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Origins of a collection Major paintings or collections acquired by the Directors Acquisitions CELEBRATING 50 YEARS OF COLLECTING 2010-11 AcquisitionS


Origins of a collection

In its fifty years Hamilton Art Gallery has only had four Directors each of whom has added to the collection in different ways and made the Gallery what it is today. This essay is intended to highlight some of their achievements as they have built upon the Herbert and May Shaw Bequest. Their achievements were done in concert with the many supporters the Gallery has but their direction was the final determinant. Victorian art teacher John Ashworth was appointed inaugural Director on 10th July 1961 and commenced working at the Gallery later that year. We are indebted to John as he set up the Gallery that he received as empty spaces in the days when there was neither formal training for any Gallery staff nor were there

any specific processes for handling collections, exhibitions or for many of the other processes that we take for granted today. John was fortunate in having a good relationship with Eric Westbrook (1915-2008), Director of the National Gallery of Victoria (1956-1975) and other staff from the National Gallery of Victoria: Ursula Hoff, Curator Prints and Drawings and David Lawrence, Curator Decorative Arts. Their active support enabled a number of major acquisitions from Melbourne donors. Eric Westbrook also gave John functional advice on running the Gallery but given that the entire field of gallery administration was an open book his advice was as much personal as it was professional.


With an initial collection of mainly Decorative Arts, John’s unique contribution to the collection was to exhibit and add works, particularly paintings, by a number by South Australian artists that he had obviously known from his time working there. The Gallery’s collection records contain evidence of many such exhibitions, most of which were selling exhibitions, from which the Gallery and the community acquired works. Examples of the artists he added were Nora Heysen, Bernard Hesling, Horace Trenerry (the first work by Trenerry to enter any collection in Australia), Vytas Kapociunas, Margarita Stipnieks and Malcolm Carbins.

The Gallery’s accession numbering began in John’s later days when he was asked to formally list the collection. Not having any precedent John listed the objects he had accepted (or inherited, as the Shaw Bequest arrived before he had been appointed as Director) into the collection in a straight numeric sequence from 1 to 1940 with the Shaw Bequest being objects 1 to 790. John’s wife Christina, for a number of years his administrative assistant, was probably as responsible as John for the numbering as she typed the list that contained this range of accession numbers and that list still gets consulted occasionally today. In John’s day there were two Gallery staff, the Director and a cleaner, and as an involved partner Christina inherited the role as unpaid

curator and secretary , with a small recompense following in later years.


John was involved in the negotiations for the Paul Sandby paintings, and well assisted by Ron Lowenstern, added what was to become a defining part of Hamilton’s collection. To house the newly received Sandby’s John advised on the building of the upper floor of the Gallery and single-handedly organised its decoration. John chose the Morris wallpaper in the Gaussen Gallery and was responsible for the original layout of what was to become the Barber Gallery. It was during John’s Directorship that the gift of Indian and Nepalese items from Margaret Barber arrived at the Gallery. This highly acclaimed gift, together with the predominantly Chinese items from the Shaw Bequest, contributed to Hamilton’s early reputation as one of the nation’s few Asian art collections.

John resigned in 1975 to take up a position at McClelland Art Gallery in Langwarren and passed away in Daylesford, Victoria in 1979. On 22nd May 1975 New Zealander Julian Faigan was appointed Director. Julian had formal qualifications in Medieval Studies but an abiding interest in 18th century British art. This interest and his skills saw him promote the Sandby’s and to attempt to put them in a broader context. Lack of funds hindered Julian’s capacity to really develop the collection but his acquisitions through the Caltex-Victoria Art Fund and the Hamilton Art Gallery Trust saw the addition of major sets of Sandby’s aquatint and the three prime sets of William Hogarth’s ‘moral tales’. Julian also added other Sandby prints and

drawings, many acquired with funds from local donors. Julian was also instrumental in adding works donated in 1977 by Miss Helen Johns of Melbourne and who continued to donate works to the Gallery for many years until her death in 1999. These included four excellent woodcuts by Edward Calvert with pencilled dedications to Helen’s ancestor Ambrose Bowden Johns who had taught Calvert the woodcut technique. Among them is a copy of Calvert’s Bacchante, unknown apart from a single copy in the British Museum which was thought to be the only extant copy.


Julian’s interest in English art culminated with an international seminar in 1981 focussing on the work of Paul Sandby. His two publications on Sandby have served the Gallery well until recent times and his work elevated this part of the collection to international prominence. Another of Julian’s achievements was to establish the Ansett Art Award. It was inaugurated as the biennial acquisitive R.M. Ansett Hamilton Art Award in 1976 and Julian went on to oversee the second, third, fourth and fifth Ansett Art Awards until 1984. When he began work in 1975 Julian moved the accession numbering to the international system and this has continued to be used ever since.

Under Julian’s directorship Curatorial Assistant Erica Mooney completed catalogue cards for every item in the collection and created the invaluable registration system that also continues to be used. On 14th September 1985 Julian resigned to take up a position in Sydney. On 18th April 1985 Alan Sisley was appointed Director and three months later on 26th June 1985 Paul McIntyre was appointed as the Gallery’s first Curator. The Bank of Melbourne Victorian Art Foundation commenced during Alan’s tenure as Director and he added major works by Arthur Boyd, John Olsen and Clifton Pugh through


this scheme. Paul McIntyre used his expertise in 17th and 18th century prints to add significant historic prints to the collection as well as adding some excellent contemporary paintings and prints. On the 1st August 1988 Alan Sisley resigned and Paul McIntyre continued as Curator until 1994. Finally I commenced as Director on the 26th July 1988 after responding to an advertisement requesting applicants with an interest in decorative arts or Asian art to apply. One of my first tasks was to accession the Hogarth engravings acquired by Alan Sisley and to get these catalogued and ready for exhibition. Through the generosity of Arts Victoria a computer arrived a few

days after I started work and using it we were able to gradually create a single listing of the entire collection. Having been Director for nearly half of the Gallery’s fifty years I have added to almost all the areas of the collection that my predecessors had built up and developing the collection remains a work in progress for me. I am not commenting on what I perceive to be my major acquisitions as history will pass judgement on them but some comments on the broad areas I have focussed on is in order.


My initial contribution to the collection arose from my background in metalwork and the Trust’s pre-existing program of commissioning major works by Australian metal smiths. Commissioning holds many problems for public collections in that it sets up false expectations for the institution as well as the artist and what eventuates seems to rarely suit all parties. Nonetheless it set the pattern for Hamilton to collect Australian and international metalwork and that program continues today. The highlight of our contribution in the metalwork area was for the Gallery to organise Contemporary Australian Hollow Ware in 1991 which was eventually shown in Seoul, Manilla, San Francisco and a number of Australian venues. The Visual Arts Board of the Australia Council gave the Gallery a collections

development grant in 1994 allowing the acquisition of selected works from this exhibition. Modern international silver was also acquired concurrently as the best Australian silversmiths of the 1980s and 90s were trained in Europe and saw their work in that broader context. In a similar vein, I also inherited a program of collecting contemporary European glass that had been commenced by Ron and Did Lowenstern in the 1960s. This was gradually widened so that this part of the collection had representative pieces from all the major European traditions – Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Finland, England, the Netherlands, Czechoslovakia and Italy. The emphasis in developing this collection was to demonstrate the

various techniques that each tradition had developed or focussed on in their production. Around 2000 the focus of the glass collection changed as Australian studio glass began to be recognised around the world as some of the best glass being produced. Australian glass had never been ignored and a small group of works already existed in the collection but in recent times greater emphasis has been put on adding it to the collection. Concurrently examples of the best of the international studio glass movement have also been added as the days of Australian artists being purely ‘Australian’ has long finished and again to accurately contextualise their work requires presentation in an international context not just in the context of Australian work.


Over the past six years or so four areas of Japanese decorative arts have been added to the collection. These are the collections of Japanese historic ceramics, Japanese Meiji period ceramics, Post-1960 contemporary Japanese ceramics and Japanese Meiji period metal work. It may seem odd to distinguish these areas but they represent clearly separate aesthetic traditions and yet are recognised individually as high points of international ceramic and metal work production. The current comparative weakness of the Japanese economy and changed balances of power have meant that Japanese decorative arts are affordable as never before and this opportunity has also been seized in order to add Japanese decorative arts to the collection.

The opportunity to develop the collection of Chinese decorative arts has not presented itself in recent years and so the approach with this part of the collection has been to by-pass the majority of the twentieth century and to acquire contemporary production for which the authenticity can be verified. Our Asian collections are very strong and as such they too are defining elements of the Gallery. In terms of public collections only the State galleries of Victoria, South Australia and New South Wales have similar collections in Australia and the presence of Asian art in Hamilton places the Gallery in a unique niche in the Australian Gallery world.


The Gallery also holds a collection of 20th century design across all media that we continue to develop through the occasional purchase but more frequently through gifts. The development of this part of the collection is a natural consequence of updating the Herbert and May Shaw Bequest and overlaps with the development of the contemporary metal and glass collections. Hamilton holds a wide range of work across most media from the time of the first ‘designer’, Dr Christopher Dresser, through to the present. Modern paintings and prints continue to be added to the collection but space for both their display and storage constrains what we add. The quality historic paintings that are needed are just not available

or simply too expensive in this age of investment art. Given these factors, and its history, Hamilton Art Gallery will never be defined by its painting collection unless a major gift or bequest comes our way. It is also debatable as to whether this is a desirable direction to go as the Shaw Bequest has already provided a unique, defining base of decorative arts. Considering the quality and breadth of the Shaw Bequest we should proudly let it continue to define our identity and ignite the enthusiasm for Hamilton Art Gallery that is so frequently encountered from the public and our benefactors.

In writing this brief essay I would like to thank Anne Hanlon for editing it, Letitia Ashworth for correcting and adding to the section on her father and Erica Mooney for conferring on information I was unable to verify. All remaining errors mine.

Daniel McOwan 5 September 2011


Major paintings or collections acquired by the Directors

John Ashworth Director 1961 - 1975

Shay Docking, Spirit of the Totem, Gift of Doug Alexandra

Norman Lindsay, The Olympians, E.S. McLeod Bequest

William Tibbits, Wando Dale, Gift of Ron Lowenstern

Rupert Bunny, Mrs Sybbald Currie, Trust Fund purchase 1971

Thomas Clark, Muntham Station, Gift of Tony Miller

Roland Wakelin, Parramatta Park, Trust Fund purchase 1972

Nora Heysen, Dedication, Gift of Mr and Mrs Sam Fitzpatrick

Noel Counihan, Old Man of Rue St Antoine, Gift of Georges Ltd 1972

Rene Raimonde, Harton Hills, Gift of Mr and Mrs Carmichael Davis

Rodney Milgate, Ascension, Gift of Jerry Van Beek 1972

Hans Heysen, Lords of the Bush, Gift of Hans Heysen

Charles Blackman, Red Nude in a Landscape, Trust Fund purchase 1973


Louis Buvelot, Wannon Falls, Trust Fund purchase to mark Gallery extension 1973 Dora Wilson, Calvi Corsica, Trust Fund purchase - TH Taylor Bequest 1973 Arnold Shore, Strezlitzia augusta, Gift of Lady Casey 1968 Australian prints by Fred Williams, Arthur Boyd, Sidney Nolan, Lesbia Thorpe, Murray Griffin, John Olsen, Leonard French, Albert Tucker, Charles Blackman and Roger Kemp European prints by Bernard Buffet, Hans Erni, Walter Hoyle, Fred Hoyle, Maurice de Vlaminck From various sources

Woodcuts and etchings by Lionel Lindsay, Gift of Peter Lindsay 1967


Julian Faigan Director 1975 - 1985

Brian Dunlop, Hilary against light, RM Ansett Hamilton Art Award 1976

Justus Jorgensen, Self Portrait, Dr K. Hadley Bequest 1980

Tim Storrier, Approach II, Gift of the Art Gallery Society 1977

Shibata Zeshin, Cock and hens on a sail, Gift of Miss MP Earl 1983

Justin O’Brien, Baptism of Christ, Gift of Dr HD Chamberlain 1977

Ethel Spowers, Birds following a plough, Gift of Miss MP Earl 1983

Sidney Nolan, Crucifixion, Trust Fund purchase 1977

John’s Collection of water colours and drawings by ancestors of Miss Helen Johns, Gift of Miss Helen Johns 1977

Edward Calvert, The Bacchante, The Cider Feast, The Sheep of his Pasture and The Ploughman, All Gift of Miss Helen Johns 1977 Michael Shannon, Everlastings in a glass, Trust Fund purchase 1978

Paul Sandby, aquatint series, XII Views in Wales Caltex Victorian Art Foundation 1978 Paul Sandby, aquatint series, Views if Windsor Castle, Trust Fund purchase 1980


Paul Sandby, aquatint series, XII Views in South Wales, Trust Fund purchase 1982 Paul Sandby, aquatint series, Part of the set of Middle East views after William Pars, Council allocation 1984

Arthur Boyd prints, Gift of Dr B. Roberts 1981 Other 1970s and 1980s Australian prints form various sources 18th century Prints related to the history of Gibraltar

Paul Sandby drawings, Gift of Dr SW McVicker 1980

Works by Muriel Pornett 1983

William Hogarth, Marriage a la Mode, Caltex-Victoria Art Fund and Trust 1978

International prints from Mrs Minya Lipkes (including two prints by Francis Bacon) 1984

William Hogarth, Rakes Progress, Trust Fund purchase 1979 William Hogarth, Harlots Progress, Caltex-Victoria Art Fund and Trust Fund purchase 1979

Works by Norma Bull 1983


Allan Sisley Director 1985 - 1988 Paul McIntyre Curator 1985 - 1994

Brian Dunlop, Study for the Sesquicentenary Portrait of the Queen, Gift of Joseph Brown Gallery 1984

The Hamilton Wool Tapestry designed by Les Kossatz 1985 Commissioned by the Hamilton Heritage Festival Committee, 1984, with funds from Victoria’s 150th Anniversary Board, and assistance from the Victorian Tapestry Workshop Samuel Palmer, The Weary Ploughman, Trust Fund purchase 1985 Victor Majzner, Centrefold N.T. 1986, 6th RM Ansett Art Award 1986

Deborah Russel, Near the Stony Rises, Trust Fund purchase 1987 Clifton Pugh, Olive grove and goats and Coptic Church Crete, both purchased through the Bank of Melbourne Regional Galleries Art Foundation 1987 Steig Persson, Painting 1986, Trust Fund purchase 1987 John Russell, Miss Sophia Vansittart, Trust Fund purchase and Russell Portrait Fund (public subscription) 1988


17th and 18h century European prints by Francesco Grimaldi, Benedetto Boschi, Richard Bonnington, Gerard Hoet, William Woolett, David Lucas (after Constable) (acquired by Paul McIntyre) 34 decorative arts items gifted by Olive Ferguson


Daniel McOwan Director 1988 - Present

Samuel Palmer, The Skylark, The Willow, The Cypress Grove, The Early Ploughman, The Herdsman’s Cottage, The Morning of Life, The Eclogues of Virgil (book) Edward Calvert, The Brook, The Lady with the Rooks, The Return Home 1992 Kristin Headlam, The Sick Rose, Gift of the Friends 1996 9 works donated by the Bank of Melbourne, Arthur Boyd, John Olsen (nominated by Allan Sisley) Steig Persson, Allan Mittelman, Robert Clinch, Roger Kemp, Brian Dunlop, Lindy Lee (nominated by Daniel McOwan) 1997

Tim Maguire, Untitled 97U66, Trust Fund acquisition, Geoff and Helen Handbury Gift 1997 Lloyd Rees, Balmoral 1927, Trust Fund acquisition, Katie Mein Bequest 1999 William Guilfoyle, Plan for the Hamilton Botanic Gardens 1991 Thomas Clark, The Wannon Falls, Trust Fund acquisition, Geoff and Helen Handbury Bequest 2003 Thomas Clark, Early Coleraine, Acquired by the Shire of Wannon 1951


Fred Williams, Sherbrooke Forest, Bequest of Elizabeth Summons 2003 John Brack, Sketch for Nude in a Bathroom, Bequest of Elizabeth Summons 2003 Kathleen Petyarre, My Country, Rush Seeds (after a sandstorm), Gift of the Friends 2006 Daniel Crooks, Static #9 (video), Purchased with annual Council allocation 2006 Richard Clements, 2 paintings of Chernobyl subjects, Gift of Larissa Usenko 2011 82 Prints by William Hogarth (acquired by Allan Sisely and Paul McIntyre but not accessioned) 1990 77 Sandby prints, Gift of Mrs Vera Gaussen in memory of her husband Mr Paddy Gaussen 1991 25 prints or drawings, Gift of the artist Edward Heffernan 1992 30 Cibacrome prints by John Kiely, Images of Western Victoria 1994

26 prints by Barbara Brash donated by Mr Geoff Brash 2003

22 Black and White photographs by John Kiely, Portraits of the Western District 1999

13 Japanese prints, gift of Lesley Kehoe 2009

24 Black and white photographs by Richard Crawley, Images of Dunkeld 2006 Gifts of prints and drawings by Napier Waller from Miss Heather Waller 1995 17 Australian watercolours including J.J. Hilder, Norman Lindsay, Rah Fizelle, Tom Garrett and others, R.G.L. and M.L. Taylor Bequest 1998 21 prints and books Bequest of Mrs Christian Segar 2002

Friends 21st anniversary tapestry designed by Lesley Dumbrell 1991 Gift of the Friends Glass from Dr David Chamberlain 1989 Australian Metal work from Contemporary Australian Hollow Ware 1994 and from the Regional Galleries Collection Fund in 2005 Silver from Bill and Joan Hyslop 1994, 2003, 2004 Ceramics from the Seger Bequest 2002

The Shaw Royal Copenhagen dinner service from Mrs Joan Shaw and the Late Dr Michael Shaw 2004 Glass from Did Lowenstern 1967, 1978, 1984, 1989, 1990, 1991, 2000, 2001, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2008, 2010 Italian glass and Japanese ceramics from the Trust Fund Japanese and Chinese ceramics from Allan Myers QC AO Japanese and Chinese works from Jason Yeap OAM Australian paintings, glass and sculpture from Dr Barbara van Ernst AM


Acquisitions Celebrating 50 Years of Collecting

John Wolseley England b.1938, arr. Australia 1976 Fire and water - moths, swamps and lava flows of the Hamilton Region 2011 The Hamilton Art Gallery 50th anniversary commemorative tapestry 2011.005

Trust Fund acquisition with assistance from The Myer Foundation and the Helen Macpherson Smith Trust

This work, the first tapestry designed by John Wolseley, brings together a series of local landmarks that appealed to John on his visits to the district in 2010. His strong responses to the volcanic features of the region dominate the composition with the central motif being a representation of the Western slopes of Mt Napier, its lava flow in Harmans Valley and the Byaduk Caves. The right hand side is a representation of the Western flanks of the Victoria Range of the Grampians and the light across the water reeds of marshes in that area. Some of the five moths or butterflies are species endemic to this region and the sprig of lichen is based on a small sprig found at the entrance to the Byaduk Caves.


In commissioning this tapestry John was not give the remit of making the composition representational of the district but left to respond to features or landforms that appealed to him. John’s work has always shown great sensitivity to nature and the ecology of places he has chosen to depict and this work has not departed from that approach. John’s deep research surfaces in the selection of the moths and butterflies he has incorporated in the design – species many locals would not realise are endemic to the area but in their own way as symbolic of our area as the better known profiles of Mt Napier or the Byaduk caves.


Munesada Nakao Japan (n.d.) Pair of lamps c.1900 Cast and chased bronze 2011.005

Purchased with annual Council allocation

These multi-component lamps were initially major altar lamps for a Buddhist temple. Their general theme is of dragons ascending and descending – coming to earth and returning to their home in the heavens. Reading their symbols from the top down the covers have a dragon in a cartouche on one side and a phoenix on the other side. Just below these the lamp is decorated with cloud motifs, all symbolising the heavens. The three-claw dragon entwined upon itself then becomes the long connection between heaven and earth, with the earth being represented by the candle tray. The arms of ‘earth’ are decorated with a cloud motif also but the support for the lamp and the surrounds for the candles are decorated with idealised water flowing across the earth and


forming wave patterns reminiscent of Hokusai’s famous woodblock print ‘The Great Wave’ but actually a motif created a millenia earlier. The lamps are well marked but apart from the name of their manufacturer no more details are known of Munesada Nakao, their maker. They are nonetheless classic examples of the incredibly sophisticated metalwork generated during the Meiji period, bringing together casting, chasing and engraving to produce virtuoso objects for everyday usage.


Janet Beckhouse Australia (b.1955) Guardians of the Grotto Vase 2011 Hand cast and constructed porcelain 2011.028

Gift of Dr Barbara van Ernst AM to commemorate the Gallery’s 50th Birthday

Our era has prized minimalist forms and matt surfaces but the occasional artist emerges for whom exuberance is the hallmark of their work. Janet Beckhouse is such an artist, creating virtuoso pieces such as this vase. Stylistically this work would probably be described as neo-rococo but its intricate naturalistic modelling shares much in common with Bernard Palissy’s work in 16th century France. Its title suggests a grotto as the source of inspiration which in its 17th century manifestation, was frequently lined with shells and features suggestive of an undersea world.


Ultimately though this vase is just a highly original, beautifully crafted object that evokes curiosity, fascination and wonder. Janet Beckhouse trained at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology and lives and works in Melbourne. This work was commissioned by Dr Barbara van Ernst AM for Hamilton Art Gallery and made by the artist this year.


Kondo Yuzo Kyoto, Japan (1951-1999) Vase c.1978 Porcelain with underglaze blue decoration and gilding 2011.006

Gift of Allan Myers QC AO

Kondo Yuzo (1903-1985) had a distinguished career on many fronts but his ultimate achievement was to be nominated as a Living National Treasure in 1977 as the great master and innovator of underglaze blue decoration. This style of decoration underpins both the Chinese and Japanese porcelain traditions and because of its significance Kondo Yuzo has long been on the Gallery’s desiderata list. This piece is the same shape and decorated similarly to the one in the Kyoto National Museum but is slightly later as the artist only started adding the gold to his work after about 1970. This makes it a rich and impressive work, consistent with the richly embellished work that often came from Kyoto, influenced as it


was by the presence of the Imperial court. This, together with Yuzo’s hallmark underglaze blue painting, and its size make it a truly superb example of his work. This vase has an impeccable provenance having come from a member of the Kondo family and was the star piece in the exhibition of ‘Three Generations of Members of the Kondo Family’ held in New York in 2010. The Gallery holds three pieces by Kondo Yuzo’s grandson, Kondo Takahiro, who visited the Hamilton Art Gallery in 2008. Kondo Takahiro is considered to be one of the great internationalists among the current younger generation of Japanese ceramicists and, through

the generosity of Lesley Kehoe, has entered the collections of the National Gallery of Victoria and the National Gallery of Australia. Hamilton Art Gallery though is the only Australian gallery that has work by his famous Grandfather.


David Keeling Australia (b.1951) 4.36 pm (Casuarinas) 2010 Oil on canvas 2011.043

Gift of the Friends to commemorate the Gallery’s 50th anniversary

David Keeling consistently paints a number of themes; some works are interiors, some are surrealistic sculptural type objects and others – usually with an environmental overtone – are naturalistic representations of landscape and its features. This painting 4.36 pm belongs to this latter group with the Casuarina being the singular feature in its ‘landscape’. The painters unusual viewpoint, looking into the canopy of the tree, leaves little doubt that there is a stem touching the ground below and simultaneously suggests a presence of one tree among many. The landscape is actually created in the viewers imagination.


This original viewpoint is not the only suggestive element in the work. The late afternoon light suggests a forlornness, a singularity and a loneliness prompting the thought that perhaps this is the last tree of its kind standing against an aggressive and environmentally unsympathetic world. Concurrently one is also left with a sense of the dignity of this tree contending with its environment and surviving against the odds. It can also symbolise natures determination to persist in contrast to humankinds apparent neglect for the environment.

David Keeling was born in Launceston, trained in Melbourne, Hobart and Sydney and lives in Tasmania. He describes himself as a landscape painter and won the Glover Prize for landscape painting in 2006. He has exhibited nationally and internationally and is held in major public and private collections in Australia and overseas.


Huang Yongyu China (b.1924) Spring 1989 Ink and colour on paper 2011.027

Gift of Jason Yeap OAM to commemorate the Gallery’s 50th Birthday

The title of this work tells only half its story. Indeed it depicts springtime but the real subject of this work is two lotus blooms standing defiantly against dark reflections on the water from which they grow. Strong diagonals define this painting and its content takes some sorting out. The lotus blooms could be taken for dragonflies lightly touching the surface if it were not for the spotted stems of the lotus. Either subject, together with the dark reflections, leaves little doubt that a watery surface is present. The artist Huang Yongyu was born in Hunan Province in 1924 as part of the Tujia ethnic minority. He trained as a woodcut artist in Fujian Province from 1937 to 1939 but never completed his training and eventually described himself as self-taught. He


was in Shanghai in 1947 but by 1948 had moved to Taiwan and then to Hong Kong where he worked as the editor of a leftist newspaper. In 1953 his commitment to the socialist cause saw him to move back to China to teach woodcut printing at the Central Academy of Fine Arts in Beijing. As a consequence of his later critical comments about the communist party he became the subject of attacks during the Cultural Revolution. Mao Zedong’s wife, Jiang Qing, helped organise the Black Painting Exhibition which featured Huang’s work for which he was imprisoned and then exiled to the countryside. On his return to Beijing in 1966 his satirical writings were denounced as counter-revolutionary and he was severely beaten. In 1988 he moved back to Hong Kong but retained his

position of Professor at the Central Academy and in 1998 moved back to Beijing where he lives today. His chequered history in China has meant that his works are relatively rare there and so this example of his work is to be particularly treasured.


Form designed by Emile Decoeur (1876-1953) decoration by Raymond Joly-Clare (1911-2006) for Sevres, France Spring 1989 Vase ‘Decoeur’ 1947/1951 2011.0??

Purchased with annual Council allocation

Throughout the 20th century Sevres remained a powerhouse of creativity and innovation. Carrying the mantle of probably the greatest of the continental porcelain factories they had high standards and a great tradition to both maintain and to emulate. Using a limited repertoire of forms – all named, in this case a form thrown by the great French studio potter Emile Decouer (1876-1953) in 1947 – various artists were commissioned to decorate the forms. Raymond Joly-Clare was a famous French printmaker and medallist and this vase is painted after his design. The marks on the base allow us to record that the blank vase was made in 1951 and the painting was done in 1951 also. Joly-Clare did not actually paint the work but a studio


artist painted it after his design and signed the work as well. The design shows the Greek God Poseidon (or the Roman god Neptune) and this vase was one of a trio Joly-Clare did celebrating under-sea scenes. The slight eccentricity of his subject and the decorative motifs he used are typical of French mid-century modernism but it was only the skill of a great factory that made this work a reality.


Bowl Kakiemon ware c.1700 Porcelain with underglaze blue decoration Japan 2011.025

Purchased with annual Council allocation

Kakiemon porcelain came from a few small kilns in Arita in Kyushu, Japan, and has always been marked by its superior design and quality. Its manufacture was attributed to the Kakiemon family based on documentation that they alone had developed and had the mandate to produce overglaze enamelling in Japan albeit the technique was already long standing in China. Indeed in most collections it is the over-glaze enamelled pieces that are the archetypal examples of this ware but the kiln also produced plain undecorated, moulded wares and pieces with blue and white decoration such as this example. All three types are now represented in the Hamilton collection.


The fuschi-beni or brown rim was intended either as protection from chipping or more likely as a framing device to highlight the white porcelain and its decoration. The central idealised prunus blossom with its five stamens, the slightly waxy glaze and its fuku (good luck) mark inside the base all typify the best Kakiemon wares of the Genroku period (16881704). The underglaze blue decoration is more complex on this bowl than that on many Kakiemon bowls nonetheless its pattern is consistent with other documented Kakiemon wares. The snowdrop roundels (yukiwa) appear on other Japanese porcelain and occasionally as the shape of mons or family symbols.

Kakiemon ware is comparitively rare in Japan but large quantities were exported to Europe after Chinese wares ceased to be available following the fall of the Ming dynasty in 1644. By about 1710 Chinese porcelain was once again available and importation of Japanese wares declined. This bowl was purchased by its previous owner from a dealer in Amsterdam.


2010-11 Acquisition Hedley Fitton England (1859-1929) Cour de Corbeau, Strasbourg 1919 Etching Gift of Lesley Slorach 2010.043

Nagae Shigekazu Seto, Japan (b.1953) Animals of the Zodiac – Sheep 2003 Porcelain, partially glazed Purchased with annual Council allocation 2010.050

Paul Sandby England (1731-1809) Overton Bridge, Over the River Dee 1776 Aquatint Purchased with annual Council allocation 2010.044

Nagae Shigekazu Seto, Japan (b.1953) Animals of the Zodiac – Rabbit 1999 Porcelain, partially glazed Purchased with annual Council allocation 2010.051

Paul Sandby England (1731-1809) Harlech Castle in Merionethshire 1776 Aquatint Purchased with annual Council allocation 2010.045 Paul Sandby England (1731-1809) Dromana, the seat of Lord Grandison 1778 Engraving Purchased with annual Council allocation 2010.046 After Major Thomas Mitchell England/Australia (1792-1855) The River Glenelg 1839 Lithograph Purchased with annual Council allocation 2010.047 After Major Thomas Mitchell England/Australia (1792-1855) Mt Arapiles 1839 Lithograph Purchased with annual Council allocation 2010.048 Nagae Shigekazu Seto, Japan (b.1953) Animals of the Zodiac – Cow 1997 Porcelain, partially glazed Purchased with annual Council allocation 2010.049

Shimizu Uichi Japan (1926-2004) Vase c.1990 Stoneware with iron glaze Purchased with annual Council allocation 2010.052 Miyanaga Rikichi Kyoto, Japan (b.1935) Sculpture – Shrine of the Thunder God 1987 Porcelain with celadon glaze Purchased with annual Council allocation 2010.053 Mihara Ken Japan (b.1958) Dish c.2000 Stoneware with impressed decoration Purchased with annual Council allocation 2010.054 Seifu Yohei III Kyoto, Japan (1851-1914) Set of three bowls c.1888 Porcelain with underglaze blue decoration Purchased with annual Council allocation 2010.055abc Jug 400B.C. Earthenware with linear decoration Greek Cypriote Bequest of Lois Valerie Sheldon 2010.056

Ken Knight Australian (b.1956) Gums on dam embankment, Western District 2009 Oil on board Gift of the artist 2010.057 Makuzu Kozan II (Miyagawa Hannosuke (Hanzan)) Japan (1859-1940) Teabowl, Ninsei style c.1910 Stoneware with overglaze enamel decoration Gift of Pauline Gandel 2010.058 Cigarette Box c.1910 Silver, shibuichi, copper and rosewood Panel by Komei, box work by Taishodo, Tokyo Donated through the Australian Governments Cultural Gifts Program by Pauline Gandel 2010.059 Gesso Yamano II Tokoname, Japan (b.1941) Sencha set, Shudei ware, c.1973 Stoneware Tokoname, Aichi Prefecture, Japan Gift of Lesley Kehoe 2010.060 Pickle Jar (tanji) with peony design, 19th century Porcelain with underglaze blue decoration Choson dynasty 1392-1910, Korea Donated through the Australian Governments Cultural Gifts program 2010.061 Jar 18th century Stoneware with black glaze Choson dynasty 1392-1910, Korea Donated through the Australian Governments Cultural Gifts program 2010.062


Pickle Jar (tanji) with floral design, 19th century Stoneware with underglaze blue decoration Choson dynasty 1392-1910, Korea Donated through the Australian Governments Cultural Gifts program 2010.063 Summer teabowl, kohiki technique, 15 century Stoneware Choson dynasty 1392-1910, Korea Donated through the Australian Governments Cultural Gifts program 2010.064

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Footed Jar 6th century Stoneware with incised and moulded decoration and piecing Silla kingdom, 5th-6th century, Korea Donated through the Australian Governments Cultural Gifts program 2010.065 Bowl 6th century Stoneware with incised and pierced decoration Silla Kingdom 5th-6th century, Korea Donated through the Australian Governments Cultural Gifts program 2010.066 Bowl 15 century Stoneware, thrown, inlaid slip and celadon glazed Early Choson dynasty 1392-1910, Korea Donated through the Australian Governments Cultural Gifts program 2010.067 th

Bowl 18th century Stoneware with brushed white slip decoration Choson dynasty 1392-1910, Korea Donated through the Australian Governments Cultural Gifts program 2010.068

Bowl 18th century Stoneware with carving and celadon glaze Choson dynasty 1392-1910, Korea Donated through the Australian Governments Cultural Gifts program 2010.069

Box c.1900 Iron inlaid with gold and silver Made by Komai Company Kyoto, Japan Purchased with annual Council allocation 2010.076

Dish 18th century Porcelain, moulded with celadon glaze Koryo dynasty 918-1392, Korea Donated through the Australian Governments Cultural Gifts program 2010.070

William Daniell after George Dance England (1769-1837) Portrait of Paul Sandby 1809 Soft ground etching Purchased with annual Council allocation 2010.077

Incense burner and cover with trigrams 19th century Porcelain with celadon glaze Choson dynasty 1392-1910, Korea Donated through the Australian Governments Cultural Gifts program 2010.071

Keith Murray (designer) New Zealand / England (1892-1981) Tea service c.1938 Electro-plated nickel silver Made by Mappin and Webb, London Purchased with annual Council allocation 2010.078

Bowl 15th century Stoneware, thrown, inlaid slip and celadon glazed Early Choson dynasty 1392-1910, Korea Donated through the Australian Governments Cultural Gifts program 2010.072

Charger, Imari ware c.1870 Porcelain with under- and overglaze decoration Meiji period (1868-1912), Arita, Japan Purchased with annual Council allocation 2010.079

Teabowl 18th century Stoneware with celadon glaze Choson dynasty 1392-1910, Korea Purchased with annual Council allocation 2010.073 Takahashi Dohachi V (manufacturer) Kyoto, Japan ( 1869-1914) Tomioka Tessai (decorator) Japan (1837-1924) Sencha set c.1910 Porcelain with underglaze blue decoration Purchased with annual Council allocation 2010.074 Dr Christopher Dresser (designer?) England (1834-1904) Plate c.1880 Porcelain with transfer printed decoration Made by Mintons, England Purchased with annual Council allocation 2010.075

Col Levy Australia (b.1933) Vase c.1993 Porcelain with copper red glaze with crackle Donated through the Australian Governments Cultural Gifts Program by Margaret Billson in Memory of May Shaw 2010.080 Col Levy Australia (b.1933) Bowl c.1993 Porcelain with copper red glaze with crackle Donated through the Australian Governments Cultural Gifts Program by Margaret Billson in Memory of May Shaw 2010.081


Col Levy Australia (b.1933) Small bowl c.1993 Porcelain with copper red glaze with crackle Donated through the Australian Governments Cultural Gifts Program by Margaret Billson in Memory of May Shaw 2010.082 Roland Wakelin New Zealand, arr. Australia 1912, (1887-1971) Still life in blue and green 1960 Oil on board Donated through the Australian Governments Cultural Gifts Program by Dr Barbara van Ernst AM in memory of Henk van Ernst 2010.083 Guy Boyd Australia (1923-1988) Pensive bather c.1985 Bronze Donated through the Australian Governments Cultural Gifts Program by Dr Barbara van Ernst AM in memory of Henk van Ernst 2010.084 Leopoldine Mimovich Austria b.1920, arr. Australia 1949 Kneeling female nude c.1980 Bronze with stone base Donated through the Australian Governments Cultural Gifts Program by Dr Barbara van Ernst AM in memory of Henk van Ernst 2010.085 Shimaoka Tatzuso Japan (1919-2007) Cup, two saucers, covered sugar bowl and milk jug c.1972 Stoneware with ash and iron glazes Donated through the Australian Governments Cultural Gifts Program by Relton Leaver in memory of Ian Sprague 2010.086a-f

Hamada Shoji Japan (1894-1978) Vase c.1965 Stoneware with iron glaze Donated through the Australian Governments Cultural Gifts Program by Relton Leaver in memory of Ian Sprague 2010.087 Mark Henry Australia (b.1954) Vault 3 1998 Bronze, edn 2/2 Donated through the Australian Governments Cultural Gifts Program by Mark Henry 2010.088 Takahashi Dohachi V (manufacturer) Kyoto, Japan ( 1869-1914) Tanomura Chokunyu (decorator) Japan (1814-1907) Sencha set c.1900 Porcelain with underglaze blue decoration Purchased with annual Council allocation 2011.001a-f Ito Tozan I Japan (1846-1920) Bowl with senchado scenes, c.1910 Kyoto earthenware with underglaze blue decoration Purchased with annual Council allocation 2011.002 Pickle Jar (tanji) with peony design, 19th century Porcelain with underglaze blue decoration Choson dynasty 1392-1910, Korea Purchased with annual Council allocation 2011.003 Dish with inlaid slip decoration, 19th century Stoneware Choson dynasty 1392-1910, Korea Purchased with annual Council allocation 2011.004

John Wolseley England b.1938, arr. Australia 1976 Cartoon for ‘Fire and water - moths, swamps and lava flows of the Hamilton Region’ 2011 [The Hamilton Art Gallery 50th anniversary commemorative tapestry] Pencil and watercolour on paper Purchased with annual Council allocation 2011.005 Kondo Yuzo Japan (1902-1985) Vase c.1978 Porcelain with underglaze blue decoration and gilding Gift of Allan Myers QC AO 2011.006 Richard Clements Australia (1951-1999) Nowhere to go 1998 Oil on linen Gift of Larissa Usenko 2011.007 Richard Clements Australia (1951-1999) Dark Cloud 1995 Oil on linen Gift of Larissa Usenko 2011.008 Lace collar Linen Belgium (?) Gift of Mrs Elizabeth Johnston 2011.009 Lace collar Linen Belgium (?) Gift of Mrs Elizabeth Johnston 2011.010 Handkerchief Linen Belgium (?) Gift of Mrs Elizabeth Johnston 2011.011


Dress / Petticoat Linen Belgium (?) Gift of Mrs Elizabeth Johnston 2011.012 Sample to match 2011.012 Linen Belgium (?) Gift of Mrs Elizabeth Johnston 2011.013 Strip of Needle lace Linen Belgium (?) Gift of Mrs Elizabeth Johnston 2011.014 Pair of white kid gloves Leather England Gift of Mrs Elizabeth Johnston 2011.015 Takahashi Dohachi V (manufacturer) Kyoto, Japan ( 1869-1914) Tomioka Tessai (decorator) Japan (1837-1924) Sencha teapot c.1910 Porcelain with underglaze blue and red decoration Gift of Robert Mangold 2011.016 Bertil Vallien Sweden (b.1938) Wine glass c.1960 Blue glass Made by Boda Afors, Sweden Gift of Mrs Sally Hearn 2011.017 Bertil Vallien Sweden (b.1938) Liqueur glasses (2) c.1960 Blue glass Made by Boda Afors, Sweden Gift of Mrs Sally Hearn 2011.018ab

Ron ‘Stretch’ Penrose Australia (b.1958) Portrait of Geoff Handbury 2011 Oil on canvas Gift of Geoff Handbury 2011.019 Footed bowl 6th century Stoneware with incised decoration and piecing Silla kingdom 5th-6th century, Korea Donated through the Australian Governments Cultural Gifts program 2011.020 Salver c.1900 Silverplate Made by Barker Brothers, Birmingham, England Gift of Alan and Joan Blain 2011.021 Paperweight - Prince Charles and Princess Diana 1981 Cut glass with basalt ware plaque Made by Wedgwood, England Gift of Alan and Joan Blain 2011.022 Danny McDonald Australia (b.1949) Petit DEXA-Dan 2010 Digital print on paper Purchased with annual Council allocation 2011.023 Uetake Satoshi Japan (b.1956) Box c.1995 Stoneware Purchased with annual Council allocation 2011.024 Bowl Kakiemon ware c.1700 Porcelain with underglaze blue decoration Japan Purchased with annual Council allocation 2011.025

Grant McDonald England (b.1947) Box 1972 Sterling silver with gold plating London assay marks Gift of Anne Cassidy 2011.026 Huang Yongyu China (b.1924) Spring 1989 Ink and colour on paper Gift of Jason Yeap OAM to mark the 50th anniversary of the Gallery 2011.027 Qi Baishi China (1863-1957) Lotus Pod c.1946 Water colour woodblock print Gift of Min Lee Wong 2011.028 Qi Baishi China (1863-1957) Blossoms c.1946 Water colour woodblock print Gift of Min Lee Wong 2011.029 Janet Beckhouse Australia (b.1955) Vase ‘Guardians of the Grotto’ 2011 Porcelain, cast, constructed and hand decorated Gift of Dr Barbara van Ernst AM 2011.030 Demonstration set - cloisonné enamelling c.1934 Copper, enamels and powdered enamels Japan Gift of David and Isobel Jones 2011.031 Pair of framed plaques Porcelain with underglaze blue decoration Seto, Japan Purchased with annual Council allocation 2011.032ab


HG Annual Report 2010/11  
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