EMILY DRINKWATER photographers KRISTY BENDETTI, TALIA BLOOM, EUNICE CHOI,SARA MEISSNER, KARA SHANNON, SAM TOOLE founder KATIE CHILDS founding editor KATE STINCHFIELD

letters to the editor E-mail contmag@hamilton.edu advertisers E-mail contmag@hamilton.edu sponsors a product of the Hamilton College Media Board


the continental a student-run magazine based at hamilton college

“Taylor, Stratton, and Forrest ’13 in front of South, Apr ’13”

on the cover

REBECCA POMERANTZ editor in chief

from the hamilton college archives the student body of 1931 in front of south dorm.

SOPHIE HAYS creative director

We also uncovered a photo album that belonged to Harold H. Smith, class of 1913. Clockwise from above: “Before the bookshop on paint night in Fall 1911.” The comencement Parade of 1912. “Feed of freshmen delegation of ELS held in 18 South during winter of 1909-10.” “Feed given by 1916--Library of Emerson Hall.”

director of photography SAM TOOLE news editor CHRISTIE CRAWFORD entertainment editor DANIELLE BURBY features editor CHARLOTTE HOUGH style editor SARAH SHAUGHNESSY society editor SCOTT BLOSSER travel editor HANNAH GRACE O’CONNELL

Above: “Smith desk in 16 South” Below: “Fulton ’16 at his desk in 21 South”

layout MATT LANGAN, VIRGINIA WALSH, KAYE KAGOAN, HANNAH GRACE O’CONNELL, CHRIS LABORA web advisor CHRIS MADDOX advertising director JACKIE WALD account managers BECCA MACK, JOSIE JONES editors at large HEATHER KRIEGER, ANNE LOIZEAUX writers KNUTE GAILOR, SCOTT BLOSSER, STEVEN SAURBIER, ANNA PAIKERT, PEARL SHIN,

SARA SHAUGHNESSY, JULIA JARROLD, SADE OYALOWO, HANNAH KLOECKNER, KATE BENNERT, ABBY GOOGLE, BLAIR CASEY, MEG PENGUE, SOPHIE HAYS, MADISON FORSANDER, CHRISTIE CRAWFORD, ARMAL ASGHAR, GRACE O’CONNELL, RACHEL BOYLAN, ANDREW MENGES, KATIE HUTCHINS, TREVOR HOWE, EMILY DRINKWATER photographers KRISTY BENDETTI, TALIA BLOOM, EUNICE CHOI,SARA MEISSNER, KARA SHANNON, SAM TOOLE founder KATIE CHILDS founding editor KATE STINCHFIELD

letters to the editor E-mail contmag@hamilton.edu advertisers E-mail contmag@hamilton.edu sponsors a product of the Hamilton College Media Board


from the editors This issue has taught us more than we ever imagined about our school, its past, its people, and its future. After many trips to the College archives for article ideas, photos and fact checking, research has never felt so exhilarating, so personal. In the month following the Bicentennial Kick-Off Weekend, the spirit of Hamilton history was most inspiring to our writers. This issue is a compilation of stories from past and current students, as well as a look at what the bicentennial means for us.

table of contents

While much is new on campus, like the Days-Massolo Center and full participation in the NESCAC, we’ve come to realize that things aren’t that different today on the Hill as they were long ago. The fall still means toss-up football games, a new freshman class, runs to the Cider Mill, and of course, declining temperatures.

On the Cover

Interview with Professor Isserman 18 Beyond the VT 41 What You Didn’t Know About Hamilton 13 Middle Eastern Travels 46 Bicentennial History Highlights

But so far this fall, we managed to escape the dreary weather our campus bubble to discover new bars and even roller derby in Utica. But we were also aware of the happenings on our own campus: new styles, new facts, and a new restaurant.

Our autumn editorial staff!

Believe us, a trip to the College Archives and a chat with our archivist Katherine Collett (who we owe many thanks to for this issue) will allow you a moment to remember why we can’t seem to tear ourselves away from the Hill. The following pages are our own contributions to the Hamilton bicentennial and archives. Enjoy!

Blair Casey’s 7 Wonders of the Hamilton Campus. She reels in her favorites from the dark side, light side, and even an offcampus surprise. page 24

4

the continental | autumn 2011

Style

Hamilton Transitions to NESCAC 8 Operation Smile 10 Women’s Cancer Awareness Week 11 Days-Massolo Initiatives 12 Bicentennial Weekend Highlights 14

Spotted 30 Bicentennial Fashion 32 Hamilton Style Blogger 36 Alums in Fashion 38

Talk of the Town

in this issue

scope out

On the Hill

Kabobviously Review 20 What Grinds My Gears 21 Legends of the Hill 21

play

by the new rules: four of Hamilton’s prized teams move up to the NESCAC. Christie Crawford gives the inside scoop. page 8

Society Letter to the Editor 7 Roller Derby 39 Mixed Gender Housing: A History 42

Features

Travel

The 7 Wonders of Hamilton 24 Time Capsules 26 Hops History 28

A Factory-Made Summer 43 Sabbatcal Travels 44 Post-Hamilton: Living Abroad 48

style

after Pearl Shin’s take on bicentennial fashion. Students Dyllon Young, Sarah Song, Trevor Howe, and Julia Jarrold show off timeless pieces. page 34 the continental | autumn 2011

5


from the editors This issue has taught us more than we ever imagined about our school, its past, its people, and its future. After many trips to the College archives for article ideas, photos and fact checking, research has never felt so exhilarating, so personal. In the month following the Bicentennial Kick-Off Weekend, the spirit of Hamilton history was most inspiring to our writers. This issue is a compilation of stories from past and current students, as well as a look at what the bicentennial means for us.

table of contents

While much is new on campus, like the Days-Massolo Center and full participation in the NESCAC, we’ve come to realize that things aren’t that different today on the Hill as they were long ago. The fall still means toss-up football games, a new freshman class, runs to the Cider Mill, and of course, declining temperatures.

On the Cover

Interview with Professor Isserman 18 Beyond the VT 41 What You Didn’t Know About Hamilton 13 Middle Eastern Travels 46 Bicentennial History Highlights

But so far this fall, we managed to escape the dreary weather our campus bubble to discover new bars and even roller derby in Utica. But we were also aware of the happenings on our own campus: new styles, new facts, and a new restaurant.

Our autumn editorial staff!

Believe us, a trip to the College Archives and a chat with our archivist Katherine Collett (who we owe many thanks to for this issue) will allow you a moment to remember why we can’t seem to tear ourselves away from the Hill. The following pages are our own contributions to the Hamilton bicentennial and archives. Enjoy!

Blair Casey’s 7 Wonders of the Hamilton Campus. She reels in her favorites from the dark side, light side, and even an offcampus surprise. page 24

4

the continental | autumn 2011

Style

Hamilton Transitions to NESCAC 8 Operation Smile 10 Women’s Cancer Awareness Week 11 Days-Massolo Initiatives 12 Bicentennial Weekend Highlights 14

Spotted 30 Bicentennial Fashion 32 Hamilton Style Blogger 36 Alums in Fashion 38

Talk of the Town

in this issue

scope out

On the Hill

Kabobviously Review 20 What Grinds My Gears 21 Legends of the Hill 21

play

by the new rules: four of Hamilton’s prized teams move up to the NESCAC. Christie Crawford gives the inside scoop. page 8

Society Letter to the Editor 7 Roller Derby 39 Mixed Gender Housing: A History 42

Features

Travel

The 7 Wonders of Hamilton 24 Time Capsules 26 Hops History 28

A Factory-Made Summer 43 Sabbatcal Travels 44 Post-Hamilton: Living Abroad 48

style

after Pearl Shin’s take on bicentennial fashion. Students Dyllon Young, Sarah Song, Trevor Howe, and Julia Jarrold show off timeless pieces. page 34 the continental | autumn 2011

5


society

Letter to the Editor See the Science Center? How about K.J.? Yeah, (Are we building to make Middlebury feel bad about itself?) By Knute Gailor ’13 Building projects have transformed Hamilton’s campus in the last ten years. The recently named Edward and Virginia Taylor Science Center is state of the art, K.J. is a marvel of engineering (even though I still don’t quite know what a water feature is…), and Sadove, for all it lacks in functionality, is spectacular. But while we are undoubtedly lucky to have such incredible campus facilities, how have our buildings been paid for? Are we building just to keep up with other schools? Is it sensible for us to be developing our campus at the same time our tuition bills are consistently rising? Hoping to learn more about how Hamilton goes about improving and maintaining its facilities, I asked Karen Leach, the College’s Vice President for Administration and Finance, to answer these questions. Her responses surprised building sensibly. According to Ms. Leach, Hamilton views campus building projects in the context of the College’s larger strategic initiatives. Academic buildings like K.J. and the Taylor Science Center were improved to support high quality academic programs; residence halls have been updated to meet code requirements that ensure students’ safety; and energy saving improvements are being made all over campus to reduce the College’s carbon footprint. In its bicentennial year, Hamilton is mindful that its facilities need to be around for the next two hundred years: updating aging buildings is a priority and most of the projects Steve Bellona’s emails kept us up to date on over the summer were preventative maintenance. (As a note, the Summer Construction Updates were the one reason I checked my email over the summer.) When I moved on to questions of money, I learned from Ms. Leach that Hamilton funds each building project differently. While gifts from alumni and friends of the College paid for the Sadove Student Center in its entirety, K.J. was funded by a combination of gifts and money raised from the sale of taxexempt bonds. The Bristol Center has a unique endowment to pay for its upkeep, and the Wellin Art Museum’s construction was also paid for by gifts. I was surprised to learn that building maintenance costs contribute minimally to tuition increases. More than half of Hamilton’s budget goes to supporting more than six hundred full-time employees, pointed out, even buying paper for the College is expensive. (Who knew Paper-Cut could help keep our tuition down…should have known Dave Smallen knows what he is talking about.) So, as I see it, Hamilton is improving the campus sensibly. Our buildings all serve great purposes and Projects like the Days-Massolo Center show how the right facilities can contribute to improving the campus climate. Steve Bellona and Bill Huggins even gave drinking helmets, I mean, hard hats, to those of us living in the kennel that is Saunders this year. While there is still work to be done (the library’s carpet comes readily to mind, although I’m convinced it’s still around to punish all those who try to study there hung-over on Sunday morning), Hamilton has ensured that we have tremendous learning facilities. The generosity of Hamilton alumni is incredible, and we are improving and expanding our facilities when many other colleges are putting off muchneeded repairs and cutting faculty positions to get by. What’s more, the College admitted the class of 2015 without considering an applicant’s ability to pay. In short, we haven’t been building to keep up

the continental | autumn 2011

7


society

Letter to the Editor See the Science Center? How about K.J.? Yeah, (Are we building to make Middlebury feel bad about itself?) By Knute Gailor ’13 Building projects have transformed Hamilton’s campus in the last ten years. The recently named Edward and Virginia Taylor Science Center is state of the art, K.J. is a marvel of engineering (even though I still don’t quite know what a water feature is…), and Sadove, for all it lacks in functionality, is spectacular. But while we are undoubtedly lucky to have such incredible campus facilities, how have our buildings been paid for? Are we building just to keep up with other schools? Is it sensible for us to be developing our campus at the same time our tuition bills are consistently rising? Hoping to learn more about how Hamilton goes about improving and maintaining its facilities, I asked Karen Leach, the College’s Vice President for Administration and Finance, to answer these questions. Her responses surprised building sensibly. According to Ms. Leach, Hamilton views campus building projects in the context of the College’s larger strategic initiatives. Academic buildings like K.J. and the Taylor Science Center were improved to support high quality academic programs; residence halls have been updated to meet code requirements that ensure students’ safety; and energy saving improvements are being made all over campus to reduce the College’s carbon footprint. In its bicentennial year, Hamilton is mindful that its facilities need to be around for the next two hundred years: updating aging buildings is a priority and most of the projects Steve Bellona’s emails kept us up to date on over the summer were preventative maintenance. (As a note, the Summer Construction Updates were the one reason I checked my email over the summer.) When I moved on to questions of money, I learned from Ms. Leach that Hamilton funds each building project differently. While gifts from alumni and friends of the College paid for the Sadove Student Center in its entirety, K.J. was funded by a combination of gifts and money raised from the sale of taxexempt bonds. The Bristol Center has a unique endowment to pay for its upkeep, and the Wellin Art Museum’s construction was also paid for by gifts. I was surprised to learn that building maintenance costs contribute minimally to tuition increases. More than half of Hamilton’s budget goes to supporting more than six hundred full-time employees, pointed out, even buying paper for the College is expensive. (Who knew Paper-Cut could help keep our tuition down…should have known Dave Smallen knows what he is talking about.) So, as I see it, Hamilton is improving the campus sensibly. Our buildings all serve great purposes and Projects like the Days-Massolo Center show how the right facilities can contribute to improving the campus climate. Steve Bellona and Bill Huggins even gave drinking helmets, I mean, hard hats, to those of us living in the kennel that is Saunders this year. While there is still work to be done (the library’s carpet comes readily to mind, although I’m convinced it’s still around to punish all those who try to study there hung-over on Sunday morning), Hamilton has ensured that we have tremendous learning facilities. The generosity of Hamilton alumni is incredible, and we are improving and expanding our facilities when many other colleges are putting off muchneeded repairs and cutting faculty positions to get by. What’s more, the College admitted the class of 2015 without considering an applicant’s ability to pay. In short, we haven’t been building to keep up

the continental | autumn 2011

7


on the hill

on the hill

Hamilton Finalizes its Transition into the NESCAC: Four Hamilton Teams Debut in the ‘CAC By Christie Crawford ’13

Rumor on the Hill is that an old basketball coach from the seventies switched Hamilton teams from the New England Small College Athletic Conference (NESCAC) into the Liberty League because he wanted his team to win a championship. As juicy as it sounds, it’s about as true as the last rumor you and Fitness Center Director, David Thompson, shed some light on the true history of Hamilton’s unique position in the NESCAC. Hamilton has been a charter member of the NESCAC since its founding in 1971; however, according to Coach Thompson, today’s NESCAC is different than the NESCAC that Hamilton helped found. Originally, the NESCAC allowed its members to move around, playing both NESCAC and other teams in the New York area, such as Union and Saint Lawrence. Coach Thompson explained that the NESCAC wasn’t so much a league as it was a loose association of teams like Hamilton, Middlebury, and Williams who agreed to uphold high academic standards, but were given more freedom in regards to who they played in athletics. The NCAA changed its ways in 1999, and forced leagues to solidify member teams. According to Coach Hind, small NCAA conferences used to pick and choose what teams received bids to the NCAA tournament. As more college teams joined the association, the NCAA realized that they needed a set

place team would automatically qualify for a bid to the NCAA championship tournament. For several years, Hamilton enjoyed the freedom of playing both NESCAC and Liberty League teams, but when the NESCAC was forced to solidify itself, Hamilton had to pick a side. Hamilton was at a crossroads of two very different paths, and they chose…both. Coach Thompson claims that the decision was easy for hockey and football to join NESCAC because they were already playing almost exclusively NESCAC ultimately had tighter ties with New York teams in the Liberty League. Coach Thompson described it as a “collective decision of convenience, honoring traditions that already existed.” teams in the Liberty League had to follow NESCAC rules, which put Hamilton at a “competitive disadvantage.” For instance, preseason for basketball teams in the Liberty League starts on October 15th, but even when they played in the Liberty League, Hamilton basketball could not start until the NESCAC started on November 1st. In addition, the Liberty League is quite competitive with a respected reputation, but ultimately, the NESCAC is an all around stronger league, both academically and athletically. Coach Hind is excited about the teams’ transfer to the NESCAC because Hamilton students are “high achievers, hard workers, and goal setters” who deserve to play with the best of the best. Hamilton has been associated Hamilton will show the NESCAC that they are a force to be reckoned with.

Hamilton Players Set on

Making Waves in the ‘CAC

2009 All-American Third Team 2010, 2009 NFHCA All Region, First Team 2009 & 2010 Liberty League All League, First Team

photos courtesey of Jim Taylor

2010 NABC All-Region, First Team 2009 Liberty League All-League, 1st team 2008 Liberty League, Rookie of the Year

In 2010, McNally ’12 played a crucial role in leading

Last season, Sullivan ’12 led the Conts to the Liberty League championship game. Sullivan led

the Liberty League by storm when they earned their

game. The Continentals went 16-10 last season, and winter.

Even though they were the new kids on the block this their recent successes into the NESCAC.

2010 NSCAA All Region, Third Team 2010 Liberty League All League, Honorable Mention Defensive Performer of the Week

8

the continental | autumn 2011

2010 NSCAA All Region, First Team 2010 Liberty League All League, First Team Offensive Performer of the Week

In 2010, Sarah Boak ’12 led the women’s soccer team to their 3rd performance in the NCAA tournament. Hamilton defense proved to be unstoppable when they shut out Virginia Wesleyan

In 2010, Campagnano ’12 set the pace for a successful season for men’s soccer. Campagnano set up the men’s offense to reach a winning record

powerful defensive line had NESCAC offenders shaking in their boots this fall.

of the Liberty League Championship, and looked to shake things up in their debut in the NESCAC this fall.

the continental | autumn 2011

9


on the hill

on the hill

Hamilton Finalizes its Transition into the NESCAC: Four Hamilton Teams Debut in the ‘CAC By Christie Crawford ’13

Rumor on the Hill is that an old basketball coach from the seventies switched Hamilton teams from the New England Small College Athletic Conference (NESCAC) into the Liberty League because he wanted his team to win a championship. As juicy as it sounds, it’s about as true as the last rumor you and Fitness Center Director, David Thompson, shed some light on the true history of Hamilton’s unique position in the NESCAC. Hamilton has been a charter member of the NESCAC since its founding in 1971; however, according to Coach Thompson, today’s NESCAC is different than the NESCAC that Hamilton helped found. Originally, the NESCAC allowed its members to move around, playing both NESCAC and other teams in the New York area, such as Union and Saint Lawrence. Coach Thompson explained that the NESCAC wasn’t so much a league as it was a loose association of teams like Hamilton, Middlebury, and Williams who agreed to uphold high academic standards, but were given more freedom in regards to who they played in athletics. The NCAA changed its ways in 1999, and forced leagues to solidify member teams. According to Coach Hind, small NCAA conferences used to pick and choose what teams received bids to the NCAA tournament. As more college teams joined the association, the NCAA realized that they needed a set

place team would automatically qualify for a bid to the NCAA championship tournament. For several years, Hamilton enjoyed the freedom of playing both NESCAC and Liberty League teams, but when the NESCAC was forced to solidify itself, Hamilton had to pick a side. Hamilton was at a crossroads of two very different paths, and they chose…both. Coach Thompson claims that the decision was easy for hockey and football to join NESCAC because they were already playing almost exclusively NESCAC ultimately had tighter ties with New York teams in the Liberty League. Coach Thompson described it as a “collective decision of convenience, honoring traditions that already existed.” teams in the Liberty League had to follow NESCAC rules, which put Hamilton at a “competitive disadvantage.” For instance, preseason for basketball teams in the Liberty League starts on October 15th, but even when they played in the Liberty League, Hamilton basketball could not start until the NESCAC started on November 1st. In addition, the Liberty League is quite competitive with a respected reputation, but ultimately, the NESCAC is an all around stronger league, both academically and athletically. Coach Hind is excited about the teams’ transfer to the NESCAC because Hamilton students are “high achievers, hard workers, and goal setters” who deserve to play with the best of the best. Hamilton has been associated Hamilton will show the NESCAC that they are a force to be reckoned with.

Hamilton Players Set on

Making Waves in the ‘CAC

2009 All-American Third Team 2010, 2009 NFHCA All Region, First Team 2009 & 2010 Liberty League All League, First Team

photos courtesey of Jim Taylor

2010 NABC All-Region, First Team 2009 Liberty League All-League, 1st team 2008 Liberty League, Rookie of the Year

In 2010, McNally ’12 played a crucial role in leading

Last season, Sullivan ’12 led the Conts to the Liberty League championship game. Sullivan led

the Liberty League by storm when they earned their

game. The Continentals went 16-10 last season, and winter.

Even though they were the new kids on the block this their recent successes into the NESCAC.

2010 NSCAA All Region, Third Team 2010 Liberty League All League, Honorable Mention Defensive Performer of the Week

8

the continental | autumn 2011

2010 NSCAA All Region, First Team 2010 Liberty League All League, First Team Offensive Performer of the Week

In 2010, Sarah Boak ’12 led the women’s soccer team to their 3rd performance in the NCAA tournament. Hamilton defense proved to be unstoppable when they shut out Virginia Wesleyan

In 2010, Campagnano ’12 set the pace for a successful season for men’s soccer. Campagnano set up the men’s offense to reach a winning record

powerful defensive line had NESCAC offenders shaking in their boots this fall.

of the Liberty League Championship, and looked to shake things up in their debut in the NESCAC this fall.

the continental | autumn 2011

9


on the hill

on the hill

It’s Personal: Women’s Cancer Awareness Week

A Smile-Worthy Cause

By Madison Forsander ’14

By Olusade Oyalowo ’14

Every three minutes a child is born with a cleft — often unable to eat, speak, socialize or smile (operationsmile. org). Starting this fall, students on the Hill will have the opportunity to help heal children’s smiles through a non-

Week. The campus buzzed with activity as students participated in events designed to raise awareness for gynecologic cancers. Members of the Hamilton community attended a joint lecture by Professor of Women’s Studies Michele Paludi and Professor of Biology Jinnie Garrett, which explored both the science behind various gynecologic cancers, and the social issues surrounding them. During the week, students had the opportunity to sign ribbons that were compiled into one giant ribbon that was donated to a local hospital. WHCL, the campus radio, released several public service announcements about women’s cancers. To wrap up the week, The Little Pub hosted a Ladies’ Night on Friday serving customized and virgin drinks. A portion of the proceeds was donated to the cause.

Hamilton College’s chapter of Operation Smile, started provide free surgeries to repair cleft lip, cleft palate and other facial deformities for children around the globe. In of smiles. Co-founder and President of Fundraising, Shannon, expressed her enthusiasm for the beginnings of this new club: “The campus, students and administrators, were very receptive to our proposal for an Op Smile club. We are excited to have so many people, right off the bat, on our team.”

Luckily for Krause and Shannon, starting Operation Smile at Hamilton has been a smooth process. Krause said, “Starting a club on campus has actually been pretty simple. We’ve gotten a lot of positive feedback from our adviser, Associate Dean of Students for Off-Campus Study Carol

Sarah Perdomo ’12, organizer and intiator of the week, is a native of Ft. Lauderdale, Florida. Her major is an interdisciplinary focus in art, comparative literature, and religious studies. She and a few friends were inspired by their personal experiences to raise awareness at Hamilton of various gynecologic cancers. After a meeting with Lisa Magnarelli ’96, Associate Dean of Students for Student Engagement and

else we’ve talked to. I think that the excitement that Kara and I have for starting this club is really evident, and that’s certainly made it much easier.”

Women’s Cancer Awareness Week at Hamilton was born.

Krause and Shannon have big plans for Hamilton’s Operation Smile this year. According to Krause, “If all goes

Sarah’s motivations for organizing Women’s Cancer Awareness Week are deeply personal. Her mother was diagnosed with endometrial cancer in March of 2011 and underwent a hysterectomy, but over the summer, doctors discovered that what they thought was endometrial was actually ovarian cancer. Following this news, Sarah’s mother underwent chemotherapy. Sarah cites this experience as her impetus to raise awareness of the unfortunate commonality of women’s cancers.

The idea of creating a chapter at Hamilton started when Krause, co-founder and President of Awareness, attended Operation Smile’s International Student Cultural Exchange Conference with a friend in Beijing this August. She said, “When I left Beijing I really felt like I had no other choice but to start an Op Smile club at Hamilton. I guess doing nothing was no longer an option.” Krause explained how much she learned from this conference: “It isn’t just about Americans going overseas, providing the surgeries, and leaving. They really do a great job at training doctors in the country, involving local students, and energizing entire communities to help with the cause.” Shannon was also inspired over the summer when she conducted research on ways to become more involved with this effort.

a Late Nite activity second semester, screenings of movies from some of Op Smile’s medical missions, a few bake sales, toothbrush drives, etc.” Shannon adds, “[We] hope that students will become involved in Operation Smile, and remain involved after time at Hamilton.” Krause said, “To me, Operation Smile is about recognizing the dignity and value in the face of every child, and that’s truly profound! They are hidden and isolated because of their condition, but here we are on the other side of the

Leah at the conference in China.

cancer, and vulvar cancer, which generally receive less recognition than breast cancer. The Foundation for Women’s Cancer estimates that this year, over 78,000 women in the United States will be diagnosed, and over 28,000 will die from gynecologic cancer. There are only about 1,000 gynecologic oncologists in the United States, so not all women who have been diagnosed with gynecologic cancer will have access to the best treatments. Fortunately, Sarah’s mother has made a full recovery and was present at Women’s Cancer Awareness Week to support her daughter and promote her cause. But for many more women, the ending of their story may not be so optimistic. Sarah stressed the importance of being proactive, not simply reactive, when it comes to battling cancer: “We have to Cancer can strike young, it isn’t just limited to older women.” Since gynecologic cancers occur for a variety of reasons, including health, family history, sexual activity, and environmental factors, they can affect women of all ages.

(from L to R) The leading ladies behind Hamilton’s 1st annual Women’s Cancer Week, Jennifer Hightower, Tracey Ogagba, Sarah Perdomo, and Alison Ritacco at ladies’ awareness night at the Pub.

Women’s Cancer Awareness Week focused primarily on gynecologic cancers, such as cervical cancer, ovarian cancer, uterine cancer, endometrial cancer, vaginal

Women can personally reduce their risk of contracting certain cancers through healthy lifestyle choices, scheduling regular medical exams, and taking birth control to encourage regular shedding of the uterine lining, where cancerous cells may develop. There are also ways to become involved in the

The Foundation for Women’s Cancer is organizing the second National Race to End Women’s Cancer on November 6th in Washington, D.C. Hamilton is organizing a team for the race, and interested runners (and walkers) of all skill levels are encouraged to join. It is important to remember that while events like Women’s Cancer Awareness Week are fun, their true purpose is to get people excited about the causes and make a difference. As Sarah summed up, “As a community, Hamilton has a much wider reach than The Foundation for Women’s Cancers, and we have

smile.’” 10

the continental | autumn 2011

the continental | autumn 2011

11


on the hill

on the hill

It’s Personal: Women’s Cancer Awareness Week

A Smile-Worthy Cause

By Madison Forsander ’14

By Olusade Oyalowo ’14

Every three minutes a child is born with a cleft — often unable to eat, speak, socialize or smile (operationsmile. org). Starting this fall, students on the Hill will have the opportunity to help heal children’s smiles through a non-

Week. The campus buzzed with activity as students participated in events designed to raise awareness for gynecologic cancers. Members of the Hamilton community attended a joint lecture by Professor of Women’s Studies Michele Paludi and Professor of Biology Jinnie Garrett, which explored both the science behind various gynecologic cancers, and the social issues surrounding them. During the week, students had the opportunity to sign ribbons that were compiled into one giant ribbon that was donated to a local hospital. WHCL, the campus radio, released several public service announcements about women’s cancers. To wrap up the week, The Little Pub hosted a Ladies’ Night on Friday serving customized and virgin drinks. A portion of the proceeds was donated to the cause.

Hamilton College’s chapter of Operation Smile, started provide free surgeries to repair cleft lip, cleft palate and other facial deformities for children around the globe. In of smiles. Co-founder and President of Fundraising, Shannon, expressed her enthusiasm for the beginnings of this new club: “The campus, students and administrators, were very receptive to our proposal for an Op Smile club. We are excited to have so many people, right off the bat, on our team.”

Luckily for Krause and Shannon, starting Operation Smile at Hamilton has been a smooth process. Krause said, “Starting a club on campus has actually been pretty simple. We’ve gotten a lot of positive feedback from our adviser, Associate Dean of Students for Off-Campus Study Carol

Sarah Perdomo ’12, organizer and intiator of the week, is a native of Ft. Lauderdale, Florida. Her major is an interdisciplinary focus in art, comparative literature, and religious studies. She and a few friends were inspired by their personal experiences to raise awareness at Hamilton of various gynecologic cancers. After a meeting with Lisa Magnarelli ’96, Associate Dean of Students for Student Engagement and

else we’ve talked to. I think that the excitement that Kara and I have for starting this club is really evident, and that’s certainly made it much easier.”

Women’s Cancer Awareness Week at Hamilton was born.

Krause and Shannon have big plans for Hamilton’s Operation Smile this year. According to Krause, “If all goes

Sarah’s motivations for organizing Women’s Cancer Awareness Week are deeply personal. Her mother was diagnosed with endometrial cancer in March of 2011 and underwent a hysterectomy, but over the summer, doctors discovered that what they thought was endometrial was actually ovarian cancer. Following this news, Sarah’s mother underwent chemotherapy. Sarah cites this experience as her impetus to raise awareness of the unfortunate commonality of women’s cancers.

The idea of creating a chapter at Hamilton started when Krause, co-founder and President of Awareness, attended Operation Smile’s International Student Cultural Exchange Conference with a friend in Beijing this August. She said, “When I left Beijing I really felt like I had no other choice but to start an Op Smile club at Hamilton. I guess doing nothing was no longer an option.” Krause explained how much she learned from this conference: “It isn’t just about Americans going overseas, providing the surgeries, and leaving. They really do a great job at training doctors in the country, involving local students, and energizing entire communities to help with the cause.” Shannon was also inspired over the summer when she conducted research on ways to become more involved with this effort.

a Late Nite activity second semester, screenings of movies from some of Op Smile’s medical missions, a few bake sales, toothbrush drives, etc.” Shannon adds, “[We] hope that students will become involved in Operation Smile, and remain involved after time at Hamilton.” Krause said, “To me, Operation Smile is about recognizing the dignity and value in the face of every child, and that’s truly profound! They are hidden and isolated because of their condition, but here we are on the other side of the

Leah at the conference in China.

cancer, and vulvar cancer, which generally receive less recognition than breast cancer. The Foundation for Women’s Cancer estimates that this year, over 78,000 women in the United States will be diagnosed, and over 28,000 will die from gynecologic cancer. There are only about 1,000 gynecologic oncologists in the United States, so not all women who have been diagnosed with gynecologic cancer will have access to the best treatments. Fortunately, Sarah’s mother has made a full recovery and was present at Women’s Cancer Awareness Week to support her daughter and promote her cause. But for many more women, the ending of their story may not be so optimistic. Sarah stressed the importance of being proactive, not simply reactive, when it comes to battling cancer: “We have to Cancer can strike young, it isn’t just limited to older women.” Since gynecologic cancers occur for a variety of reasons, including health, family history, sexual activity, and environmental factors, they can affect women of all ages.

(from L to R) The leading ladies behind Hamilton’s 1st annual Women’s Cancer Week, Jennifer Hightower, Tracey Ogagba, Sarah Perdomo, and Alison Ritacco at ladies’ awareness night at the Pub.

Women’s Cancer Awareness Week focused primarily on gynecologic cancers, such as cervical cancer, ovarian cancer, uterine cancer, endometrial cancer, vaginal

Women can personally reduce their risk of contracting certain cancers through healthy lifestyle choices, scheduling regular medical exams, and taking birth control to encourage regular shedding of the uterine lining, where cancerous cells may develop. There are also ways to become involved in the

The Foundation for Women’s Cancer is organizing the second National Race to End Women’s Cancer on November 6th in Washington, D.C. Hamilton is organizing a team for the race, and interested runners (and walkers) of all skill levels are encouraged to join. It is important to remember that while events like Women’s Cancer Awareness Week are fun, their true purpose is to get people excited about the causes and make a difference. As Sarah summed up, “As a community, Hamilton has a much wider reach than The Foundation for Women’s Cancers, and we have

smile.’” 10

the continental | autumn 2011

the continental | autumn 2011

11


on the hill

An Open Door: The Days-Massolo Center Provides a Platform for Student Discussion

By Amal Asghar’15

Although Hamilton often feels like it may be frozen in time, the College has recently made several changes including the opening of the DaysMassolo Center located on College Hill Road. For several years, the campus has been in need of a common location for students, faculty, and staff to engage in open discussion. The new Center will be dedicated to multicultural awareness and education on campus, and will serve as a resource for all Hamilton students. The Center was dedicated to Hamilton trustees Drew S. Days III and Arthur J. Massolo last April, and Amit Taneja was appointed the director of Days-Massolo this past summer. Taneja, a native of India, has a strong, personal connection to his job. During his undergraduate days at the University of British Columbia, he felt overwhelmed by personal and family rough time he gave up on higher education until a few mentors saw his potential. For this reason, Taneja truly

of these groups include the Asian Cultural Society (ACS), Muslim Students’ Association (MSA), and South Asian Students’ Association (SASA). only in asking tough questions, but in answering them as well. He elaborated, “We’re encouraged in main society to not look at our differences … but the Center is a safe space where dialogue can happen freely across differences in race, gender, and sexuality. We talk about how our identities shape our experience, our thoughts, and our feelings.” The Center is not just for multicultural students to visit, but it is a place for all Hamilton students to come and have open conversations about questions or issues. Taneja said, “This is a place where how we talk to one another is equally important as what we talk about. Honest dialogue amongst students is essential for their understanding.”

Not only does Taneja have faith in the Center as a tool for the entire community, but he also has taken a liking to the having a support system campus dynamic as a safe, and wants the Center intellectual environment. to become a “homeTaneja said, “I have been away-from-home” for all really impressed by the students. ways in which faculty, staff, photo courtesy of the Days-Massolo Center The Center has several administrators interact facilities open for student use. There is a living with students like they’re human beings. You are room equipped with a television and Wii console, a student who has a name, has interests, and has a kitchen, a study location, and a computer lab. history. You are not just your student number.” The building also houses the Womyn’s Center and Rainbow Alliance. Taneja’s goal is for the Center to become an integral part of the campus and for every student to Many multicultural clubs and organizations take part in discussions and events. have started moving their meetings to the gathering

Coming to the Days-Massolo Center on November 10th: Professor Paula Moya on “Doing Race: Eight Conversations About Race” 12

the continental | autumn 2011 the

What You Didn’t Know about Hamilton

features

but it does have quite a few secrets. Hamilton’s bicentennial is a good time to reveal the littleknown facts that lie behind Hamilton’s 200-year-old walls.

By Abby Googel ’12 Time for church!

Hamilton’s religious standings were quite different back in the day. Students were required to go to chapel services twice a day and once on Sundays. Surprisingly, chapel service often became a time for class rivalry. The students were made to enter the chapel by class year, starting with the seniors, and when it came time for the freshmen to enter, the sophomores would frequently close the doors on them. This was simply one example of how the freshmen were often hazed. Photos from early years have been found of full-out brawls, encircled by onlookers. Both compulsory chapel and these class rivalries eventually students refused to go inside the chapel and sat out on the steps instead. Starting at this time, students were only required to attend chapel once per week. However, it wasn’t the end of frequent chapel services that put an end to class rivalry, but the popularity of fraternities that relocated this contention to the Greek life scene.

Buff and…pink?

It’s hard to imagine what Hamilton must have been like before indoor plumbing, but it is even harder to imagine that the school’s color used to be pink. Thanks to the College’s president in 1892, who decided that a college of our stature should have more manly colors, the school colors were changed to the “buff and blue” that we know today. You can imagine that this must have been a welcomed change by the all-male student body.

Haunted Hamilton

The Emerson Literary Society building was professedly haunted back in the 1900s and the ghosts may still remain today! According to a 1990 Spectator article, there were two ghosts who took residence in ELS. Old Edward Fitch, class of 1896,

A strong and changing political climate

Students were limited in political activism until 1971, when the voting age was lowered from twenty-one to eighteen. As most students were too young to vote in presidential elections, The Spectator would hold a straw poll instead. of students, the student body had always voted extremely Republican. In the next election, Republican candidate never polled a majority again on campus.

Bringing the family to school

Remarkably, many of the students who attended Hamilton in the years just after World War II were studying under the GI bill. According to Publius Virgilius Rogers Professor of American History Maurice

in the graduating class had served in World War II.” Many of the veterans were married during their time here at Hamilton and brought their wives and children along. During this time, Carnegie was remodeled to have kitchenettes. Additionally, seven barrack-like structures were built along Campus Road for GI families to live in, called “North Village.” The last one standing was demolished in 1962.

Doing your “business” outdoors was buried in Hamilton’s cemetery and began haunting ELS. The Hamilton campus is wildly different than Often a knock was heard on the side door, and once during a it was back in 1812. Although some of the old heated “political debate among house members, the sunroom buildings remain today, others have been removed. breeze, so this was taken as a sign of Fitch’s disapproval of the According to Hamilton College archivist Kathy Collett, “in some early engravings of the College tension in the house. The story of “The Woman in White” is quite a bit creepier. interspersed between the main buildings. It is speculated that these buildings all over boyfriend who lived in ELS. When she got here he was nowhere to be found and she discovered that he had gone to campus could have served as woodsheds for visit a girlfriend at Smith College. She was overwhelmed with heating or stabling for horses. Collett added, “they may have even been used as outhouses since grief and hung herself in his room that night. Hamilton didn’t have indoor plumbing until 1890!” It is reported that some nights if you stand in front of the mirror in the room where she died you can see her ghost. Students living in the room in both 1988 and 1991 were tormented by the ghost and one even moved out to escape her eerie presence. the continental | autumn 2011 13


on the hill

An Open Door: The Days-Massolo Center Provides a Platform for Student Discussion

By Amal Asghar’15

Although Hamilton often feels like it may be frozen in time, the College has recently made several changes including the opening of the DaysMassolo Center located on College Hill Road. For several years, the campus has been in need of a common location for students, faculty, and staff to engage in open discussion. The new Center will be dedicated to multicultural awareness and education on campus, and will serve as a resource for all Hamilton students. The Center was dedicated to Hamilton trustees Drew S. Days III and Arthur J. Massolo last April, and Amit Taneja was appointed the director of Days-Massolo this past summer. Taneja, a native of India, has a strong, personal connection to his job. During his undergraduate days at the University of British Columbia, he felt overwhelmed by personal and family rough time he gave up on higher education until a few mentors saw his potential. For this reason, Taneja truly

of these groups include the Asian Cultural Society (ACS), Muslim Students’ Association (MSA), and South Asian Students’ Association (SASA). only in asking tough questions, but in answering them as well. He elaborated, “We’re encouraged in main society to not look at our differences … but the Center is a safe space where dialogue can happen freely across differences in race, gender, and sexuality. We talk about how our identities shape our experience, our thoughts, and our feelings.” The Center is not just for multicultural students to visit, but it is a place for all Hamilton students to come and have open conversations about questions or issues. Taneja said, “This is a place where how we talk to one another is equally important as what we talk about. Honest dialogue amongst students is essential for their understanding.”

Not only does Taneja have faith in the Center as a tool for the entire community, but he also has taken a liking to the having a support system campus dynamic as a safe, and wants the Center intellectual environment. to become a “homeTaneja said, “I have been away-from-home” for all really impressed by the students. ways in which faculty, staff, photo courtesy of the Days-Massolo Center The Center has several administrators interact facilities open for student use. There is a living with students like they’re human beings. You are room equipped with a television and Wii console, a student who has a name, has interests, and has a kitchen, a study location, and a computer lab. history. You are not just your student number.” The building also houses the Womyn’s Center and Rainbow Alliance. Taneja’s goal is for the Center to become an integral part of the campus and for every student to Many multicultural clubs and organizations take part in discussions and events. have started moving their meetings to the gathering

Coming to the Days-Massolo Center on November 10th: Professor Paula Moya on “Doing Race: Eight Conversations About Race” 12

the continental | autumn 2011 the

What You Didn’t Know about Hamilton

features

but it does have quite a few secrets. Hamilton’s bicentennial is a good time to reveal the littleknown facts that lie behind Hamilton’s 200-year-old walls.

By Abby Googel ’12 Time for church!

Hamilton’s religious standings were quite different back in the day. Students were required to go to chapel services twice a day and once on Sundays. Surprisingly, chapel service often became a time for class rivalry. The students were made to enter the chapel by class year, starting with the seniors, and when it came time for the freshmen to enter, the sophomores would frequently close the doors on them. This was simply one example of how the freshmen were often hazed. Photos from early years have been found of full-out brawls, encircled by onlookers. Both compulsory chapel and these class rivalries eventually students refused to go inside the chapel and sat out on the steps instead. Starting at this time, students were only required to attend chapel once per week. However, it wasn’t the end of frequent chapel services that put an end to class rivalry, but the popularity of fraternities that relocated this contention to the Greek life scene.

Buff and…pink?

It’s hard to imagine what Hamilton must have been like before indoor plumbing, but it is even harder to imagine that the school’s color used to be pink. Thanks to the College’s president in 1892, who decided that a college of our stature should have more manly colors, the school colors were changed to the “buff and blue” that we know today. You can imagine that this must have been a welcomed change by the all-male student body.

Haunted Hamilton

The Emerson Literary Society building was professedly haunted back in the 1900s and the ghosts may still remain today! According to a 1990 Spectator article, there were two ghosts who took residence in ELS. Old Edward Fitch, class of 1896,

A strong and changing political climate

Students were limited in political activism until 1971, when the voting age was lowered from twenty-one to eighteen. As most students were too young to vote in presidential elections, The Spectator would hold a straw poll instead. of students, the student body had always voted extremely Republican. In the next election, Republican candidate never polled a majority again on campus.

Bringing the family to school

Remarkably, many of the students who attended Hamilton in the years just after World War II were studying under the GI bill. According to Publius Virgilius Rogers Professor of American History Maurice

in the graduating class had served in World War II.” Many of the veterans were married during their time here at Hamilton and brought their wives and children along. During this time, Carnegie was remodeled to have kitchenettes. Additionally, seven barrack-like structures were built along Campus Road for GI families to live in, called “North Village.” The last one standing was demolished in 1962.

Doing your “business” outdoors was buried in Hamilton’s cemetery and began haunting ELS. The Hamilton campus is wildly different than Often a knock was heard on the side door, and once during a it was back in 1812. Although some of the old heated “political debate among house members, the sunroom buildings remain today, others have been removed. breeze, so this was taken as a sign of Fitch’s disapproval of the According to Hamilton College archivist Kathy Collett, “in some early engravings of the College tension in the house. The story of “The Woman in White” is quite a bit creepier. interspersed between the main buildings. It is speculated that these buildings all over boyfriend who lived in ELS. When she got here he was nowhere to be found and she discovered that he had gone to campus could have served as woodsheds for visit a girlfriend at Smith College. She was overwhelmed with heating or stabling for horses. Collett added, “they may have even been used as outhouses since grief and hung herself in his room that night. Hamilton didn’t have indoor plumbing until 1890!” It is reported that some nights if you stand in front of the mirror in the room where she died you can see her ghost. Students living in the room in both 1988 and 1991 were tormented by the ghost and one even moved out to escape her eerie presence. the continental | autumn 2011 13


on the hill

200 Years 1812-2012 200 Years 1812-2012 200 Years

1812-2012 200 Years 1812-2012 200 Years 1812-2012

on the hill

Major Bicentennial Events Major Bicentennial Events

Hamilton College kicked off this year with its Bicentennial Celebration on September 15th-18th. The campus buzzed with activities for over 3,500 Hamilton alumni, families, friends, and students. The cloudy skies and stormy weather did not hold any alumni back from returning to their old stomping grounds for Hamilton’s 200th birthday. Then again, they did go here at some point, which means they know not to be surprised by Hamilton’s The celebration started with the opening of the time capsule from the Class of 1871. The Emerson Gallery also featured an exhibit called “Time Capsules and Cornerstones: 200 Years of Collective Memory at Hamilton,” in which scrapbooks and other school artifacts were put on display to show how Hamilton has both changed and remained the same for the last 200 years. The Art Department sponsored a print exhibit displaying various prints made by Hamilton and Kirkland world of BlackBerries and fancy technology that the class of

Text by Christie Crawford ’13 14

the continental | autumn 2011

making prints like they did over 80 years ago shows Hamilton and Kirkland alums had the opportunity to relive the glory days and sit in on various classes. History students led tours of campus that focused on Bicentennial bits of Hamilton history. Bon Appétit put together a delicious campus wide picnic on Saturday on the Dunham quad, bringing together families, friends, and alumni, both young and old. The Bicentennial Assembly featured speeches from President Joan Hinde Stewart, Student Assembly President Daniel Knute Gailor, Professor Simon, and other Hamilton representatives. They spoke about Hamilton’s rich past, promising future, and unique legacy. Students and alumni enjoyed engaging lectures by other professors throughout the weekend. Professor Isserman spoke about the Bicentennial History of the College, and the changes that both the students and the institution have gone through since Hamilton’s founding in 1812.

1812-2012 200 Years 1812-2012 200 Years 1812-2012 200 Years 1812-2012 200 Years

the continental | autumn 2011

15


on the hill

200 Years 1812-2012 200 Years 1812-2012 200 Years

1812-2012 200 Years 1812-2012 200 Years 1812-2012

on the hill

Major Bicentennial Events Major Bicentennial Events

Hamilton College kicked off this year with its Bicentennial Celebration on September 15th-18th. The campus buzzed with activities for over 3,500 Hamilton alumni, families, friends, and students. The cloudy skies and stormy weather did not hold any alumni back from returning to their old stomping grounds for Hamilton’s 200th birthday. Then again, they did go here at some point, which means they know not to be surprised by Hamilton’s The celebration started with the opening of the time capsule from the Class of 1871. The Emerson Gallery also featured an exhibit called “Time Capsules and Cornerstones: 200 Years of Collective Memory at Hamilton,” in which scrapbooks and other school artifacts were put on display to show how Hamilton has both changed and remained the same for the last 200 years. The Art Department sponsored a print exhibit displaying various prints made by Hamilton and Kirkland world of BlackBerries and fancy technology that the class of

Text by Christie Crawford ’13 14

the continental | autumn 2011

making prints like they did over 80 years ago shows Hamilton and Kirkland alums had the opportunity to relive the glory days and sit in on various classes. History students led tours of campus that focused on Bicentennial bits of Hamilton history. Bon Appétit put together a delicious campus wide picnic on Saturday on the Dunham quad, bringing together families, friends, and alumni, both young and old. The Bicentennial Assembly featured speeches from President Joan Hinde Stewart, Student Assembly President Daniel Knute Gailor, Professor Simon, and other Hamilton representatives. They spoke about Hamilton’s rich past, promising future, and unique legacy. Students and alumni enjoyed engaging lectures by other professors throughout the weekend. Professor Isserman spoke about the Bicentennial History of the College, and the changes that both the students and the institution have gone through since Hamilton’s founding in 1812.

1812-2012 200 Years 1812-2012 200 Years 1812-2012 200 Years 1812-2012 200 Years

the continental | autumn 2011

15


on the hill

200 Years 1812-2012 200 Years 1812-2012 200 Years

1812-2012 200 Years 1812-2012 200 Years 1812-2012 on the hill

Major Bicentennial Events Major Bicentennial Events

Photos Courtesy of Nancy Ford, Laura Laurey, and the Hamilton College Archives

Various events on campus also inspired opportunities for students and alumni to interact and network. At the Careers in Entrepreneurship panel, successful alumni such as the CEO of LinkedIn.com, Dan Nye ’88, and the entrepreneurship. Interactions with successful alumni inspire current students to stay focused and positive about life after Hamilton. women’s soccer all had games over the weekend. Football dominated and won their opening game against Tufts for the day and beat Wesleyan 3-1. Women’s Field Hockey lost on Sunday, but beat out Amherst, who is ranked 12th in the country. All in all, despite a few missing bicentennial banners and several displaced golf carts, the weekend couldn’t have been any more of a success. People came from all over to celebrate Hamilton’s 200th birthday, and that says something about the strength of the relationships that are fostered on the Hill. Hamilton has had a great ride for the last 200 years, and if the next 200 years go anyway like the last, Hamilton has nothing but a bright future ahead.

16

the continental | autumn 2011

1812-2012 200 Years 1812-2012 200 Years 1812-2012 200 Years 1812-2012 200 Years

the continental | autumn 2011

17


on the hill

200 Years 1812-2012 200 Years 1812-2012 200 Years

1812-2012 200 Years 1812-2012 200 Years 1812-2012 on the hill

Major Bicentennial Events Major Bicentennial Events

Photos Courtesy of Nancy Ford, Laura Laurey, and the Hamilton College Archives

Various events on campus also inspired opportunities for students and alumni to interact and network. At the Careers in Entrepreneurship panel, successful alumni such as the CEO of LinkedIn.com, Dan Nye ’88, and the entrepreneurship. Interactions with successful alumni inspire current students to stay focused and positive about life after Hamilton. women’s soccer all had games over the weekend. Football dominated and won their opening game against Tufts for the day and beat Wesleyan 3-1. Women’s Field Hockey lost on Sunday, but beat out Amherst, who is ranked 12th in the country. All in all, despite a few missing bicentennial banners and several displaced golf carts, the weekend couldn’t have been any more of a success. People came from all over to celebrate Hamilton’s 200th birthday, and that says something about the strength of the relationships that are fostered on the Hill. Hamilton has had a great ride for the last 200 years, and if the next 200 years go anyway like the last, Hamilton has nothing but a bright future ahead.

16

the continental | autumn 2011

1812-2012 200 Years 1812-2012 200 Years 1812-2012 200 Years 1812-2012 200 Years

the continental | autumn 2011

17


talk of the town

talk of the town

A History of Hamilton: An Interview with Professor Maurice Isserman

Professor Maurice Isserman, a Former Fulbright grant-winner and James L. Ferguson Professor of History, recently published his latest book, On the Hill: A Bicentennial History of Hamilton College. Isserman has also written prize-winning books such The Other American: The Life of Michael Harrington, and his co-authored book Fallen Giants: A History of Himalayan Mountaineering from the Age of Empire to the Age of Extremes. He has also contributed editorials and book reviews to The New York Times, The Boston Globe, Newsday, The Los Angeles Times, The Nation, and The American Alpine Review. Anyone who has experienced the unique

the College in a larger context – regional Hamilton alumni and students during the Civil War. OO: How do you think the college has changed since the 1995 removal of Greek houses? Have you seen any major changes at Hamilton in terms of social structures since then?

change comes it does so in a hurry. That can be disconcerting to people who knew and loved the characterized by both

PI: One result of the Residential Life Decision

women students in majority female student body at the end of although Residential Life was an important

“...Hamilton is characterized by both continuity and change, and both are necessary to sustain a vibrant learning community.”

fascinating, and Professor Isserman has a wealth of knowledge on the subject.

to be seen as one of a multitude of decisions in recent decades that have moved the College into the front rank of liberal arts institutions in the

Oulsade Oyalowo: Which Side Were You On? was

national college. I think a lot of credit for that

to begin writing histories?

some years back that it had to recruit aggressively on a national and international level. In the 20-

Which Side Were You On? on the dissertation I wrote in graduate school to earn my Ph.D. It was a history of the American Communist Party during the Second World War.

and more committed to their studies. OO: How long did it take you to write On The Hill? PI: I began writing the book in the summer of 2010. It then took 18 months to design and

and 1960s. In recent years I’ve shifted the focus of my research to the history of mountaineering and

OO: What was the most interesting thing you learned during the process of writing On The Hill?

and both are necessary to sustain a vibrant learning community. On the Hill is dedicated to

president and trustee unfortunately passed away before the Bicentennial. In a Class & Charter Day address he jokingly suggested that the College set up a “standing committee

If you are interested in learning more about Hamilton’s history, you can purchase On the Hill today at the College bookstore or on the store’s website. The book can also be reserved at the Burke Library at http://www. hamilton.edu/200/bicentennial-history-book.

professional designers.

Fallen Giants. I am currently

OO: What was the research process like and what people did you contact while you were writing? PI: On the Hill is not only a book about Hamilton;

OO: Based on the title, it’s pretty obvious what On the Hill is about, but could you share a little of the book’s content?

have written it without the cooperation of the are listed in the acknowledgments. To give just two

PI: On the Hill of Hamilton College. It tells the story of Samuel his decision to form the Hamilton-Oneida down to the present. It also places the history of 18

the continental | autumn 2011

Photos Courtesy of Nancy Ford and Laura Laurey

history of the Oriskany Valley which appears in chapter one without the help of Emeritus Professor of Geology Don Potter; nor could I have written the section on the painful experience of gay men at Hamilton in the 1960s without the memories shared by a member of the Class of 1964. the continental | autumn 2011

19


talk of the town

talk of the town

A History of Hamilton: An Interview with Professor Maurice Isserman

Professor Maurice Isserman, a Former Fulbright grant-winner and James L. Ferguson Professor of History, recently published his latest book, On the Hill: A Bicentennial History of Hamilton College. Isserman has also written prize-winning books such The Other American: The Life of Michael Harrington, and his co-authored book Fallen Giants: A History of Himalayan Mountaineering from the Age of Empire to the Age of Extremes. He has also contributed editorials and book reviews to The New York Times, The Boston Globe, Newsday, The Los Angeles Times, The Nation, and The American Alpine Review. Anyone who has experienced the unique

the College in a larger context – regional Hamilton alumni and students during the Civil War. OO: How do you think the college has changed since the 1995 removal of Greek houses? Have you seen any major changes at Hamilton in terms of social structures since then?

change comes it does so in a hurry. That can be disconcerting to people who knew and loved the characterized by both

PI: One result of the Residential Life Decision

women students in majority female student body at the end of although Residential Life was an important

“...Hamilton is characterized by both continuity and change, and both are necessary to sustain a vibrant learning community.”

fascinating, and Professor Isserman has a wealth of knowledge on the subject.

to be seen as one of a multitude of decisions in recent decades that have moved the College into the front rank of liberal arts institutions in the

Oulsade Oyalowo: Which Side Were You On? was

national college. I think a lot of credit for that

to begin writing histories?

some years back that it had to recruit aggressively on a national and international level. In the 20-

Which Side Were You On? on the dissertation I wrote in graduate school to earn my Ph.D. It was a history of the American Communist Party during the Second World War.

and more committed to their studies. OO: How long did it take you to write On The Hill? PI: I began writing the book in the summer of 2010. It then took 18 months to design and

and 1960s. In recent years I’ve shifted the focus of my research to the history of mountaineering and

OO: What was the most interesting thing you learned during the process of writing On The Hill?

and both are necessary to sustain a vibrant learning community. On the Hill is dedicated to

president and trustee unfortunately passed away before the Bicentennial. In a Class & Charter Day address he jokingly suggested that the College set up a “standing committee

If you are interested in learning more about Hamilton’s history, you can purchase On the Hill today at the College bookstore or on the store’s website. The book can also be reserved at the Burke Library at http://www. hamilton.edu/200/bicentennial-history-book.

professional designers.

Fallen Giants. I am currently

OO: What was the research process like and what people did you contact while you were writing? PI: On the Hill is not only a book about Hamilton;

OO: Based on the title, it’s pretty obvious what On the Hill is about, but could you share a little of the book’s content?

have written it without the cooperation of the are listed in the acknowledgments. To give just two

PI: On the Hill of Hamilton College. It tells the story of Samuel his decision to form the Hamilton-Oneida down to the present. It also places the history of 18

the continental | autumn 2011

Photos Courtesy of Nancy Ford and Laura Laurey

history of the Oriskany Valley which appears in chapter one without the help of Emeritus Professor of Geology Don Potter; nor could I have written the section on the painful experience of gay men at Hamilton in the 1960s without the memories shared by a member of the Class of 1964. the continental | autumn 2011

19


talk of the town

The Hamilton community initially hummus replace the standard breadbasket, waved goodbye to Lil’ Tex Mex with and authentic tzatziki sauce adds a welcome frustration. No more late night cravings freshness to the otherwise savory meal. Commons’ new hummus bar has some clear Let’s admit it, there is nothing better than competition. ending (or in some cases, starting) your night According to the staff, one of the digging into a steaming plate of cheese fries. best sellers is the Kabob Quesadilla, which has been described as “out of this world.” fast food elsewhere has opened the back of For drinks, the old-fashioned Boylan Sodas the Village Tavern to a new kind of restaurant: add an old-school twist and the Sweet Leaf Kabobviously! Organic Iced Tea offers an alternative to the Located in arguably the classiest and generic Pepsi or pitcher of beer. most sought after locale in downtown Clinton, The food is made fresh daily and Kabobviously has all the ingredients are become the new gutlocal. Kabobviously is buster inside the both environmentally VT. Founder, Kurt and vegetarian friendly. Krumme, started Kabobs are made-toKabobviously in order with your choice 2008, originally of veggies and tofu, selling his namesake and customers are kabobs at the Clinton encouraged to recycle Farmers’ Market. their cans, bottles, and A traditionally plastic trays. Middle Eastern food, While the setting is not the word kabob exactly for the parents, generally refers to with rickety plastic tables freshly grilled meat and a lack of napkins and on a skewer. As the silverware, the laid back, business grew it informal atmosphere became clear that a attracts locals and permanent establishment was necessary, so Hamiltonians alike. In terms of price, there when Lil’ Tex Mex moved out, Krumme seized is not much to complain about. Meals average the opportunity and moved in. $7, which is bearable coming from a student’s Kabobviously offers a wide variety of near-empty wallet. food such as kabobs with a side of pita pieces, While some students have expressed pizza, burgers, and sandwiches. Though the anger and disappointment at the replacement name suggests that the kabob is the specialty, of Tex Mex, the truth is that Kabobviously Hamilton students mostly rave about the offers many of the same delicious foods sweet potato fries and cheeseburgers. While comfortably shared in the back of a bar. From the burger is not cooked-to-order, it arrives fries and mozzarella sticks to chicken wings, sandwiched between a soft ciabatta roll and Kabobviously will be sure to satisfy late night accompanied with a steaming plate of thickly cravings as well as offer a diverse, new eat cut fries. The traditional kabob is equally in, take out, or delivery option for Hamilton hearty and delicious. It is freshly grilled in students. house-made rosemary and garlic marinade. Kabobviously 14 College Street Clinton, NY; Complementary pita and homemade 315-853-5353; Open daily 10:30am-12:30am 20

the continental | autumn 2011

what grinds my gears As you may have noticed on alumni/parents/Bicentennial/what-werethey thinking weekend, older alums love to tell you tidbits about Hamilton that you were probably already aware of with you believe that you are indeed learning new information. What’s funny is that you can often derive a bit of subtext from these encounters. For instance: “You know when I was here, we were still allowed to live with our fraternity brothers” actually means: “This is exactly the excuse I was looking for not to donate money anymore!” Another common example: “Look at all these fancy buildings here now!” in turn means: “They didn’t spend any money on us when I was here. You guys are spoiled and quite bratty.” By extension this also seems to mean: “This is exactly the excuse I was looking for not to donate money anymore.” But despite my keen awareness for this particular alumni propensity, I am often out-bizzared (which is not common) by some of the things they come up with. A few weekends ago, I happened to be at a canoe race in the Adirondacks with an abnormally high number of alums and Hamilton parents. I was wearing my Hamilton College Marathon Canoe Racing t-shirt, which naturally doubles as an invitation for anyone to come talk to me about Hamilton College. One of the said alums approached me and said exactly this: “Hamilton College! I went there a couple (he was class of ’82) years ago! Then I sent my son

talk of the features town

By Kate Bennert ’12

I told him that I had, in fact, heard that before and then kindly excused myself, suddenly very thirsty, ignoring the little voice in the back of my head that was telling me to misquote Amy Poehler in Baby Mama and say something like “Bitch, you don’t know my life!” There may be many things in this world that leave me feeling annoyed or slightly disillusioned, but this random alum happened to hone in on the two that really make my blood boil. One is the assumption that I would in any way be interested in dating your son/daughter/ nephew/niece/granddaughter/grandson, and the second is that parents are still ruthlessly involved in our dating lives. I mean, this guy wasn’t even my own parent. How are we still expected to uphold a committed, monogamous relationship when some of us can’t even hold our alcohol? You know, that wouldn’t even work

a career path and be in a marriage-track relationship? No thank you. I’m all about limiting the complications. Maybe I’m just jaded because I’ve ended every relationship I’ve ever been in because at some point it got too confusing. Or maybe my roommate’s right and I’m completely soul-less. But you don’t need to know that, Hamilton Community, because I don’t really want to hear about your awesome relationships either. I’m just saying, I trust that I came to Hamilton for one reason: to end up with a job that I can brag about to “funemployed” people during the to marry.” And he winked at me. recession. Visibly taken aback, I was I didn’t come here to marry anyone’s son or daughter. presumptuousness. But I am now quite positive that I He continued: “You know that have prevented exactly that from happening Hamilton has one of the highest rates of by virtue of this rant. And frankly, if you student-student marriages in this country,” all means call me…after graduation. eyebrow raising. the continental | autumn 2011

21


talk of the town

The Hamilton community initially hummus replace the standard breadbasket, waved goodbye to Lil’ Tex Mex with and authentic tzatziki sauce adds a welcome frustration. No more late night cravings freshness to the otherwise savory meal. Commons’ new hummus bar has some clear Let’s admit it, there is nothing better than competition. ending (or in some cases, starting) your night According to the staff, one of the digging into a steaming plate of cheese fries. best sellers is the Kabob Quesadilla, which has been described as “out of this world.” fast food elsewhere has opened the back of For drinks, the old-fashioned Boylan Sodas the Village Tavern to a new kind of restaurant: add an old-school twist and the Sweet Leaf Kabobviously! Organic Iced Tea offers an alternative to the Located in arguably the classiest and generic Pepsi or pitcher of beer. most sought after locale in downtown Clinton, The food is made fresh daily and Kabobviously has all the ingredients are become the new gutlocal. Kabobviously is buster inside the both environmentally VT. Founder, Kurt and vegetarian friendly. Krumme, started Kabobs are made-toKabobviously in order with your choice 2008, originally of veggies and tofu, selling his namesake and customers are kabobs at the Clinton encouraged to recycle Farmers’ Market. their cans, bottles, and A traditionally plastic trays. Middle Eastern food, While the setting is not the word kabob exactly for the parents, generally refers to with rickety plastic tables freshly grilled meat and a lack of napkins and on a skewer. As the silverware, the laid back, business grew it informal atmosphere became clear that a attracts locals and permanent establishment was necessary, so Hamiltonians alike. In terms of price, there when Lil’ Tex Mex moved out, Krumme seized is not much to complain about. Meals average the opportunity and moved in. $7, which is bearable coming from a student’s Kabobviously offers a wide variety of near-empty wallet. food such as kabobs with a side of pita pieces, While some students have expressed pizza, burgers, and sandwiches. Though the anger and disappointment at the replacement name suggests that the kabob is the specialty, of Tex Mex, the truth is that Kabobviously Hamilton students mostly rave about the offers many of the same delicious foods sweet potato fries and cheeseburgers. While comfortably shared in the back of a bar. From the burger is not cooked-to-order, it arrives fries and mozzarella sticks to chicken wings, sandwiched between a soft ciabatta roll and Kabobviously will be sure to satisfy late night accompanied with a steaming plate of thickly cravings as well as offer a diverse, new eat cut fries. The traditional kabob is equally in, take out, or delivery option for Hamilton hearty and delicious. It is freshly grilled in students. house-made rosemary and garlic marinade. Kabobviously 14 College Street Clinton, NY; Complementary pita and homemade 315-853-5353; Open daily 10:30am-12:30am 20

the continental | autumn 2011

what grinds my gears As you may have noticed on alumni/parents/Bicentennial/what-werethey thinking weekend, older alums love to tell you tidbits about Hamilton that you were probably already aware of with you believe that you are indeed learning new information. What’s funny is that you can often derive a bit of subtext from these encounters. For instance: “You know when I was here, we were still allowed to live with our fraternity brothers” actually means: “This is exactly the excuse I was looking for not to donate money anymore!” Another common example: “Look at all these fancy buildings here now!” in turn means: “They didn’t spend any money on us when I was here. You guys are spoiled and quite bratty.” By extension this also seems to mean: “This is exactly the excuse I was looking for not to donate money anymore.” But despite my keen awareness for this particular alumni propensity, I am often out-bizzared (which is not common) by some of the things they come up with. A few weekends ago, I happened to be at a canoe race in the Adirondacks with an abnormally high number of alums and Hamilton parents. I was wearing my Hamilton College Marathon Canoe Racing t-shirt, which naturally doubles as an invitation for anyone to come talk to me about Hamilton College. One of the said alums approached me and said exactly this: “Hamilton College! I went there a couple (he was class of ’82) years ago! Then I sent my son

talk of the features town

By Kate Bennert ’12

I told him that I had, in fact, heard that before and then kindly excused myself, suddenly very thirsty, ignoring the little voice in the back of my head that was telling me to misquote Amy Poehler in Baby Mama and say something like “Bitch, you don’t know my life!” There may be many things in this world that leave me feeling annoyed or slightly disillusioned, but this random alum happened to hone in on the two that really make my blood boil. One is the assumption that I would in any way be interested in dating your son/daughter/ nephew/niece/granddaughter/grandson, and the second is that parents are still ruthlessly involved in our dating lives. I mean, this guy wasn’t even my own parent. How are we still expected to uphold a committed, monogamous relationship when some of us can’t even hold our alcohol? You know, that wouldn’t even work

a career path and be in a marriage-track relationship? No thank you. I’m all about limiting the complications. Maybe I’m just jaded because I’ve ended every relationship I’ve ever been in because at some point it got too confusing. Or maybe my roommate’s right and I’m completely soul-less. But you don’t need to know that, Hamilton Community, because I don’t really want to hear about your awesome relationships either. I’m just saying, I trust that I came to Hamilton for one reason: to end up with a job that I can brag about to “funemployed” people during the to marry.” And he winked at me. recession. Visibly taken aback, I was I didn’t come here to marry anyone’s son or daughter. presumptuousness. But I am now quite positive that I He continued: “You know that have prevented exactly that from happening Hamilton has one of the highest rates of by virtue of this rant. And frankly, if you student-student marriages in this country,” all means call me…after graduation. eyebrow raising. the continental | autumn 2011

21


talk of the town

Legends of the Hill

Two hundred years is a long time for a school’s traditions to shift, for life to move forward, and for the very subjects we learn to evolve. The Continental asked several Hamilton alumni for a snapshot of what life was like for them back when they were on the Hill. Their stories may be set at a different Hamilton, but still may inspire students today.

One of the things I loved most about Kirkland was that the College allowed us to “pull” non-human roommates. Mine was a sweet, beautiful, black lab mix named Tasha. I would leave my dorm room in the morning with Tasha by my side; in the afternoon when I returned, she would be happily snoring on my bed. Our “kids” had the freedom to run wherever they wanted. They had their friends and we had ours. Olive, a scruffy campus dog, would often hitchhike into town and back. I once got a ride with her and her human. In fact, hitchhiking was pretty commonplace for those of us who lived off campus. We rented houses in town and on College Hill Road and enjoyed communal living. Wherever we lived, the smell of apples and - Jennifer Rich ’75 I would not recommend this, but sometimes an allnighter can pay off. A lucky few of us had the great Austin Briggs for Modern British Literature, and at the beginning of the semester he told us we should be reading Yeats on a regular basis in preparation for a paper toward the end of the semester. Naturally, I put off reading Yeats until two days before the paper was due. I camped out in a comfy chair on the second feet up on a window seat, looking south, and began reading poem after poem. After poem. Not fast, mind you—I would not do that to Yeats. After poem. in the window was turning into the scenery along College Hill Road. And so it dawned on me, quite literally, that some of Yeats’ poems were night-time outside world. (Some were even about sitting in a chair all night long.) With that imagery in mind, I wrote my essay. One of the reasons I remember that paper is that I got an A, and I didn’t get many of those. - Steve Wulf ’72

My best memories revolve around all of the “work hard-play hard” aspect of Hamilton! While that phrase is a little hackneyed, it is still relevant in today’s world and it is a lifestyle we Hamiltonians lived on the Hill! - Alexandra Kirtley ’93

The moment I recognized that Hamilton was more than a place to study and hang out with friends was in an American literature class. Fred Wagner was the professor. He conducted class around a single large table and delighted in our discovery and appreciation of works he loved. When one of us made a worthy comment he lit up. He had a wonderful laugh and it was clear he loved to teach. I looked forward to going to his class and read his assignments carefully in hopes of making valuable contributions to the discussion. On a dreary day during that “Daddy Wags” as he was called, I stopped at the coffee shop near McEwen. There sat my (somewhat intimidating) professor having coffee and a sweet. I joined him for a mere 15 minutes. We didn’t talk about literature or even school. I barely remember what we discussed, but somehow by the end of our time I realized what a wonderful community I had fallen into. To this day I marvel at my good fortune to have spent four years in bitter cold icy weather, toiling away as professors picked apart my work, at and all these years later, l feel privileged to have been on campus and to be a part of the Hamilton family - a family of which I have been an active member for all these years. - Linda Johnson ’80

Compiled by Danielle Burby 22

the continental | autumn 2011

talk of the town When I started at Hamilton in 1967, the core requirements were expected to mandate a complete “Hamilton man.” The overriding force during the late sixties and early seventies Hamilton was the captain of the soccer team, a vibrant, athletic, bright senior. By the same time the next year he had been killed in Viet Nam. I have never gotten over that. Viet Nam was constantly in every student’s thoughts. We had friends over there. We were destined to be drafted after our student deferments expired and be sent there. Unlike many colleges in New York, no buildings on campus were taken over by protesters, but anti-war protests were regular events. Megaphone-packing students drew groups throughout the campus. A liberal faculty was supportive of protesters (some even gave A’s to students who missed the exam due to protest activities). Major rallies were held on campus and in the Village park in downtown Clinton. Students who never stood out became leaders and spokesmen in the anti-war movement. Army fatigues were de rigeur, the peace sign was ubiquitous, and anti-war folk singers were blaring all around campus. The escape for many was drugs. Timothy Leary, the guru of LSD, came and spoke on campus, advocating “tuning out by turning on.” He found a receptive audience among many. Recruiters came to campus and lying down around the recruiters trying to limit access. They were trampled by other students who felt they were making a different statement. No one was apolitical. No one was uninformed. It was a time to think of things bigger than ourselves. In the midst of this came “The Sterile Cuckoo.” and Liza Minnelli seemed anachronistic in light of the times, but we were all captivated by the concept. Students were paid to be extras in the party scenes, and one or two actually had speaking parts, becoming instant celebrities. Free time was spent standing around hoping to see the “stars”, and “Come and the priority again was the War. Looking back forty years later, I am still not clear if there was a right or wrong in the way we at Hamilton dealt with Viet Nam. I do know it made us all less self-centered and more aware of life. I guess that is always a goal of higher education. Hamilton succeeded! - Robert Wiggins ’71 the continental | autumn 2011

23


talk of the town

Legends of the Hill

Two hundred years is a long time for a school’s traditions to shift, for life to move forward, and for the very subjects we learn to evolve. The Continental asked several Hamilton alumni for a snapshot of what life was like for them back when they were on the Hill. Their stories may be set at a different Hamilton, but still may inspire students today.

One of the things I loved most about Kirkland was that the College allowed us to “pull” non-human roommates. Mine was a sweet, beautiful, black lab mix named Tasha. I would leave my dorm room in the morning with Tasha by my side; in the afternoon when I returned, she would be happily snoring on my bed. Our “kids” had the freedom to run wherever they wanted. They had their friends and we had ours. Olive, a scruffy campus dog, would often hitchhike into town and back. I once got a ride with her and her human. In fact, hitchhiking was pretty commonplace for those of us who lived off campus. We rented houses in town and on College Hill Road and enjoyed communal living. Wherever we lived, the smell of apples and - Jennifer Rich ’75 I would not recommend this, but sometimes an allnighter can pay off. A lucky few of us had the great Austin Briggs for Modern British Literature, and at the beginning of the semester he told us we should be reading Yeats on a regular basis in preparation for a paper toward the end of the semester. Naturally, I put off reading Yeats until two days before the paper was due. I camped out in a comfy chair on the second feet up on a window seat, looking south, and began reading poem after poem. After poem. Not fast, mind you—I would not do that to Yeats. After poem. in the window was turning into the scenery along College Hill Road. And so it dawned on me, quite literally, that some of Yeats’ poems were night-time outside world. (Some were even about sitting in a chair all night long.) With that imagery in mind, I wrote my essay. One of the reasons I remember that paper is that I got an A, and I didn’t get many of those. - Steve Wulf ’72

My best memories revolve around all of the “work hard-play hard” aspect of Hamilton! While that phrase is a little hackneyed, it is still relevant in today’s world and it is a lifestyle we Hamiltonians lived on the Hill! - Alexandra Kirtley ’93

The moment I recognized that Hamilton was more than a place to study and hang out with friends was in an American literature class. Fred Wagner was the professor. He conducted class around a single large table and delighted in our discovery and appreciation of works he loved. When one of us made a worthy comment he lit up. He had a wonderful laugh and it was clear he loved to teach. I looked forward to going to his class and read his assignments carefully in hopes of making valuable contributions to the discussion. On a dreary day during that “Daddy Wags” as he was called, I stopped at the coffee shop near McEwen. There sat my (somewhat intimidating) professor having coffee and a sweet. I joined him for a mere 15 minutes. We didn’t talk about literature or even school. I barely remember what we discussed, but somehow by the end of our time I realized what a wonderful community I had fallen into. To this day I marvel at my good fortune to have spent four years in bitter cold icy weather, toiling away as professors picked apart my work, at and all these years later, l feel privileged to have been on campus and to be a part of the Hamilton family - a family of which I have been an active member for all these years. - Linda Johnson ’80

Compiled by Danielle Burby 22

the continental | autumn 2011

talk of the town When I started at Hamilton in 1967, the core requirements were expected to mandate a complete “Hamilton man.” The overriding force during the late sixties and early seventies Hamilton was the captain of the soccer team, a vibrant, athletic, bright senior. By the same time the next year he had been killed in Viet Nam. I have never gotten over that. Viet Nam was constantly in every student’s thoughts. We had friends over there. We were destined to be drafted after our student deferments expired and be sent there. Unlike many colleges in New York, no buildings on campus were taken over by protesters, but anti-war protests were regular events. Megaphone-packing students drew groups throughout the campus. A liberal faculty was supportive of protesters (some even gave A’s to students who missed the exam due to protest activities). Major rallies were held on campus and in the Village park in downtown Clinton. Students who never stood out became leaders and spokesmen in the anti-war movement. Army fatigues were de rigeur, the peace sign was ubiquitous, and anti-war folk singers were blaring all around campus. The escape for many was drugs. Timothy Leary, the guru of LSD, came and spoke on campus, advocating “tuning out by turning on.” He found a receptive audience among many. Recruiters came to campus and lying down around the recruiters trying to limit access. They were trampled by other students who felt they were making a different statement. No one was apolitical. No one was uninformed. It was a time to think of things bigger than ourselves. In the midst of this came “The Sterile Cuckoo.” and Liza Minnelli seemed anachronistic in light of the times, but we were all captivated by the concept. Students were paid to be extras in the party scenes, and one or two actually had speaking parts, becoming instant celebrities. Free time was spent standing around hoping to see the “stars”, and “Come and the priority again was the War. Looking back forty years later, I am still not clear if there was a right or wrong in the way we at Hamilton dealt with Viet Nam. I do know it made us all less self-centered and more aware of life. I guess that is always a goal of higher education. Hamilton succeeded! - Robert Wiggins ’71 the continental | autumn 2011

23


features

The 7 Wonders of Hamilton college

by Blair Casey ’13

Mango Brie Panini Few events on campus are as highly anticipated or as well attended as the scramble to Café Opus for mango Brie panini day. Brie, the most fattening and delicious of all French cheeses, comes together in a glorious union with juicy, tangy mango twice a month to create the most satisfying lunch of all time. The line at Opus on mango Brie panini day speaks for itself. Although Opus employees remain mum on why such a famed moneymaker is not offered more frequently, it is hard to feel anything but grateful for the days that they are served. No list of Hamilton’s wonders would be complete with out homage to the praise-worthy and often life-saving mango Brie panini.

McEwen Rock Swing The unusual-looking hanging of McEwen Dining Hall is such

features

Chapel Easily the most iconic building on Hamilton’s campus, the chapel contains even more College history than most people realize. Completed in 1827, the chapel’s design was the combined effort of prominent architect Philip Hooker and College trustee John Lothrop. In Hamilton’s early days, the chapel was the center of student life on the Hill as prayer was a required activity and the building housed Greek and Physics classes. A perennial Hamilton prank, students used to sneak barnyard animals into the chapel, such as the sheep and 15 mules into the chapel one night.

Cannons Have you ever been curious about the two cannons on the quad in front of admissions? The cannons were donated by Elihu Root, class States Secretary of War under William McKinley. U.S. forces captured these Spanish cannons during the Spanish-American War; take a closer look at either of them and you’ll notice the inscription of their Spanish names. Although the cannons are now mounted and permanently face Colgate, they used to have wheels underneath them that were removed after mischievous students repeatedly moved them.

on the Hill that people often forget that it functions as a swing. The rock swing was designed and created in the seventies by a Kirkland Art major and Hamilton Physics major as a joint senior thesis. Four people standing equidistant around the circle of the base twisting the swing in unison can eventually be elevated swing represents the most prominent example of the unique relationship between Hamilton, Kirkland, and their students.

Clinton Pottery Keep your eyes open for small, white, unmarked boxes sprinkled around campus…you might just discover a small ceramic piece from Clinton Pottery, one of Hamilton’s best kept secrets. popular “Hamilton” mug. The store is located downtown on Utica Street, but owner and lifelong potter Jonathan Woodward brings Clinton Pottery to the Hill by periodically hiding free pottery around campus. Woodward hopes to bring in new customers (and their parents) by including the name and address of the store in the same box as the beautiful hidden pieces. Be on high alert for these boxes if you want to snag a piece of handmade local art. No 24

the continental | autumn 2011

1812 Garden Beyond the co-op and surrounded by a split-rail fence, the 1812 Garden cultivates a living history of life at the time of Hamilton’s inception. This “founding” garden is the full reconstruction of an early 19th century kitchen garden, and serves as the “laboratory” project of the Food For Thought class. Planted in 2008 by the seminar sections of Professor David Gapp and Professor Franklin Sciacca, the garden continues to be a profound teacher of sustainability. The students that work the garden learn the harvesting techniques and preservation methods of Hamilton’s forefathers while gaining the ability to cook and live in 1812, two hundred years later.

1768 Marker As you may recall from your high school history class, the British declared that all land west of the line drawn by their Proclamation of 1763 was to forever be Indian territory. You may also recall that it didn’t exactly work out that way. In 1768, the Treaty of Fort Stanwix adjusted the Proclamation Line to accommodate white settlement, and the revised line ran straight across College Hill Road. The stone marker located towards the bottom of the hill was intended to be an absolute boundary for white settlement, but instead provides a reminder of the land Hamilton sits upon, and the natives who once occupied it. the continental | autumn 2011

25


features

The 7 Wonders of Hamilton college

by Blair Casey ’13

Mango Brie Panini Few events on campus are as highly anticipated or as well attended as the scramble to Café Opus for mango Brie panini day. Brie, the most fattening and delicious of all French cheeses, comes together in a glorious union with juicy, tangy mango twice a month to create the most satisfying lunch of all time. The line at Opus on mango Brie panini day speaks for itself. Although Opus employees remain mum on why such a famed moneymaker is not offered more frequently, it is hard to feel anything but grateful for the days that they are served. No list of Hamilton’s wonders would be complete with out homage to the praise-worthy and often life-saving mango Brie panini.

McEwen Rock Swing The unusual-looking hanging of McEwen Dining Hall is such

features

Chapel Easily the most iconic building on Hamilton’s campus, the chapel contains even more College history than most people realize. Completed in 1827, the chapel’s design was the combined effort of prominent architect Philip Hooker and College trustee John Lothrop. In Hamilton’s early days, the chapel was the center of student life on the Hill as prayer was a required activity and the building housed Greek and Physics classes. A perennial Hamilton prank, students used to sneak barnyard animals into the chapel, such as the sheep and 15 mules into the chapel one night.

Cannons Have you ever been curious about the two cannons on the quad in front of admissions? The cannons were donated by Elihu Root, class States Secretary of War under William McKinley. U.S. forces captured these Spanish cannons during the Spanish-American War; take a closer look at either of them and you’ll notice the inscription of their Spanish names. Although the cannons are now mounted and permanently face Colgate, they used to have wheels underneath them that were removed after mischievous students repeatedly moved them.

on the Hill that people often forget that it functions as a swing. The rock swing was designed and created in the seventies by a Kirkland Art major and Hamilton Physics major as a joint senior thesis. Four people standing equidistant around the circle of the base twisting the swing in unison can eventually be elevated swing represents the most prominent example of the unique relationship between Hamilton, Kirkland, and their students.

Clinton Pottery Keep your eyes open for small, white, unmarked boxes sprinkled around campus…you might just discover a small ceramic piece from Clinton Pottery, one of Hamilton’s best kept secrets. popular “Hamilton” mug. The store is located downtown on Utica Street, but owner and lifelong potter Jonathan Woodward brings Clinton Pottery to the Hill by periodically hiding free pottery around campus. Woodward hopes to bring in new customers (and their parents) by including the name and address of the store in the same box as the beautiful hidden pieces. Be on high alert for these boxes if you want to snag a piece of handmade local art. No 24

the continental | autumn 2011

1812 Garden Beyond the co-op and surrounded by a split-rail fence, the 1812 Garden cultivates a living history of life at the time of Hamilton’s inception. This “founding” garden is the full reconstruction of an early 19th century kitchen garden, and serves as the “laboratory” project of the Food For Thought class. Planted in 2008 by the seminar sections of Professor David Gapp and Professor Franklin Sciacca, the garden continues to be a profound teacher of sustainability. The students that work the garden learn the harvesting techniques and preservation methods of Hamilton’s forefathers while gaining the ability to cook and live in 1812, two hundred years later.

1768 Marker As you may recall from your high school history class, the British declared that all land west of the line drawn by their Proclamation of 1763 was to forever be Indian territory. You may also recall that it didn’t exactly work out that way. In 1768, the Treaty of Fort Stanwix adjusted the Proclamation Line to accommodate white settlement, and the revised line ran straight across College Hill Road. The stone marker located towards the bottom of the hill was intended to be an absolute boundary for white settlement, but instead provides a reminder of the land Hamilton sits upon, and the natives who once occupied it. the continental | autumn 2011

25


features features

features

Buried in Time

By Meg Pengue ’12

A Hamilton Literary Monthly, course catalogues, and a printing block. These are among the artifacts resurrected from the Hamilton College Class of 1871 time capsule. September 15,

boys of 1871 saw the founding of Theta Delta Chi, although no fraternity houses dotted the landscape until the early 1980s. Boys handled a rigid course load including Greek, Latin, and mathematics. By their senior year, they had the exciting options of metaphysics, Commentaries on English Law, and Moral Philosophy.

turns picking up the shovel and pouring the earth over their college remains. Fifty years later, whoever remained of the class would reunite on the Hill to resurrect their time capsule and reminisce.

seniors who weathered four years of education and impressionable youth during what are

Following in the footsteps of the graduates before them, the men celebrated their ensuing commencement with Tree Day, a tradition now foreign to the campus. Tree Day, a custom that dated back to 1856, offered each senior class an opportunity to leave to their alma mater mementos from their four years on campus.

The tradition remained in place through the late 19th century until the Hamilton quad began to resemble a graveyard littered with stones of varying shapes and sizes. In 1925, Elihu Root organized the removal of most of the trees and relocation of the class stones. It was not until 1978 that Leigh Keno’79 discovered most of the stones

years. President Brown (1866-81) governed a student body that returned to the Hill fresh off the heels of the Civil War and the recent assassination of President Abraham Lincoln.

Each June, it was customary for the senior class to gather outside on the same afternoon the Clark Prize was awarded for public speaking. The whole school would attend to watch a tree planted and marked with a boulder bearing the

arranged for the stones to be relocated to the space next to Minor Theater and Bristol Center where they remain today.

Despite the national unrest, college life on the Hill continued with the routine grind of recitation and chapel meetings. On campus, the

year. In time, copper or lead boxes containing class and college records were buried beneath the stones. Each member of the class would take

memories most prized by the Class of 1871 were unveiled for eyes to see. We must take a step back to June of 1871 to imagine the day this group of men buried their memories of college life in a time capsule beneath the sapling of an elm tree. The

26

the continental | autumn 2011

Findings from the most recent time capsule opening.

Today, as we walk the very same paths as the 200 classes before us, we continue to bear witness to this lost Hamilton tradition. Stone monuments still scatter our campus and preserve the

mysteries and secrets hidden within. What was the intent of these memorials left behind? The tradition gave the men the opportunity to draw to a close one chapter of their lives and prepare for the opening of a new world. The school’s bicentennial has provided an However, much of our great institution’s past is still unclear. Time capsules serve as sacred reminders of a forgotten age. While we have recovered many, there are potentially dozens of these time capsules still hidden below the ground we walk across every day. Time capsules from various class years and their contents can be found in the “Time Capsules and Cornerstones” exhibition in Emerson Gallery through December 16, 2011.

the continental | autumn 2011

27


features features

features

Buried in Time

By Meg Pengue ’12

A Hamilton Literary Monthly, course catalogues, and a printing block. These are among the artifacts resurrected from the Hamilton College Class of 1871 time capsule. September 15,

boys of 1871 saw the founding of Theta Delta Chi, although no fraternity houses dotted the landscape until the early 1980s. Boys handled a rigid course load including Greek, Latin, and mathematics. By their senior year, they had the exciting options of metaphysics, Commentaries on English Law, and Moral Philosophy.

turns picking up the shovel and pouring the earth over their college remains. Fifty years later, whoever remained of the class would reunite on the Hill to resurrect their time capsule and reminisce.

seniors who weathered four years of education and impressionable youth during what are

Following in the footsteps of the graduates before them, the men celebrated their ensuing commencement with Tree Day, a tradition now foreign to the campus. Tree Day, a custom that dated back to 1856, offered each senior class an opportunity to leave to their alma mater mementos from their four years on campus.

The tradition remained in place through the late 19th century until the Hamilton quad began to resemble a graveyard littered with stones of varying shapes and sizes. In 1925, Elihu Root organized the removal of most of the trees and relocation of the class stones. It was not until 1978 that Leigh Keno’79 discovered most of the stones

years. President Brown (1866-81) governed a student body that returned to the Hill fresh off the heels of the Civil War and the recent assassination of President Abraham Lincoln.

Each June, it was customary for the senior class to gather outside on the same afternoon the Clark Prize was awarded for public speaking. The whole school would attend to watch a tree planted and marked with a boulder bearing the

arranged for the stones to be relocated to the space next to Minor Theater and Bristol Center where they remain today.

Despite the national unrest, college life on the Hill continued with the routine grind of recitation and chapel meetings. On campus, the

year. In time, copper or lead boxes containing class and college records were buried beneath the stones. Each member of the class would take

memories most prized by the Class of 1871 were unveiled for eyes to see. We must take a step back to June of 1871 to imagine the day this group of men buried their memories of college life in a time capsule beneath the sapling of an elm tree. The

26

the continental | autumn 2011

Findings from the most recent time capsule opening.

Today, as we walk the very same paths as the 200 classes before us, we continue to bear witness to this lost Hamilton tradition. Stone monuments still scatter our campus and preserve the

mysteries and secrets hidden within. What was the intent of these memorials left behind? The tradition gave the men the opportunity to draw to a close one chapter of their lives and prepare for the opening of a new world. The school’s bicentennial has provided an However, much of our great institution’s past is still unclear. Time capsules serve as sacred reminders of a forgotten age. While we have recovered many, there are potentially dozens of these time capsules still hidden below the ground we walk across every day. Time capsules from various class years and their contents can be found in the “Time Capsules and Cornerstones” exhibition in Emerson Gallery through December 16, 2011.

the continental | autumn 2011

27


features

I Heard They Recently Decided to Add More Hops To It!

The Revival of Hops Farms in the Greater Clinton Area By Sophie Hays ’13

features

After the detrimental disease hit hop farms across New York State, many hops were then imported to uphold the state’s beer industry. And so followed the decline of hop farms in the state. However, today a few noteworthy farmers in the greater Clinton area are pursuing the perennial crop that once played such a large role during the initial Hamilton years. Jim Wrobel is the owner and operator of Wrobel Farms in Bridgewater, NY. He has not only pursued a revival of the hop crop on his land, but also grows the same heirloom varieties that were once planted on his farm 100 years ago. And in Munnsville, NY, Larry Fisher, also the current president of the Northeastern Hops Alliance, owns the only hop farm in Madison County, Foothill Farms. He provides organic Cascade hops to Empire Brewing Company Bar and Restaurant in Syracuse for a production of their own beer—Empire Hop Harvest (Pale Ale). Two of those hop farmers today are Hamilton’s own. Seniors Mike Manwaring and Will ThoresonGreen have begun a brewing adventure of their own. For Professor Sciacca’s Food For Thought Seminar, these two students will be brewing a beer from the hops that are currently growing in the 1812 garden. Manwaring and Thoreson-Green have always wanted to craft their own brew, and opportunity hit them one day in the garden when learning about the 1812 beer. we won’t be able to produce too much of it,” said Manwaring, “But we are excited to learn about the brewing process as we go along, through research and discussions with other biology professors with brewing experience.” More importantly, who will get to taste this

The campus pub, once located underneath Commons, circa mid-1970s.

What if I told you that beer was up for sale in Commons? Or once was at least—in an underground haunt that was known as the “Buttery,” tucked in a basement room in the Hall of Commons, now Commons Dining Hall. It was in this retreat that students could purchase items such as raisins, nuts, apples, cheese, stationary, cigars, and even beer and hard cider after their evening meal. Founding president Azel Backus, who was taught how to steal hops poles while growing up on a farm, fully

28

to organize a tasting session for the people who are involved in the bicentennial celebrations and will appreciate the beer,” they said. Between the founding students of 1812 and Hamilton students of today, not too much seems to have changed in our tastes. The spirit of the man who once encouraged stealing hops poles and selling beer in Commons is sorely missed. Yet something about

campus at the time, the Buttery was shut down in 1818 by the nefarious President Davis. But New York State and its students would continue to love their beer, returning all the way

just feels right this year, coinciding with Hamilton’s bicentennial celebrations. Maybe we’re living in a hoppier time after all.

Madison, NY. By the beginning of the 19th century, hops were one of the most ubiquitous crops in the state, and by the 1850s, New York was growing 90 percent of the nation’s supply. Much of that production came from central New York. Today around seventy different brews hail from New York

Special thanks to David Gapp and Sharon Williams for assisting with research for this article.

the continental | autumn 2011

One of several hops barns located on Dugway Road, this hops barn formerly stood on the property of Onno Oerlemans and Sally Cockburn. Hop barns were used to store and dry hops until they were ready to ferment. Even Kirkland Cottage was once used to store and dry hops.

Hops, a crucial ingredient in beer-making, help the bitterness of a beer, distinguishing and specializing home-brews. the continental | autumn 2011

29


features

I Heard They Recently Decided to Add More Hops To It!

The Revival of Hops Farms in the Greater Clinton Area By Sophie Hays ’13

features

After the detrimental disease hit hop farms across New York State, many hops were then imported to uphold the state’s beer industry. And so followed the decline of hop farms in the state. However, today a few noteworthy farmers in the greater Clinton area are pursuing the perennial crop that once played such a large role during the initial Hamilton years. Jim Wrobel is the owner and operator of Wrobel Farms in Bridgewater, NY. He has not only pursued a revival of the hop crop on his land, but also grows the same heirloom varieties that were once planted on his farm 100 years ago. And in Munnsville, NY, Larry Fisher, also the current president of the Northeastern Hops Alliance, owns the only hop farm in Madison County, Foothill Farms. He provides organic Cascade hops to Empire Brewing Company Bar and Restaurant in Syracuse for a production of their own beer—Empire Hop Harvest (Pale Ale). Two of those hop farmers today are Hamilton’s own. Seniors Mike Manwaring and Will ThoresonGreen have begun a brewing adventure of their own. For Professor Sciacca’s Food For Thought Seminar, these two students will be brewing a beer from the hops that are currently growing in the 1812 garden. Manwaring and Thoreson-Green have always wanted to craft their own brew, and opportunity hit them one day in the garden when learning about the 1812 beer. we won’t be able to produce too much of it,” said Manwaring, “But we are excited to learn about the brewing process as we go along, through research and discussions with other biology professors with brewing experience.” More importantly, who will get to taste this

The campus pub, once located underneath Commons, circa mid-1970s.

What if I told you that beer was up for sale in Commons? Or once was at least—in an underground haunt that was known as the “Buttery,” tucked in a basement room in the Hall of Commons, now Commons Dining Hall. It was in this retreat that students could purchase items such as raisins, nuts, apples, cheese, stationary, cigars, and even beer and hard cider after their evening meal. Founding president Azel Backus, who was taught how to steal hops poles while growing up on a farm, fully

28

to organize a tasting session for the people who are involved in the bicentennial celebrations and will appreciate the beer,” they said. Between the founding students of 1812 and Hamilton students of today, not too much seems to have changed in our tastes. The spirit of the man who once encouraged stealing hops poles and selling beer in Commons is sorely missed. Yet something about

campus at the time, the Buttery was shut down in 1818 by the nefarious President Davis. But New York State and its students would continue to love their beer, returning all the way

just feels right this year, coinciding with Hamilton’s bicentennial celebrations. Maybe we’re living in a hoppier time after all.

Madison, NY. By the beginning of the 19th century, hops were one of the most ubiquitous crops in the state, and by the 1850s, New York was growing 90 percent of the nation’s supply. Much of that production came from central New York. Today around seventy different brews hail from New York

Special thanks to David Gapp and Sharon Williams for assisting with research for this article.

the continental | autumn 2011

One of several hops barns located on Dugway Road, this hops barn formerly stood on the property of Onno Oerlemans and Sally Cockburn. Hop barns were used to store and dry hops until they were ready to ferment. Even Kirkland Cottage was once used to store and dry hops.

Hops, a crucial ingredient in beer-making, help the bitterness of a beer, distinguishing and specializing home-brews. the continental | autumn 2011

29


style

Kate Harloe, ’12 / Canton, NY

Probably oblivious. I appreciate fashion as art, but I think the amount of time and money we spend on the pieces of cloth we throw over ourselves from day to day is pretty hilarious. I don’t take myself or my wardrobe very seriously...which I recommend because you’ll end up feelin’ good in whatever you wear, you’ll have the money to buy a concert ticket instead of a bikini top, and you’ll continually have the pleasure of confusing the typical Martin’s Way passersby.

Spotted: Kate Harloe & Sean Smith

Sean Smith, ’15 / Miami, FL

style

in SoHo. An American in Paris. Your favorite English professor. It’s rustic, it’s sophisticated, it’s fun. It’s every rule of male fashion properly executed, and then completely ignored. Where do you draw your inspiration? impacted me an awful lot. You’d never think Home Depot would be such a fashionable place, huh? Those paint swatches have helped me to blend and accent colors, mixing neutrals and colors that pop, while maintaining a theme. Take Ivy has become my second Bible, and I often watch and rewatch The Darjeeling Limited, Bored to Death, Purple Noon, Mad Men, The Graduate, and for ideas. And I can’t forget Tumblr.com, home of the menswear community.

Where do you draw your inspiration? Friends and travels. I’m not much into television or entertainment media, so I’m usually behind when it comes to trendiness. But my travels last year brought me from India to Paris to San Francisco and I picked up a lot of different clothing items/approaches to style along the way. My collection of friends is about as eclectic as my wardrobe, too, so I constantly get fun or

Favorite piece from your wardrobe? One is a wooden bead bracelet that my mom and I both have. I feel bare without it. The second is my navy Ludlow J. Crew blazer, due to its timelessness and versatility. You can wear it a million and one ways right through the year, dressed up or dressed down.

always like to sport her rings, bracelets, and scarves. Favorite piece from your wardrobe? Cowboy boots. I bought them in Ottawa and they have seen me through nearly every element and all kinds of ridiculous situations. Also, I never take off any of my rings. Each of them has a very different back-story.

Where do the majority of your clothes come from? Well, I worked at J. Crew for nearly a year, so I do have quite a bit from there, but I pride myself in owning things from all over. I mix ideas from several well; some are even hand-me-downs that I’ve had tailored.

Where do the majority of your clothes come from? Thrift stores, which I seek out wherever I am. I try not to give too much of my small budget to sweat shops and the like. Plus I hate malls. But in the same way that Hamilton students (myself included) “hate texting,” yet spend a sad amount of hours staring at that tiny portable and Cotton On are always a challenge to resist.

On Sean: Blazer and belt: H&M; Shirt: Banana Republic; Tie: Vintage; Pants: Dockers; Shoes: Sebago; Feather and 30

the continental | autumn 2011

Cotton On; Converse: Thrift Store.

On Kate: Dress: Cotton On; shirt: thrift store in Paris; necklace: thrift store; belt: Pac Sun; boots: Value Village in Ottowa. On Sean: Blazer: Zara; Belt: Vintage; the continental | autumn 2011 Shirt: Saint 31 James; Pants: J.Crew; Sneakers: SeaVees.


style

Kate Harloe, ’12 / Canton, NY

Probably oblivious. I appreciate fashion as art, but I think the amount of time and money we spend on the pieces of cloth we throw over ourselves from day to day is pretty hilarious. I don’t take myself or my wardrobe very seriously...which I recommend because you’ll end up feelin’ good in whatever you wear, you’ll have the money to buy a concert ticket instead of a bikini top, and you’ll continually have the pleasure of confusing the typical Martin’s Way passersby.

Spotted: Kate Harloe & Sean Smith

Sean Smith, ’15 / Miami, FL

style

in SoHo. An American in Paris. Your favorite English professor. It’s rustic, it’s sophisticated, it’s fun. It’s every rule of male fashion properly executed, and then completely ignored. Where do you draw your inspiration? impacted me an awful lot. You’d never think Home Depot would be such a fashionable place, huh? Those paint swatches have helped me to blend and accent colors, mixing neutrals and colors that pop, while maintaining a theme. Take Ivy has become my second Bible, and I often watch and rewatch The Darjeeling Limited, Bored to Death, Purple Noon, Mad Men, The Graduate, and for ideas. And I can’t forget Tumblr.com, home of the menswear community.

Where do you draw your inspiration? Friends and travels. I’m not much into television or entertainment media, so I’m usually behind when it comes to trendiness. But my travels last year brought me from India to Paris to San Francisco and I picked up a lot of different clothing items/approaches to style along the way. My collection of friends is about as eclectic as my wardrobe, too, so I constantly get fun or

Favorite piece from your wardrobe? One is a wooden bead bracelet that my mom and I both have. I feel bare without it. The second is my navy Ludlow J. Crew blazer, due to its timelessness and versatility. You can wear it a million and one ways right through the year, dressed up or dressed down.

always like to sport her rings, bracelets, and scarves. Favorite piece from your wardrobe? Cowboy boots. I bought them in Ottawa and they have seen me through nearly every element and all kinds of ridiculous situations. Also, I never take off any of my rings. Each of them has a very different back-story.

Where do the majority of your clothes come from? Well, I worked at J. Crew for nearly a year, so I do have quite a bit from there, but I pride myself in owning things from all over. I mix ideas from several well; some are even hand-me-downs that I’ve had tailored.

Where do the majority of your clothes come from? Thrift stores, which I seek out wherever I am. I try not to give too much of my small budget to sweat shops and the like. Plus I hate malls. But in the same way that Hamilton students (myself included) “hate texting,” yet spend a sad amount of hours staring at that tiny portable and Cotton On are always a challenge to resist.

On Sean: Blazer and belt: H&M; Shirt: Banana Republic; Tie: Vintage; Pants: Dockers; Shoes: Sebago; Feather and 30

the continental | autumn 2011

Cotton On; Converse: Thrift Store.

On Kate: Dress: Cotton On; shirt: thrift store in Paris; necklace: thrift store; belt: Pac Sun; boots: Value Village in Ottowa. On Sean: Blazer: Zara; Belt: Vintage; the continental | autumn 2011 Shirt: Saint 31 James; Pants: J.Crew; Sneakers: SeaVees.


style

style

style

style

Bicentennial Fashion styled by Pearl Shin photos by Kristy Bendetti The old becomes new again this bicentennial year. Hamilton students today show off their updated looks from the past using long skirts and dresses for girls and arrow shirts for boys. These four Hamilton students create looks that seamlessly merge past and present fashions while blending in a mix of their own unique tastes and styles. They prove that fashion is in fact moving forward. We tend to think of long skirts as an outdated look, but today this trend has made its way back to the Hill. Combine the maxi skirt with a bold colored tank, casual blazer, for the fall includes a simple mustard yellow and gray striped vintage dress, a casual yet twist. Today’s biggest trend is fun and adorable polka dots. The look has made it everywhere from red carpets, fall 2011 runways, and everyday casual wear. These dots act as a chameleon for any style, including long, vintage skirts and short polka-dotted skirts. It may not be winter quite yet, but accessorizing these looks with a scarf as a headband or

in stripes inspired by “arrow shirts,” button-downs with detachable collars. A striped button down shirt tucked into a pair of khakis is the easiest way to make a clean and sleek look. There are various ways to create a more modern look for the “arrow shirt,” whether it’s an untucked plaid shirt or a colored button down and bowtie over dark jeans. Plaid is often a go-to shirt, and wearing it over unrolled khakis creates a casual collegiate look. And, of course, bright colors can always help you stand out from the crowd.

32

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the continental | autumn 2011

the continental | autumn 2011

the continental | autumn 2011

the continental | autumn 2011

33

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style

style

style

style

Bicentennial Fashion styled by Pearl Shin photos by Kristy Bendetti The old becomes new again this bicentennial year. Hamilton students today show off their updated looks from the past using long skirts and dresses for girls and arrow shirts for boys. These four Hamilton students create looks that seamlessly merge past and present fashions while blending in a mix of their own unique tastes and styles. They prove that fashion is in fact moving forward. We tend to think of long skirts as an outdated look, but today this trend has made its way back to the Hill. Combine the maxi skirt with a bold colored tank, casual blazer, for the fall includes a simple mustard yellow and gray striped vintage dress, a casual yet twist. Today’s biggest trend is fun and adorable polka dots. The look has made it everywhere from red carpets, fall 2011 runways, and everyday casual wear. These dots act as a chameleon for any style, including long, vintage skirts and short polka-dotted skirts. It may not be winter quite yet, but accessorizing these looks with a scarf as a headband or

in stripes inspired by “arrow shirts,” button-downs with detachable collars. A striped button down shirt tucked into a pair of khakis is the easiest way to make a clean and sleek look. There are various ways to create a more modern look for the “arrow shirt,” whether it’s an untucked plaid shirt or a colored button down and bowtie over dark jeans. Plaid is often a go-to shirt, and wearing it over unrolled khakis creates a casual collegiate look. And, of course, bright colors can always help you stand out from the crowd.

32

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the continental | autumn 2011

the continental | autumn 2011

the continental | autumn 2011

the continental | autumn 2011

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style style

style style

On Sarah: Dress: Japanese vintage from Soeul, South Korea; Flats: Salvation Army in Utica. On Trevor: Polo: Lacoste; Pants: Brooks Brothers; Shoes: Cole Haan.

On Dyllon: Shirt: Ralph Lauren; Pants: Urban Sperry’s. On Sarah: Skirt: Salvation Army in Utica; Silk tank: mother’s vintage; Scarf: borrowed; Sunglasses: street vendor in Seoul, South Korea.

On Dyllon: Shirt: Vineyard Vines; Khakis: Urban On Julia: Blazer: Aqua; Tank: Eloise; Skirt: Madewell; Flats: Steve Madden; Aviators: Ray Ban.

34

the continental | autumn 2011

On Trevor: Shirt and tie: Brooks Brothers; Pants: Seven Jeans; Belt: Tucker Blair; Shoes: Cole Haan; Glasses: Ray Ban. On Julia: Scarf: Carlisle; Top: Yaya Non de Plume; Skirt: Anthropologie; Flats: Steve Madden.

the continental | autumn 2011

the continental | autumn 2011

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style style

style style

On Sarah: Dress: Japanese vintage from Soeul, South Korea; Flats: Salvation Army in Utica. On Trevor: Polo: Lacoste; Pants: Brooks Brothers; Shoes: Cole Haan.

On Dyllon: Shirt: Ralph Lauren; Pants: Urban Sperry’s. On Sarah: Skirt: Salvation Army in Utica; Silk tank: mother’s vintage; Scarf: borrowed; Sunglasses: street vendor in Seoul, South Korea.

On Dyllon: Shirt: Vineyard Vines; Khakis: Urban On Julia: Blazer: Aqua; Tank: Eloise; Skirt: Madewell; Flats: Steve Madden; Aviators: Ray Ban.

34

the continental | autumn 2011

On Trevor: Shirt and tie: Brooks Brothers; Pants: Seven Jeans; Belt: Tucker Blair; Shoes: Cole Haan; Glasses: Ray Ban. On Julia: Scarf: Carlisle; Top: Yaya Non de Plume; Skirt: Anthropologie; Flats: Steve Madden.

the continental | autumn 2011

the continental | autumn 2011

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style

style

An Eye on Hamilton Fashion: Julia Jarrold ’13 Takes It All In

MENSWEAR. Boys, gentlemen, men, chaps, and hombres. Hooray! You’ve got it! Your tapered and tailored jeans, your use of plaid, your choice to insert bright colored pieces into your wardrobe, and how you’ve got the look of the horizontal stripe nies, baseball caps, and athletic shorts will forever be a part of this campus’ fashion, but after all, we’re still just students. I mean, what can you expect? A guy needs to wear those white tube socks to work out, right? Nevertheless, you guys have got it. Americana trends are swarming the runways and at the root of this look, are people like you. Tops. The men of Hamilton’s campus shirt. From the tank top, worn in t-shirt, casual v-neck, and button-up, the male students are rocking it. They’re embracing plaid, horizontal stripes, and a mix of all different sorts of color. Pants. You boys are starting to move beyond the classic looking khaki, and I like it. Not only have you branched out and started to wear corduroys, twill pants, and even jeans, but you’ve also started to embrace different cuts. I can guarantee that every female on this campus is enjoying those tighter

Just as we’re beginning to wrap our heads around the Spring/Summer 2011 designs and trends, here comes Fashion Week with the 2012 collections. your pants are honestly, the cherry on the sundae. Shoes. Who knew male shoes could be so darn bottoms, tapered hems, crochet, tassels and so much exciting. Between the Jordans and thoseVans Classics, more, but now we’re expected to continue reshaping, I can not take my eyes off of your feet. So, thank you and don’t be modest. I know you know you look good. To capture these looks in your everyday apjust expects so much from us; but we are curious…. parel—start slowly. There’s no need to jump into so, what’s to come for the next course of fashion? the deep end of fashion, just start out with a few The new fall lines, of course! Rest easy folks and don’t upgraded pieces and work them into your wardtoss your maxis! (They’re still good here, as far as I’m robe. Try mixing in slimmer pants or splurge on a to make runway looks that can be more easily comprehended and adapted by your average Joe and Joanne; and, frankly Joe and Joanne are looking pretty darn good. So far, this entrée of spring/summer 2012 is settling with me. Fashion is beginning to seem much more accessible. My proof? Hamilton’s student body. Hamilton’s campus has never been known as the fashion hub of the universe; however, since the beginning of the semester our fellow peers have been knocking the fashion-ball out of the park. Both the men and women on the Hill are embracing the colors, silhouettes, patterns, and textures of the trends that are at the core of this Fashion week’s runway collections.

the continental | autumn 2011

WOMENSWEAR. Oh, ladies! You girls have really got it going on. I know the maxis, pleats, high-waisted pants, harem pants, and crochet pieces have all apparently “gone out,” but props to you for keeping them “in” and wearing them well. However, just because you all seem to be fond of last season’s trends does not mean you are stuck in the past. There are some pretty current pieces and ideas among us. So, ladies, if you’re doing it right you can now feel free to pat yourself on the back, but if you need a little guidance—perk up and listen closely! Hair. Braids. Boy, are these puppies “in.” Both Mara Hoffman’s show and United Bamboo took the idea of plaits to an entirely different level. learn and can take your look from an eight to a ten. However, please don’t forget about my beloved topknot. They’re easy and adorable, and I mean real easy. I think every girl on this campus has rocked at least one, and if you haven’t, come join the club. For yo’ face—brightly colored lips are

The neck, Dracula’s favorite part of the body. Peter pan collars are very popular, but what’s cooler than a top with a peter pan collar? A free-standing necklace bib. I have yet to see a Hamilton student rock this, but when it happens (and it will) it’s going to be B-A-N-A-N-A-S. The body. It’s true, us girls sort of know what we’re doing. The chicas at Hamilton have always loved a great nautical striped shirt, chambray button down, utility jacket, and menswear inspired blazer; however, new trends are starting to become infectious. We’ve seen everything from colored jeans to silky sheer blouses to mixing of patterns—and I love them all. Bravo ladies, these items are all pretty brave. You want to jazz up your digs? Try embracing different cuts of pants and shirts—they’re not as hard to pull off as you think, and you’ll never know until you try. In addition, fun colored jeans can be found for super cheap at places like H&M and Zara’s. So why not invest in a pair to spice things up? Finally, shoes! There are so many to choose from, I mean really. Aside from Miu Miu’s new pump being featured in um, about every magazine you could ever think of, I think trends for us gals at Hamilton are pretty reasonable. Desert boots and all other forms of ankle boots are popular in addition to solid plat-

eye with a neutral lip. However, be careful because when either of these looks go wrong, they can go very wrong. Taking risks at school with makeup is tricky, but I say the riskier the better. Are you getting your nails did? I know you are, I mean I certainly am. I think it’s also important to note how the women of Hamilton are no longer in all, Hamilton girls are making the fashion world

Photo courtesy of digidrawb.blogspot.com 36

Illustration by Susannah Wales ’13

In conclusion, either fashion is comboldly moved onto nails. Nail color this season is huge—the main word being COLOR. The runways ing back down to earth or Hamilton students are showing models with designs on their nails and are rising to the occasion—because no matter all sorts of colors including plum, forest green, and a soft pearl. You’ll see ladies on this campus wear- ing somewhere in the middle, and it is glorious. ing soft purples, bright blues, tomato reds, and anything else they can get their hands on because it’s the continental | autumn 2011

37


style

style

An Eye on Hamilton Fashion: Julia Jarrold ’13 Takes It All In

MENSWEAR. Boys, gentlemen, men, chaps, and hombres. Hooray! You’ve got it! Your tapered and tailored jeans, your use of plaid, your choice to insert bright colored pieces into your wardrobe, and how you’ve got the look of the horizontal stripe nies, baseball caps, and athletic shorts will forever be a part of this campus’ fashion, but after all, we’re still just students. I mean, what can you expect? A guy needs to wear those white tube socks to work out, right? Nevertheless, you guys have got it. Americana trends are swarming the runways and at the root of this look, are people like you. Tops. The men of Hamilton’s campus shirt. From the tank top, worn in t-shirt, casual v-neck, and button-up, the male students are rocking it. They’re embracing plaid, horizontal stripes, and a mix of all different sorts of color. Pants. You boys are starting to move beyond the classic looking khaki, and I like it. Not only have you branched out and started to wear corduroys, twill pants, and even jeans, but you’ve also started to embrace different cuts. I can guarantee that every female on this campus is enjoying those tighter

Just as we’re beginning to wrap our heads around the Spring/Summer 2011 designs and trends, here comes Fashion Week with the 2012 collections. your pants are honestly, the cherry on the sundae. Shoes. Who knew male shoes could be so darn bottoms, tapered hems, crochet, tassels and so much exciting. Between the Jordans and thoseVans Classics, more, but now we’re expected to continue reshaping, I can not take my eyes off of your feet. So, thank you and don’t be modest. I know you know you look good. To capture these looks in your everyday apjust expects so much from us; but we are curious…. parel—start slowly. There’s no need to jump into so, what’s to come for the next course of fashion? the deep end of fashion, just start out with a few The new fall lines, of course! Rest easy folks and don’t upgraded pieces and work them into your wardtoss your maxis! (They’re still good here, as far as I’m robe. Try mixing in slimmer pants or splurge on a to make runway looks that can be more easily comprehended and adapted by your average Joe and Joanne; and, frankly Joe and Joanne are looking pretty darn good. So far, this entrée of spring/summer 2012 is settling with me. Fashion is beginning to seem much more accessible. My proof? Hamilton’s student body. Hamilton’s campus has never been known as the fashion hub of the universe; however, since the beginning of the semester our fellow peers have been knocking the fashion-ball out of the park. Both the men and women on the Hill are embracing the colors, silhouettes, patterns, and textures of the trends that are at the core of this Fashion week’s runway collections.

the continental | autumn 2011

WOMENSWEAR. Oh, ladies! You girls have really got it going on. I know the maxis, pleats, high-waisted pants, harem pants, and crochet pieces have all apparently “gone out,” but props to you for keeping them “in” and wearing them well. However, just because you all seem to be fond of last season’s trends does not mean you are stuck in the past. There are some pretty current pieces and ideas among us. So, ladies, if you’re doing it right you can now feel free to pat yourself on the back, but if you need a little guidance—perk up and listen closely! Hair. Braids. Boy, are these puppies “in.” Both Mara Hoffman’s show and United Bamboo took the idea of plaits to an entirely different level. learn and can take your look from an eight to a ten. However, please don’t forget about my beloved topknot. They’re easy and adorable, and I mean real easy. I think every girl on this campus has rocked at least one, and if you haven’t, come join the club. For yo’ face—brightly colored lips are

The neck, Dracula’s favorite part of the body. Peter pan collars are very popular, but what’s cooler than a top with a peter pan collar? A free-standing necklace bib. I have yet to see a Hamilton student rock this, but when it happens (and it will) it’s going to be B-A-N-A-N-A-S. The body. It’s true, us girls sort of know what we’re doing. The chicas at Hamilton have always loved a great nautical striped shirt, chambray button down, utility jacket, and menswear inspired blazer; however, new trends are starting to become infectious. We’ve seen everything from colored jeans to silky sheer blouses to mixing of patterns—and I love them all. Bravo ladies, these items are all pretty brave. You want to jazz up your digs? Try embracing different cuts of pants and shirts—they’re not as hard to pull off as you think, and you’ll never know until you try. In addition, fun colored jeans can be found for super cheap at places like H&M and Zara’s. So why not invest in a pair to spice things up? Finally, shoes! There are so many to choose from, I mean really. Aside from Miu Miu’s new pump being featured in um, about every magazine you could ever think of, I think trends for us gals at Hamilton are pretty reasonable. Desert boots and all other forms of ankle boots are popular in addition to solid plat-

eye with a neutral lip. However, be careful because when either of these looks go wrong, they can go very wrong. Taking risks at school with makeup is tricky, but I say the riskier the better. Are you getting your nails did? I know you are, I mean I certainly am. I think it’s also important to note how the women of Hamilton are no longer in all, Hamilton girls are making the fashion world

Photo courtesy of digidrawb.blogspot.com 36

Illustration by Susannah Wales ’13

In conclusion, either fashion is comboldly moved onto nails. Nail color this season is huge—the main word being COLOR. The runways ing back down to earth or Hamilton students are showing models with designs on their nails and are rising to the occasion—because no matter all sorts of colors including plum, forest green, and a soft pearl. You’ll see ladies on this campus wear- ing somewhere in the middle, and it is glorious. ing soft purples, bright blues, tomato reds, and anything else they can get their hands on because it’s the continental | autumn 2011

37


Trending the Roller Derby

style

style

By Steven Saurbier ‘12

From College Hill Road to Fashion Avenue: Two Hamilton students graduate with style

and, perhaps most important of all, Roller Derby. The origins of Roller Derby hearken back to endurance races which were popular from the late 19th century through the 1930s. Events would often simulate cross-country races where skaters raced for up to 12 hours a day for weeks at a time, and it was not unusual for skaters to pass At this point, the sport was essentially speed skating on dry land. The critical moment in the evolution of Roller Derby came in 1939, when a series of substantial collisions occurred, much to the crowd’s delight. Competitive better. Employing traditional American resourcefulness, skaters began to trip, elbow or otherwise strike opponents attempting to lap them. Roller Derby as we know it was thus born. Alas, the sport faced a steady decline in popularity throughout the 70s and 80s. Roller Derby lost its legitimacy as bouts became increasingly theatrical--more similar to professional wrestling than competitive sport. Simultaneously, oil crises struck both the fanbase and the athletes; teams could not afford to travel across

By Sara Shaughnessy ’14 Behind the scenes at RueLaLa Photo courtesy of thatssorue.tumblr.com For Kristine Cupertino strutting her style down the hallways, and impressing many fashion-challenged classmates. Her unique interest in fashion at a young age combined with an exquisite eye for detail led Cupertino to quickly recognize her talent as a “self-proclaimed fashionista.” Fast forward a few years and she has unleashed her passion for fashion and discovered her dream job working for Ralph Lauren. Cupertino has undoubtedly combined the best of both worlds by utilizing her economics major and sense of style to handle all dot com forecasting globally across over 20 brands. While she spends a lot of time working with spreadsheets, she explains “I am also the connoisseur of all things RL.” She works with the digital operations team who produce all of the e-commerce photo shoots, so she gets the chance to see all of the samples before they are mass-produced. Cupertino even shares her opinions and provides the designers with her expertise on fashion, proclaiming, “Hey, it’s good for the brand, right?” According to Cupertino, Hamilton students pursuing a career in fashion should keep the term “networking” in their minds at all times and should constantly think about potential connections. She notes, “I am where I am today because I talk to everyone, do it with a smile, and am never afraid to reach out to people.”

In the early 90’s, kinder fortunes befell Roller Derby enthusiasts. At the nexus of a burgeoning DIY ethic and a burgeoning punk aesthetic, the sport was suddenly in a prime position for resurgence. Social developments created a perfect storm, popularizing amateur sports with an anti-consumerist ethic. Player and Hamilton College graduate Emily Gerston ’11 describes the sporting culture saying, “it’s about more than just being on a track and hitting people… it’s one of the only sports I can think of that’s women run and women-played.” In fact, the WFTDA (Women’s Flat Track Derby Association) regulations state that all teams appeal. Leagues began to form in earnest during the new millennium, with 50 in existence by 2005 and 135 by 2007. In 2007, Utica organized its own teams in the Central New York Roller Derby League, featuring the Utica Clubbers, the Blue Collar Betties, and the Rome Wreckers. Traditionally, clever team names were encouraged but not required. Ms. Gerston jumped right into the action one day her junior year. “I was really bored one found some information on a training camp, and the rest is history. These “newbie camps” are open to anyone regardless of skill level, lasting 12-16 weeks and covering proper skating form, hitting and strategy. As Americans, we must not forget the noble sport of Roller Derby. From the American Revolution to the victory in a competitive environment. It is a sport that requires both striking wit and striking opponents, the necessity of brains and brawn makes Roller Derby a fundamental sport in the American psyche.

’07, co-founder of The Continental, discovered her undying interest in fashion while at Hamilton, which is precisely why the style section of this magazine exists today. She began her professional career in magazines by interning for Time and This Old House. She then worked at Health, despite her lack of interest in sciences as she “only set foot in the science building at Hamilton to get coffee at Opus.” But these Rue La La, a website dedicated to rewarding members with daily fashion boutiques. If you have shopped on Rue La La, you know the design team does an excellent job of keeping their members pleased. Even if an item is completely sold out, members have the opportunity to click the marketing team to produce content for the Rue La La Facebook and Twitter pages. encourages Hamilton students to follow their passion and showcase their sincere interest in a company when pursuing an internship or job as she did. “When I’ve interviewed candidates, I’m instantly drawn to people who are excited about my company,” she stated. She agrees with Cupertino in that the power of networking is priceless and helps to initially “get your foot in the door.” Finding the ideal job can prove challenging, so she advised, “Don’t beat yourself up…The right one will come along, even if it doesn’t feel that way at the time.”

38

the continental | autumn 2011

Photos courtesy of CNY Roller Derby Myspace thecontinental continental | autumn 2011 2011 the | autumn

3939


Trending the Roller Derby

style

style

By Steven Saurbier ‘12

From College Hill Road to Fashion Avenue: Two Hamilton students graduate with style

and, perhaps most important of all, Roller Derby. The origins of Roller Derby hearken back to endurance races which were popular from the late 19th century through the 1930s. Events would often simulate cross-country races where skaters raced for up to 12 hours a day for weeks at a time, and it was not unusual for skaters to pass At this point, the sport was essentially speed skating on dry land. The critical moment in the evolution of Roller Derby came in 1939, when a series of substantial collisions occurred, much to the crowd’s delight. Competitive better. Employing traditional American resourcefulness, skaters began to trip, elbow or otherwise strike opponents attempting to lap them. Roller Derby as we know it was thus born. Alas, the sport faced a steady decline in popularity throughout the 70s and 80s. Roller Derby lost its legitimacy as bouts became increasingly theatrical--more similar to professional wrestling than competitive sport. Simultaneously, oil crises struck both the fanbase and the athletes; teams could not afford to travel across

By Sara Shaughnessy ’14 Behind the scenes at RueLaLa Photo courtesy of thatssorue.tumblr.com For Kristine Cupertino strutting her style down the hallways, and impressing many fashion-challenged classmates. Her unique interest in fashion at a young age combined with an exquisite eye for detail led Cupertino to quickly recognize her talent as a “self-proclaimed fashionista.” Fast forward a few years and she has unleashed her passion for fashion and discovered her dream job working for Ralph Lauren. Cupertino has undoubtedly combined the best of both worlds by utilizing her economics major and sense of style to handle all dot com forecasting globally across over 20 brands. While she spends a lot of time working with spreadsheets, she explains “I am also the connoisseur of all things RL.” She works with the digital operations team who produce all of the e-commerce photo shoots, so she gets the chance to see all of the samples before they are mass-produced. Cupertino even shares her opinions and provides the designers with her expertise on fashion, proclaiming, “Hey, it’s good for the brand, right?” According to Cupertino, Hamilton students pursuing a career in fashion should keep the term “networking” in their minds at all times and should constantly think about potential connections. She notes, “I am where I am today because I talk to everyone, do it with a smile, and am never afraid to reach out to people.”

In the early 90’s, kinder fortunes befell Roller Derby enthusiasts. At the nexus of a burgeoning DIY ethic and a burgeoning punk aesthetic, the sport was suddenly in a prime position for resurgence. Social developments created a perfect storm, popularizing amateur sports with an anti-consumerist ethic. Player and Hamilton College graduate Emily Gerston ’11 describes the sporting culture saying, “it’s about more than just being on a track and hitting people… it’s one of the only sports I can think of that’s women run and women-played.” In fact, the WFTDA (Women’s Flat Track Derby Association) regulations state that all teams appeal. Leagues began to form in earnest during the new millennium, with 50 in existence by 2005 and 135 by 2007. In 2007, Utica organized its own teams in the Central New York Roller Derby League, featuring the Utica Clubbers, the Blue Collar Betties, and the Rome Wreckers. Traditionally, clever team names were encouraged but not required. Ms. Gerston jumped right into the action one day her junior year. “I was really bored one found some information on a training camp, and the rest is history. These “newbie camps” are open to anyone regardless of skill level, lasting 12-16 weeks and covering proper skating form, hitting and strategy. As Americans, we must not forget the noble sport of Roller Derby. From the American Revolution to the victory in a competitive environment. It is a sport that requires both striking wit and striking opponents, the necessity of brains and brawn makes Roller Derby a fundamental sport in the American psyche.

’07, co-founder of The Continental, discovered her undying interest in fashion while at Hamilton, which is precisely why the style section of this magazine exists today. She began her professional career in magazines by interning for Time and This Old House. She then worked at Health, despite her lack of interest in sciences as she “only set foot in the science building at Hamilton to get coffee at Opus.” But these Rue La La, a website dedicated to rewarding members with daily fashion boutiques. If you have shopped on Rue La La, you know the design team does an excellent job of keeping their members pleased. Even if an item is completely sold out, members have the opportunity to click the marketing team to produce content for the Rue La La Facebook and Twitter pages. encourages Hamilton students to follow their passion and showcase their sincere interest in a company when pursuing an internship or job as she did. “When I’ve interviewed candidates, I’m instantly drawn to people who are excited about my company,” she stated. She agrees with Cupertino in that the power of networking is priceless and helps to initially “get your foot in the door.” Finding the ideal job can prove challenging, so she advised, “Don’t beat yourself up…The right one will come along, even if it doesn’t feel that way at the time.”

38

the continental | autumn 2011

Photos courtesy of CNY Roller Derby Myspace thecontinental continental | autumn 2011 2011 the | autumn

3939


society

society

Beyond the “VT”: The Nail Creek Pub

By Scott Blosser ’12

It is easy to spend your entire Hamilton experience without ever exploring the unappreciated treasures of Utica. The convenience of having our own on-campus few incentives for venturing too far from the Hill. This tired routine is both easy and superior bar experience, but a connection to the greater community outside of our cozy Hamilton bubble. I set out to write an article about “better bars” in the area for students seeking more of a choice than just the VT or the Rok, but I found that one bar stood above the rest for its old fashioned pub feel and its commitment to serving great beer. The Nail Brewery, stands alone as a place where owners and patrons take pride in the beer they drink and the sense of community that binds them all together. Owners Chris and Tracey opened the Nail Creek Pub in 2008 and have sought occupies a now charming space on Varick Street that was formerly a dilapidated apartment carefully sculpted wood interior lend a timeless feel to the bar, and the spacious front porch is perfect for lounging with a drink on a cool fall night. The most distinguishing features of the Nail Creek Pub are the commitment to serving the best-tasting beer and the down-to-earth atmosphere that welcomes all visitors. The bar advertises that it has the “largest selection of beer between Syracuse Righteous Ale--a copper colored beer with a hoppy, rye taste--and a local Saranac Wet Hop IPA, I knew my search for a better bar was over. The impeccable service only enhanced the experience, and the affable bartenders at the Nail Creek Pub are quick to help recommend a beer to less discerning drinkers. Their passion for beer is evident, and they talk about beer with the sort of reverent admiration usually reserved for wine snobs, but without the pretentiousness or self-serving attitude. Indeed the Nail Creek Pub is about as laid back as they come. It’s the kind of place where everyone takes care of each other and where friends gather to relax and enjoy their favorite libations while some forgotten classic rock song rolls along in the background. One patron described Chris and Tracey as “real people, just like the people who come to the bar.” They are extremely receptive to clientele and host regular events that include Traditional Irish gourmet dinners every Wednesday night. Above all is an emphasis on community, and Chris and Tracey are set to open a new restaurant in Utica that will feature a seasonal menu of locally grown produce. On a lucky night at the Nail Creek Pub you may run into Peanut, a neighbor of the bar who helped do the interior woodwork, swapping stories and sipping on either Utica Club or his second favorite beer, Utica Club Light. Other nights you might excitedly chat with Dave and Beth about the newest local initiatives in Utica while Dave pursues his quest to drink at least 100 Guinnesses and have his name engraved in Pub, you are bound to make some new friends while enjoying your favorite beer. Sure the VT and the Rok may be the easy options, but what was ever worth having that didn’t require a little bit of effort? Our time at Hamilton is

40

the continental | autumn 2011

and try something different, because a community of great people and great service is waiting just down the road.

Hamilton junior James Lovejoy sips a

the continental | autumn 2011

41


society

society

Beyond the “VT”: The Nail Creek Pub

By Scott Blosser ’12

It is easy to spend your entire Hamilton experience without ever exploring the unappreciated treasures of Utica. The convenience of having our own on-campus few incentives for venturing too far from the Hill. This tired routine is both easy and superior bar experience, but a connection to the greater community outside of our cozy Hamilton bubble. I set out to write an article about “better bars” in the area for students seeking more of a choice than just the VT or the Rok, but I found that one bar stood above the rest for its old fashioned pub feel and its commitment to serving great beer. The Nail Brewery, stands alone as a place where owners and patrons take pride in the beer they drink and the sense of community that binds them all together. Owners Chris and Tracey opened the Nail Creek Pub in 2008 and have sought occupies a now charming space on Varick Street that was formerly a dilapidated apartment carefully sculpted wood interior lend a timeless feel to the bar, and the spacious front porch is perfect for lounging with a drink on a cool fall night. The most distinguishing features of the Nail Creek Pub are the commitment to serving the best-tasting beer and the down-to-earth atmosphere that welcomes all visitors. The bar advertises that it has the “largest selection of beer between Syracuse Righteous Ale--a copper colored beer with a hoppy, rye taste--and a local Saranac Wet Hop IPA, I knew my search for a better bar was over. The impeccable service only enhanced the experience, and the affable bartenders at the Nail Creek Pub are quick to help recommend a beer to less discerning drinkers. Their passion for beer is evident, and they talk about beer with the sort of reverent admiration usually reserved for wine snobs, but without the pretentiousness or self-serving attitude. Indeed the Nail Creek Pub is about as laid back as they come. It’s the kind of place where everyone takes care of each other and where friends gather to relax and enjoy their favorite libations while some forgotten classic rock song rolls along in the background. One patron described Chris and Tracey as “real people, just like the people who come to the bar.” They are extremely receptive to clientele and host regular events that include Traditional Irish gourmet dinners every Wednesday night. Above all is an emphasis on community, and Chris and Tracey are set to open a new restaurant in Utica that will feature a seasonal menu of locally grown produce. On a lucky night at the Nail Creek Pub you may run into Peanut, a neighbor of the bar who helped do the interior woodwork, swapping stories and sipping on either Utica Club or his second favorite beer, Utica Club Light. Other nights you might excitedly chat with Dave and Beth about the newest local initiatives in Utica while Dave pursues his quest to drink at least 100 Guinnesses and have his name engraved in Pub, you are bound to make some new friends while enjoying your favorite beer. Sure the VT and the Rok may be the easy options, but what was ever worth having that didn’t require a little bit of effort? Our time at Hamilton is

40

the continental | autumn 2011

and try something different, because a community of great people and great service is waiting just down the road.

Hamilton junior James Lovejoy sips a

the continental | autumn 2011

41


society

Spotlight: Gender Neutral Housing By Anna Paikert ’13

Hamilton’s gender-neutral housing option has been in the forefront of many students’ minds as of late. The option intertwines the institution’s desire to protect tradition with its enthusiasm began before Hamilton became coed— students returning from the military during the Second World War lived in Carnegie and later North Village with their wives and children. Although North Village was abandoned in 1952, genderneutral housing once again became an option for students at the beginning of last year. As soon as married GIs returned to Hamilton to complete their college education,

it is not prohibited. Alexandra explains that she loved this living situation. In an effort to remove herself from an emotionally damaging housing situation, she moved into Alexander’s Millbank double in September of 2010. She explained that they established a smooth dynamic, perhaps smoother than one she may have had with a female roommate, and chose to live next to each other in a suite this year. Other students opt for gender-neutral housing because they identify as transgender or genderqueer. A transgender student, who wishes to remain anonymous, explains that he can be more open about his identity through gender-neutral housing. Although he explains that this policy is a

Student Housing.’ This meant that they could enjoy the luxury of both academic and family life. he argues that certain policies inhibit this goal. Initially, these students lived in apartment-style One of which includes specifying one’s biological sex during the housing lottery. Still, he looks Carnegie grew too crowded, and Hamilton began forward to future progress and is excited that this building individual houses for married students. option attracts transgender or genderqueer high These houses occupied North Village, coined “GI school students to Hamilton. Village,” located near Minor Theater. Travis Hill echoes this sentiment, explaining Students’ wives played an active role in that he is “hopeful that prospective students of any gender identity will consider Hamilton an enroll in the College, they were allowed to sit in opportunity to express themselves.” Although Hill urges students to think very carefully about Susan Richardson, the wife of John Richardson this option, he has received very positive feedback about the policy. old classic movies are well attended by the wives Gender-neutral housing certainly helps who do not need to worry about studying for a support and increase Hamilton’s uniquely diverse quiz the next day.” community, while harkening back to its older Additionally, these wives held on-campus traditions. jobs at the college store, library, and switchboard. They also regularly attended athletic games and fraternity parties and often threw their own dinner parties. Mrs. Richardson used these parties to “testify to the fact that [the married couples] took to heart the word from the college that they wanted to make Carnegie [and North Village] as much like a home as possible for the young couples.” Although the last house in North Village was torn down in 1957, Hamilton has kept its promise to ensure that on-campus housing becomes home for all students—including those who now wish to share a room with students of the opposite biological sex. Beginning in the fall of 2010, Residential Life established campuswide gender-neutral housing. Although Residential Life considered gender-neutral housing long before 2010, they of students to live in a gender-neutral double, Alexander De Moulin ’12 and Alexandra Nasto ’13, chose to do so because they were close friends. Note that they were not a couple, as Residential Life urges couples not to live together, though 42

the continental | autumn 2011

Mrs. John Gallagher, wife of John F. Gallagher, class of 1948 with their daughter in Carnegie, August, 1946.

A Factory-Made Summer: A talk with Tom Youngblood ’13 By Trevor Howe’14

travel

“So what did you do this summer?” Youngblood moved to the “regional” part of the Honestly, this question is a seasonal form of “How internship in Hong Kong. He spent a week here are you?” We care occasionally, but for the most part where he did more business administration. And situations, though, you hear of a summer so epic, with absolutely no references to lifeguarding or working at a camp. This is exactly what happened when Tom Youngblood ’13 made mention of his globe trotting summer of marketing, business administration, and general excellence. Youngblood was admitted as a January-Admit in in London along with around thirty other incoming team, a captain of the water polo team, the media relations photographer, and a self-proclaimed History major but is also interested in photography

One stark difference from the common notion of a factory that Youngblood noticed was that the workers truly wanted to work, mentioning “they all tried to get in their overtime as often as they could.” Youngblood added how “cool” it was to be like a cog in the huge machine that is China’s booming textile industry. Of course, one cannot have only work and no play. Being that Weinheim was so small, Youngblood told me that he basically just became friendly with the chef of the Bed and Breakfast that he was staying at. While in Germany, Youngblood spent a weekend in Heidelberg, the nearest city, where he met some more locals and even had an encounter with a D-list celebrity. After this fairly quiet experience in Germany, he spent time mingling with other “ex-pats” (his words), getting free bottles of champagne for being Western, and just generally soaking up a unique combination of partying and culture while in China. Finally, once I felt certain that my summer was rendered completely pointless and I’d given him enough time to squeeze in as many German impersonations as he could, I asked him if he had any plans for next summer. Youngblood mentioned

about his summer I think the response I got was about a minute long and just mentioned that he had an internship that allowed him to work in both Germany and China. Later that night I realized that I still had no idea what it was that he actually did. Youngblood later told me that after deciding that he didn’t want to spend another semester away from our lovely home atop the Hill, Youngblood began looking for professional international summer internships in lieu of a semester abroad. Having taken Chinese all throughout high school and for a year at Hamilton, Youngblood knew production. that China would be the target location for his Or in his words: “I’m not saying that global internship. interlining solutions, non-wovens, and highly elastic Youngblood stumbled upon a family woven and weft materials are my true calling, but

based out of Weinheim, Germany. His cousin was wide experience. For a 20 year old guy who’s just halfway through a college education, I’d say that it Freudenberg, which also has operations in China, was pretty awesome.” and as fate would have it Youngblood made a great family contact. In the textile-producing world, non-woven interlinings are an extremely important part of creating all types of clothes from shirts to shoes and are used in their seams; they basically email, Youngblood got the job. He relocated to Weinheim, “a tiny, tiny town,” as he describes it, where he would walk 15 minutes through the town to work, and then another 15 minutes through the Freudenberg Complex. Although Freudenberg has a few different internship options, Youngblood held a unique position by doing a bit of marketing, taking pictures of the textiles, and editing many of the presentations. From Weinheim, which he describes as the “corporate” part of the internship, the continental | autumn 2011

43


society

Spotlight: Gender Neutral Housing By Anna Paikert ’13

Hamilton’s gender-neutral housing option has been in the forefront of many students’ minds as of late. The option intertwines the institution’s desire to protect tradition with its enthusiasm began before Hamilton became coed— students returning from the military during the Second World War lived in Carnegie and later North Village with their wives and children. Although North Village was abandoned in 1952, genderneutral housing once again became an option for students at the beginning of last year. As soon as married GIs returned to Hamilton to complete their college education,

it is not prohibited. Alexandra explains that she loved this living situation. In an effort to remove herself from an emotionally damaging housing situation, she moved into Alexander’s Millbank double in September of 2010. She explained that they established a smooth dynamic, perhaps smoother than one she may have had with a female roommate, and chose to live next to each other in a suite this year. Other students opt for gender-neutral housing because they identify as transgender or genderqueer. A transgender student, who wishes to remain anonymous, explains that he can be more open about his identity through gender-neutral housing. Although he explains that this policy is a

Student Housing.’ This meant that they could enjoy the luxury of both academic and family life. he argues that certain policies inhibit this goal. Initially, these students lived in apartment-style One of which includes specifying one’s biological sex during the housing lottery. Still, he looks Carnegie grew too crowded, and Hamilton began forward to future progress and is excited that this building individual houses for married students. option attracts transgender or genderqueer high These houses occupied North Village, coined “GI school students to Hamilton. Village,” located near Minor Theater. Travis Hill echoes this sentiment, explaining Students’ wives played an active role in that he is “hopeful that prospective students of any gender identity will consider Hamilton an enroll in the College, they were allowed to sit in opportunity to express themselves.” Although Hill urges students to think very carefully about Susan Richardson, the wife of John Richardson this option, he has received very positive feedback about the policy. old classic movies are well attended by the wives Gender-neutral housing certainly helps who do not need to worry about studying for a support and increase Hamilton’s uniquely diverse quiz the next day.” community, while harkening back to its older Additionally, these wives held on-campus traditions. jobs at the college store, library, and switchboard. They also regularly attended athletic games and fraternity parties and often threw their own dinner parties. Mrs. Richardson used these parties to “testify to the fact that [the married couples] took to heart the word from the college that they wanted to make Carnegie [and North Village] as much like a home as possible for the young couples.” Although the last house in North Village was torn down in 1957, Hamilton has kept its promise to ensure that on-campus housing becomes home for all students—including those who now wish to share a room with students of the opposite biological sex. Beginning in the fall of 2010, Residential Life established campuswide gender-neutral housing. Although Residential Life considered gender-neutral housing long before 2010, they of students to live in a gender-neutral double, Alexander De Moulin ’12 and Alexandra Nasto ’13, chose to do so because they were close friends. Note that they were not a couple, as Residential Life urges couples not to live together, though 42

the continental | autumn 2011

Mrs. John Gallagher, wife of John F. Gallagher, class of 1948 with their daughter in Carnegie, August, 1946.

A Factory-Made Summer: A talk with Tom Youngblood ’13 By Trevor Howe’14

travel

“So what did you do this summer?” Youngblood moved to the “regional” part of the Honestly, this question is a seasonal form of “How internship in Hong Kong. He spent a week here are you?” We care occasionally, but for the most part where he did more business administration. And situations, though, you hear of a summer so epic, with absolutely no references to lifeguarding or working at a camp. This is exactly what happened when Tom Youngblood ’13 made mention of his globe trotting summer of marketing, business administration, and general excellence. Youngblood was admitted as a January-Admit in in London along with around thirty other incoming team, a captain of the water polo team, the media relations photographer, and a self-proclaimed History major but is also interested in photography

One stark difference from the common notion of a factory that Youngblood noticed was that the workers truly wanted to work, mentioning “they all tried to get in their overtime as often as they could.” Youngblood added how “cool” it was to be like a cog in the huge machine that is China’s booming textile industry. Of course, one cannot have only work and no play. Being that Weinheim was so small, Youngblood told me that he basically just became friendly with the chef of the Bed and Breakfast that he was staying at. While in Germany, Youngblood spent a weekend in Heidelberg, the nearest city, where he met some more locals and even had an encounter with a D-list celebrity. After this fairly quiet experience in Germany, he spent time mingling with other “ex-pats” (his words), getting free bottles of champagne for being Western, and just generally soaking up a unique combination of partying and culture while in China. Finally, once I felt certain that my summer was rendered completely pointless and I’d given him enough time to squeeze in as many German impersonations as he could, I asked him if he had any plans for next summer. Youngblood mentioned

about his summer I think the response I got was about a minute long and just mentioned that he had an internship that allowed him to work in both Germany and China. Later that night I realized that I still had no idea what it was that he actually did. Youngblood later told me that after deciding that he didn’t want to spend another semester away from our lovely home atop the Hill, Youngblood began looking for professional international summer internships in lieu of a semester abroad. Having taken Chinese all throughout high school and for a year at Hamilton, Youngblood knew production. that China would be the target location for his Or in his words: “I’m not saying that global internship. interlining solutions, non-wovens, and highly elastic Youngblood stumbled upon a family woven and weft materials are my true calling, but

based out of Weinheim, Germany. His cousin was wide experience. For a 20 year old guy who’s just halfway through a college education, I’d say that it Freudenberg, which also has operations in China, was pretty awesome.” and as fate would have it Youngblood made a great family contact. In the textile-producing world, non-woven interlinings are an extremely important part of creating all types of clothes from shirts to shoes and are used in their seams; they basically email, Youngblood got the job. He relocated to Weinheim, “a tiny, tiny town,” as he describes it, where he would walk 15 minutes through the town to work, and then another 15 minutes through the Freudenberg Complex. Although Freudenberg has a few different internship options, Youngblood held a unique position by doing a bit of marketing, taking pictures of the textiles, and editing many of the presentations. From Weinheim, which he describes as the “corporate” part of the internship, the continental | autumn 2011

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travel

travel

On Sabbatical By Emily Drinkwater ’14

Though nearly 50 percent of Hamilton’s juniors study abroad each year, they aren’t the only members of the community leaving the Hill for a semester. Many professors take their own “semester abroad,” for travel or research, also known as a sabbatical. Last year, 35 Hamilton professors left the classroom to pursue their interests elsewhere, be it in Clinton, leading the New York or DC programs, or studying internationally. Professors’ options for sabbatical are limitless, especially considering, unlike the juniors, they don’t have the added stress about credits transferring! Professors Vasantkumar, Rivera, and McEnroe all went on sabbatical last year recounted some of their anecdotes about their travels abroad.

John McEnroe Professor of Art History, John McEnroe, spent his spring semester and summer pursuing research in archaeology. To begin his semester, he spent time in Athens, where he resides as a senior member of the American School of Classical Studies. Athens, he described, is where the brainpower is in classical archaeology. There he had the opportunity Vance Watrous, and a team of 50 students including Caroline Morgan ’13, Professor McEnroe conducted groundbreaking work at one of the oldest archaeological sites in Crete. Throughout the summer, Professor McEnroe’s principle objective was to date each structure using electronic distance-measuring survey equipment so that he could accurately and completely map out the layout of the town. As part of the second group of people to conduct research at this site in the past 100 years, McEnroe is at present the excavation architect for the site and will continue his work in Gournia until the project is completed.

Sharon Rivera Christopher Vasantkumar For the fall of 2010, Professor Vasantkumar, a Professor of Asian Studies and Anthropology, chose to spend his sabbatical in Maynooth, Ireland; Lisbon, Portugal; New Orleans, Lousiana; and, lastly, Clinton, New York. While in retrospect, he wishes that he could have taken the whole year off to do research, it is obvious, based on his accomplishments, that he packed a lot into four months. While in Ireland, he presented papers on the experience of dislocation of Tibetan migrants on both sides of the Himalayas. In Lisbon he showed his work comparing the history of tourism of the American Southwest with recent trends in Chinese domestic travel to Tibetan areas of the PRC. His favorite thing in Lisbon, he explained, was eating grilled squid and fried potatoes with a cold beer in the Alfama. During the domestic leg of his journey, he presented more papers on a new interpretation of Georg Simmel’s The Philosophy of Money and, lastly, in Clinton, Professor Vasantkumar had helped me to rethink several articles I’d been working on for a while” he explained. Prior to setting off to Europe, Professor Vasantkumar expressed that he hoped to teach syllabus for a class on STS (anthropology 319, “The Anthropology of the Incredible”), a class the top Asian Studies journal in the country.

44

the continental | autumn 2011

The Journal of Asian Studies,

Professor Rivera spent the majority of her sabbatical in the United States, splitting her time between Clinton, New York and Utah. Her goal was to complete two databases process. One of the databases is comprised of demographic information on more than 2,500 people who, in the past two decades, have been dominant in either the political, cultural, or economic life in the Russian Federation. She also completed another original database that contains information on economic, political, and social indicators from the past ten years on each of the twenty-eight formerly communist countries in Europe and Eurasia. She described, “I can do this kind of work better when I have long stretches of done, so that I could focus on writing and other things when I returned to teaching.” Along with this, she worked on a project with Cristina Garagola ’11, called “When States Crack Down on Dissent: The Logic of Persecution in Authoritarian Regimes,” which received a Levitt award for Student-Faculty Collaborative Research. Professor Rivera also ventured to Stockholm, Sweden to present her personal research at the VII World Congress of the International Council for Central and East European Studies. She described that while most of the panels drew around ten to thirty that our research was generating, but I was also a little nervous as people continued to pour into the room.” Though this sounds like an incredible achievement, she said that, as a person scared of heights, her most gratifying accomplishment was hiking up Utah’s Mount Timpanagos to explore a cave. While much of her sabbatical was very research orientated, she explained that she and her family utilized the free time she had to explore many of the stunning national parks in Utah.

the continental | autumn 2011

45


travel

travel

On Sabbatical By Emily Drinkwater ’14

Though nearly 50 percent of Hamilton’s juniors study abroad each year, they aren’t the only members of the community leaving the Hill for a semester. Many professors take their own “semester abroad,” for travel or research, also known as a sabbatical. Last year, 35 Hamilton professors left the classroom to pursue their interests elsewhere, be it in Clinton, leading the New York or DC programs, or studying internationally. Professors’ options for sabbatical are limitless, especially considering, unlike the juniors, they don’t have the added stress about credits transferring! Professors Vasantkumar, Rivera, and McEnroe all went on sabbatical last year recounted some of their anecdotes about their travels abroad.

John McEnroe Professor of Art History, John McEnroe, spent his spring semester and summer pursuing research in archaeology. To begin his semester, he spent time in Athens, where he resides as a senior member of the American School of Classical Studies. Athens, he described, is where the brainpower is in classical archaeology. There he had the opportunity Vance Watrous, and a team of 50 students including Caroline Morgan ’13, Professor McEnroe conducted groundbreaking work at one of the oldest archaeological sites in Crete. Throughout the summer, Professor McEnroe’s principle objective was to date each structure using electronic distance-measuring survey equipment so that he could accurately and completely map out the layout of the town. As part of the second group of people to conduct research at this site in the past 100 years, McEnroe is at present the excavation architect for the site and will continue his work in Gournia until the project is completed.

Sharon Rivera Christopher Vasantkumar For the fall of 2010, Professor Vasantkumar, a Professor of Asian Studies and Anthropology, chose to spend his sabbatical in Maynooth, Ireland; Lisbon, Portugal; New Orleans, Lousiana; and, lastly, Clinton, New York. While in retrospect, he wishes that he could have taken the whole year off to do research, it is obvious, based on his accomplishments, that he packed a lot into four months. While in Ireland, he presented papers on the experience of dislocation of Tibetan migrants on both sides of the Himalayas. In Lisbon he showed his work comparing the history of tourism of the American Southwest with recent trends in Chinese domestic travel to Tibetan areas of the PRC. His favorite thing in Lisbon, he explained, was eating grilled squid and fried potatoes with a cold beer in the Alfama. During the domestic leg of his journey, he presented more papers on a new interpretation of Georg Simmel’s The Philosophy of Money and, lastly, in Clinton, Professor Vasantkumar had helped me to rethink several articles I’d been working on for a while” he explained. Prior to setting off to Europe, Professor Vasantkumar expressed that he hoped to teach syllabus for a class on STS (anthropology 319, “The Anthropology of the Incredible”), a class the top Asian Studies journal in the country.

44

the continental | autumn 2011

The Journal of Asian Studies,

Professor Rivera spent the majority of her sabbatical in the United States, splitting her time between Clinton, New York and Utah. Her goal was to complete two databases process. One of the databases is comprised of demographic information on more than 2,500 people who, in the past two decades, have been dominant in either the political, cultural, or economic life in the Russian Federation. She also completed another original database that contains information on economic, political, and social indicators from the past ten years on each of the twenty-eight formerly communist countries in Europe and Eurasia. She described, “I can do this kind of work better when I have long stretches of done, so that I could focus on writing and other things when I returned to teaching.” Along with this, she worked on a project with Cristina Garagola ’11, called “When States Crack Down on Dissent: The Logic of Persecution in Authoritarian Regimes,” which received a Levitt award for Student-Faculty Collaborative Research. Professor Rivera also ventured to Stockholm, Sweden to present her personal research at the VII World Congress of the International Council for Central and East European Studies. She described that while most of the panels drew around ten to thirty that our research was generating, but I was also a little nervous as people continued to pour into the room.” Though this sounds like an incredible achievement, she said that, as a person scared of heights, her most gratifying accomplishment was hiking up Utah’s Mount Timpanagos to explore a cave. While much of her sabbatical was very research orientated, she explained that she and her family utilized the free time she had to explore many of the stunning national parks in Utah.

the continental | autumn 2011

45


travel

travel

travel

travel

Pushing the Boundaries Andrew Menges ’12, Rachel Boylan ’12, and Katie Hutchins ’12 reccount their experiences abroad in Lebannon and adventures outside the country at a critical time in Middle Eastern history.

Last spring semester, the three of us studied The city of Beirut is not the extent of what at the American University of Beirut in Lebanon. For Lebanon has to offer. Due to the tumultuous Arab Spring, the majority of our travels were contained to mind when one thinks of the Middle East or study within Lebanon. Unbeknownst to us, Lebanon abroad. The city is far more developed and liberal than is home to phenomenally well-preserved Roman we had imagined. After 15 years of destructive civil war, ruins at Baalbek, breath-taking caves at Jeita Grotto, ending in 1990, Beirut is experiencing a renaissance. world-class skiing at Faraya and one of the oldest The city is trying to reclaim its reputation as the Paris continually inhabited cities in the world, Byblos of the Middle East. While we by no means expected (Jbeil). Additionally, Lebanon has a diversity of Beirut to be as conservative as other Middle Eastern climates, very little of which include desert. In fact, the cities, we were still surprised by how cosmopolitan majority of the sand in the country can be found on its Beirut actually is. The Lebanese take nightlife very beautiful Mediterranean beaches. In an effort to see seriously, men wear shorts, and the three of us saw less all of the country, we signed up for a trip to southern than ten women wearing burkas the entire semester. Lebanon, run by the Cultural Club of the South However, while not noticeably touched by whose allegiance is primarily with the political party the Arab Spring, Lebanon is not without political Hizb’allah. In 2006, southern Lebanon was ravished tension. Two weeks prior to our arrival, the Lebanese government collapsed due to the majority of the population was displaced. Today, the countryside has cabinet members’ resignations. Needless to say, our regained its idyllic reputation, but there are hints of plans to travel to Lebanon were put into question. the past, particularly near the Israeli border where Each of us received emails from friends and family the land is covered with land mines. warning us about the dangers of traveling to the Overall, our experience in Beirut and Lebanon Middle East. However, Lebanon’s history implies was fantastic. We were met with warm hospitality, that moderate amounts of political instability do not great food and a lot of sunny weather. Amid a tense impact daily life; and thus we began our journey. political situation, the Lebanese carried on with their We were greeted by a country that seemingly lives normally and were able to show us the best of did not notice its lack of government. The pace of life what Lebanon has to offer. was laid back and friendly and the neighborhood in which we lived provided us with a safe and inviting After Lebanon, Andrew and Rachel traveled to Palestine, home. while Katie returned home. 46

the continental | autumn 2011

Our experiences in Palestine were radically different from those in Lebanon, even though we had only traveled 150 miles. The culture in Palestine is more conservative: Muslim women almost unanimously wear head scarves, whereas in Lebanon wearing a head scarf was not as culturally imposed. Male-female relations were much more stigmatized and as Americans we were constantly aware of how the Palestinian community perceived our actions. The conservative culture was especially apparent through our homestays with Palestinian families in Bethlehem. This was particularly illuminated when we returned home later than 9 pm and were subjected to questioning by our families. However, the homestays were the best part of the program. We experienced unrivaled hospitality, exquisite cuisine and unlimited practical Arabic interaction. Another component of our program was volunteering at local Bethlehem organizations. This increased our interaction with the local Palestinian population. The homestays and volunteer placements dispelled the stereotypes and myths of the Palestinians. Unlike their portrayal in Western media, Palestinians desire peace as much as their neighbors in Israel. This was more than apparent through our daily conversations with Palestinians, whether it was our host family, shopkeepers or refugees. Our stay in Palestine was not just about

homestays, volunteer placements and Arabic lessons. A crucial component of the program involved travel around the West Bank and Israel. We visited contested sites such as Jerusalem, Hebron, and the Dead Sea, as well as the Palestinian cities of Ramallah, Nablus, and Jericho. The effects of the Israeli occupation could be felt at every turn. Throughout the West Bank, settlements occupy hillsides, extending for miles into the heart of the future Palestinian state. These settlements for Israelis and crisscross the West Bank. The and is an eyesore in the biblical town of Bethlehem. In addition to the wall there were the ubiquitous checkpoints. As Westerners, we received a certain amount of privilege at these checkpoints, but this is not the case for Palestinians, who are stopped daily and humiliated on their way to work and prayer. The situation in Palestine and Israel is untenable and it is in the interest of both people to achieve a peaceful solution. frustrating moments, but overall, the experience was full of hope and inspiration. We think it is important for people to travel to Lebanon, Palestine, and Israel to see the situations for themselves and draw their own conclusions on the region. the continental | autumn 2011

47


travel

travel

travel

travel

Pushing the Boundaries Andrew Menges ’12, Rachel Boylan ’12, and Katie Hutchins ’12 reccount their experiences abroad in Lebannon and adventures outside the country at a critical time in Middle Eastern history.

Last spring semester, the three of us studied The city of Beirut is not the extent of what at the American University of Beirut in Lebanon. For Lebanon has to offer. Due to the tumultuous Arab Spring, the majority of our travels were contained to mind when one thinks of the Middle East or study within Lebanon. Unbeknownst to us, Lebanon abroad. The city is far more developed and liberal than is home to phenomenally well-preserved Roman we had imagined. After 15 years of destructive civil war, ruins at Baalbek, breath-taking caves at Jeita Grotto, ending in 1990, Beirut is experiencing a renaissance. world-class skiing at Faraya and one of the oldest The city is trying to reclaim its reputation as the Paris continually inhabited cities in the world, Byblos of the Middle East. While we by no means expected (Jbeil). Additionally, Lebanon has a diversity of Beirut to be as conservative as other Middle Eastern climates, very little of which include desert. In fact, the cities, we were still surprised by how cosmopolitan majority of the sand in the country can be found on its Beirut actually is. The Lebanese take nightlife very beautiful Mediterranean beaches. In an effort to see seriously, men wear shorts, and the three of us saw less all of the country, we signed up for a trip to southern than ten women wearing burkas the entire semester. Lebanon, run by the Cultural Club of the South However, while not noticeably touched by whose allegiance is primarily with the political party the Arab Spring, Lebanon is not without political Hizb’allah. In 2006, southern Lebanon was ravished tension. Two weeks prior to our arrival, the Lebanese government collapsed due to the majority of the population was displaced. Today, the countryside has cabinet members’ resignations. Needless to say, our regained its idyllic reputation, but there are hints of plans to travel to Lebanon were put into question. the past, particularly near the Israeli border where Each of us received emails from friends and family the land is covered with land mines. warning us about the dangers of traveling to the Overall, our experience in Beirut and Lebanon Middle East. However, Lebanon’s history implies was fantastic. We were met with warm hospitality, that moderate amounts of political instability do not great food and a lot of sunny weather. Amid a tense impact daily life; and thus we began our journey. political situation, the Lebanese carried on with their We were greeted by a country that seemingly lives normally and were able to show us the best of did not notice its lack of government. The pace of life what Lebanon has to offer. was laid back and friendly and the neighborhood in which we lived provided us with a safe and inviting After Lebanon, Andrew and Rachel traveled to Palestine, home. while Katie returned home. 46

the continental | autumn 2011

Our experiences in Palestine were radically different from those in Lebanon, even though we had only traveled 150 miles. The culture in Palestine is more conservative: Muslim women almost unanimously wear head scarves, whereas in Lebanon wearing a head scarf was not as culturally imposed. Male-female relations were much more stigmatized and as Americans we were constantly aware of how the Palestinian community perceived our actions. The conservative culture was especially apparent through our homestays with Palestinian families in Bethlehem. This was particularly illuminated when we returned home later than 9 pm and were subjected to questioning by our families. However, the homestays were the best part of the program. We experienced unrivaled hospitality, exquisite cuisine and unlimited practical Arabic interaction. Another component of our program was volunteering at local Bethlehem organizations. This increased our interaction with the local Palestinian population. The homestays and volunteer placements dispelled the stereotypes and myths of the Palestinians. Unlike their portrayal in Western media, Palestinians desire peace as much as their neighbors in Israel. This was more than apparent through our daily conversations with Palestinians, whether it was our host family, shopkeepers or refugees. Our stay in Palestine was not just about

homestays, volunteer placements and Arabic lessons. A crucial component of the program involved travel around the West Bank and Israel. We visited contested sites such as Jerusalem, Hebron, and the Dead Sea, as well as the Palestinian cities of Ramallah, Nablus, and Jericho. The effects of the Israeli occupation could be felt at every turn. Throughout the West Bank, settlements occupy hillsides, extending for miles into the heart of the future Palestinian state. These settlements for Israelis and crisscross the West Bank. The and is an eyesore in the biblical town of Bethlehem. In addition to the wall there were the ubiquitous checkpoints. As Westerners, we received a certain amount of privilege at these checkpoints, but this is not the case for Palestinians, who are stopped daily and humiliated on their way to work and prayer. The situation in Palestine and Israel is untenable and it is in the interest of both people to achieve a peaceful solution. frustrating moments, but overall, the experience was full of hope and inspiration. We think it is important for people to travel to Lebanon, Palestine, and Israel to see the situations for themselves and draw their own conclusions on the region. the continental | autumn 2011

47


travel

travel

Finding Solace Abroad:

Alumni leave the Hill for new opportunities Compiled by Hannah Grace O’ Connell ‘14

Here are some of their stories, their reasons for leaving the country, and what they have learned abroad. I’m writing, editing, on a short break from teaching, about to head for Beijing for several weeks. I’ve lived in the Netherlands for over 30 years. While the USA always feels like “home-home;” Colombia (which I visited while a student at Kirkland College) offered a new idea of home when I was least expecting it. I set up shop in a few other places in-between: Paris, where I found a temporary job by accident; Hong Kong, a planned 1-year teaching gig; and Sri Lanka, where I was welcomed by the family of a High School pen pal. A few years after that, Amsterdam became (another) home. I raised my daughter and went to PTA meetings here; travel was frequent for my job as a producer for Dutch international radio. A lot happened in the New York suburbs where I grew up, but I always knew I wanted to get a different high school French and Spanish teachers opened more windows with great literature. Going to Kirkland meant I was able to continue in this direction. Another corner of the foundation had been laid long before: Cuban musicians had caught my eye and ear. I had been to Puerto Rico before and as a Kirkland freshman, I felt I now had to get to a sophomore, off I went to Bogotá, Colombia. Has anything learned in college proved useful? You bet, thanks to the teachers who managed to get past my awkwardness and belligerence in my rush to get out in the world. I eventually found a job that continually required adjustment to a new perspective.

- Martha Hawley, Kirkland ’73 One of the choices I had to make while at Hamilton was whether to enroll in the junior year abroad in France program, or stay on College Hill and pursue my work as an editor of The Spectator. I chose the latter course and became editor-in-chief, which helped launch my interesting, although short-lived, career in journalism. Still, I always wanted to have an experience living abroad, and it’s fair to say that I’ve more than made up for that year I missed. Of stint as a journalist and then as a lawyer. Paris) was an improvised “Plan B” after I quit my job on a Dow Jones wire service, sent in law school applications, and went backpacking in Europe, planning to start law school upon my return. One little problem arose: I was rejected

Snapshots from Martha Hawley K ’73’s travels

lance correspondent for McGraw-Hill World News in Brussels. All of this travel and journalism experience abroad from 1980-82, and the fact that I met my wife in Brussels, set the stage for a lot of transatlantic career moves. Every expatriate has in his or her head an unwritten book on life abroad - all those stories about the foreign bureaucracy, the eccentric and frustrating locals, the misunderstandings and the unexpected. As I tried to distill expatriate life down to its essence, there are two words that come to mind: perspective and openness. First, life outside one’s own country provides the luxury (and sometimes the burden) of perspective that only distance can provide: we expatriates are physically distant from our homeland and many of our loved ones, and psychologically and culturally detached from our host country. Separateness from the host country can shrink over time, but never quite disappears. C’est la vie, as we say here. But the perspective is always interesting and intellectually stimulating.

Perspective and openness to new ideas were dished out in generous portions while I was a student at Hamilton, and I’m sure the feast continues unabated. - Douglas S. Glucroft ’76 Check out our winter issue for the second installment of this series! 48

the continental | autumn 2011

the continental | autumn 2011

49


travel

travel

Finding Solace Abroad:

Alumni leave the Hill for new opportunities Compiled by Hannah Grace O’ Connell ‘14

Here are some of their stories, their reasons for leaving the country, and what they have learned abroad. I’m writing, editing, on a short break from teaching, about to head for Beijing for several weeks. I’ve lived in the Netherlands for over 30 years. While the USA always feels like “home-home;” Colombia (which I visited while a student at Kirkland College) offered a new idea of home when I was least expecting it. I set up shop in a few other places in-between: Paris, where I found a temporary job by accident; Hong Kong, a planned 1-year teaching gig; and Sri Lanka, where I was welcomed by the family of a High School pen pal. A few years after that, Amsterdam became (another) home. I raised my daughter and went to PTA meetings here; travel was frequent for my job as a producer for Dutch international radio. A lot happened in the New York suburbs where I grew up, but I always knew I wanted to get a different high school French and Spanish teachers opened more windows with great literature. Going to Kirkland meant I was able to continue in this direction. Another corner of the foundation had been laid long before: Cuban musicians had caught my eye and ear. I had been to Puerto Rico before and as a Kirkland freshman, I felt I now had to get to a sophomore, off I went to Bogotá, Colombia. Has anything learned in college proved useful? You bet, thanks to the teachers who managed to get past my awkwardness and belligerence in my rush to get out in the world. I eventually found a job that continually required adjustment to a new perspective.

- Martha Hawley, Kirkland ’73 One of the choices I had to make while at Hamilton was whether to enroll in the junior year abroad in France program, or stay on College Hill and pursue my work as an editor of The Spectator. I chose the latter course and became editor-in-chief, which helped launch my interesting, although short-lived, career in journalism. Still, I always wanted to have an experience living abroad, and it’s fair to say that I’ve more than made up for that year I missed. Of stint as a journalist and then as a lawyer. Paris) was an improvised “Plan B” after I quit my job on a Dow Jones wire service, sent in law school applications, and went backpacking in Europe, planning to start law school upon my return. One little problem arose: I was rejected

Snapshots from Martha Hawley K ’73’s travels

lance correspondent for McGraw-Hill World News in Brussels. All of this travel and journalism experience abroad from 1980-82, and the fact that I met my wife in Brussels, set the stage for a lot of transatlantic career moves. Every expatriate has in his or her head an unwritten book on life abroad - all those stories about the foreign bureaucracy, the eccentric and frustrating locals, the misunderstandings and the unexpected. As I tried to distill expatriate life down to its essence, there are two words that come to mind: perspective and openness. First, life outside one’s own country provides the luxury (and sometimes the burden) of perspective that only distance can provide: we expatriates are physically distant from our homeland and many of our loved ones, and psychologically and culturally detached from our host country. Separateness from the host country can shrink over time, but never quite disappears. C’est la vie, as we say here. But the perspective is always interesting and intellectually stimulating.

Perspective and openness to new ideas were dished out in generous portions while I was a student at Hamilton, and I’m sure the feast continues unabated. - Douglas S. Glucroft ’76 Check out our winter issue for the second installment of this series! 48

the continental | autumn 2011

the continental | autumn 2011

49


West Park Row Salon an AVEDA concept salon 4 West Park Row Clinton, NY 13323 315.381.3040

52

the continental | spring 2011

the continental | spring 2011

53


West Park Row Salon an AVEDA concept salon 4 West Park Row Clinton, NY 13323 315.381.3040

52

the continental | spring 2011

the continental | spring 2011

53


CLINTON WINE & SPIRITS Great Wine at a Great Price!

TOWN or COUNTRY

Clinton, NY 13323

54

the continental | spring 2011

the continental | spring 2011

55


CLINTON WINE & SPIRITS Great Wine at a Great Price!

TOWN or COUNTRY

Clinton, NY 13323

54

the continental | spring 2011

the continental | spring 2011

55


Parting Note

An inside look at the Hamilton literary world of 1925 The Royal Gaboon, Hamilton’s humor magazine since 1921, takes us back to the days of lady-less Hamilton. Filled with satirical dialogues and risque cartoons, it ultimately became The Continental The Continental was re-established as a publication by Kate Childs ’08 in 2006. First issues were distributed at halftime at the Fallcoming football game in 2006.

The Royal Gaboon, “Spring Party Number,” 1925

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the continental | autumn 2011



Fall 2011