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inside Linc, Upper James top detour parade this year LIFESTYLE

Road and sewer work to begin soon, construction continues until late fall BY MARK NEWMAN NEWS STAFF

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not the kind of Easter gift business owners along the southern portion of Upper James are looking forward to. Nearly $5 million worth of road and sewer work is slated to begin along Upper James between

Helping hands Sisters reach out to Gambia.

Page 15 FOOD

Stone Church Road to just south of Rymal right after the holiday weekend. The work is expected to continue until November and crews are expected to be on the street six days a week. At press time it was not known at which end of Upper James the work will begin. The Upper James corridor carries thousands of cars and trucks each day between the downtown and north Mountain area south to the John C. Munro-Hamilton International Airport and Haldimand county.

Cheri Muench, manager at the Whistling Walrus pub, located in the heart of what will soon be the construction zone, noted many business owners in the area have struggled through a difficult winter and are now worried the road work will put a damper on summer business. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to affect the businesses here dramatically,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People are going to be losing hours because there wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be enough work for them,â&#x20AC;? she continued. See SUMMER/Page 14

Peddle storms out of private session on ethics probe â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;They will not do this to me anymore,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; east Mountain trustee fumes BY RICHARD LEITNER NEWS STAFF

Egg-cellent eggs Something new for Easter brunch.

Page 23 INDEX Community Opinion/Letters Life Food Classifieds City Sidelines Sports

3 8-9 13 21 29-34 35 37-39

  

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Mr. Monopoly

Loophole paved way for sweetheart Westmount deal, page 3

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Yelling that she was tired of being attacked in private, Ward 6 trustee Laura Peddle stormed out of a closed public school board meeting Monday on the investigation into her alleged breach of code of conduct rules. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m done! Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m done!â&#x20AC;? she could be heard shouting repeatedly through shut doors as she accused education director John Malloy of using the guise of a legal matter to discuss the matter in closed session on Monday.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;You snuck it in,â&#x20AC;? Peddle said. Breathing heavily, the east Mountain representative, emerged from a side hallway moments later and said she had to go outside for fresh air. Only ward trustees and Malloy were allowed to stay for the meeting, which ran for about an hour and continued after Ward 4 trustee Ray Mulholland came out and said it had adjourned. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Excuse me, the doorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s closed,â&#x20AC;? Stoney Creek trustee Robert Barlow objected to a member of the public who tried to enter the board chambers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The meetingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s over, but the doorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s closed.â&#x20AC;? At issue is a formal investigation into board chair Judith Bishopâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s allegation Peddle broke ethics rules in her criticisms of a decision to exclude Westmount and Saltfleet from an accommodation review of Mountain high schools. See TRUSTEE/Page 27

Alistair Lam glides around the ice as Rich Uncle Pennybags, better known as Mr. Monopoly, during a rehearsal for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Monopoly On Ice,â&#x20AC;? the Hamilton Skating Clubâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s carnival, held last weekend at Dave Andreychuck-Mountain Arena. About 500 members of the club took part in the two shows.

Area-rating studies show suburban tax hikes Whitehead wants change to begin this year BY KEVIN WERNER NEWS STAFF

Hamilton councillors may be talking about compromise and co-operation to mitigate the effects of a tripling of suburban residentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; tax, but some councillors are prepared to fight to keep the area-rating policy in place for now.

Under at least four scenarios proposed by city staff, which were first presented to politicians in late 2009, based upon an urban-rural geographical split, any changes to the current area-rating policy will see suburban homeownersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; taxes jump anywhere between 6.5 per cent for Ancaster residents to 16 per cent for Glanbrook homeowners, while residents in the former city of Hamilton will see their taxes drop by over four per cent. See DEEP/Page 22

Enhancing the Health Care System is Our #1 Priority

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ELECTION

All-candidates meeting April 20 A Hamilton Mountain riding allcandidates debate is planned for Wednesday. The Rotary Club of Hamilton Mountain is presenting the “meet the candidates” lunch April 20 at 11:45 a.m. at Chan’s Restaurant on Upper James St. Non-members are welcome; cost of the lunch is $17.

OBITUARY

Local cable TV pioneer dies at 79

Owen Boris, founder and former owner of one of the last and largest independent cable TV operators in Canada, died suddenly in his home Saturday. He was 79. Boris, who was born in Thunder Bay but came to Hamilton as a teenager, was one of the engineers for the Avro Arrow program before founding Mountain Cable in 1959 in the Buchanan Park neighbourhood. The company was sold to Shaw Communications in 2009. After his business was handed over, Boris began looking to give back to the community, in particular in the health-care sector, said a family member. He recently donated $50,000 for diagnostic equipment for eye research and $3 million to fund a stem cell vision research chair position at the Toronto General and Western Hospital Foundation. Boris is survived by his 77-yearold wife, Marta.

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Ministry declines to comment on deal, closed-door meeting BY RICHARD LEITNER NEWS STAFF

Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board trustees took advantage of a loophole in the Education Act to lease 6.25 acres of land for the new Westmount Recreation Centre to the city for $1 per year over the next 99 years. While school boards must normally sell or lease land at fair market value, the act allows exemptions on leases for services and programs that “promote healthy emotional, social or physical development in children.” The Westmount deal, passed behind closed doors in December 2009 and only made public on March 28, is unusual because the board has often told the public it is bound by the market-value requirement when disposing of

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surplus school property. agreed to enter into the lease the The city, for instance, paid the very same night. fair market value price in 2009 for “In our discussions, the city out2.1 hectares (5.2 acres) of land at lined market demand as one critethe former Vern Ames school on the rion in determining a site for the Mountain to preserve park space. project,” she said in an email It also paid $1 response to inquires million in 2007 for on why the board “In our discussions, the city parkland across the didn’t follow its norroad from the for- outlined market demand as mal rules. mer Dundas Dis- one criterion in determining a “The Westmount trict School, site has a combined site for the project.” although neither enrolment of nearly case involved the 2,000 students Jackie Penman building of a rec between Westcentre. mount (secondary Board spokesperson Jackie Pen- school) and the two elementary man said the Education Act exemp- schools on the site.” tion recognizes the “unique value” Mike Feenstra, press secretary of partnerships like the recreation for Education Minister Leona centre deal. Dombrowsky, confirmed the EduThe exemption also meant the cation Act allows exemptions board didn’t have to follow normal where “taxpayer investment in rules of giving other school boards schools and school properties conand public agencies 90 days to tinue to benefit the boarder comexpress interest in the property. munity.” In this instance, the board Decisions are made by boards declared the land surplus and on a case-by-case basis, he said,

and the Hamilton board didn’t seek or necessarily need ministerial approval. “I can’t speak to whether the regulation was followed. We haven’t been asked for approval,” he said. Feenstra said he couldn’t comment on whether the decision to approve the lease behind closed doors met ministry guidelines because “we do not have all the details on this particular motion.” “However, all resolutions of a board must be passed in a session that is open to the public,” he said in an email. “The board would be in the best position to explain its procedures.” Until the lease deal finally became public late last month, trustees had repeatedly insisted Westmount Secondary’s abovecapacity enrolment led them to exclude it from a high school review that could potentially close Sherwood, Barton and Mountain. They now acknowledge the lease deal sealed their decision.

Students’ square in the works at Mohawk Outdoor area in recognition of MSA’s $1 million donation for college’s Fennell campus BY MARK NEWMAN NEWS STAFF

A new outdoor area complete with walking paths, benches and greenery is in the works for the open space next to the Mohawk College Students’ Association centre at the Fennell campus. “We’re thinking something along the lines of Mohawk Students’ Square,” said MSA president Kat Cullen of the project that has yet to be named but is being built in recognition of the $1 million donation the students’ association is making to the $30 million redevelopment of the Fennell campus. A timeline for construction of the new square is still to be worked out. Cullen, a television broadcast-

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PHOTO BY MARK NEWMAN

Mohawk College Students’ Association president Kat Cullen in the open area at the rear of the Fennell campus next to the MSA centre that will be turned into a students’ square in the coming years. resumes and tattooed on us and the better we can make the college the better we can be overall,” she said. Campus renovations include the new two storey learning exchange along Fennell Avenue

that includes a new library and classrooms; massive upgrades to the cafeteria and renovations to the community studies wing. Work is also underway to convert the old library into a one-stop centre for student services.

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City tops up local food banks with a $350,000 deposit BY KEVIN WERNER NEWS STAFF

The city is once again providing $350,000 to Hamilton’s food banks and Christmas hamper programs to help them survive the critical summer period. “We are trying to get the funds out immediately,” said ward 6 (east Mountain) Coun. Scott Duvall. “We

can hopefully relieve some of the pressure.” Some area food banks were seeing bare shelves early this spring, and were pleading for more goods from the community. The Mountain’s Neighbour to Neighbour, which is conducting its annual spring food drive, needs about 60,000 pounds of food per month to feed about 1,110 families. The orga-

nization’s food drive ends April 22. “We’re really counting on this Easter drive to get us through to the summer drive,” said Sara Collyer, operations manager at Neighbour to Neighbour. She said most of the food collected during the winter holidays is now gone. The Ancaster Community Food Drive ended in February raising

79,000 pounds and $8,000 in cash. Duvall had asked councillors last week to add the $350,000 to this year’s budget. The money is expected to be paid for by the provincial government’s $8.1 million Ontario Municipal Provincial Partnership grant. There should be no effect on this year’s budget. Joe-Anne Priel, community services general manager, said the

Attendant’s flight foils gas station thief Flight proved to be the right response for a Mountain gas station attendant confronted by a would-be robber last Friday afternoon. Hamilton police spokesperson Sgt. TerriLynn Collings said the thief walked into the kiosk at the Husky station on Mohawk Road West across from Westcliffe Mall at about 1 p.m. and yelled at the attendant to turn over his cash. The attendant instead ran out the back door and asked a customer to call police, prompting the robber to bolt out the front door and run away. The suspect is described as a white male in his late teens or early 20s and five feet seven inches tall. He had short black hair and was wearing a black jacket and black and white bandanna.

money will be provided to Hamilton Food Share, which will then distribute the funds to the community food banks. Hamilton came to the rescue of its food banks in late 2009, providing $100,000 for the Christmas hamper program. Earlier in the year the city also gave $184,000 to cover the food banks for the summer.

the weekend. Sgt. Terri-Lynn Collings said the driver was headed southbound on Upper Wentworth Street by Kingfisher Drive at about 5:30 a.m. on Saturday when he lost control of his Chrysler Intrepid. The car crossed the centre line and drove up onto the east sidewalk, striking a fire hydrant before hitting and toppling the light pole. Police were called and the driver was sent to hospital with minor injuries. He blew more than double the legal blood-alcohol limit in breath tests. The man is charged with impaired driving and driving with more than 80 milligrams of alcohol per 100 millilitres blood. A 47-year-old Hamilton man meanwhile faces drunk driving charges after being spotted driving erratically on Upper James Street at about 2 p.m. on Saturday by another motorist who called police. The suspect car was pulled over by Miles and White Church roads. He is charged with impaired driving and refusal to provide a breath sample.

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Mayor reluctant to ‘badger’ province for more cash after Pan Am payout BY KEVIN WERNER NEWS STAFF

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Hamilton may have to pay the $4 million in social services out of local taxpayers’ pockets this year. Mayor Bob Bratina said the provincial government isn’t convinced it should help the city after providing Hamilton with over $100 million since 2004 in social services funding. “The province is facing serious deficit issues,” said Bratina. “There is a difference of opinion (between the city and province).” Judy Dolbec, Bratina, city managHamilton Product Advisor er Chris Murray and Performance Lexus other finance staff con905-923-0232 ceded provincial staff haven’t been swayed by jdolbec@performancelexus.ca arguments that it should cover Hamilton’s social services costs. Bratina and corporate services general manager Rob Rossini reiterated they were “surprised” to discover the Ontario Municipal Partnership Grant from the provincial government totaled

$8.15 million. Rossini said he was expecting a number close to $3 million, similar to what the city received last year. Councillors decided that half of money will be used to pay for some social services costs, while the other half will be put in an unallocated capital fund. Council still has to agree next week to the recommendation. Politicians could also use some of the $14.5 million in 2010 surplus money the city is expected to have to pay for the social services costs.

“We’re like Oliver Twist, always asking for more, please. It’s about fairness. (The money) is a drop in the bucket for the province. They spend that on a coffee break.” Coun. Terry Whitehead “We have been given sufficient funds from the province,” said Bratina. The mayor remained reluctant to “badger” the Liberals for them to cover the $4 million, especially after the province has already given the city an extra $25 million for the Pan Am Stadium, and millions of dollars for other projects. He said he also believes “more things” will be given to the city in the future.

Bratina was ready to approve the city’s 2011 budget Thursday, after councillors managed to reduce the average tax increase to about 0.8 per cent, after agreeing to some strategic staffing cuts that will cost about $1 million. “We have been treated well by the province,” said Bratina. “We can pass this budget today.” Council has also asked the province to pay the $1.5 million in extra emergency medical service expenses Hamilton is expected to incur because of the restructuring Hamilton Health Sciences implemented Monday at McMaster University. Murray suggested councillors pay the $4 million out of the city’s tax stabilization fund this year. Still, councillors will continue to meet with provincial officials to pry money from them. Politicians have given them until the end of June to complete the job. The decision didn’t sit well with Ward 8 (west Mountain) Coun. Terry Whitehead. He said he believes the province is responsible for providing the money to Hamilton. “We are clearly letting the province off the hook,” he said. “We’re like Oliver Twist, always asking for more, please. It’s about fairness. (The money) is a drop in the bucket for the province. They spend that on a coffee break.”

Hamilton precipitation up nearly two-thirds in March About 64 per cent more precipitation than normal fell in Hamilton in March. The area normally receives 48.6 millimetres, but last month received a total of 79.4

millimetres. In most parts of the province, the normal trend from earlier in the year continued, with normal temperatures and precipitation amounts recorded.

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• THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2011 • MOUNTAIN NEWS • WWW.HAMILTONNEWS.COM

Hamilton to absorb $4 million in social services funding

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Mountain candidates support health care

THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2011 • MOUNTAIN NEWS • WWW.HAMILTONNEWS.COM •

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But the parties differ on who is best to renegotiate health accord BY MARK NEWMAN NEWS STAFF

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They may not agree on much, but the candidates on Hamilton Mountain all agree healthcare is a key issue in the upcoming federal election. “I think we all agree that one of the things that makes us competitive as a country is the fact we do have universal healthcare that’s available to everyone,” said Conservative candidate Terry Anderson, who noted the Harper government has increased healthcare payments to the provinces by six percent. “We need more money for health care,” said Liberal candidate Marie Bountrogianni. “It’s completely unacceptable that five million Canadians are currently without a family doctor,” said NDP incumbent Chris Charlton, who added the New Democrats will spend more money to train more doctors and nurses and provide funding for a variety of other medical services such as in-home care. An important component of the healthcare debate across the country is which party is best to renegotiate the national heath accord that was struck by the federal government and the premiers in 2004 and is slated to expire in 2014. Whoever forms the next government will likely be responsible for working out a new national health agreement and the candidates have differing opinions on who is best to do that. “I think the Conservative have worked

hard with the provinces in the past to allow them to maintain their autonomy,” Anderson said. “I think there’s a level of respect that will come from the premiers of the different provinces because of that.” Bountrogianni said the Harper government can’t be trusted to live up to any agreements it signs. “He (Prime M i n i s t e r Stephen Harper) tore the child-care agreement up and he’s going back now on the immigration (agreement) for Ontario,” she said. “There’s proof from his past behaviour that he doesn’t have any problem taking away monies or taking away monies from a signed contract.” Charlton said the next government has to abide by the principles of the Canada Health Act. “We have to maintain public health care,” Charlton said. “We can’t go down the road of privatization; we can’t let the lack of public funding become the excuse for privatization.” The NDP and Liberals say they would cancel corporate tax cuts to pay for increased healthcare spending. Green party candidate Stephen Brotherston said the Greens support the principle of public health care, but government needs to find ways to keep costs down. “Our costs are escalating out of control,” he said. “We need a new approach.” Brotherston said the Greens would like to see a national pharmacare plan where

2011

Hamilton Centre candidates speak, page 21 the federal government, by its sheer size and buying power, could negotiate lower drug costs with the big pharmaceutical companies. “The health-care system can't continue as it is with Canadians suffering from declining service quality, growing wait times and run away costs,” said Christian Heritage Party candidate Jim Enos via email. “CHP Canada will encourage a competitive environment for health service providers to offer world-class care while attracting more top doctors.”

Eramosa Karst tree planting April 23 The public is invited to the second annual tree planting day at Eramosa Karst. Hamilton Conservation Foundation and others are organizing the event at the Eramosa Karst conservation area on April 23 from 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Along with the tree planting, there will be guided hikes, cave clean-ups with karst expert Marcus Buck and the Friends of the Eramosa Karst (FOTEK), and a light lunch for participants. Volunteers are asked to bring work gloves and a shovel, wear appropriate footwear, and dress for the weather. The Eramosa Karst Conservation Area is located on Upper Mountain Albion Road, between Rymal Road East and Highland Road West.

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Public meeting to go ahead as planned Board, high school review committee still at odds BY GORD BOWES NEWS STAFF

Ministry needs to be called in: Peddle

The next chance for the public to ask questions about the Mountain high school review will go ahead as planned. It will take place April 26, 6-9 p.m., at Sherwood Secondary School. Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board staff and consultants hired for the school closure process suggested at last week's meeting the date be swapped with the Mountain review committee’s May 17 meeting. They said the group has made little progress since the last public meeting, held at Hill Park high school in February, and would have nothing new to offer the public. It was at the group's next working meeting March 8 that, after a long discussion about staff's recommendation to close Sherwood, Mountain Secondary and possibly Barton, members voted to step back from the process until they were allowed to examine Saltfleet and Westmount. The board originally said the two schools were exempted from the review because they are at 115 per cent or more of capacity. Little ground was covered at that meeting and even less at last week’s meeting, as with only seven voting members at the table — the rest

BY GORD BOWES NEWS STAFF

HAMILTON SPECTATOR PHOTO

Public school board executive director John Malloy speaks to the Mountain high school review committee during a meeting last week. were in the gallery or absent — there was no quorum to approve the night’s agenda, let alone approve a change in the meeting date. Quorum was a key topic during the night which began with education director John Malloy answering questions from committee members. The committee had previously asked to speak to trustees, but were rebuffed. With some of the 15 committee members threatening not to return to the table, Malloy said the board would try to find community members to replace those who leave. If no one can be found for those positions (there are spots for two parent representative from each of the five high schools under review), the

committee could still continue with fewer members, he said. Trustee Laura Peddle asked how the committee could continue with less than eight members, the current number required for quorum. She noted only seven people were at the table and of those only three were parent reps, out of a possible 10. “That’s a message,” the Ward 6 (east Mountain) rep said. Because there would no longer be 15 voting members if people left and could not be replaced, that would reduce the number required for quorum, Malloy said. “I’m not suggesting this would be community engagement at its best,” Malloy added.

With the public school board and one of its high school review committees in the middle of a standoff, a trustee is calling for help from the province. Only three of 10 parent representatives on the Mountain review committee sat at the table for Tuesday night's meeting. They were joined by the two student members, a community representative and a principal representative, along with a number of non-voting members comprised of staff and trustees. The other seven parent reps either sat in the gallery, did not attend the meeting or have quit the process. “That’s not meaningful stakeholder engagement,” said Laura Peddle, trustee for Ward 6 (east Mountain). She said she doesn’t see the board being able to solve the impasse with its Mountain volunteers and suggested the Ministry of Education be called in. "We need ministry intervention

to fix it," said Peddle. The committee, tasked with coming up with a recommendation for dealing with falling enrolment at the Mountain's high schools and the dwindling per-student grants to pay for all its buildings, voted at its March 8 meeting to pull out of the process until the board put Westmount and Saltfleet into the review. The two high schools, along with Waterdown, were originally excluded because they are at 115 per cent of capacity or greater. The board later noted Westmount was also protected because it is next to a new recreation centre the city is building and is also home to a popular, systemwide self-paced learning program. Last month, the board voted down a motion to reconsider the terms of reference to include Saltfleet and Westmount. On March 28, the board revealed it had forgotten to rise and report from a Dec. 7, 2009 in-camera meeting that Westmount had been exempted because of a deal with the city to get the rec centre built there. The city says the board has no legal requirement to keep Westmount open.

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• THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2011 • MOUNTAIN NEWS • WWW.HAMILTONNEWS.COM

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THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2011 • MOUNTAIN NEWS • WWW.HAMILTONNEWS.COM •

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MOUNTAIN NEWS (est. 1968), is published every Thursday at 333 Arvin Avenue, Stoney Creek, Ontario, L8E 2M6, by Hamilton Community News, which is a division of Metroland Media Group Ltd., a subsidiary of Torstar Corp.

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YOUR REPRESENTATIVES CITY OF HAMILTON Mayor Bob Bratina Councillors Ward 6 Tom Jackson

905-546-4200 bbratina@hamilton.ca 905-546-2707 tjackson@hamilton.ca 905-546-2706 sduvall@hamilton.ca

Ward 7 Scott Duvall Ward 8 Terry Whitehead

905-546-2712

twhitehead@hamilton.ca ONTARIO MPP Sophia Aggelonitis 905-388-9734 Queen’s Park office: 416-325-0702 saggelonitis.mpp.co@liberal.ola.org MPP Andrea Horwath 905-544-9644 Queen’s Park office : 416-325-2777 ahorwath-co@ndp.on.ca CANADA MP Chris Charlton Charlton.C@parl.gc.ca 905-574-3331; Ottawa office 613-995-9389 MP David Christopherson hamilton@davidchristopherson.ca 905-526-0770; Ottawa office 613-992-8356 Audited circulation:

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EDITORIAL

OPINION PAGE

2010

Time to start anew Watching the Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board in recent weeks, we can't help but wince as we witness the rift between elected officials and the public widen with each passing week. With the piling on of reasons for exempting Westmount from an accommodation review, chair Judith Bishop battling Parkview's principal at a public meeting and vice-chair Tim Simmons telling the Mountain high school review committee to stop questioning trustees' wisdom and get back to work, the board seems to be fumbling the ball at every turn of late. Add trustee-vs-trustee battles, questionable in-camera decisions and a general sense of arrogance, and it's no wonder the public is increasingly questioning if they are being properly served. It all began over a year ago with the start of the accommodation review committee (ARC) process, which requires engaging the public about which high schools need to close. Not everyone believes school boards listen to the public during such a review — there's a general mistrust of institutions and politicians that gets in the way of blind faith — but at least there was a chance the wisdom of a colTHE ISSUE lection of community memPublic’s lack of trust bers might be heard. Starting out with a promover high school ise of total transparency, the closure process board has since exposed itself as hiding at least one OUR VIEW key fact from the start, comBoard needs to find ing up with an excuse for sheltering three schools from way to earn back the process rather than being public’s trust upfront with the reason. The board could have been forthright from the start, but chose to be opaque. Now, the public has lost faith in the review process. Take the special education, or vocational, schools for example. At the outset of the accommodation review committee (ARC) process, Mountain and Parkview secondary schools were included for their respective committees to examine and make suggestions about their future. But early in the process, with the announcement by staff that special needs students will be integrated into regular schools, the board’s pre-determined intention to close Mountain and Parkview regardless of the committee's recommendation was excavated. In Westdale, parents are wary of the board's review of G.R. Allan, Dalewood and Prince Phillip elementary schools. They feel the fix is in for a new superschool at Dalewood as the city has already announced a plan to rebuild the recreation centre there. They see the review process as a farce, especially in light of the recent revelations regarding Westmount. In the ARC looking at schools in the lower city, there is a belief the money saved from shutting down area schools will be used to fund a new high school on the Mountain or in Glanbrook. And what about possibly redeveloping Westmount. No one believes the board has not thought about what to do with that school, which is ailing badly, after the review. It would be irresponsible if no one at the board has thought out how our tax dollars will be spent to fix up or replace the decaying building. If the board truly wants to restore the public's trust, it must make efforts to do so. It must go the extra mile and not worry about appearances or egos. For starters, it must capitulate on its heavy-fisted stance and restart the Mountain high school review, all cards in, and actually listen to what the public says during the process. Anything else is lip service to the HWDSB's claim of transparency. Trustees might argue they find themselves between a rock and a hard place, but they wedged themselves into that spot with obstinacy and by acting with impunity right from the start.

AGREE? DISAGREE? HAVE WE MISSED ANYTHING? SHARE YOUR VIEWS IN A LETTER TO THE EDITOR.

TALES

FROM THE

CRYPT

Monuments of recession in South Carolina I just returned from a week-long vacation in As for the golf, the economic situation in the Santee, South Carolina. The area is located area worked to my favour. I played five rounds on between Columbia and Charleston, and is well- some pretty good courses and paid $150 total. known as an affordable golf destination. $200,000 in reach I drove down with my dad and his Speaking of golf, the 6th annual wife. It’s the first lengthy driving Hamilton Community News-Mission excursion I’ve taken part of in a long Services Charity Golf Tournament is time. slated for May 5 at Hidden Lake Golf The last time I drove more than 12Club. hours in one haul I was part of a crew Over the last five years, we have of high school buddies heading to raised more than $170,000 to help Fort Lauderdale, Florida for some Mission Services carry out its crucial spring break fun. mandate to help the less fortunate in The route took us through New our community. York, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, VirThis year, if all goes according to ginia, North Carolina and finally plan, we hope to top the $200,000 MARK CRIPPS South Carolina. It’s about a 13.5 hour mark in total funds raised. This is a MANAGING EDITOR drive from Hamilton, travelling at or huge milestone for our tournament. near the speed limit. Mission Services often uses the Santee is a small town – about 800 people – slogan – for just $3.11 – in soliciting donations to located just off the I-95 in the south eastern part help provide hot, nutritious meals to the needy. of South Carolina. It sits on the banks of Lake If we can reach our goal of topping the Marion, the state’s largest inland lake. The man- $200,000 mark this year, that translates into made lake was created in 1940s as part of a 64,308 meals provided to the homeless and poor hydroelectric project. in our community. It’s a beautiful area, but one that bears the We are still looking for golfers, sponsors and scars of recession. It’s also an area where you see prizes for our tournament. If you can help in any the stark contrast between rich and poor. way, or want to enjoy a great day of golf for a good Lining many of the gated golf courses in the cause, I encourage you to visit www.missionarea are gorgeous homes with immaculate land- services.com and follow the tournament link. scaping. But travel outside these areas, and you It’s agencies like Mission Services that work on will see many people living in old trailers or bro- the front lines to tackle Hamilton’s poverty issues. ken down homes. I’ve always believed in the old Chinese One telling sign of the impact the recession proverb that if you give a man a fish, you feed had on the area is the outlet mall just off the main him for a day. Teach him how to fish and you feed drag (Hwy. 6). Built to accommodate at least 100 him for life. At Mission Services, providing hot stores, there are only three retailers currently sell- meals in just one aspect of a broader agenda to ing goods. impact poverty in our community. One day, we took a trip to a golf course locatThis long-standing agency also provides ed about 25 minutes north on the I-95. I counted shelter and services for abused women, addicat least 10 abandoned hotel/motels along the tion counselling, employment and training servroute. Some were in pretty good shape, others ices, community outreach and much more. were run down. The sit like depressing monuThe wide-ranging impact Mission Services ments to the impact the recession had on South has in our community is the main reason I Carolina’s tourism industry. approached them six years ago with the idea to While the U.S. unemployment rate is 8.9 per partner in a charity golf tournament. cent, it’s 10.2 in South Carolina. Hope to see you out on May 5.

DO YOU HAVE AN IDEA, AN OPINION, OR A NEW PERSPECTIVE TO SHARE WITH THE COMMUNITY? TO SUBMIT A GUEST COLUMN, PLEASE CALL GORD BOWES AT 905-523-5800, EXT. 335 TO DISCUSS


THE HAMILTON MOUNTAIN NEWS WELCOMES YOUR LETTERS. PLEASE SEE GUIDELINES AT BOTTOM OF THIS PAGE OR CALL 905-523-5800 EXT. 335

Many questions for trustees to answer re: Mountain high school review Now that our public school board is finally (albeit reluctantly) starting to come clean with why they wanted the Mountain high school closure review process to play out with Westmount excluded, maybe it’s time they continue to travel that path and answer the following questions as well: 1. Who is the school board accountable to? The Ministry of Education has claimed to not have any control on how they conduct their business. Does this mean they can do anything they want and never be held accountable by anyone over their recent management style? 2. Trustees were voted in at the last election by the public. Is it a surprise if some of them choose to serve out their terms by representing the interests of

More letters to the editor, page 10 those who voted them in and not to how the board would like them to behave? 3. We finally have one deal done between the City of Hamilton and the public school board begrudgingly brought out into the open (the community centre deal if Westmount remained open); are there any more political/real estate deals still to be unveiled? Is the timing of re-opening discussions on the board’s headquarters relocation with the city significant or just plain coincidence? Could the land exchange and its new location be tied to any past agreements and/or future dealings once the Sherwood/Barton/Mountain high school real estate deals are finalized? The board’s integrity has been ques-

tioned in how they’ve handled the Mountain school closure review process, its hesitancy to fully disclose the rationale behind the high schools exempt from this process, and its attempt to muzzle any dissenters from within and outside their organization. They tried to appease the public with a partial disclosure, but perhaps they should try going further and lay all their cards on the table at the next meeting being held at Sherwood. In any business, when you lose the trust of your stakeholders, your job is usually in jeopardy. From the meetings held to date, my concern is that the public school board has already lost the trust of its stakeholders, the community, and it may be too late for this current board to gain it back. Craig Hagopian Hamilton Mountain

Taxpayers have lost faith in high school process Open letter to Judith Bishop and members of the board of education: We received your “letter to the community” and we wish to respond to it. Your apology is an empty one. You are apologizing on behalf of the board simply because you were forced to by the South ARC (accommodation review committee) and trustee Laura Peddle. If the ARC, Ms. Peddle and members

ONLINE POLL RESULTS Last week’s question If the May 2 federal election results in another Conservative minority, do you believe opposition claims they won't move to form a coalition government? The Results Community Ancaster News Dundas Star News Mountain News Stoney Creek News

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of the community at large had not forced this issue so vehemently, the true reasons of why Westmount high school was excluded from the ARC process would perhaps never have come to light. You yourself and your board repeatedly misrepresented the reasons why Westmount was to be excluded and refused to be forthright. In your letter you stated, “Our delay in making these property discussions public was a mistake for which I am sorry.” With such a statement one would think that this delay was a matter of weeks or months, but in fact you have

kept this information hidden for a matter of years. We were told Westmount was removed from the review process because it is overcapacity, then because of its unique program. Now we learn that it was due to a secretive deal with the City of Hamilton dating to 2009. We do not understand why we would as taxpayers place our trust in this process again. The decisions were in fact made long ago when this backroom deal was sealed. Your public consultation is a sham. Jim and Lisa Hagan Hamilton Mountain

Trustees should accept public scrutiny re: Mountain high school review Public school board chair Judith Bishop should teach a course on how to speak out of both sides of one’s mouth. One headline reads: “Bishop: We’ll go on without you.” Yet in her “Letter to the Community,” she asserts the board’s commitment to open dialogue. How hypocritical. The proclamation was a poor attempt at damage control. The public need not be fooled by the tenor of Ms. Bishop’s communique. Her conduct on March 28 was in stark contrast and unbecoming. About 130 people witnessed it. Elected officials being questioned by the public is part of the job. Accept it. Deal with it. Otherwise step down. Filing ethics violation charges

against an elected trustee who is looking out for the interests of her constituents and due process? It appears as though the board thinks it is running its own little fiefdom. The Education Act enables school boards to self-regulate and self-relegate. Without question this legislation is in serious need of reform. School boards must not be provided with the means to investigate and silence fellow trustees who do not agree with the majority and report questionable conduct. Taxpayers require legitimate participation into a system they both fund and elect representatives to steward.

Danusia Szpak Hamilton Mountain

Submitting your letter to the MOUNTAIN NEWS The Hamilton Mountain News welcomes Letters to the Editor of less than 200 words. Letters must contain the writer’s full name, signature, address and telephone number. Addresses and telephone numbers will be used only for verification purposes and will not be published. Names will not be withheld. This newspaper reserves the right to edit, condense or reject any contribution for brevity or legal purposes. Copyright in letters and other materials submitted to the Publisher and accepted for publication remains with the author, but the Publisher and its licensees may freely reproduce them in print, electronic or other forms. Letters may be submitted by fax, email, mail or delivery to our office at 333 Arvin Ave., Stoney Creek, ON L8E 2M6.

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Hamilton Mountain News 333 Arvin Ave. Stoney Creek, ON, L8E 2M6

Fairness to city taxpayers

I

n 2005, the provincial gov- tent with past years and pay ernment introduced the out the $4 million for social Ontario Municipal Part- service downloading. nership Fund (OMPF), The “Access to Best Care replacing the previous trans- Plan” was imposed on city fer program, the Community taxpayers by Hamilton Reinvestment Fund (CRF), a Health Sciences. Indepencommitment was made that dent studies have deterthe OMPF would be respon- mined that the cost of delivsive to changing municipal ering ambulance service will circumstances. increase by an additional The majority of the OMPF $1.5 million as a result of this grant is based on social pro- plan. Over and above the gram costs including Ontario findings of the independent Works, social housing and consultant, regionalizing our child-care services. hospitals has driven many The level of transfers patients from outside of this accruing to the city, through community to utilize our the OMPF, has emergency servbeen declining ices further with the impacting on the corresponding delays of our uploading of ambulances in some of the their offloading social services of patients at our programs. In emergency 2009, the city wards. incurred costs of It is not fair to $115,865,321, expect the taxwhich exceeded payers of this TERRY WHITEHEAD provincial forecommunity to COMMUNITY COLUMNIST casts of pay for increased $107,713,695 cost on expendirelated to programs that are tures that we have no control recognized under the social of and have been driven in programs grant component some part by the broader of the OMPF. The costs were catchment area that the hosborne by the city and reflect- pitals serve. ed the demand for social The $8.1 million is money services as a result of the eco- that the province is paying nomic downturn that began back to the City of Hamilton in the fourth quarter of 2008. to cover off the difference The city received between forecast a reconciliation payand real cost to ment of $8.15 mil- The $8.1 million deliver our social lion in 2011 recog- is money that the services programs. nizing the change in It is my opinion that province is costs that were the $8.1 million is paying back to incurred. the taxpayers' the City of The province recmoney and should ognized that as a Hamilton to be spent on initiaresult of downloadthat will directcover off the tives ing the social servicly or indirectly alledifference es to the City of viate the tax burden Hamilton, it resulted between forecast on our residents. in approximately and real cost to In conclusion, it $19.4 million in is clear that the Govgreater costs to the deliver our social ernment of Ontario taxpayers. In 2004, services program. has been wonderful recognizing the on providing fundinequity, the ing on various files province paid us a grant of in this community. At no $19.4 million and continued time were we ever told that paying annually at a decreas- funding any other issue ing rate because of upload- would jeopardize the $4 miling and clawbacks which lion. I respectfully request resulted in a $4 million short- the province to step up to the fall this year. plate and apply the same Some of the wealthiest principles as in the past and communities in southern pay out the $4 million for the Ontario had their uploading benefit of this community relating to the GTA pooling and provide additional addressed earlier and under financial assistance to a shorter time period to address the increased ambumake them whole. All we ask lance cost. is to be treated in the same Terry Whitehead is counmanner for the benefit of our cillor for Ward 8 (west Mountaxpayers. The city has tain). Columns from councilrequested the province to lors representing the Mounmake the taxpayers of this tain’s three wards appear community whole, consis- monthly.

• THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2011 • MOUNTAIN NEWS • WWW.HAMILTONNEWS.COM

COMMUNITY VOICES

9


COMMUNITYVOICES

THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2011 • MOUNTAIN NEWS • WWW.HAMILTONNEWS.COM •

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School board causing irreparable damage Open letter to Judith Bishop, Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board: The HWDSB board’s handling of the South ARC has severely damaged parental confidence and trust in the HWDSB. Parents are aware that the volunteer South ARC committee has unanimously walked away, stating unequivocally that the process is not fair. Both the Spectator and the Mountain News have published letters to the editor by the HWDSB’s own Parent Involvement Committee chair, as well as many others,

decrying the actions of the HWDSB. Our school council has had members in attendance at HWDSB board, South ARC, committee-of-the-whole and WIN meetings. We have witnessed you and the HWDSB board in action — we are appalled. Continuing the South ARC as it is — unfair, exclusive and covert — will irreparably damage parental confidence and trust in the HWDSB for decades to come. Highview School Council asks you and

the HWDSB board to, by whatever means necessary, include Westmount and Saltfleet in the South ARC process, “stand and report” on all in-camera matters at the earliest opportunity, and withdraw your accusations against trustee Laura Peddle. We believe this to be your, and our, only hope of beginning to restore an atmosphere of trust, co-operation and confidence in our school board. Thank you for considering our concerns. Mark Harrington Chair, Highview School Council

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On Sunday morning, my daughter fell and injured her arm. She was unable to move it and we decided that she required some medical attention. We contemplated visiting St. Joseph’s Healthcare, where my daughter had been treated numerous times in a timely and efficient manner, but decided that McMaster, “the centre of excellence for children,” would be a better option if she required an orthopedic surgeon. Firstly, we had a very difficult time even finding the ER. The lady working at the information desk was directing anxious parents carrying very sick children to the ER. The journey was a maze and quite a distance to travel with a crying child. Our anticipation of a child friendly environment was quickly crushed as we entered a clinical environment that looked like it belonged in a Third World country. The waiting room was old and dirty and sick children were lying on their parents waiting to be seen by a doctor. Ambulances were bringing in patients on stretchers and backboards through the waiting room for all of the scared sick children to see. There was not a children’s book in sight, no television, only a narrow hallway with some animal prints that parents were pacing with their sick children in an effort to distract them during the wait. After waiting to see the triage nurse, my daughter’s elbow popped back in, but we thought that she should still be checked out. Four hours later, after waiting with a twoyear-old, we were told that she was the lowest priority and every patient who had arrived after us would be seen first as they were a higher priority than her. They have hyped up this hospital to be the centre of excellence. Nothing excellent was on display in that emergency room. A rapid assessment or quick-care area should be implemented in order to see the children with minor injuries to avoid these ridiculous wait times. It is a sad day for the children in Hamilton if this is what is deemed to be the centre of excellence for pediatric health care. Robert Welsh Hamilton Mountain


Ever wonder where those huge ice cones come from that ooze out of the shale rocks along the Sherman Access every winter? Long before it was called Sherman Access, it was referred to by Mountain folk as "the New Road." It was finished back in the early 1920s to allow ambulance access to the new Mount Hamilton Hospital from the lower city. Realtor John Fish was also first publisher of the Mountain News and rattled off his small weekly in the back of his shop across from the library. He not only hand fed his old Meighle open-jawed press, but he slung a bag of papers over his shoulder and delivered them to a few hundred residents along the Old Stone Road and side streets. Before the city invaded Barton Township in the late 1920s, all the streets from the Jolley Cut to East 32nd along Concession had real names. We wuz robbed! Here they are: East 18th was Yale Ave., East 19th was Cornell Ave., East 21st was Alameda St., East 22nd was Adelaide St., East 23rd was Alberta St., East 24th was Alexandria St., East 25th was Coral Ave., East 26th was William St., East 31St was Carlisle St., and finally East 32nd St. was Sanford Ave. There were no paved streets past this point. Now let's go back to those ice cones. Old John Fish, considered an authority on Mountain history, wrote a letter in 1949 warning the city engineer about a possible cascade of water swamping the lower city if construction on the foundation for the new 1955 Nora Francis Henderson Hospital was allowed to proceed. He claimed that as a lad during the First World War he and an Indian boy that he had

befriended found a narrow crevasse in the side of the Mountain near Sherman Avenue. He and his pal crawled into the tight, dank fissure on hands and knees, carrying only a stub of a candle to light the way. After a few moments they were jolted to a halt when they found themselves on the crumbling brink of a dark and very scary body of water. Assuming it was but a pool that settled after a recent rain storm, they prodded it with a stick and COLWYN BEYNON were alarmed to find DUSTY CORNERS that it was quite deep. John daringly cast a rock into the murky water and waited to here it hit bottom. To their shock and horror the rock made no noise and it occurred to both that the pond was bottomless. Believing tales they had heard about monsters that lived in the rocks, they shuffled backwards, skinning their knees, till finally outside. John said to me that he had tried many times to find that cave again, but to no avail. Perhaps some evil ogre had sealed it over! When the Henderson foundation was dug, it filled with 30 feet of pristine blue-green water. I was there! John had passed away, but somehow I know that he got the last laugh. Those ice cones keep on comin' too. Mountain historian Colwyn Beynon can be reached at crsw389@sympatico.ca.

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• THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2011 • MOUNTAIN NEWS • WWW.HAMILTONNEWS.COM

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PLANTAR FASCIITIS A common cause of heel pain is irritation along a structure, which attaches from the heel to the toes - the plantar fascia. Inflammation of this is called Plantar Fasciitis. When demands such as overexertion, structural deformity and trauma exceed the capabilities of the plantar fascia, it becomes overstressed and tears. Pain is most common in the heel area where the plantar fascia is tearing away from the heel bone. The pain is usually worse in the morning with the first few steps. A heel spur may also develop where the plantar fascia is tearing away from the bone. Short term treatment may include anti-inflammatory medication, taping, cortisone. Long term treatment is found mainly through the use of custom made orthotics, which correct the structural deformity responsible for the plantar fasciitis.

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Diamond METATARSALGIA, BALL-OF-FOOT-PAIN Is a painful foot disorder that affects the joints of the ball of the foot. They become painful or inflamed, usually due to excessive pressure over a long period of time. It is usually felt in the sole of the foot and sometimes feels like “walking on pebbles”. Other people feel a diffuse pain or burning. High heeled, pointytoed shoes and being overweight are the prime culprits. Calluses or pressure sensitivity may develop under the joints. Metatarsalgia can also be caused by arthritis, trauma, hard floors and specific footwear. For mild cases, a simple change of footwear may be all that is required. Unfortunately, few people seek treatment while the problem is still in the mild stage. For moderate to severe cases, a full length custom orthotics provides proper foot alignment, as well as cushioning the painful, damaged area. ARCH / KNEE PAIN Now consider a foot which is not perfectly formed. One possibility is a foot which is flattened out … or stuck in a high arch position. The foot structure can also be twisted toward the midline of the

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• THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2011 • MOUNTAIN NEWS (HAMILTON) • WWW.HAMILTONNEWS.COM

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THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2011 • MOUNTAIN NEWS • WWW.HAMILTONNEWS.COM •

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Summer road work to begin after Easter weekend Continued from Page 1 Jerry Parisotto, the city’s manager of construction for engineering services, said his department is aware of business owners’ concerns and it will maintain one open lane in each direction through the construction period. “If they’ve got a big sale on some weekend, we’ll try to be away from it as far as we can,” he said. “We’ll keep an entrance open to their place always. They’ll never be shut out completely.” Muench did agree the road is in rough shape and they’re hoping the new pipes will put an end to watermain breaks in the area. Susan Jacob, manager of the design section in the city’s public works department, said the 200-millimetre watermain that runs down the east side of Upper James was installed in the 1950s and the 400-millimetre pipe on the west side was installed in 1962. Since those pipes went in the ground, there have been 21 watermain breaks on the east side and seven on the west side. Upper James is one of eight road work projects slated for the Mountain this year. Drivers who use the Linc will have to find some alternate routes later this year. Parisotto said the 14-year-old east-west expressway that carries about 100,000 vehicles each day, will be repaved over seven consecutive weekends (weather permitting) starting June 15. “The asphalt’s got some cracks in it, it’s time to redo it,” he said. The city had planned to repave the western end of the Linc

last summer, but decided to postpone that work to this year and repave the entire 11-kilometre stretch from Dartnall Road to Highway 403 at a cost of $5 million. Parisotto said shave-and-pave operation will run from 10 p.m. on Fridays to 5 a.m. on Mondays. Both lanes in the same direction will be done at one time and the project will start on the eastbound lanes at the 403. About 1,500 metres can be repaved per weekend. Parisotto said no more than two ramps to the Linc will be closed at one time. The city is spending more than $40 million on road and sewer work this year. About $16 million of that is on the Mountain. Other Mountain road work this year: • Glover Road between Rymal and Twenty. Road and sewer reconstruction. September to October • Crockett Street between Upper Wentworth and Upper Sherman. Road and sewer reconstruction. June to November • Barker Avenue. Road and sewer work. July to September • Inverness between Barker and Upper James. Road and sewer work. July to September. • Nebo Road, south of Twenty. Extend water and sewer services to the Glanbrook section of the Red Hill Industrial Park. July to September • Upper James. Addition of a middle turning lane in front of the transit centre and installation of a traffic light at Dickenson Road. July to September.

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Student bursary offered for environmental conservation Hamilton Conservation Authority is inviting students to apply for one of two $500 student bursaries for environmental conservation. The bursary is open to students currently attending their final year of high school in the city of Hamilton. Students also must portray a strong academic average, and have demonstrated participation, leadership or volunteerism in the promotion of conservation awareness and the environment in our local watershed. All nominations forms, letter of reference and entries must be received by Friday (April 15). For further details and for nomination forms, visit www.conservationhamilton.ca.

Living Rock holds Idol finals Tuesday Living Rock’s Rock Idol finals are being held Tuesday night. Finalists will perform in front of a panel of judges, which include Tim Pocius, director of the Mustard Festival, and Hamilton recording artist Sarena Paton. The show runs 7-9:30 p.m. at Living Rock, 30 Wilson St. Admission is one non-perishable item for Living Rock’s food bank. For details, see www.livingrock.ca or call 905-528-ROCK.

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Good Friday hunts The annual Good Friday Easter egg hunt at Mountain Drive Park is all set to go. The event, presented by Mountain Kidz Klub, runs from 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Cost is $1 per child per egg and includes a bag of goodies. The day kicks off with a pancake breakfast with the Easter bunny from 9-10:30 a.m. Adults eat for $5, kids for $3. Proceeds go to Mountain Kidz Klub programs. Call Kathy Archer at 905-574-2993 for tickets. Mountain Drive Park is located on Concession Street at Upper Gage Avenue. Gourley Park is holding its first ever Easter egg hunt on Good Friday at noon. Rain date is April 23. The event is sponsored by Gourley Park Community Association and Mountain entrepreneur Chris Ecklund. Weather and diamonds permitting, there will also be some organized pickup 3-pitch games for kids ages eight to 12, plus a T-ball area for younger kids. For more information, see www.gourleypark.com.

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CAP Moving Mountains The annual Moving Mountains fundraiser for Cancer Assistance Program hits the road May 1. This year there are three routes — three, five and 15 kilometres — which will leave CAP House on Concession Street and run along the brow. Everyone is welcome to join as a walker, jogger, runner or biker. This fundraiser is a fun, family day which ends with a barbecue lunch at CAP House. Cancer Assistance Program provides transportation for cancer patients to medical appointments. Last year, volunteers gave 2,988 rides to patients. CAP also loans out a variety of equipment and medical aids, from walkers and wheelchairs to wigs and breast prostheses. CAP receives no government funding and relies on community support through special events, donations and bequests. Registration for Moving Mountains is May 1 at noon. The walks leave CAP House at 1 p.m. For more information, call 905-383-9797 or visit www.cancerassist.ca.

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Sisters travel to see funds boost Gambian families BY CATHERINE O’HARA SPECIAL TO THE NEWS

A few thousand dollars raised locally had a major impact on two African villages, ultimately improving the lives of countless families living in Gambia. Known as the Smiling Coast, Gambia is home to the Yagana World Foundation, a Hollandbased not-for-profit organization. The charity is run by Dinemarie Langereis, who is the cousin of Freelton’s Karen DeMedeiros and her sister, Sylvia Galli, of Hamilton. Established 11 years ago, Yagana World Foundation is focused on supporting Gambian youth and community projects. Although the organization sponsors 35 children to attend school, more funds were needed to help sustain a garden project run by local women. So DeMedeiros and Galli teamed up to boost the foundation by hosting a luncheon at Galli’s Hamilton Mountain home, where 40 women turned out to raise funds for underprivileged Gambians. The event, which featured door prizes, a silent auction and a delicious homemade meal, raised $3,200 for the cause. Eager to see first-hand the foundation’s impact on the African community and reconnect with their cousin, who resides in Holland and makes frequent trips to Gambia to operate the non-profit organization, the Hamilton sisters packed their bags and headed to the Smiling Coast. Their month-long journey was spent under a bright blue sky, not one cloud was ever in sight, said Galli. Residing with Langereis in a rented home located in Gambia’s tourist area, the Hamilton pair traveled to two villages, including Fass and Mukumbaya, where they had the opportunity to see how the funds raised at the ladies luncheon would benefit the communities and their residents. And the money went a long way in supporting the villagers. First, a generator, water pump and pipes were purchased to provide women who tend to a community garden access to water. Water pumps in need of repair were also fixed in Mukumbaya. Some Gambian families, who

Sylvia Galli (left), her sister Karen DeMedeiros and cousin Dinemarie Langereis, visit with Gambian youth, including DeMedeiros’s sponsor child Jainaba Manga (holding dolls). earn roughly $2 a day, typically live in mud or corrugated metal homes. During the rainy season, noted DeMedeiros, the elements can cause severe damage to a home’s foundation and – in some cases – cause the house to collapse. This happened to two homes in Mukumbaya, including the residence of a widow and a blind man. “We told them we were doing the mud home,” said DeMedeiros, who alongside Galli, decided to allocate some of the funds they raised to rebuild the two Gambians new residences made of clay blocks and a tin roof. With $1,000 left over from the money they raised in Hamilton, the sisters chose to put it towards the cost of building a third home. During their February trip, DeMedeiros and Galli met Babacar Barry, a hard-working man who was hired by their cousin to tend to the garden of her rented home. Barry, a father of six, was poor and hungry but always put his family’s needs before his own. This was

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evident when the Hamilton pair offered the man a sandwich at lunchtime. And, while he accepted the meal, he didn’t eat it. “He said, ‘I can’t eat this if my kids don’t have food,’” recalled Galli, who described Barry as a gentle giant. “So he wrapped it up and took it home to his kids.” His actions and kindness left a lasting impression on DeMedeiros and her sister, who decided that the rest of the funds should go towards building Barry and his family a new home. And when they told Barry the news, he was overwhelmed. “He just teared up,” explained Galli. With his hand on his heart, he said, “Thank you so much, you are helping my family,” said DeMedeiros. While the women were busy funding various projects and visiting the region, they also spent a lot of time meeting with youth at local schools. Children sponsored by Yagana

World Foundation are offered the opportunity to go to school. The sponsors’ donations pay for school fees, uniforms and meals. But to ensure that the youth are indeed attending classes, Langereis visits with principals and teachers and obtains regular updates. DeMedeiros and Galli were surprised to see how little the schools had in terms of supplies and resources. The students, explained the Hamilton Mountain resident, would simply love to have their own pencil and eraser. The sisters made sure that youth were provided with the necessary supplies to succeed in their studies. They donated exercise books, pencils and erasers, which they had collected from friends and family members prior to their February 7 departure. Soccer balls, donated by the Flamborough Soccer Club, were also a huge hit among the youngsters, as were skipping ropes provided by DeMedeiros. The Hamilton pair also brought with them medical supplies, including a blood pressure cuff, a stethoscope, bandages and overthe-counter pain relief tablets, which were donated by two area doctors and other supporters. Their contributions to the communities were accepted with open arms, and villagers, noted the Hamilton sisters, were greatly appreciative – so much so that the locals provided DeMedeiros and Galli with a list of other items they would like to receive upon the pair’s next visit to Gambia, including electricity for the entire village and an ambulance. While some of the Gambians’ wishes go above and beyond what DeMedeiros and Galli can fulfill, the sisters realized just how much they were able to do with limited funds. “What we did with that money is amazing,” said Galli, who hopes to host an annual luncheon in support of the Yagana World Foundation. DeMedeiros, too, was pleased to see first-hand the impact their contributions had on the villagers and would like the opportunity to travel to Gambia in the future to revisit with the individuals they supported and see their newly built homes. For more information on the not-for-profit organization, visit www.yaganaworld.com.

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THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2011 • MOUNTAIN NEWS • WWW.HAMILTONNEWS.COM •

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Time to think about annuals for your garden True annuals germinate, flower, set seeds and die within a single growing season. There are many different annuals, some of the most popular include nasturtiums, sunflowers, impatiens, petunias, marigolds and cosmos. Annual vegetables include tomatoes, peppers, pumpkins, peas, beans, zucchini and many others. Annuals can be started indoors from seeds and transplanted into your garden after the last frost of the season, usually around mid-May in our area. Purchasing flats of annuals, flowers or vegetables, from your local garden centre is another option. Hanging baskets of petunias, impa-

tiens or begonias are very popular for adding colour to any garden or patio. Marigolds are often used as a border along the edge of a lawn or vegetable garden. Young gardeners are amazed to see how high the large sunflowers grow from the GROWING GREEN seeds that they MOUNT HAMILTON have planted. HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY Most annuals prefer full sun, but can usually grow in

partly shady locations. There are two types of impatiens, one prefers full sun (sunshine impatiens) and the other prefers full shade. Keep this in mind when planting your impatiens. The Mount Hamilton Horticultural Society is also holding its annual spring plant sale on Saturday, May 21, at 9 a.m. at Chedoke Presbyterian Church on the west Mountain. This will be a great opportunity for everyone to buy some annuals or perennials for their garden or balcony. Growing Green is prepared by Mount Hamilton Horticultural Society and appears biweekly. This week’s column was written by Bill Fegan.

Struggling With DEBT? Government Programs Available! NEW STANDARDS JUST INTRODUCED TO ELIMINATE OR REDUCE YOUR DEBT Call NOW W to see if you qualify

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‘Survivorman’ at RBG Visitors to Royal Botanical Gardens who are looking to brush up on their outdoor survival skills will get to do so Saturday at 10 a.m. as celebrity survival expert Les Stroud will stop by to take part in the launch of renowned artist Robert Bateman’s ‘Get to Know’ Contest. Stroud will be taking questions from guests and talking about the importance of getting outdoors and in touch with nature, the basis of the ‘Get to Know’ Program, an inspiring conservation program developed by Canadian artist Robert Bateman. The ‘Get to Know’ Contest is open to Canadians 19 and this year's theme is "This is My Forest," in celebration of the United Nations’ International Year of Forests. Students can make a submission in a variety of forms and can learn more about the contest at www.gettoknow.ca.

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Opera club performs Grade 6 students Grace Cheng (left), as the Countess, and Andrew Stefan, as Figaro, will be on stage tonight (Thursday) through Saturday as the Buchanan Park Opera Club presents The Marriage of Figaro at Buchanan Park Public School, 30 Laurier Ave. Tickets are $5 with all profits going to children's cancer research at Chedoke-McMaster. Phone 905-387-5212 or see www.bpoc.ca for details.

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Science in a turtle shell Ashlyn Stewrt (left) and Alexander Spriggs take a look at the inside of a turtle shell during a demonstration last week by Scientists in School featuring hands-on activities at Westwood elementary.

Healthy weight-loss support group begins Healthy For Life is a weight-loss support group based in Hamilton that is helping participants transform their bodies in a 12week program. A certified health coach directs the program and provides instruction to participants, helping them make lifestyle changes, monitoring body weight and providing coaching to help guide their decisions when planning meals. This session will involve raising funds for the Cana-

dian Diabetes Association for research and advocacy. Average weight loss for most participants is 20 pounds over 12 weeks. One recent participant lost more than 70 pounds over three seasons and avoided knee replacement surgery. The program begins Wednesday, April 20 at Holy Trinity Anglican Church, 120 Fennell Ave. For more information, call 905-3892839.

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17


THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2011 • MOUNTAIN NEWS • WWW.HAMILTONNEWS.COM •

18

National Volunteer Week April 10-16, 2011 Lend a hand in a variety of ways

What can you do as a volunteer? Here are some examples of the variety of volunteer positions available through Volunteer Hamilton: organize events; fundraising; teaching, counselling; committee/board members; office support; boards of directors/committee work and other leadership roles; driving; coaching; referee/time keeper; canvassing;

mentoring; companionship/friendship; recreation leader; clerking; maintenance/handyman; data management/entry; trainer/presenter; virtual volunteering; volunteer from home; arts, drama, music, writing. Check Volunteer Hamilton’s online database at volunteerhamilton.on.ca for hundreds of volunteer opportunities.

Enriching lives through volunteerism Volunteer Hamilton operations co-ordinator makes connections

Thank You

to the volunteers and their contribution to our communities!

THANK YOU Royal Botanical Gardens owes a great deal of gratitude to our hundreds of volunteers and exceptional Auxiliary now in their 50th year and our committee members for the thousands of hours of dedicated service over the past and previous years. Your commitment, passion and spirit as ambassadors is truly remarkable and help make the Gardens a spectacular and memorable place to visit.

TO BECOME A VOLUNTEER please call 905-577-7771 or visit www.rbg.ca RBG Centre, 680 Plains Road West, Hamilton/Burlington

BY DEBRA DOWNEY SENIOR EDITOR

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PHOTO BY DEBRA DOWNEY

Volunteer Hamilton operations coordinator Barbara Klimstra.

Easter Special Gourley Park Community Assoc. and the Easter Bunny invites you to their

Friday, April 22, 2011 at 12 noon

followed by Games/Festivities & BBQ in Gourley Park (Rain Date: Saturday April 23, 2011)

Bring your basket and hop on over for some old fashioned fun.

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invites you to their 2nd Annual

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Sunday, April 24th at 2 pm in Gilkson Park

Followed by a Raffle of 3 Bicycles & a BBQ! Easter Egg Fun sponsored by Chris Ecklund / City of Waterfalls

1791 Stone Church Road, Hamilton

905-561-6777 www.beyondthebatter.com

Volunteer Hamilton operations co-ordinator Barbara Klimstra has exceptional skills at connecting people. Through leadership, education and advocacy Klimstra has linked organizations, businesses and individuals in embracing volunteerism for the past two years. She has connected people and organizations to successfully stage Volunteer Hamilton’s two largest fundraisers — All That Rock and the Community Builders Breakfast. And, on a personal basis, she has irrevocably joined Hamilton, Ontario, with Hamilton, New Zealand, on the Klimstra family tree. Established in 1963, Volunteer Hamilton has more than 40 years experience in facilitating and supporting volunteer activity. See SUPPORTING/Page 19


answers questions from the public and hosts workshops on a variety of volunteer-related topics. With funding from the City of Hamilton and the United Way, Volunteer Hamilton also runs two longstanding programs â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Snow Angels, which last year connected 237 service recipients with 162 volunteer shovellers, and the Bay Area Leadership program at Mohawk College. Volunteer Hamilton representatives also visit schools and community groups to present Volunteer 101, a PowerPoint presentation designed to educate potential volunteers and agencies that need assistance. With todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economic climate, Klimstra said Volunteer Hamilton is also thinking strategically by sharing space at 267 King St. E. with Hamilton Volunteer Probation Officers and the Hamilton Centre for Civic Inclusion. With a spacious area open to the public, Volunteer Hamilton also makes its premises available to groups for presentations and special events. And with all these professional connecting skills, it comes as no surprise that Klimstra undoubtedly made the biggest link of her life the day she â&#x20AC;&#x153;connectedâ&#x20AC;? online from her native Hamilton, New Zealand, with a gentlemen from Hamilton, Ontario. He was looking for someone to talk to in Hamilton. Eventually, the pair sorted out the mis-

communication over Hamilton, met and married. Before moving to Ontario, Klimstra worked in senior management at a major corporation in New Zealand. Because of her professional skills, Volunteer Hamilton was a â&#x20AC;&#x153;natural choiceâ&#x20AC;? to volunteer when she arrived in Canada. Klimstra volunteered twice a

Thank You Neighbour to Neighbour Centre wishes to extend a heartfelt thank you to all of our dedicated volunteers for their continuous support.

Help is just a neighbour away. 28 Athens Street, Hamilton, ON L9C 3K9 905-574-1334 www.n2ncentre.com

...to all our Mission Servicesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; volunteers who make a difference in the lives of people in need in the community. You help us offer hope for today and opportunities for tomorrow.

Mission Services has been meeting needs in Hamilton since 1956

www.mission-services.com

905-528-4211

ton, New Zealand, is a hidden gem,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Most people bypass them, but donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t pass by between Niagara Falls and Toronto, call in to Hamilton and see it, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really a beautiful place.â&#x20AC;? For more information on Volunteer Hamilton and its services, call 905-523-4444 or visit www.volunteerhamilton.on.ca.

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Habitat for Humanity Hamilton would like to say Thank You to the heart of our organization, our Volunteers. Through the work and dedication of an evergrowing number of volunteers that have helped Habitat Hamilton in achieving unprecedented success this past year as we continue to expand our homebuilding efforts.

Thank you

New and used home Improvement Warehouse

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Monday - Saturday 9am-5pm 285 Nash Rd. N. (just below Barton) Hamilton, Ontario L8H 7P4

of Burlington & Greater Hamilton

Phone: 905-560-6707 www.habitathamilton.ca info@habitathamilton.ca

The Wellington J^WdaOek

week, working reception and answering phones, before being hired as operations co-ordinator. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I love living here,â&#x20AC;? said Klimstra, adding Hamilton, Ontario, is a lot like Hamilton, New Zealand, in that the marvels of the city are often overshadowed by a nearby, larger urban area. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hamilton, Ontario, like Hamil-

We Would Like To Thank All The Volunteers For Your Dedicated Service At The Wellington. 201019

Diamond

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Continued from Page 18 The organization has more than 130 member agencies, with the number always climbing, and about 10,000 volunteer opportunities currently available â&#x20AC;&#x201D; everything from office support to driving, coaching and canvassing, mentoring and music. The mission All Lives Enriched Through Volunteerism guides Klimstra and other staff members who work at the downtown Hamilton office. Klimstra said there is no average age of people who use Volunteer Hamiltonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s services. Clients could be teens looking to get their 40hour community service credit, people who are unemployed but want to remain involved in the community or retirees hoping to keep active. â&#x20AC;&#x153;No day is the same. Every day is different,â&#x20AC;? said Klimstra. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Although I have been asked the same question a lot of times, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a different person asking it.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;I just love being here, helping people to connect to volunteer activities, and helping them find an opportunity where they know they are going to be helpful and useful, and a meaningful experience for them.â&#x20AC;? Along with connecting agencies and volunteers through the userfriendly website at www.volunteerhamilton.on.ca, Volunteer Hamilton provides mentoring services,

OUR VOLUNTEERS NURTURE GROWING MINDS!

Helping People Help Themselves St. Matthewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s House is a place of hope where families, children, seniors and individuals most in need receive help to improve their capacity to participate in the community.

Thank you for your time and commitment and for sharing the gift of literacy. If you would like to become a volunteer tutor, please call 905-529-9907. We provide tutor training.

For more information, visit www.thewellington.ca or call marketing manager Doretta Skidmore at 905-385-2111, Ext. 104

St. Matthewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s House Provides: â&#x20AC;˘ Food & Basic Needs Assistance â&#x20AC;˘ Day care & Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Programs â&#x20AC;˘ Summer Camp Program â&#x20AC;˘ Seniors Supports & Programs â&#x20AC;˘ Supportive Housing â&#x20AC;˘ Transitional Housing â&#x20AC;˘ Supports to Families & Individuals â&#x20AC;˘ Homelessness Prevention â&#x20AC;˘ Special Needs Resourcing â&#x20AC;˘ Mental Health Outreach

Thank you A Heartfeltlu nteers for to all our vo es you make! the differenc ST. MATTHEWâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S HOUSE 414 BARTON ST. E. (905) 523-5546

For information A huge THANK YOU to the members of the Junior League, our community about membership visit volunteers and partner organizations who together, dedicate thousands of volunteer hours each year to create lasting positive changes in our community! www.juniorleague.ca Are you interested in improving your community while developing your own potential? Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t let the word â&#x20AC;&#x153;juniorâ&#x20AC;? fool you. Junior Leagues reach out to women of all ages.

New Member Information Session on Wednesday, April 20, 2011. Visit www.juniorleague.ca or call 905.525.1077 for more information. You too can be a catalyst for lasting comm unity change!

or call (905) 525-1077 The Junior League of Hamilton - Burlington

HOLIDAY HOUSETOUR d[ Y^hi ^cXi ^kZ]dbZh

â&#x20AC;˘ THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2011 â&#x20AC;˘ MOUNTAIN NEWS â&#x20AC;˘ WWW.HAMILTONNEWS.COM

National Volunteer Week April 10-16, 2011 Supporting and facilitating volunteers for more than 40 years

19


Mohawk invites high school students to video contest Take a hike with Iroquoia club Mohawk Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s advertising program has announced a sweet contest that involves looking at lemons in a creative way. The Mohawk ad contest gives high school students across the Hamilton area a chance to showcase their creativity by making a video that advertises the â&#x20AC;&#x153;insane sourness of lemons.â&#x20AC;? Entrants will post their videos to YouTube, then post the link on

d 250tc SelecteSets only t e e h S ach, $5.00 SeIZE! Y N A

the contestâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Facebook page. Based on the total number of YouTube likes, the videos will be short-listed to the 10 best. Professors in the advertising program will then judge the winner from that list. The winner receives their first yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tuition to the advertising program, a value of $3,500, not including books or living expenses. Professor Jef Petrossi says the

video project is a different way to attract applicants to the program especially with its mix of hands-on involvement and social media aspects. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We expect a lot of excitement about this contest and know weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to see some really smart creative (videos),â&#x20AC;? says Petrossi. To learn more about the contest, visit www.mohawkadcontest.com.

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Want to get into hiking but donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know where to start? The Iroquoia club is offering a free two-part hiker initiation program. The first portion takes place Monday, May 9, 7 p.m at Tumblehome Source for Adventure, 401 Brant St., Burlington. Experienced hike leaders will teach the essentials of having an enjoyable hiking experience. On Saturday, May 14, at 10 a.m., an experienced hike leader will lead participants on a scenic hike through a section of the Bruce Trail Registration is required. Email LindaTiley@hotmail.com.

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Health care a priority in next term NEWS STAFF

The next crop of federal politicians have serious decisions to make on health care, candidates say. Conservative leader Stephen Harper, NDP leader Jack Layton and Liberal leader Michael Ignatieff have all committed their parties to maintaining the six-per-cent escalator in provincial health-care funding embedded in the current Health Accord, which expires in 2014. Ignatieff made his pledge last Friday during an announcement at the Juravinksi Cancer Centre. The pledge would give the provinces about $2 billion more each year. “The federal government really needs to set those standards,” said Anne Tennier, the Liberal candidate for Hamilton Centre. “We need to be sure we have good funding in place.” Tennier said one of the things her party would do if it has the chance is help take some of the demand off the health-care system through health promotion programs. The Liberals would also offer family-care programs to take some of the load off hospitals and allow people to take time off work to help a relative. That program would offer a tax credit and Employment Insurance changes so family members can take care of loved ones at home. Tennier said that hits close to home for her. When her mother was dying six years ago from ovarian cancer, her sister had to retire early to help take care of her.

• THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2011 • MOUNTAIN NEWS • WWW.HAMILTONNEWS.COM

BY GORD BOWES

21

“When families need that kind of assistance, you should not be forced to take leave of your job with no benefits, or worse yet quit your job to take care of a family member,” said Tennier. “You shouldn’t have to ever choose between working and families.” David Christopherson, the incumbent MP, says his party would go beyond just the health accord commitment. An NDP government would add 1,200 doctors and 6,000 nurses over 10 years, he said. It would also focus on enticing provinces to expand home health care, pharmacare and longterm care, helping them to make the decision with more funding to expand those programs. “I haven’t heard any of the other party leaders say they would do that," he said. Christopherson said the NDP budget is fully costed, but whether it is the government or individuals, the money will be spent in those areas. “The question is, is it going to bankrupt individual Canadians to provide those services for their family members or are we prepared to take the next step in the kind of health-care system that we have in Canada.” Jim Byron, the Conservative candidate in Hamilton Centre, declined to comment when contacted by the Mountain News. Karen Burson, the Green candidate, did not return a call requesting comment.

2011

What’s your opinion? editor@hamiltonmountainnews.com

825 Fennell Ave. E. (Corner of Upper Sherman Ave.) (905) 383-5380

455 Ottawa St., N. (West side Centre Mall) (905) 549-7026

955 Upper James (North of the Linc) (905) 388-1477

★ Limeridge Mall (Next to Sears) OPEN SUNDAYS (905) 575-0084

138 Hughson St., N. (at corner of Cannon St.) (905) 572-7444 1289 Main St., W. (Opposite McMaster Hospital) (905) 523-4323

Stoney Creek 930 Queenston Rd. (East of Lake Ave.) (905) 664-6666


Deep divide between councillors on area-rating

THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2011 • MOUNTAIN NEWS • WWW.HAMILTONNEWS.COM •

22

Raining art Mountain News staffers Mike Vukovich and Kerrie Buikema put the finishing touches on a rain barrel which will be auctioned off in Hamilton’s first Earth Day Rain Barrel Art Auction. Designs by school children, artists and others are part of an online silent auction where they will be auctioned off to raise funds for Earth Day Hamilton-Burlington’s eco-festival and community tree planting events. The silent auction concludes on April 30 at www.RainBarrel.ca/artbarrel.

Volunteers needed for breast cancer conference Volunteers are needed for sixth World Conference on Breast Cancer to be held in Hamilton June 7-11. For more information on the conference and a list of volunteer opportunities, visit www.wcbcf.ca and go to the Volunteer tab or call 905-523-4664.

Continued from Page 1 Under the Citizens’ Forum recommendation for a three-tiered fire service rate, suburban residents would see their taxes rise from between 1.9 per cent for Ancaster residents, to 9.2 per cent for Glanbrook homeowners. The forum, which introduced its recommendations about a month ago, also proposed to eliminate Ancaster’s sidewalk snow clearing service. City staff said eliminating the service would mean a $4 savings for each household. Ancaster Coun. Lloyd Ferguson has called the forum’s recommendation silly and said he will fight to keep the service. But if councillors decide to eliminate area-rating for transit, fire, culture and recreation, as a number of inner city politicians want to happen starting this year, then suburban taxpayers will see a jump in their taxes anywhere from 3 to 4 per cent. Hamilton residents would see tax cuts in every scenario that was proposed by city financial staff. Corporate services general manager Robert Rossini said any area-rating proposal includes ideas to mitigate the tax impacts by phasing in the increases over a number of years. “I’m still very nervous where we are going,” said Stoney Creek Coun. Brad Clark. Clark pointed out that if Stoney Creek residents pay the same in taxes as other suburban areas for fire services, for example, they should expect to get the most complete service available. Upper Stoney Creek residents receive a hybrid fire service that is a combination of full-time and volunteer. But Deputy Fire Chief Dave Cunliffe said it would cost about $20 million in salaries to provide full-time fire service for Stoney Creek. That figure does not include money for equipment that also would be needed, he said.

“There will be a natural demand for increase services,” said Clark, directing his comments to inner city councillors who want to eliminate area-rating. “Be careful what you wish for.” After listening to the nearly five-hour presentation about changes to area-rating, councillors said they needed time to talk about such an emotional and fractious issue among themselves.

“(Reforming area-rating) has dragged on way too long. Hamilton is the only community that hasn’t addressed it.” Coun. Terry Whitehead “I want to bring us together,” said Ward 4 Coun. Sam Merulla, who has wanted to eliminate area rating, believing it has benefited the suburban areas since amalgamation. Although he condemned some colleagues for practicing “petty politics” with area rating. “Some people are still trying to make this a divisive issue,” he said. “We need to get into the back room and have this discussion,” said Ward 8 (west Mountain ) Coun. Terry Whitehead, who also wants to change area-rating for this year. “(Reforming area-rating) has dragged on way too long. Hamilton is the only community that hasn’t addressed it.” The past municipal election also reminded councillors that voters demanded they do something to cut taxes. They said, say councillors, Hamilton remains one of the highest taxed municipalities in the province. “Taxes are just too high,” said Mayor Bob

Bratina. Flamborough Coun. Judi Partridge, whose residents will have to absorb the second highest tax increase if area-rating is eliminated or reformed, said her homeowners can’t afford further tax hikes. “We have to get them down in a sustainable fashion,” she said. But Brenda Johnson, councillor for Glanbrook, which would have the highest tax hikes if area rating is changed, remained fearful of any changes council adopts. She would like to see a tax policy that would allow homeowners pay for what they receive in services. “I’m already dreading the outcome,” she said. Councillors are expected to discuss changing area rating this week, with the possibility that it could take effect in the 2011 budget. So far politicians have whittled the average 2011 tax increase down to about 0.8 per cent. If councillors agree to a changed area-rating system, and phase it in over a period of five to 10 years, city staff say tax increases this year could be as high in the urban areas as 3.1 per cent for Dundas residents, to a low of 0.3 per cent increase for Hamilton residents. Other politicians believe they should gather more information, including conducting a municipal services delivery review before implementing such a comprehensive tax policy. Such a review could take anywhere from six months to a year. “I’m not married to my previous report,” said Rossini, referring to his 2009 area rating study. “I know the sensitivity of the issue. Nobody wants a head-on collision. Compromise needs to happen.”

A tale of two rallies downtown Harper, Ignatieff stop in Hamilton

second trip he has made to the downtown core — was interrupted by a steelworker who BY KEVIN WERNER shouted that jobs were being lost at U.S. Steel. NEWS STAFF Wayne Rae, president of United Steelworkers Local 6200 in Welland, was immediately It was a tale of two competing political ral- surrounded by reporters, telling them Harper’s lies in Hamilton April 7 with the Conservatives Conservative government has done nothing to and Prime Minister Stephen Harper avoiding help Stelco and its 900 locked out workers. the protests, while Liberal leader Michael Rae said he would be voting NDP in the Ignatieff embraced the demonstrations at his federal election. standing-room-only get-together at LIUNA “He needs to hear from regular people,” station. said Rae. “The way things are Harper barely noticed the the middle class is dis“They did allow me to speak. I going, 100 United Steelworkers Local appearing. And what U.S. Steel 1005 and student protesters thought they would toss me.” is doing in Hamilton is disguston Main Street when he took ing. (The Conservatives) have Wayne Rae the stage at about 6:15 p.m. in allowed the companies to the Hamilton Convention come in and run roughshod.” Centre to reiterate his theme of creating jobs Harper ignored Rae and continued his and demonizing a possible “ramshackle” presentation. coalition between the Liberals and NDP. The tight security around Harper did not During his 35-minute speech, surrounded expel Rae, which has happened to others at by a partisan crowd including several Conser- previous Conservative rallies. Harper on vative candidates, and introduced by Hamil- Thursday apologized for his security throwing ton East-Stoney Creek Conservative candidate out a university student because she had Brad Clark, Harper talked about providing a posed for a photo with Liberal leader Michael “strong, stable majority “to create jobs, and Ignatieff. provide tax relief to families, and seniors. “They did allow me to speak,” said a surThe Liberals, he said, will only spend more prised Rae. “I thought they would toss me.” money, and introduce “job-killing” tax hikes. Ignatieff, making his eighth visit to Hamil“The choice is to have a ramshackle, inco- ton and second stop in less than a month, saw herent, unprincipled, unstable coalition of Mr. and heard the 50 or so steelworkers and other Ignatieff, backed by the NDP,” he said. “What protesters at LIUNA, as he waded into an Canada needs is a strong, stable majority.” enthusiastic Liberal crowd at the entrance to Harper tried out a few of his ideas that were the historical building. be revealed in the party’s platform the next Once inside, he attacked Harper for spendday, including more investment in the north, ing $30 billion on fighter jets, another $13 bilreducing the deficit by 2015 by delaying costly lion on “U.S.-style mega prisons,” and for proprograms, and introducing the Conservative viding tax breaks to corporations. budget that was rejected by the three other Ignatieff said he offered the “politics of federal parties. hope”, as apposed to Harper’s “appeal to fear” Harper, who was making his first visit to about economic collapse, and political instaHamilton this political season — and only the bility.


FOOD NEWS

• THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2011 • MOUNTAIN NEWS • WWW.HAMILTONNEWS.COM

23

A WEEKLY FEATURE TO TEMPT THE TUMMY

Try something new for Easter brunch After the kids have finished hunting for Easter eggs, gather your family for a memorable mid-day meal. These menu ideas will please every guest at your table: • Excellent eggs: If you’re planning a sitdown meal, serve Eggs Benedict made with Canadian bacon and sliced Ontario greenhouse tomatoes. For a casual buffet style brunch, set out foods guests can easily serve themselves, including a bowl of hard-boiled eggs, sliced peameal bacon and a basket of rhubarb oatmeal muffins. • Perfect protein: Make glazed ham, roast duck or pork tenderloin the star attraction on your table and surround it with side dishes that your guests will love. • Superbsweets: Create a crowd-pleasing apple or carrot cake in an Easter egg or Bunny shape using a mould. Decorate it with piped icing, jelly beans and gum drops. Here are some brunch recipes from Foodland Ontario to try this Easter.

2 cloves Ontario garlic, minced

In large skillet, heat oil over medium heat; cook onion until wilted, about 5 minutes, stirring often. Add red pepper; cook for 3 minutes, stirring occasionally. Stir in garlic and potatoes, to coat with oil. Stir together water, tomato paste and piri-piri; stir into potato mixture. Reduce heat, cover and cook until potatoes are tender, 20 to 25 minutes. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Increase heat slightly. Break eggs, one at a time, into cup and slip into skillet on potato mixture, spacing evenly. Cover and cook until white is set, about 5 minutes. Sprinkle with coriander.

Eggs top a skillet dish of potatoes, onions and sweet pepper that is good for brunch.

Eggs cooked on spicy potatoes

Mushrooms au gratin

1/2 tsp (2 mL) each salt and dried majoram

Eggs top a skillet dish of potatoes, onions and sweet pepper that is good for brunch or a light supper with a crisp green salad. Preparation Time: 15 minutes Cooking Time: 35 minutes Serves: 4 3 tbsp (45 mL) olive oil

An easy way to try the many different kinds of delicious freshly-grown Ontario Mushrooms. Serve as an appetizer, side dish, or light main course. Preparation Time: 10 Minutes Cooking Time: 35 Minutes Servings: 4 to 6 1 1/2 lbs (750 g) Ontario mushrooms (any mixture of crimini, white, portobello, oyster, and shitake)

1 tsp (5 mL) all-purpose flour

1 small Ontario onion, minced

1 tbsp (15 mL) chopped fresh parsley

1 Ontario Onion, chopped 1 small Ontario greenhouse sweet red pepper, thinly

4 Ontario potatoes, cut into 1/4-inclh to 1/2-inch (5 mm to 1 cm) cubes 1/2 cup (125 mL) water 2 tbsp (25 mL) tomato paste 1/2 tsp (2 mL) piri-piri or hot pepper sauce 4 eggs Chopped fresh coriander or parsley

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THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2011 • MOUNTAIN NEWS • WWW.HAMILTONNEWS.COM •

24

Caden Okis, 2, shows off his artwork with parents Rick and Jessica during the preschool art gala at the Les Chater YMCA Child Care Centre on the Mountain March 31. Dozens of youngsters took part in the event. The artwork by children ages 1-5 was auctioned off to raise funds for the Y’s Strong Kids campaign. SUBMITTED PHOTO

Easy dish for first course, main or side Continued from Page 23

1/2 tsp (2 mL) each salt and dried thyme

Easy squash risotto

1/4 tsp (1 mL) pepper

Traditionally this creamy Italian rice dish requires liquid to be added gradually and stirred constantly, which is rather labor intensive for today's busy cooks. Try this easier version that is only stirred when squash is added. Serve as first course, main dish or side dish with grilled meats or fish. Preparation Time: 20 Minutes Cooking Time: 20 Minutes Servings: 4 main-dish or 6 side-dish servings 2 tbsp (25 mL) olive oil 1 Ontario onion, chopped 2 cloves garlic, minced 1 1/2 cups (375 mL) Italian short-grain rice (e.g. Arborio) 4 cups (1L) chicken broth 1 tbsp(15 mL) white wine vinegar, cider vinegar or rice vinegar 1 tsp (5 mL) dried sage

4 cups (1L) large bit-size pieces peeled Ontario butternut or buttercup squash 1/2 cup (125 mL) light or half-and-half cream 1/2 cup (125 mL) grated Parmesan cheese 1/4 cup (50 mL) minced fresh parsley (optional) In large saucepan, heat oil over medium heat; cook onion and garlic, stirring for 2 to 3 minutes. Add rice; cook, stirring, for 2 to 3 minutes. Stir in chicken broth, vinegar, sage, salt, thyme and pepper; bring to boil. Cover and reduce heat to medium-low; cook for 5 minutes. Stir in squash; simmer for 15 to 18 minutes or until squash and rice are tender but still slightly firm. Stir in cream (rice should be moist and creamy). Serve immediately topped with cheese and parsley. (If rice gets dry upon standing, add a little more chicken broth.) For variation, add diced cooked bacon or smoked sausage.

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BY KEVIN WERNER NEWS STAFF

Since 2005, politicians have asked its internal auditor to conduct almost 430 audits of various city programs. Six years later, about 42 per cent of those original recommended audits are either not completed, or are in various stages of progress. “Forty-two per cent is a glaring number,” said Dundas Coun. Russ Powers. Stoney Creek Coun. Brad Clark said since he became a member of the audit and administrative committee in 2006 he has seen no change when it comes to the internal auditor fulfilling council’s requests to complete an audit. “What is the follow-up?” said Clark. A review of the audits conducted found that of 428 audits of department programs since 2005 that councillors have asked for, about 248 have been completed, with about 180 in various stages of being completed, said staff. It usually takes an audit 12 to 18 months to be finished. At the moment there is no recommendation by politicians to

accelerate the progress or if the auditing will be entirely completed. City staff argue the audit department has a lack of resources to fulfill its mandate, a complaint that councillors have heard many times

before. Both Clark and Stoney Creek Coun. Brenda Johnson said the city needs to provide the necessary support to its internal auditor. If not, said Johnson, then the

WASTE REDUCTION TASK FORCE (WRTF) PUBLIC MEETING The City of Hamilton is working with the WRTF to implement the Solid Waste Management Master Plan. You are invited to attend and learn more. The WRTF will hold its next meeting on: Wednesday, April 20, 2011 from 7:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. at City Hall, 71 Main St W, in Room CH264. If you have any accessibility requirements in order to participate in this meeting, please contact Rźta at (905) 546-2424 ext 5252. Advance requests are encouraged to enable us to meet your needs adequately.

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process to follow up the incomplete audits, including having general managers provide written updates, and the internal auditor will provide a status report to councillors later in the year.

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• THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2011 • MOUNTAIN NEWS • WWW.HAMILTONNEWS.COM

City audits fail to pass grade; only 42 per cent completed

25


WWW.HAMILTONMOUNTAINNEWS.COM • MOUNTAIN NEWS (HAMILTON) • THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2011 •

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Continued from Page 1 Among the accusations is that she breached confidentiality by divulging the details of a December 2009 in-camera meeting at which trustees voted to exclude Westmount after agreeing to lease land next door to the city for a new recreation centre next door. Until details of the meeting were finally made public on March 28, trustees had repeatedly insisted Westmount was excluded from the review because enrolment is above capacity.

EDITORIAL: Public trust is lost, page 8 “Whatever they do with this process, they will damn well do it in public. They will not do this to me anymore. I’ve had it,” Peddle said as she caught her breath outside. “No staff, nobody recording, no minutes, it’s just trustees and the director,” she said. “There was press waiting (outside), so they got caught red-handed.” Bishop left the closed session a short time later and said the pur-

pose had been to divulge “a confi- sought,” Bishop said, agreeing the dential legal matter with informa- issue is spiraling out of control. tion about the “There were eleinvestigation.” ments that were She said the “It certainly has been dealt confidential that remaining trustees with properly. Legal counsel need to remain condecided not to hear fidential, but we had been sought.” the information and didn’t in fact hear the probe will next what they were Judith Bishop be discussed in because we decided open session at the not to discuss it,” board’s meeting this Monday “as she said. was always our intention.” “It will be information trustees “It certainly has been dealt with won’t have.” properly. Legal counsel had been The chair of the school council at

Highview elementary, which feeds Sherwood, said he was “appalled” to arrive and find trustees were discussing the Peddle probe in closed session. Mark Harrington said the board has lost the public’s trust and the only hope of regaining it is to drop the charges against his trustee and restart the high school review with all schools in. “To continue the process the way they’re going it’ll take years, probably decades, to heal the wounds,” he said.

Police probe street mugging of teenager Summer child-care options available Hamilton police detectives have few leads as they try to identify a group of males who attacked and robbed a 16-year-old boy in upper Stoney Creek on the weekend. Sgt. Terri-Lynn Collings said the boy and a 15year-old male friend were walking through

the St. Mark Catholic Elementary School yard by Whitedeer Road and Highbury Drive at about 8:30 p.m. on Saturday when they were accosted by the group. The victim was robbed of his cell phone and wallet, but has been reluctant to provide details on his attackers.

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• THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2011 • MOUNTAIN NEWS • WWW.HAMILTONNEWS.COM

Trustees opted to forgo ‘confidential information,’ Bishop says

27


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l Greetings & Announcements FRIENDS IN GRIEF (FIG) Offers Adult Bereavement Support Groups - Widows and Widowers, Seniors, and suicide loss. Ongoing monthly groups available; Weekly groups begin April 12th. Facilitator training also available. Please contact FIG for more info. 905-318-0059 friendsingrief@shaw.ca In Memoriam Verse Sample Sample 27 His memory is as dear today, As in the hour he passed away. These verses can be used when placing an In Memoriam notice by simply quoting the verse number to our representatives. Call 905-527-5555

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Articles for Sale

Articles for Sale

GLASS COFFEE table, Red Rose tea figurines, 1 KITCHEN large, 1 small wooden I have several 1000 yds. CABINETS desks; 2 rowing exercise Of new Stainmaster & All-wood, dove-tailed, machines, antique rocking soft close drawers, WASHER DRYER Set, 100% nylon carpet. Will chair, antique clock, many finishes to Super Capacity White, do living-room & hall for antique radio, brass firechoose from $385, Stove $185, Dish$389. Includes carpet, place screen with bellows, washer, $150. Maytag, SuNow up to various size mirrors, gate pad & installation (25 yds) per Capacity electric Dryer legged table, 2 drawer Steve, 905-777-1170 50% off. $185. Will separate. wooden filling cabinet like www.carpetdeals.ca 905-928-6002 289-337-1328 new, 2 drawer steel filing call George CHESTERFIELD, THROW cabinet, Articles for Sale cushions included. Brand 905-336-0866 new. Paid $600, asking $250. Sony 32" TV, Vega Trinitron with stand. Like RECORDS, 500, various new. $200 905-538-1338 genres, all good condition, $250. Call 289-700-5048 CONTENTS OF house. Call for appointment. King brass bed, framed prints, HOUSE CONTENTS 170 COLLECTOR plates, patio furniture, occ tables, Antique furniture- dressers SOFA, RECLINING chair 2 clear, $1 - $25, Good etc. 905-648-8053 tables/chairs/brass bed, tv, cedar chest, 10" radial odds-n-ends, deal! For appointment to Why not sell no longer used items pictures/frames, radios, arm saw, buy 905-388-3571. records, tools, pot-belly best offer. 905-679-1911 with a fast working Classified Ad? stove Binbrook Call today...905-526-3443 905-692-0632 Classified 905-526-3443 Classified 905-526-3443

CARPETS

Vote for them because of their consideration, cheerfulness, courtesy, prompt service or anything else that makes for a super-special newspaper carrier. Let your carrier know he or she is special. Show you appreciate the hard work in delivering the news to your doorstep. Vote for your carrier. It’s easy – just mail, fax or drop off the ballot to our office. You can also email your nomination to agorven@thespec.com

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Comment: ___________________________________ ____________________________________________ ____________________________________________ DEADLINE FOR ENTRIES IS APRIL 29, 2011

R001942463

WWW.HAMILTONMOUNTAINNEWS.COM • MOUNTAIN NEWS (HAMILTON) • THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2011 •

28


Jewellery

Pet Supplies/ Boarding/Service

GoodHeart Dog Training Centre

LINCOLN LINE ORCHARDS 10 dress fabric lengths: assorted weights, colours, designs. $100. Electric: Osterizer, plus 2 jars, $15. Large kettle, stainless steel, $15. Small kettle, new, $10. Steam/Dry iron $10. Hostess tray, 9x30" $15. Tapes: 50 figureskating, 1996-2002 plus 20 TV stories: $2 each (in 10 piece lots). Cookbooks: All hard cover, colour illustrated: 12 pieces, 10", $5 each. 5 pieces 11", $10 each; 5 pieces 12", 400-600 pages $15 each. "Bon Appetit", January-December 1980, 1,000 pages, $35. Books, needlepoint: Full colour plates, glass and colour charts, 10x13". "Decorative Needlepoint", "New World of Needlepoint", "Decorative Victorian Needlepoint", "Antique Flowers", $15 each. "Ringstraszen Symphony", (Vienna), German language: 3 volume set. $35. "National Geographic" Traveller 1996-1998, in 3 bookcase containers, $25. Mini personal clothing washer. portable, electric, 12x12" $50. Back Rejuvenator: 8-motor massager with percussion action and heat, $50. 905-679-4972.

Farm Market Fresh Crisp Apples, Gala, Golden, Courtland, Mutsu and Pears. Pies, and Sparkling Cider And preserves Everything for your Easter needs Tues - Fri 8am - 6pm Saturday 8am - 5pm 9764 Reg. Rd. 20, east of Westbrook Rd. 905-643-2205 lincolnlineorchards.com

HAVING STORAGE PROBLEMS Why not sell no longer used items with a fast working Classified Ad? Call today...

905-526-3443 Furniture

3 PIECE brown Leather Chesterfield, 2 matching chairs, 2 years new. Mint condition $1500. 905-573-6184

Obedience Training & Problem Behaviours Group, Private or in-home Lessons

SEWING MACHINE, JENOME 9000, Embroiders and quilts. 150 regular and decorative stitches, several sewing feet, 3 hoops, quilting arm, 2 memory cards, manual, bobbin pedal, cover case. $1100 obo. 905-335-2721

BEDROOM SET, queen, 7 piece, British Columbia pine, 3 years old. Paid $2700, asking $1700 obo. 905-575-3010

DINING ROOM Table, walnut, with 6 chairs, 7 years old. $625. obo. 289-238-8385 WHIRLPOOL FRIDGE, good condition $200, entertainment unit, excellent condition $300 Call 905-692-1312 after 6 p.m. LUXURY HOTEL mattress set. Brand new queen size, pillow top, mattress set. Left over from large hotel ALL ANTIQUES, TEAK order. 722 coils. 2 inch and Rosewood furniture, pillow tops. 10 year paintings, wrist watches, warranty. Made by jewelry, militaria, figurines, Restonic in Canada. 7 time gold, coins and collectibles Consumer Digest best buy We pay top winner. WANTED! Regular retail cash! 905-979-4447 $1399. Liquidation price 5 available. $490. Delivery available. Call or text Trains NScale, Hornby, 289-880-7980 Tirang, etc. Diecast MOVING SALE furniture, dinky's. Wind-up Toys, Tin appliances, lighting, beds Toys, Small Antiques and more. Saturday and 519-579-7947 Sunday, April 9-10 and 16-17 from 10am to Building Equipment/ 12pm. 391 Stone Church Rd. E., Unit 14. Price range Materials $20 - $450. Please ConNEW FIBER Glass ceiling tact. 905-383-2480 tile 2x4 $4/ piece. Call 905-923-1090

Articles Wanted

WANTED

Computers

COMPUTER REPAIR SHOP Refurnished Systems for Sale + Service, Repairs, and Recycling Corner of Cannon East and Ottawa, Hamilton

Classified. It’s the easy and effective way to attract buyers for all kinds of items quickly and conveniently. 905-526-3443

Medical/Health Needs PATIENT TRANSFER rails (toilet) and "stripper's pole", (for standing) as new, call Ted 905-387-6304

SCOOTERS New & used. Best prices. Monthly payments. Free Trial. Call 905- 690-7368

Brand new Walker w/large wheels, basket, seat & brakes, $95. 905-690-7368

PETS Cats

New Bunk Beds SPRING IS HERE!!

Bright & Colorful Pansies Custom planting avail for your hangers & planters, new maple syrup from our bush, crunchy apples, cider eggs, honey & more! Daily 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Closed Sun. Lynden

(519) 647-2025 josmaracres.com

Golden Honey Solid Pine Wood. Twin-Twin $360, Twin- Double $460! Total prices delivered. 226-749-3584 SOFA AND chair, cream & sage green print, $225. Black leather recliner $150. Both in good condition. 905-575-5058.

Private In-Home Sessions For Dogs/Puppies with Behavioural Problems Your dog will be well behaved ...Guaranteed Common Curable Problems: Aggression, Biting, Barking, Pulling, Jumping, Anxiety, Doorbell... Contact Bruce Warrington at

905-681-0423 bruce@canadiandogwhisperer.ca www.canadiandogwhisperer.ca Cats

Dogs

ID#: A12643055. "Whitley" DLH, 6 years old. SHARE THE LIFE OF A HOMELESS PET Hamilton/Burlington SPCA 905-574-7722 www.hbspca.com

BICHON POOS dewclaws removed, 1st shots. 1 male, 1 female. Ready to Go! $500. 289-282-1188 CHIHUAHUA Pups. 1 male/ 1 female, long coat, no Vet check or papers, $450 Negotiable, ready to go 905-788-3951

Garages SalesHamilton

Farmer’s Market

Josmar Acres

The Canadian Dog Whisperer

GERMAN SHORTHAIRED pointer puppies one female and one male available. These are exceptional puppies with mild temperaments and are easily trained. Puppies are from champion parents. Mother solid liver, and on site. Father resides in New York. Both parents are certified hips, elbows, heart and eyes. Puppies are 13+ weeks old, CKC registered, micro-chipped, two sets of vaccinations and health guaranteed. Please Contact. 905-388-9733 NEW FOUNDLAND puppies. Pure bred. 1st shots, vet checked. Microchipped. Available April 27th. Family raised. Lots of love. 519-443-8583

PUREBRED DOBERMAN pups, Euro Champion bloodlines. 4 weeks old, ready to go May 5. 2 girls, GERMAN SHEPHERD 3 boys. Tails, dewclaws, cross Black Lab. Beautiful, HAGSTROM GUITAR Mint healthy, 3 month old. dewormed, 1st shots, microchipped. $900. condition. Comes with Ready to go. Call, Parents, pedigree on-site. carry bag, tuner and extra 905-957-3725 $200 deposit. set of strings. Asking or GERMAN SHEPHERD Pup- 905-930-8473 $400. 905-730-4680 pies CKC Registered. Vet ndymond@cogeco.ca KORG PA1XPRO key- checked. Male & Female. board. This keyboard is a Ready to Go. 905-774-7847 SHELTIE PUPS! Beautiful, CKC, now ready! Home professional 76 note unit www.rebelrunkennels.ca raised and very social. Vet capable of recording and burning to a CD your vo- GERMAN SHORT hair check, shots and chipped. cals and music arrange- pointer pups. CKC regis- Health guaranteed. $750. ments. $1,800. tered. 1st shots included Contact Shannon at vet checked Home raised fusionshelties@bell.net or 905-945-3879 with kids $675. 905-659-6527. 519-284-4675 Sporting/Outdoor SMALL MALTESE also Equipment GOLDEN RETRIEVER/ Scottie Terriers. 2 shots, lab pups - 12 weeks old, dewormed, guaranteed. BRUNSWICK HERITAGE 1st shots. Great family pet. $550. 905-774-6859 Pool Table, 2 complete $350. 905-957-1641 sets of balls, billiards/ STANDARD SCHNAUZER RETRIEVER PUPPIES. Born Feb 14. snooker. Good condition. GOLDEN Call with offer. puppies, CKC, purebred, CKC Reg'd Breeder. Homevet checked, generations raised. Parents onsite. 905-979-6176 clear. Guaranteed. And Health Guarantee, microShih Tzu puppies, same, chip, shots, de-wormed, male Champion sired. tails cropped, dewclaws. $950.00. Deposit reqd. ENFIELD 3 band Musket, 905-689-5629 good for shooter or re- LAB PUPPIES, Yellow, 905-934-8700 enactor. $750 obo. P.A.L $400. No Sunday calls. Classified 905-526-3443 905-957-0299 Please call 519-688-1890.

TREADMILL, PRO-FORM T10.0. Heart and body fat monitors. $125. Please call 905-648-0982

AWA ADOPTIONS $150 Cats & kittens, Vaccinated Spayed/Neutered 905-547-4169, 544 -1053 Website: awa.xux.net

TWO 3' X 6' Corian Marble Dining Tables, with chairs, like new, $1500 each. Call 905-529-2424

Classified

Classified 905-526-3443

905-526-3443

TINY TOY POODLE, born Valentine's Day, ready for Easter, home raised, vetted, cropped, dewormed, 905-573-1826 WEIMARANER PUPS, all shots, tails docked, CKC reg'd, ready now $1000. or best offer. 905-312-8209

Pets-Other

Dogs 1,000 GUITARS new from $49. *Amps $29 *Effects $29 *Private Lessons $13.50 *Drums $399. 20,000 + items. 905-318-7447 945 Upper James

Garages SalesHamilton

Dogs

jackie@goodheart.ca

Spring Special

KR Systems 289-396-5864 kennyram99@yahoo.com

(905) 304-4284

SELL IT.

NEW MATTRESSES

Direct from Factory Queen Size Mattress & Box $ 239 All Sizes Available OUTLET FURNITURE & MATTRESS LIQUIDATION 931 Queenston Rd @ Lake 905-662-0538

www.goodheart.ca

1.03 CARAT, yellow gold diamond ring. Selling for $5500. Appraised at $11000. 905-765-3903

Musical Instruments ADJUSTAMATIC, ADJUST ABLE electric single bed, with remote control, vibration, excellent condition, $1500, 905-538-4122

Pet Supplies/ Boarding/Service

Garages SalesHamilton

Lab Pups Choc/Yell/Blk, CKC Reg., micro-chipped, de-wormed, 1st Shots, From Registered Kennel, $600 www.silverdkennels.com 905-776-0163

Pet Supplies/ Boarding/Service All Seasons Kennels 557 Rymal Rd E. Hamilton

905-385-9144 2010 DIAMOND Readers' Choice Winner Dogs $12/day Cats $7/day

GARAGE SALES & BAZAARS Garage SalesDundas/Greensville

Mountain Central

Garage/ Moving Sale 94 East 34th St. Sat. & Sun. Apr. 16th & 17th Household items & lots more!!! Neighborhood Yard Sale Sat. April 16th 8 a.m.- 2 p.m.

Arrowhead Dr. & Omyz Dr.

(South of Rhymal Rd. on Upper Wentworth. Turn left at Arrowhead) Rain Date: Sunday April 17, 8-2 p.m. East Hamilton

ANNUAL PENNY SALE

Saturday, April 16th 11 a.m. St. Paul's Hamilton United Church 42 Tragina Ave. N. Draw at 1 p.m. Baking, treasures, draws and prizes. West Mountain

CRAFT SALE Friday, April 22 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. 10 Market St. S. Dundas Lions Community Centre Candles, Lawn Art, Wood Crafts, Jewellery, Florals, Stained Glass, Baby items, Handmade crafts, Used Books Admission $2.00

Classified 905-526-3443

Rummage Sale Sat. April 16th 9 a.m. - noon

125 Red Fern Avenue St. Peters Residence at Chedoke

Bake sale, raffle table, inside sale.

Lost & Found

Drivers

Drivers

LOST: DOCUMENTS (passport, etc.) in brown plastic case. Reward. Call 905-389-5299. LOST: PRESCRIPTION sunglasses in green case, on Solomon Cres. Call 905-383-7172

2 AZ DRIVERS REQUIRED (Experience Preferred)

Drivers

AZ Drivers & Owners OPS

Needed now. Great career opportunities. We're seeking professional, safety minded drivers and owner operators. Cross border and intra Canada positions available. Call Celadon Canada, Kitchener. 1-800-332-0518 www. celadoncanada.com

General Help

Ballroom Dance Instructors

High energy males and females with strong interpersonal skills. No Exp. necessary. Intensive latin & ballroom instructor training will be provided. Call btwn 12 & 5 pm 905-522-3237 Ham., 1092 Main St. W Oakville, 225 Lakeshore Rd. E. 2nd flr. 1-905-815-3237 www.fredastaire.ca 1-888-97DANCE

SELL IT.

SELL IT.

Classified. It’s the easy and effective way to attract buyers for all kinds of items quickly and conveniently. 905-526-3443

Classified. It’s the easy and effective way to attract buyers for all kinds of items quickly and conveniently. 905-526-3443

Careers

Careers

• U.S. TANDEM SHORT HAUL- FLATBED • NEWER DEDICATED EQUIPMENT We Deliver • EXCELLENT WAGE & BENEFITS Quality! • HOME EVERY WEEKEND GUARANTEED

R001939272

Farmer’s Market

29

NOTICE BOARD

OWNER/OPERATORS REQUIRED AS WELL

CALL DAVE 1-888-257-3136 EXT. 226 or e-mail: careers@whiteoaktransport.com www.whiteoaktransport.com

General Help

Start Immediately

Health Care/ Medical

Kinesiologist & R.M.T.

Green Home Consultants Required No Experience needed Full Product Training Provided For accepted applicants $17.50/hr avg rate Rapid advancement Students Also Welcome Scholarships Available 1-866-821-8266

req'd for Stoney Creek clinic. Great team! Kin hours: M & W 11-7, Th 8-7, T & F 8-1 RMT hours: Mon &Th 11-7, T & Fr 8-1, Wed 2-7. Please send resume to: dsdjobs@gmail.com

Unemployed?

Grinder Operator

FREE assistance... *Job Search *Resumes * Career Planning * Training Options Community Employment Services at Mohawk College Call: 905-575-2177 WORK OPPORTUNITIES Enjoy children? In Florida, New York, California, Boston, all USA. Salary, airfare, medical provided, plus more. Available Spain, Holland. Summer camps in Italy and England. Teaching in Korea - Different benefits apply. Interviews in your area. Call: 1-902-422-1455 or Email: scotiap@ ns.sympatico.ca

Careers

Classified 905-526-3443 Technical/Skilled Trades

Blanchard grinding experience necessary -Send resume by fax: 905-689-8801 or Email: blanchardgrinding @hotmail.com

HAVING STORAGE PROBLEMS Why not sell no longer used items with a fast working Classified Ad? Call today...

905-526-3443 Careers

Garages SalesHamilton

The Advertising Department of the Hamilton Spectator currently has a full time opening for an MOM TO MOM SALE Peoples Church

510 Mohawk Rd. W. Sat. April 16th 8:30 a.m. - 12 noon FREE Admissions FREE Refreshments

Classified 905-526-3443

HAGGLER'S

FLEA MARKET

MORE BOOTHS! MORE VARIETY! MORE SAVINGS!

SUMMER HOURS: May Thru October Saturdays 12-5 Sundays 10-5 1565 Barton St. E. 905-545-4747 Celebrating 25 years!!!

Account Executive

If interested, apply to the Human Resources Department by Wednesday, This individual will report to the Director, April 20th, 2011.

Advertising Sales.

The Hamilton Applicants must be self-starters and exceptionally Spectator goal-oriented as the focus of this position is on Human Resources Department 44 Frid Street Hamilton, Ontario L8N 3G3 Fax: (905) 526-9211 email: SpecJobs-Advertising@ thespec.com We thank you for your interest but only those candidates receiving an interview will be contacted. No phone calls or agencies, please.

For more information on Metroland Media Group, view our Metroland Information video at http://www.metroland. com/page/Videos

developing new revenue opportunities.

The successful candidate will: • Have proven sales results in “hunting” new business • Be comfortable making cold sales calls • Be a motivated professional with superior customer sales and service skills • Be able to work cooperatively in a team environment • Develop strong business relationships with advertisers to build business opportunities • Have the ability to provide clients with creative advertising solutions • Be well organized and able to meet daily deadlines • Have excellent communication and presentation skills • Possess strong interpersonal skills for presentations, negotiations, and problem resolution

R001944557

Articles for Sale

GARAGE SALES & BAZAARS

PETS

• THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2011 • MOUNTAIN NEWS (HAMILTON) • WWW.HAMILTONMOUNTAINNEWS.COM

MERCHANDISE


BUSINESS

Accepting Applications for

CONTRACT YOUTH/ ADULT CARRIERS DELIVERY OF THE Flyer Package BY EACH THURSDAY EVENING by 6pm Also Free Press Routes for Wednesday evenings NO COLLECTING! Carriers are needed ASAP and must live in the areas below: * Adult with/without vehicles and youths are needed. CENTRAL MOUNTAIN:

AA001 - 22 drops - Brucedale E/Upper Wellington AA003 - 58 drops - Belair/Skyland Dr/Queensdale E AA015 - 63 drops - East 7th/East 9th/Brucedale E/Fennell E/East 8th AA020 - 80 drops - East 11th/East 12th/East 13th/Brucedale E AE003 - 129 drops - Bryna Ave/Maitland Ave/Huntsville St/Manning/ Limeridge E/June AE004 - 112 drops - Purdy Cres/Hester St/Deschenes Ave/Manning Ave AE008 - 99 drops - Greeningdon Dr/ Limeridge E/Ridge St BC020 - 63 drops - Mcintosh Ave/Angeline Pl/Ottaviano Dr/Regent Ave BD004 - 82 drops - Upper Paradise 1215-1322/Rymal Rd W 395-707 CA005 - 106 drops - Chesley St/West 5th/Chester Ave/Annabelle St CA007 - 79 drops - Allegro Pl/Fortissimo Dr/Sonata Ave/West 5th/Forbes/Blossom Ln CA011 - 52 drops - Stonepine Cres/West 5th If interested please call 905-526-4680 if unavailable leave message with full name, address with postal code & phone number

Sales Opportunities

Sales Opportunities

BOOKEEPING SERVICES Quickbooks, Simply Accounting, Payroll and Taxes.

Call Henry 289-838-6317 info@accounteam.ca Business Opportunities CONTRACTING COMPANY FOR SALE. Specializing in Decks & Renovations. Tools, auger, and a truck. Jim,

519-212-2247 FANTASTIC BUSINESS opportunity established, profitable, Curves fitness franchise for sale. Turnkey with fully trained staff. Be your own boss! 30 minutes from Hamilton. Be a part of the worlds largest fitness franchise! Serious inquiries call for details. 905-765-8279

Legal Services #1 IN pardons. Remove your criminal record! Get started today for only $49.95/month. Limited time offer. Fastest, guaranteed pardon in Canada. Free consultation. 1-866-416- 6772 www.ExpressPardons.com DON'T LET your past limit your future. Only Pardon Services Canada has 20 years experience guaranteeing record removal. Fast, affordable, A+ BBB rating, Financing Available. ($45.50/mo). Call for your free information booklet 1-8NOW-PARDON; 1-866-9727366. RemoveYourRecord. com GUARANTEED CRIMINAL pardons. Confidential, fast, affordable. 100% free information booklet. 1-8-nowpardon (1-866-972-7366) Don't let your past limit your future. Pardon Services Canada. www.Remove YourRecord.com

Rent To Own Established Small drapery workroom. Be your own boss. Work own hours. Help if needed. 905-637-7453. STAR FLEET Trucking hiring! Drivers, farmers, ranchers & retirees needed with 3/4 ton or 1-ton pickup trucks to deliver new travel trailers & fifth wheels from US manufacturers to dealers throughout Canada. Free IRP plate for your truck and low insurance rates! Pref. commercial lic. or 3 yrs towing exp. Top pay! Call Craig 1-877-890-4523 www.starfleettrucking.com

Classified 905-526-3443 Money Avail/ Wanted

DEBT PROBLEMS? Reduce your Debt by 75% without Bankruptcy. Pay 0% interest on the balance.

905-540-4100 MoneyProvider.com

$500 Loan No Credit Refused!

Fast, Easy, Secure

1-877-776-1660

CAREER OPPORTUNITY Advertising Representative: Newspaper Advertising Sales

The Cambridge Times has an excellent opportunity for an individual experienced in print advertising sales or similar/related commission sales capacity The candidate we seek will demonstrate exceptional abilities in... ✓ Prospecting and closing customers with advertising sales opportunities. ✓ Cold-calling new or non-serviced businesses in Cambridge and related areas ✓ Creative thinking style and an ability to problem-solve ✓ Self-starter with loads of initiative who needs minimal direction ✓ High energy and a positive attitude ✓ Excellent verbal and written skills ✓ Literate in computer skills including Microsoft Word, Excel ✓ Driven for success ✓ Excellent organizational skills This is a career position. You will be asked to produce results and devote the time and effort required to consistently produce improved results. The earning potential is far better than average. Remuneration includes: • Base Salary • Car Allowance • Commissions • Entry level account list • Bonus Opportunities • Benefits package and pension plan Post Secondary Education an asset but not a pre-requisite. Interested candidates are asked to email their resumes by April 22, 2011. Ted Anderson Regional Advertising Manager Cambridge Times, Forever Young, City Parent and Specialty Publications 475 Thompson Drive Cambridge, Ontario N1T 2K7 tanderson@cambridgetimes.ca

Mortgages/ Loans

Mortgages/ Loans

Career Development

CAMBRIDGE TIMES

Child Care Available

HOME LINE OF CREDIT Borrow as low as $7500-Pay only $59/mth *(APR 5.99%) All types of mortgage money available (competitive rates) Purchase, Refinance, Debt Consolidation Good or Bad Credit, Self-Employed, Past BankruptcyNo Problem! Power of Sale Stopped!!!! Call up to 9 p.m!! 905-296-0805, 1-877-336-7475 www.aikammortgages.com

Unlimited Private Funds Available Real Mortgage Associates Lic 10464 *OAC

Below Bank Rates

1st, 2nd, 3rd Mortgages Debt Consolidation – SAVE 75% on mthly pymt Finance to 100% of Home Value Construction Financing • Rental Properties We Specialize in: Credit Issues, Self Employment, 5 Yr Variable 2.10% 5 Yr Fixed 3.78%

Call Steve Ferrin, Mortgage Agent

1-877-568-9255 HomeGuard Funding Ltd. www.butlermortgage.ca License #10409

ALL TYPES OF MORTGAGES • 1st, 2nd & 3rd • Good Credit & Bad • Power of Sales • Specializing in Bankruptcy & Proposals For FREE Consultations Call

JimFitzGerald, Mortgage Agent 905-699-3358 jimfitzgerald@ invis.ca FSCO: M09002783 www.jimfitzgerald mortgages.com Are you financially better off today than you were a year ago? Or even 5 years ago? Our proven process is guaranteed to Increase your monthly Cash Flow, Up your Assets, and Down your Debt, with results realized sooner than you may think. We will empower you to discover and understand your financial blueprint! (905) 997 5278 FREE YOURSELF FROM DEBT MONEY FOR ANY PURPOSE! DEBT CONSOLIDATION 1st, 2nd & 3rd mortgages credit lines & loans up to 90% LTV. Self employed, mortgage or tax arrears. Don't pay for 1 yr program! #10171 ONTARIO-WIDE FINANCIAL CORP. CALL 1-888-307-7799 www.ontario-widefinancial.com Catch the savings in classified! We’re your home base for good buys! Call 905-526-3443

HAVING STORAGE PROBLEMS Why not sell no longer used items with a fast working Classified Ad? Call today...

905-526-3443 Professional Directory

Looking for Work- We can Help! Free Employment Workshops @ the YMCA Employment Services in Waterdown. April 7 Job Search that Works 2pm- 4pm April 14 Apprenticeships in Ontario - Information Session 2pm to 4pm April 21 Resumes and Cover Letters that Get You Noticed 2pm - 4pm Call to register at 905-690-9927 This Employment Ontario Service is Funded by the Ontario Government

POWER OF SALE STOPPED CALL US FIRST & LET US HELP Mortgage & Tax Arrears Fixed Consolidate Credit Card Debts and Save $

Experts at Self-Employed, Pension Income Consumer Proposals Call Steve Ferrin, Mortgage Agent

877-568-9255 www.butlermortgage.ca License # 10409 Homeguard Funding Ltd.

Shape your career with a quality college education in less than one year.

Enrolling Now for All Classes Call: 905 521 9991 or visit

www.NAHB.ca

Tax/ Financial

• Personal Support Worker One of Canada’s highest demand careers

MAKING SENSE Bookkeeping Income Tax Prep - Sue 905-578-2610

TAX RETURNS Prepared by professional accountant. 30 years experience From $20 905-383-4521 Massages

A registered career college since 1979 Government Assistance Available*

774 Brant Street at Ghent Ave

905-632-9233

RIVIERA SPA New and friendly Attendants 103 Barton Street East Hamilton

31 King St. East (at Hughson)

905-525-4504 Why not sell no longer used items with a fast working Classified Ad? Call today...905-526-3443

Professional Directory

CENTRAL HEALTH INSTITUTE COURSES IN

Personal Organizer

Canadian Career College Diploma Programs

GRAND HEALTH ACADEMY Diploma Programs Personal Support Worker Food Service Worker F/T;P/T;Evg.;Wknd Bridging Classes

2 LOCATIONS: 760 King St. E. 905-577-7707 574 Concession St. 905-385-7727 www.grandhealthacademy.com

Pharmacy Assistant CPI Food Safety

905-638-0926

Fabiom@KingYorkPaving.com

Why not sell no longer used items with a fast working Classified Ad? Call today...

905-526-3443

Call Lisa 905-962-0922

KATE'S CLEANING Surprisingly affordable home cleaning. Rates from as low as $60. We will clean your home as if it were our own. Servicing Ancaster & Hamilton Mountain and Haldimand County. Call now for a free in home estimate, 905-906-1676.

Domestic Help Wanted LIVE-IN CAREGIVER wanted for 2 toddlers. Fluent in English & Tagalog and cook Filipino food. References. 905-575-4650 LIVE-IN NANNY for Burlington family required. call 905-637-3188

Seeking a house? Selling a car? Classified unlocks doors to your dreams, no matter what they are!

346 Main St. E. Hamilton 905-524-0440

ASPHALT PAVING, INTERLOCKING, CONCRETE 20% off until April 23 - Call for Details

Reliable with References 5th Clean 1/2 price

Second Career Approved

Personal Support Worker

HAVING STORAGE PROBLEMS

Cleaning Ladies Reliable and experienced Reasonable rates Call us at 905-928-7813.

HOUSE CLEANING/

*to those who qualify

905-387-8787 www.cccitm.com

Classified

905-526-3443

As good as sold call Classifieds

905-526-3443 or fax 905-526-3442

Personals/ Companions

905-929-2392 or 905-545-8669

• Intra-Oral Dental Assistant (Level 1 & 2) Several Career Opportunities

Train today to become a Teacher of English as a Second Language. Teach English to newcomers to Canada or go abroad and travel the world! Now accepting applications for TESL Diploma FT starting in May. Also PT in Sept. Excellent teacher training! Recognized by TESL Ontario & TESL Canada. Request an application today! 905-896-0000 www.canadiancollegeofeducators.ca

TUTORING TEACHERS Two qualified specialists. Reading, Literacy, French, Math, Science, Assignment Organization. For Info 905-522-8654. cal3002@gmail.com.

Prof. organizer/declutter

• Accounting & Payroll Canadian economy is recovering-be career ready!

Thinking of becoming a Teacher?

Enjoy Korean Style Massage

Blinds, Baseboards, Laundry, Lights, etc. References, 12 years exp

• Community Services Worker A truly life changing career – for you and others

CANADIAN

BOOTY CAMP fitness! Join now! Get ready to: Lose up to 16 pounds and 1-6 inches, two nights a week. Start dates: April 5th and May 3, 2011. Join now at http://www.bootycampfitness.com/hamilton-bootcamp.php. $50 off - group discount available. 519-788-4087

Tutoring

• Police Foundations Work in Customs, immigration, police and many more

COLLEGE OF EDUCATORS

Health/Beauty/ Fitness

OUTDOOR BOOTCAMP. Bored of your regular gym routine? Ready to 'Spring' into action? Join us outdoors for our motivating and exhilarating bootcamp sessions. We will be meetSTONEY CREEK mountain ing at Turner Park (Rymal 17 years experience, Road E). WOMEN'S ONLY smoke and pet free home. sessions to begin April daniellesdaycare@live.ca 19-May 26, Tuesdays and or call 905-561-5600 Thursdays from 6pm-7pm. Sessions are 6 weeks long, twice a week, for a Child Care Wanted total of 12 classes. Cost is $125.00. Please contact CHILD CARE needed in your certified fitness trainDundas. We are seeking ers for more information. care for our 2 children, n j m e a n d m i ages 4 and 8 before and nime@gmail.com after school near Dundana. Monday through Friday if Hobbies & Crafts possible in our home. 4 year old attends school alternate days and would need care on off days. 905-627-6678 WOODWORKING EQUIPLIVE-IN NANNY Mon-Fri, MENT Sale 10" General weekends off, minimum cabinet saw;General jointer pay + vacation pay, & planer & bandsaw. Call 45hrs/week. Speaks 905-643-2296 English/Somali/Swahili, 905-730-3750

A Reliable Portuguese Cleaning Lady That Does it All!

Enrolling Now!

Classified 905-526-3443

MAGIC GARDEN home daycare. Mom and daughter team, reg. ECE teacher and children's director run Magic Garden. We have little ones of our own. We are located in Stoney Creek. We have openings for 12 month and up. Before and after school program, kinder pickup in area. Reasonable rates. Monday to Friday. 7:30 5:00pm. We do everything that a daycare will do with your child and more. Call for an appointment to meet us. 905-664-1242

Domestic Help Available

Popular Diploma Programs

• Early Childcare Assistant 37 weeks to a rewarding career with children

We appreciate the interest of all applicants; however only those selected for an interview will be contacted

Your Hometown Newspaper

Career Development

R005938702

METROLAND WEST DISTRIBUTION SERVICES

Accounting/ Bookeeping

R002934526

General Help

COMMUNITY & FAMILY

R001931780

General Help

EDUCATION

R002872173

WWW.HAMILTONMOUNTAINNEWS.COM • MOUNTAIN NEWS (HAMILTON) • THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2011 •

30

Health & Home Care

Adventures in Friendship Club for 50+ Singles. Mix 'n Mingle, food & laughs Wednesday Apr 20th 5:30 p.m.Whistling Walrus 1508 Upper James, Ham. 905-575-2805 AFFECTIONATE ROMANTIC, 64 year old seeking big plus sized woman. Reply to: Box 168, The Spectator, L8N 3G3 ARE YOU still single? Isn't it time you gave Misty River Introductions a call? Ontario's traditional matchmaker. www.misty riverintros.com 519-6584204 or 416-777- 6302 MALE SEEKS, lady. If you're a lady between 46-56, lovable, caring, trustful and truthful I'm looking for you. I want someone I can love, cherish and adore. If that's you I would like to hear from you. Family important. Please reply with picture to The Hamilton Spectator Box 174 Hamilton L8N 3G3 MALE SMOKER seeks petite lady between 46-56, Loveable, caring and truthful, young at heart, enjoys indoor swimming and hot tub. I am looking for you for long term. I want someone I can love and cherish, if that's you, I'd like to hear from you. Please reply with a recent full photo to: Box 179 The Hamilton Spectator 44 Frid St, L8N 3G3 ROMANTIC, MARRIED male, shift worker, 56, seeks an affectionate woman who is comfortable in a dress or jeans with heels who enjoys walks on the beach, candlelight dinners, dancing, cuddling in front of the fireplace, shopping, gardening, fiction reading, arts, for discreet daytime interludes. Reply to The Spec, Box 178, 44 Frid St., Hamilton, ON L8N 3G3

SWM SEEKS lady friend 65-70 years for companionship, outings and possible relationship. Reply to PASSIVE REDUCING 6 The Spectator, Box 176 Toning/Massage beds for L8N 3G3 sale, maintenance free. $2000. 905-765-4076 Classified 905-526-3443


31

CAREGIVER RELIEF AND AVAILABLE MAY 15, 1 COMPANIONSHIP. PSW Bedroom, $699. Clean with 14 years experience quiet building, hardwood specializing in geriatric floors throughout. Laundry. care. Andrea, 19 Richwill Rd. 905-381-9553 905-318-7090

SUPER WASH COIN LAUNDRYMAT Super Clean, Super Value & Super Friendly Wash & fold service. Upper Ottawa & Larch behind the gas bar Open 7 am - 10 pm 7 days a week

Gold Cross Home Care

FURNISHED SUITES BACHELOR & 1 BR Bay S. Secure, Laundry. Minimum 28 day stay. Utilities included $135 to $185/week 905-577-1973.

Houses for Rent

HAMILTON MOUNTAIN

Volunteering

Own A Home No Money Down Turning More Renters Into Home Owners! Over 1400 Families Serviced to Date. www.artisanfinancial.ca

1-866-993-0099

RENTALS Apts for Rent-Burl/ Waterdown

NEW RENTAL SUITES 140 Plains Road W.

QUALITY, OVERSIZED 1,2,3 BEDROOM SUITES

• • • •

Lake views available 5 appliances incl. Ensuite Laundry Indoor Pool, Sauna Whirlpool, Gym Granite & Stainless Appliance Avail.

289-812-0103 drewloholdings.com

Apts for Rent Hamilton

1 BR $681; 2 BR $733. 905-387-2329 YOUNG ST. - 1BR $624. 905-527-9210 MAR-STAN APTS- 1BR $675. 905-524-2977

Apts for RentHamilton Central

Market St Apts Jr 1, 1 & 2 BRs

111 Market St 905-523-5700 Immaculate, spacious, with private balcony, exercise & social rooms, controlled entry & 24 hour management.

www.realstar.ca

Trucks & SUVs

2004 TOYOTA COROLLA 108K 5speed ac clean car proof 1 owner cert/etest $5999 + tax obo 905-512-8197 dlr

1999 CHRYSLER Intrepid. 131,000 Kms. $1800. as is. Please call 905-388-4365 2005 VW Golf 5DR Hatchback automatic 2000 FORD Taurus SEL 139900kms+ Silver a/c loaded, leather, new tires, Certified and Etest, $6500 rotors, drums, pads. 275 firm as is. 905 468 2315 km. Synthetic oil maintenance records. $2000 2006 MAZDA 6 auto air obo. 905-765-9291 PW PL PM PSeats remote start only 55K $11,700 + 2000 VOLVO S70, 4 hst dlr 905-528-3500 door, automatic, champagne, leather, sunroof. $1500 as is. E-tested, 307,000 kms. 905-308-8435 2006 TOYOTA Corolla CE 49900 kms., cert., etest2000 VW PASSAT GLS ed remote start, power 6cyl fully loaded 225K locks, winter/summer leather/snrf $4500 + tires, nice car hate to taxes. Certified/etested. sell! $9500. Dealer 905-544-3104, 905-573-8008 905-379-9354 2006 TOYOTA MATRIX XRS 6speed-fully-loaded pwr-snrf 129K X-clean, no accident, $9800 Cert/etest+txs dlr905-309-9300or 905-379-9300

905-526-3443

2002 TOYOTA Camry XLE Silver with grey leather interior, power & heated seats, sunroof, CD player, automatic climate control, Hamilton Mountain West. rear manual sunshade, 3-4 bedroom home. New cruise control, keyless enkitchen. Call 647-977-9403 try, remote car starter. Second owner. Certified & 24/hour message. e-tested. $8,000 obo. All credits ok. 905-522-6033.

RENT TO OWN

2008 FORD FOCUS SE 4dr, 42K. Many Options. Factory Warr. F.A. Depot $9,750+ tx 905-637-1044

2007 BMW 328I jet black, 1 owner, prem.pkg $128 wkly, 0 down! bad credit O.K CALL DLR 1-888-488-8660

Townhouses for Rent

MIKES AUTO 2010 TOYOTA COROLLA CE 4 cyl auto air PL CD 48K tx. 2007 DODGE RAM 1500 wty $12,950 + 905-317-5920 QC 4x4, loaded $19777 or $95 wkly, 0 down! bad credit o.k call DLR 1-888-488-8660

HAVING STORAGE PROBLEMS

2003 BUICK REGAL LS only 100K 1 owner loaded REALLY NICE cert/etest $5295+tx 905-548-0757 2007 CADILLAC CTS dlr black, sunroof, 1 owner, $92 wkly, 0 down! bad 2010 TOYOTA MATRIX, credit o.k CALL DLR silver, auto,$13777 or $58 1-888-488-8660 wkly, 0 down! bad credit o.k call dlr 1-888-488-8660

3 BR, 2.5 Bath, all appls included, 1 min from QEW, Trucks & SUVs priv.street, bus, $1,250 includes utilities. 2003 PONTIAC Grand 416-659-7574 Prix GT, 3.8L, Leather Interior, Fully Loaded, New Tires, 170,500km, 2007 CHEV. COBALT certified. $4500 OBO. COUPE LT 1 owner, 905-335-2715 $7999 or $40 wkly, 0 down! bad credit o.k call Cars dlr 1-888-488-8660 1993 FORD 350 Diesel, auto, cube van. Previously 2007 CHEV COBALT LT U-Haul Truck. Runs excel1991 MAZDA 323. Excel4 cyl, auto, 4 door, pwr lent, lots of work to it lent shape, auto. 65500K. door locks, pwr windows, brakes, new rad, tune up, As is. $1200. obo. pwr mirror, cruise, tilt, two new rear tires, all new 905-662-3578 2004 CHRYSLER 300M am/fm cd with aux input, exhaust. Transmission 149,000KM fully loaded, keyless entry, a/c, c/e rebuilt 3 months ago, both leather, keyless entry, $7795 plus hst Gr Mills motor and tranny run heated seats +more. Auto 905 768 3353 strong. Needs lower ball Asking $6,995.00 2007 DODGE CALIBER joints, box and body in exCall: 905-961-0062 R/T AWD 4 cyl, auto cvt, cellent shape no damage. $2500obo, Call all wheel drive, a/c, leather Only interior, heated seats, pwr 905-518-6544 group, cruise, tilt, alloy 1993 CADILLAC Remote wheels, am/fm cd, keyless start, 20" chrome low proentry, c/e $11495 plus hst file tires. 4 tires on rims for Grand Mills Auto Centre Winter. $3,500-firm. 905 768 3353 289-260-4145 1994 MAZDA B3000, 3 litre, 5 speed, runs, needs 1997 TOYOTA TERCEL 2004 MAZDA 6 GT, leath4cyl auto ac 264K $1495 er, sunroof, $6777 certi- 2007 MAZDA 3 4cyl 5spd some work. $800 obo. or FIRM certified / e-tested fied and etested call DLR air PW PL CD sunroof 94K 905-662-7110 $8950+ tx. 905-317-5920 1-888-488-8660 905-570-4739 DLR 905-664-5111

2006 LARSON 180 LXI V6 Penta, premium package, trailer. As new condition. $19,700. Thomas, 905-689-4155 BOAT SLIPS/ DOCKAGE available, Hamilton Harbour. Variety of sizes. Park- like setting. Call 905-523-5434

Auto Parts & Accessories

2009 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN, stow & go, $72 wkly, 0 down! bad credit o.k call DLR 1-888-488-8660

Motorcycles/ Offroad

Vehicles Wanted/ Wrecking

We buy all cars and trucks ($5 - $5000) paid, 7days 24hrs Scrap autos FREE removal 1 HOUR SERVICE

905-574-4589 905-662-3871

FAST CASH

Cars & Trucks Wanted – $150-$2000

905-385-9292 Free Towing

MIKE'S AUTO PARTS Lic. recycling facility

TIRE STORE NOW OPEN Best Selection in Hamilton!

HOME IMPROVEMENT Carpentry

Automotive Services

4 wheels Alignment $59.95 + tx Includes FREE Brake & Spring Inspection!

QUEENSTON AUTO REPAIRS 905-545-1115

Carpentry

WE BUILD OR RENOVATE! Barn, shop, storage building, machine shed, horse riding arena, etc? Replace roofing or siding with steel or barn board. Agricultural or Residential.

WANTED ROOFRACK with rails for 2006 Saturn Vue. In good cond. Call 905-776-1166

APRIL SPRING SPECIAL

519-465-5960 Cleaning/Janitorial

Cleaning/Janitorial

Crystal Clean Services

Carpet CleaningTime ✧ Seniors Discount ✧ Written Guarantee 2 ROOMS PLUS A HALL $ ✧ High Quality Work ✧ Dry Foam Shampoo ONLY *UP TO 200 SQ. FT. PER ROOM

59.95

5 ROOMS, 13 STAIRS PLUS HALL

VIAU'S CUSTOM Welding. 30 years experience. We repair rusted and broken car frames. 905-664-6014

ONLY

119.95

$

*UP TO 200 SQ. FT. PER ROOM

Vehicles Wanted/ Wrecking

Why not sell no longer used items with a fast working Classified Ad? Call today...

905-526-3443

MIKES AUTO

2006 NORTHLANDER SUPREME 38FD with ALL amenities including hard awning and 8'x10' shed on 2004 DODGE Durango site. Family Paradise SLT, 4 door, 4 wheel drive, Campground, North of black, excellent condition, Seaforth. Asking $35,900 leather, 132,000kms, 2005 DODGE GRAND 519-273-7853 stow’n’go, $9,900 obo. CARAVAN, $7444 or $50 wkly, 0 905-304-9967 Boats/Motors down! bad credit o.k call dlr 1-888-488-8660

2008 PONTIAC G5, auto, a/c, red, only $44 wkly, 0 down! bad credit o.k call dlr 1-888-488-8660

Vehicles Wanted/ Wrecking

$ CASH $ IN 1 HOUR

What Deal! Must See!

2007 DODGE NITRO SLT 4X4, auto, $14999 or $72 wkly, 0 down! bad credit o.k call dlr 1-888-488-8660

Rooms for Rent and Wanted CLEAN ROOMS near Eastgate Sq., east end near bus route. $350 includes utilities. 905574-5211 or 905-945-1110

Trailers/R.V.s

NORTHLANDER 2000 FORD E, 150 Cargo 2008 Classic Park Van V8, 202,000km, good Cottage 14'x40'. Fully condition, original owner, Model furnished, 2 bedrooms, certified $2900. sleeps 7-9, central air 905-961-8685. conditioning and furnace, steel awning, insulated. 2002 TOYOTA SIENNA 7 passenger, quad chairs, Parked in Sauble Beach in fully loaded, 157,000 kms, Woodlands Park (can be $72,900. all original. Special $6995. moved). + tax. Certified/E-tested. 905-538-0718. DLR., 905-544-3104, 905-379-9354

2005 FORD Escape. 2008 MAZDA 6 GS silver, XKLT. V6 engine, low mileauto $11999 or $58 wkly, age. 93 K. Excellent condi$8300. 0 down! bad credit o.k call tion. 905-765-1177 2007 DODGE GRAND dlr 1-888-488-8660 CARAVAN SE 70Km Many 2006 KIA SPORTAGE Luxury Options. Fact. Warr. 4 cyl, auto, pwr windows, F.A. Depot $10,750 + tx pwr door locks, pwr mir905-637-1044 rors, alloy wheels, a/c, cruise, tilt, am/fm cd, keyless entry, c/e $9795 plus hst Grand Mills Auto Centre 905 768 3353 2008 NISSAN VERSA S, auto, 1 owner, low km! $53 wkly, 0 down! bad credit o.k call dlr 1-888-488-8660 2007 HONDA ODYSSEY LX, $17999 or $85 wkly, 0 down! bad credit o.k call DLR 1-888-488-8660

Classified

2001 NISSAN Sentra SE Sport 4 Door automatic Sunroof CD loaded looks and runs Very Good. You Certify $2250. obo. firm 905-468-2315 2006 TOYOTA YARIS 2 2002 CHRYS CONCORD dr auto CD AC certified LX full load blk/w grey int. etested $5499 + tx DLR 131K all orig special 905-741-5711 $3995 + taxes. Certified/etested. Dealer 9 0 5 - 5 4 4 - 3 1 0 4 , 905-379-9354

Vans

1998 OLDS Silhouette Mini Van, extended. Leather, loaded, excellent condition. Certified, e-tested. $2750 o.b.o. 905-807-9577

2007 TOYOTA COROLLA ce, auto, a/c, s.roof $55 wkly, 0 down! bad credit 1998 DODGE Dakota o.k call dlr Sport Pickup V8, Auto, loaded, new summer tires, 1-888-488-8660 also includes winter tires 2008 CHEVROLET cobalt w/rims. Looks and runs LT. Must Sell! Have a new great, must see. 194K. born baby and need a 4 Certified & etested $4995 door car. Asking $8000 or obo 905-381-4432 1998 JAGUAR XJR Super- 2005 PONTIAC CRUISER best offer. Only 42000KM! charge, mint, rare, 145 2.4L 4cyl Signature Series omerta_jm@hotmail.com 2002 FORD Ranger, 138, km's., chrome wheels. 4cyl auto air PW PL CD 000 km, certified, perfect tx. $5750 + $8,900. Certified, e-tested 104K condition. 905-547-6463 905-317-5920 call 905-304-1872

AUTOMOTIVE

MOHAWK TOWERS

Cars

MIKES AUTO

Need help at home? Certified and compassionate PSWs, Caregivers and Homemakers can help you with: ✔ Personal Carebathing, grooming ✔ Housekeeping,laundry and changing linens ✔ Meal prep, shopping and clean up ✔ Specializing in Dementia /Alzheimer's Care ✔ Lawn,garden care and Rent to own very spacious 3 bedroom, 2 bath home, home maintenance massive recreation room with fireplace and separate Call Gold Cross RN at workshop area. Updated 905-928-9595 kitchen, all appliances, for free assessment central air! www.gold 24hr message crosshomecare.com 1-888-549-5557 Bad Credit OK!

VOLUNTEER DRIVERS needed for Dundas, Stoney Creek and Acaster areas. Police check required. Mileage reimbursed. Cancer Assistance Program 569 Concession St., Hamilton 905-383-9797 www.cancerassist.ca

1998 GRAND Am GT V6 auto, loaded, brand new tires. Looks & runs great. $1800 obo. 905-531-7883

Cars

1998 HONDA Civic DX coupe. Automatic. Super 2005 MAZDA 3 GT clean. 196K kms. $2500/ Hatchback 4 cylinder, auto, Furnished offer. 905-308-0235 a/c, alloy wheels, tilt/teleApartments scopic, steering wheel audio controls, cruise, DUNDAS, ANCASTER, keyless entry, pwr group, West Hamilton, bachelor, am/fm cd, c/e $10495 1, 2, 3, bedrooms, short/ plus hst Grand Mills Auto long. 905-531-5655 or www. Centre 905 768 3353 spencercreekrentals.com

905-961-6693 Seniors Services

Cars

R001708348

Apts for RentHamilton West

AUTOMOTIVE

LIMITED TIME OFFER

$200 AND up: cars, trucks, vans. Cash 24/7. 905-512-1427, private HD FXRS 905-545-5026 www.qualitytrim.com and 2007 JEEP PATRIOT click on bikes .obo. SPORT 4x4, 1 owner, auto, $68 wkly, 0 down! bad Classic Vehicles credit o.k call dlr 1-888-488-8660

Call 8am - 9pm

Ham 574-5122 CALL US LAST & GET MORE $$$ RUSH AUTO PARTS

JR APPLIANCE

SCRAP CARS

1995 PONTIAC Firebird Convertible, red with power black top, grey leather interior, 6 cyl auto, clean, 2007 PONTIAC TORRENT 210km, runs good. Rare car! V6 auto air PW PL FWD 78K $3995 firm 905-468- 2315 $11,950 tx. 905-317-5920

MIKES AUTO

Trailers/R.V.s

$200 & UP WANTED Support a family owned and operated business. Competitive Pricing, Emergency Assistance 24-7. Reasonable Rates

We Have NEW & RECONDITIONED Items

Quality with a warranty! Free in shop repair estimate on all carry in appliances. We also carry repair parts.

905-318-5955

905-516-2887

MAJOR APPLIANCE SERVICE Free Estimates Reasonable

2008 FORD ESCAPE XLT, auto, 1 owner, $70 GEORGIE Boy, wkly, 0 down! bad credit 1997 o.k call dlr 33 Ft, Excellent condition. 65,000 km, $16,900 obo. 1-888-488-8660 Call Nick 905-536-9989

Classified 905-526-3443

Rates!

905-549-3901

call Classifieds 2007 31' Citation Travel Trailer. Fully loaded, like new. At Gulliver's Lake. $20,900. Call 905-538-3409

905-526-3443 or fax 905-526-3442

310JUNK * * * *

We Do All Loading HOME/BUSINESS FREE Estimates Cheapest Prices! Call Direct

310-5865

Bin-There Residential Friendly Bins @ Great Prices! Burl/Oak

905-634-0777 Hamilton

905-679-1900

GOT JUNK? SAME DAY 7 Days a Week

As good as sold

2008 FORD ESCAPE XLT Immac. 74K. Many Luxury Options. Warr. F.A. Depot $14450 +tx 905-637-1044

Bur 333-1203

Appliance Repairs/ Installation

905-570-8747 2007 KIA Sportage. 42,000 kms. Excellent Condition, one driver. $12,000 obo. 905-628-9582

R002898570

Special Services

RENTALS

We Take Everything Free Estimates

Adams

905-546-7517

To All Makes

GAS & ELEC Free Service Call 905-

575-1177

Well beat any price! RUBBISH Specializing in of junk and removal. $75/ load. Call 905-387-8284

REMOVAL full servic yard wast Large truc a Steve

• THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2011 • MOUNTAIN NEWS (HAMILTON) • WWW.HAMILTONMOUNTAINNEWS.COM

COMMUNITY & FAMILY


HOME IMPROVEMENT Decks & Fences

Heating & Cooling

Heating & Cooling

Heating & Cooling

Pools & Additions Pool Removals & Fill-ins Driveways - Armour Stone Retaining Walls Truck, Bobcat & Excavating Services

Business License & Insured Free Estimates Family Business 35 yrs. CALL STEPHEN AT

Doors & Windows

THE INSTALLATION PEOPLE *YOU SUPPLY - WE INSTALL* • Garage Doors • Carport Enclosers • Door Openers • Decks & Repairs • Storm Doors • Aluminum Capping • Entrance Doors • Vinyl Siding 905-648-7303 or 905-518-1942 Cleaning/Janitorial

HOUSE CLEANING Professional Assistant Services Veterans Provider

905-385-2906

Eavestroughs & Siding

MELO'S SIDING INC. * * * * *

Siding & Windows Soffits & fascia Seamless Eaves Alum. Leaf Guard Cleaning of Eaves

Lic.&Ins BBB/Visa/MC

905-304-6246 * No Sub-Contracting

905-515-6757 General Contracting, Excavating

Asphalt Removal ✔ Odd Jobs ✔ 1/2 TON TRUCK WITH DUMP

289-887-2200 Concrete & Paving SOLID ROCK CONCRETE Stamped Concrete Exposed Aggregate Driveways Walkways, Patios Concrete Pool Repairs Retaining Walls Parging

289-237-2154 Decks & Fences

Electrical

CANDOR ELECTRIC #ECRA/ESA Lic.700 5195 Full Electrical Service, 100/ 200 Amp Service Upgrades Kitchens, Rec Rooms Internet Wiring Commercial & Service Contracts. Senior Discounts

905-902-1564

DAVIDSON ELECTRICAL Residential and Commerical Renos and Repairs Free Estimates ECRA/ESA #7005156

FENCES Custom Wood

Over 20 years experience. FREE ESTIMATES

905-765-4713 SUNSET CUSTOM DECKS & FENCES Design and Construction No job to big or to small Landscaping services also available Imagination to Reality 289 439 4390

Drywall Drywall Boarding & Taping Steel Stud,Textured Ceilings, Painting 30 years experience Pre-Plan Now

1-888-702-0002 905-562-6303 905-978-1721

Eavestroughs & Siding

UNIQUE SIDING INC. Seamless Eaves, Eaves Cleaning, Soffits, Fascia We'll beat any written quote by 10% Free Est., Sr. Disc. Visa MC accepted

905-741-8017

905-807-0232 HANK'S ELECTRIC 40 Yrs Experience Knob & Tube Replacement Panel Upgrades ESA Pre-Approved Free Estimate

905-304-3000 905-387-9977

MASTER ELECTRICIAN Free estimates & advice Quality, Prompt Service

Call Nathan 905-525-8111 ECRA/ESA License #7003838

HAVING STORAGE PROBLEMS Why not sell no longer used items with a fast working Classified Ad? Call today...

905-526-3443 Exterior

BATHROOM SPECIALISTS * Reyes * HOME RENOVATIONS Floors & Painting

Over 35 Years Experience

FREE ESTIMATES

Flooring & Carpeting

CERAMIC INSTALLATION * Kitchen Backsplash * Bathroom/Shower Walls and Floors Also install Laminate Flooring Free Estimates / Good Rates! Call Tony@

905-928-4653

Ceramic Tile Installation Repairs Bathrooms 35 years exp. Call Joe 905-520-4426 905-574-7872

HARDWOOD & LAMINATE INSTALLATION Excellent Rates & Quality Work

10 Years Exp. Call Matt

905-541-4918

J&J Carpet SALES INSTALL RE-STRETCH 36 YEARS EXP.

905-317-5187 General Contracting, Excavating

DAN PARR'S Excavating Internal & External

Waterproofing Basements We'll Beat Any Written Quote Fully Insured References Available

905-719-9507 MAN WITH BOBCAT & EXCAVATOR Digging patios, walkways, exposing foundations, post holes, grading, concrete/ dirt removal. Other services avail

905-334-4028

905-807-8377 Retired Custom-Home Builder David can fix it all Wife says get out of the house! Senior's Friendly. RENOVATIONS TOO!

KRUTER CONSTRUCTION Kitchens, Baths & Basements Family Business for 40 years with Warranties, Referrals Free Estimates.

905-648-6155

Free Est. Lic & Ins.

905-385-6295

All Repairs ...

905-547-5144

Home Renovations

From Interlock To Flagstone

Handy Person Bricks - Stone - Block Foundations, Basement Walls Repaired. Free Estimates Hours 8am -7pm

General Contracting, Excavating

DAROSA'S LANDSCAPE FENCE STONEWORK & REPAIRS

JUNK MEN ✔ Tile, Drywall, Hardwd ✔ Junk Removal ✔ Concrete &

Kitchen ● Baths ● Basements ● All Flooring Drywall ● Painting & All Other Renos. Int. & Ext with Written Guarantee ● Brick ● Stone ● Block ● New & Repairs

905-516-2269 K & R Enterprise

Home Renovations

TOTAL HOME IMPROVEMENT

T&H EXCAVATING

Doors & Windows

Home Renovations

905-388-2466 905-870-0140

Handy Person

ACTIVE HANDYMAN 40 yrs., exp., Lic & Ins. **Senior Discounts** Painting, Plumbing, Electrical, Ceramics, Bathrooms, Basements "No job too small"

Call Rick 905-928-6035 CHRIS'S HOME IMPROVEMENTS ✔ Paint ✔ Trim ✔ Drywall ✔ Finish Carpentry NO JOB TOO SMALL!!

905-317-0596 NO JOB too small! If you need help around the house inside or out call Tony The Handyman 905-545-2223.

The Right Angle

HANDYMAN Service Renovations - Repairs Flooring, Decks & Fences, Basement Upgrades

Call Mike 905-973-1097

Heating & Cooling A.N.G. HOME SERVICES ✓ Furnaces & A/C ✓ Plumbing ✓ Gas Lines Insured & Licensed MARCH MADNESS WE Pay the HST!!

905-518-4580 EFFICIENT Heating & Air Cond Sale Furnace & A.C All incld. 10 yr. Parts & Labour... WE pay 1/2 the tax on new installs! Financing O.A.C Furnace maint. check $99

905-304-2955

Home Renovations

NO JOB TOO BIG OR TOO SMALL! ✔ All flooring ✔ Painting ✔ Drywall ✔ Basement ✔ Bathroom ✔ Kitchen Cabinets

Special: $1.99 Berber installed w/underpad! Lic. 25 Yrs Exp-Guaranteed Work- Free Est

Call Fred 905-966-4580

B.C. Smith Carpentry Services.

• • • • •

Renovations Bathrooms Basements Decks Siding

Call Blair:

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The volume of home sales on the Mountain so far this year is down from a year ago, but that could be due to the HST and mortgage rule changes, says a local realtor. Jeff Bonner, a sales representative with Jag Realty, said 2010 was a front-loaded year in the real estate market, with a very active first quarter. Changes to mortgage rules in early 2010 and the implementation of the HST last summer both drove sales as buyers and sellers sought to avoid perceived market fallout or higher taxes coming with those changes. First-quarter sales for the Mountain, as reported through the local MLS system, were 392, a 14.5-percent drop over the first quarter of 2010, and only a five-per-cent increase over the previous quarter, said Bonner. The average sales price over the first quarter of 2011 was $238,368, down 2.5 per cent from the same period last year and a 3.4% slide from the last quarter of 2010. There was also more activity reported in higher price ranges last year. The highest sale price in first quarter of 2010 was $775,000, but only $475,000 in the first quarter of 2011. Bonner said such a wide variance in top-end prices might suggest a shift in the active segment of the market more than depreciation in property value. He added he has seen continued appreciation in most cases on a case-by-case basis when compared to similar properties. Hamilton-wide sales were marginally better, with an 11-per-cent drop for the quarter. Hamilton as a whole saw prices flat, with virtually no change on the average from last year. On the Mountain, comparing first quarter of 2011 to the first quarter of 2009, however, the market is up nine per cent in sales and 7.1 per cent in average prices. “The first quarter results could be described as less-than-exciting,” said Bonner. “But perhaps it is not surprising with some of the factors affecting the market. And we may continue to see prices increasing at a slower pace in the shortterm with mortgage changes that took effect March 18, as a shorter maximum amortization does mean a small decrease in buying power for homebuyers.” Bonner said the first-quarter real estate market was weaker than he would have hoped, but it was a bit better than he had expected after checking the numbers in mid-March. “This suggests to me that the spring market may be a little later starting than last year, and we will have to continue to monitor the market performance as we head into the traditionally busier time of year.”

BY CRAIG CAMPBELL NEWS STAFF

Parents and teachers alike questioned school board staff about why the first Dalewood accommodation review committee (ARC) public meeting was held before information about the process — and the board’s recommended option — was released. Unlike other ongoing reviews, where the committees met a couple of times and received school information as well as a board staff recommendation, the Dalewood group hadn’t even met before the public was invited to chip in. The lack of information was a concern to several people who attended last Wednesday night’s meeting in the Dalewood School auditorium. What appeared to be an attempt by school board staff to smooth over any early concerns about the process clearly backfired. Several community residents, and committee members, were disappointed

board staff did not release its recommended option at the meeting. Ongoing secondary school ARC meetings – including one looking at Westdale, Parkside, Highland and Ancaster high schools – all released the board staff recommended option several weeks before the first public meeting, and after the committee had already met at least once to discuss school information profiles, process and other issues. “We can’t ask intelligent questions,” area resident Noel James told the committee. “I wanted to see the board recommendation. We have four public meetings and the first one is done.” Committee chair Krys Croxall said it will be up to the committee whether or not to schedule any extra public meetings. Colleen Morgan, a Prince Philip Elementary School teacher and ARC member, echoed the feelings of several speakers — many of whom received extended applause from the wider group. “I expected to hear the board option tonight. I’m disappointed I didn’t get that opportunity,” Morgan said, adding she told fellow Prince Philip staff members to attend the meeting in order to hear the boards option for Dalewood, Prince Philip

and George R. Allan. School board consultant Daniel Del Bianco said he wanted to avoid having the board recommendation dominating the conversation at the public meeting.

Rec centre to be rebuilt, with or without school The City of Hamilton already owns almost a quarter of the Dalewood middle school building on Main Street West and plans to rebuild a recreation centre on that site. Whether or not the school board will partner with the city to build a new school on the same property will be discussed at a meeting between the two organizations this week. But while the city has been clear about its plans – passing a motion more than six months ago to move forward with a modern recreation centre on its Dalewood property, the school board has not yet announced its plan. Board staff will release its recommended option April 28 on student accommodation issues at Dalewood, Prince Philip and George R. Allan.

Public school bureaucrat pay hikes leave inflation in dust BY RICHARD LEITNER NEWS STAFF

Top earners at the Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board enjoyed pay hikes well above the rate of inflation and those of their Catholic board counterparts last year, the latest provincial salary disclosure list shows. The public board’s list of employees making $100,000 per year grew to 191 in 2010, an increase of 23 over the previous year fueled by the addition of eight administrators, eight teachers, seven consultants and a social worker. Education director John Malloy topped the list at $231,807 in salary and taxable benefits. While it’s difficult to compare his pay with 2009 because he split duties with departing director Chris Spence, the position’s salary has jumped nearly seven per cent since 2008. The so-called “sunshine list” shows every top-paid bureaucrat at the public board received a raise above rate of inflation – 2.5 per cent for Ontario in 2010 – some considerably so.

Since-departed human resources boss Damian Borrelli led the pack, receiving $177,554, a pay increase of more than $26,000 or nearly 18 per cent. Others with double-digit percentage increases included budget manager Lucy Veerman, whose pay jumped by 12 per cent to $136,905, and communications manager Jackie Penman. Her salary rose by more than 13 per cent, to $115,048. Education superintendents, whose salaries range from $151,856 to $158,669, meanwhile saw their pay boosted between 4.3 and 9.6 per cent. Penman said the above rates reflect pay increases of three per cent and payouts for unused vacation time. In her own case, her increase also reflected her move to the top of her pay grid, she said. Yet most administrators were bested by two teachers. Jean Gibbard, a secondary continuing education teacher, earned $167,030 – down nearly $16,000 from 2009. Sam Hammond, on leave to serve as president of the Elementary Teachers’ Federation of Ontario, received $159,217, an

increase of 2.7 per cent over 2009. His pay is reimbursed by his union. The two teachers were only topped by Malloy and associate education director Ken Bain, whose $181,279 pay jumped by 4.3 per cent. As in previous years, principals and vice-principals dominated the remainder of the list, with 114 and 29 respectively. Most earn between $101,000 and $106,000. Public board chair Judith Bishop said special payments for outstanding holidays can affect the list, but rates for superintendents are based on those at 10 other boards, including in Waterloo and Niagara. At the Catholic board – which has about 30,000 students, compared to the public board’s 49,000 – education director Patricia Amos topped the list at $195,968. Her pay jumped by more than 13 per cent, reflecting her promotion from superintendent. In all, 99 employees were paid $100,000 or more, an increase of six over the previous year. Most superintendents, whose pay ranged from $141,290 to $157,733, received pay increases of between 1.9 and 2.5 per cent.

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• THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2011 • MOUNTAIN NEWS • WWW.HAMILTONNEWS.COM

Weak first quarter for Timing of board option for Dalewood questioned meeting held before Mountain home sale Public recommendation released

33


Council still aiming for zero hike

CITYSIDELINES

BY KEVIN WERNER NEWS STAFF

Despite the temptations to stuff this year’s budget with additional spending, councillors instead looked to its reserves to pay for needed programs, preserving the lowest tax increase in Hamilton’s post-amalgamation history. “We are trying to keep to zero as much as we can,” said Mayor Bob Bratina. As politicians creep closer to their April 27 budget deadline, they held off on adding another $3.5 million to the budget in enhanced spending recommended by city staff, while dropping the proposed average tax increase to 0.8 per cent. Councillors did approve $125,000 for food service workers training at the city’s long-term care facilities at Macassa and Wentworth lodges because if they didn’t, the city could be fined by the provincial government. And $30,000 was allocated for the annual Re-Enactment of the Battle of Stoney Creek. They did agreed to spend $350,000 to boost local food banks, but the money was taken out of the tax stabilization reserve. Politicians also agreed to spend $64,000 for the city’s rooming strategy, and $350,000 for emergency shelters. Again, the funds was paid for through the stabilization reserve. But politicians refused to spend any money for its street-tree trimming program, including $350,000 for this year. Councillor Brian McHattie said with the emerald ash borer threatening trees in Hamilton, it’s imperative the program continue.

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THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2011 • MOUNTAIN NEWS • WWW.HAMILTONNEWS.COM •

34

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OSTEOARTHRITIS GROUP The Arthritis Society is offering a free osteoarthritis group for people with osteoarthritis. The three-class program is being held on consecutive Thursdays starting April 14, 1:30-3 p.m. at Motion Specialties, 1010 Upper Wentworth St. To register, contact Darlene at 905-6329390 ext. 0 or 1-866-273-2229 ext. 0. Looking for work? Wondering why you never hear back from employers after you apply? Maybe it's your cover letter that isn't working. Get help at a workshop April 14, 9 a.m., at Goodwill Career Centre, 1050 Upper Gage Ave. Call 905-526-8488 ext. 307 to register for either workshop.

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To have your activity appear in this column, please submit a brief paragraph about the event, mentioning time, place and day. Please leave a phone number for information. This listing is reserved for non-profit organizations and guaranteed placement is not possible. Please submit your copy by faxing us at 905-664-3102 or by emailing it to editor@hamiltonmountainnews.com. All submissions should be made at least one week prior to the Thursday publication in order to reach readers well in advance of an event. Publication is not guaranteed.

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FRIDAY COMMUNITY LUNCH April 15 at Church of the Nativity, 1831 King St. East. Served continuously from 11:30 a.m. until 12:30 p.m., $5.

EUCHRE NIGHT Every Friday night at 7:30 p.m., Burkholder United Church, 465 Mohawk Rd. East, holds a euchre session. Cost is $2 per person.

MOVIE AND GAMES NIGHT Friday nights from 6-8 p.m. at Eastmount Community Centre, 115 East 26th St., Mountain Kidz Klub presents a movies and games night for children ages 5-12, $2 per child.

SATURDAY FREE MOVIE G-Force will be shown at 1:30 p.m. April 16 as part of Sensational Saturday Silver Screen Series at Terryberry Library, 100 Mohawk Rd. West. For information, call 905-546-3921.

EUCHRE TOURNAMENT Hamilton Olympic Club is hosting its second progressive

euchre tournament fundraiser at Marritt Hall, Ancaster Fairgrounds on April 16. Also looking for donations. Contact Monika Di Cesare at HOCfundraisers@gmail.com.

MOM-TO-MOM SALE St. Andrew’s United Church, 479 Upper Paradise Rd., is holding a mom-to-mom sale on April 16, 8:30-11:30 a.m. Admission $1, proceeds to Neighbour to Neighbour food bank.

MOM-TO-MOM SALE Peoples Church, 510 Mohawk Rd. West, is holding a mom-to-mom sale April 16 from 8:30 a.m.-noon. Free admission and refreshments.

RAIN BARREL FUNDRAISER Earth Day rain barrel fundraiser sale at Lime Ridge Mall (southwest parking lot), 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Reprocessed barrels that previously contained food items; all proceeds to Earth Day Eco-Festival. Price of barrels $50 including taxes. Earth Day HamiltonBurlington gets $10 from each sale.

SUNDAY BABYSITTING COURSE

United Church, 1974 King St. East, at 7 p.m.

TUESDAY BLADDER AND BOWEL CONTINENCE Hamilton & District Ostomy Association presents a seminar on "Maintaining the Balance; Bladder and Bowel Continence" with guest speaker Dr. Jennifer Skelly, director of the continence program at St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton, April 19 at 7:30 p.m. at Sacred Heart Community Hall, 24 Poplar Ave. For more information, call 905-389-8822or visit www.ostomyhamilton.com.

JOB NETWORKING Come and meet other job seekers to share experiences and job leads at the Goodwill Career Centre Networking Group meets at 9 a.m. sharp every Tuesday morning at 1050 Upper Gage Ave. No need to register, but arrive early as space is limited. For information, call 905-5268488 ext. 307.

LAUGHTER YOGA Concession on the Mountain Laughter Yoga Club meets every Tuesday at 7 p.m. at Mt. Hamilton United Church, 31 Summit Ave.

WEDNESDAY

St. John Ambulance Hamilton, 65 Nebo Rd., is holding babysitting courses for youth age 11 to 16 on April 17, May 29 and June 26 from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. Cost is $60; call 905-387-1880 to register.

HOT LUNCH

GENEALOGY

KICK START YOUR JOB SEARCH

The topic for the April meeting of the Hamilton branch of the Ontario Genealogical Society is "Mainly British Accessing records from afar" and the speaker is Ruth Burkholder, 2 p.m. on April 17 in the lower auditorium of the Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board,100 Main St. West. For further information on genealogy call 905318-8086 or visit www.ogs.on.ca/hamilton.

PARALYMPIC SPORTS INFORMATION Hamilton Accessibility Sports Council launches the first “Ready, Willing and Able Event” in Hamilton on April 17 at the Huntington Park Recreation Centre, 87 Brentwood Dr. from noon to 4 p.m. Participation is open to anyone in Hamilton, and offers a chance to learn and get the chance to try the sports of sledge hockey and bocce. These two Paralympics’ sports are in our community today. For more information, call 905-573-9393.

FAMILY FUN ZONE Every Sunday afternoon from 1-4 p.m. at Eastmount Community Centre, 115 East 26th St., Mountain Kidz Klub presents the Family Fun Zone, free of charge, with games, air hockey and more. Call 905-574-2993 for more information.

MONDAY FIGHTER PILOT SPEAKS George Stewart, a retired RCAF Second World War Mosquito fighter pilot, will speak at Pioneer Memorial

Enjoy a hot lunch April 20, 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. at Faith Lutheran Church, 1907 King St. East. Cost is $5. “Everything you wanted to know about your job search but were too afraid to ask” workshop April 20 at 9 a.m. at the Goodwill Career Centre, 1050 Upper Gage Ave. Call 905-526-8488 ext. 307 to register.

UPCOMING EMPOWERMENT WORKSHOP Ever wonder why some people appear more empowered in life than you do? Discover their secret at the Empowering Yourself workshop April 21 at 9 a.m.at the Goodwill Career Centre, 1050 Upper Gage Ave. Call 905-526-8488 ext. 307 to register.

CHOIR PERFORMANCE Libera, an internationally acclaimed boys choir, is appearing at West Highland Baptist Church, 1605 Garth St., April 22 at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $35 for premium seats, $20 regular admission and $10 for children and students with identification. Call 905-387-5385.

RUMMAGE SALE St. John United Church, corner of Queensdale and East 28th St., April 26 noon to 1 p.m.

MOM TO MOM SALE Immanuel Christian Reformed Church, 61 Mohawk Rd ., West, on April 30 from 8:30 a.m.-noon. Admission is $1. Need more information or want to rent a table? Contact Tanya at icrcnurserycomm@gmail.com.


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/W]ZTMa8IZSAW]\P*I[MJITT Registration (ages 4-13) this Sunday at the snack shed off of Brigadoon from 12-2pm 5WZMQVNWZUI\QWVI\"___OW]ZTMaXIZSKWU

Creighton and VanSickle named top Mountaineers Mohawk award winners unveiled Curler Karen Creighton and rugby player Chris VanSickle were named the 2010-2011 Outstanding Athletes at Mohawk College's 44th annual Athletics Awards Banquet at Michelangelo's Saturday night. VanSickle won the 'Wes Hicks' Outstanding Male Athlete honour after a season which saw him named Ontario Colleges Athletic Association Player of the Year and OCAA All-Star. He was the league's top scorer and led the Mountaineers to an OCAA silver medal. Creighton skipped the Mohawk women's rink to the silver medal at the OCAA Curling Championships. A virtual walk-on, as she was not recruited for curling, Creighton showed she had the mental toughness and could make the shots required to medal in her sport. The Female Freshman Athlete award was captured by Rachelle Abella of the women's basketball team, who was named to the OCAA All-Rookie Team. The men's honour went to Justin Scapinello of the bronze medal winning volleyball team. Scapinello was the OCAA Rookie of the Year and was the West Region scoring champion.

Women's soccer and volleyball player Ashley Hagen was selected the All Round Female Athlete. Hagen had seven goals in eight games for the soccer squad. Volleyball star Jennifer Knowles won the prestigious Dr. Sam Mitminger award for academic and athletic excellence. Knowles, a CCAA and OCAA AllAcademic, scored 276 offensive points and added 164 digs leading the Mountaineers to the bronze medal match at the OCAA Championship.

Varsity Coaches Awards Badminton Coaches Award – Chris Hong Most Improved Player – Alicia Jenkins Most Valuable Player – Mohammed Nazimuddin Men’s Basketball Coaches Award – Tanner Lane Rookie of the Year - Taylor Dowhaniuk Most Valuable Player – Aminu Bello Women’s Basketball Coaches Award – Joanna Brown Rookie of the Year – Rachelle Abella Most Valuable Player – Morgan Taylor Cross-country Most Improved Runner – Sandi

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Rookie of the Year – Phil Jackson Most Valuable Player – Chris VanSickle Men’s Soccer Tom Bell Coaches Award – Jordan Dykstra Tom Bell Coaches Award – Matthew Kernick Rookie of the Year – Mark Vanduyvenvoorde Women’s Soccer Coaches Award – Lana Martin Rookie of the Year – Ashley Hagen Most Valuable Player – Carlee Myles Men’s Volleyball Coaches Award – Mo Sulaiman Coaches Award – Can Henschel Most Valuable Player – Ryan dela Rosa Women’s Volleyball Coaches Award – Jenna Gignac Rookie of the Year – Kristie Crnic Most Valuable Player – Kellie Crnic

Curler Karen Creighton (left) and rugby player Chris VanSickle flank volleyball star Jennifer Knowles after Mohawk College's 44th annual Athletics Awards Banquet. Creighton and VanSickle were the female and male athletes of the year; Knowles won the Dr. Sam Mitminger award for academic and athletic excellence.

Other award winners

Bryce Most Valuable Player – Emily Hicks Most Valuable Player – Jonathan Redfearn Curling Coaches Award – James Maslen Coaches Award – Jennifer Montgomery

Alicia Jenkins - Dept. of Athletics and Recreation Award Amanda DeHaan (Volleyball) Hap Holman Business Award Wade Marquardt - Dr. Keith McIntyre Athletic Leadership Award Adam Njauw - Barb Moore Spirit of Athletics Award

Most Valuable Player – Karen Creighton Golf Coaches Award – JD Shaw Most Valuable Player – Kyle Harber Men’s Rugby Most Improved Player – John Packer

Accessibility sports council open house New group to highlight sports for disabled Sunday BY GORD BOWES NEWS STAFF

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Ontario gold The Hamilton Wildcats U12 major atom boys basketball team won gold medal in their division at the Ontario Basketball Association 2011 Ontario Cup. Pictured, from left, are: front row - Marcus Jones, James Agyapong, Brandon Sokoloski; middle - Brandon Kwiecien, Luke Moscardini, Nathan Jean, Harraj Singh and Jarren Lagleva; back - Dustin Cordeiro, Jacob Walczak, Bob Burke (manager), BB Chiemezue Chuks-Mady, Aleksa Klasnic and John Vasapolli (coach).

The Hamilton Accessibility Sports Council is inviting the public out Sunday to see the wide range of sports of which people with disabilities can take part. The recently formed council is Hamilton’s advocacy group and voice for those with physical and cognitive disabilities ensuring equitable opportunities for participation in recreation and sport. “We’re hoping we can get people with disabilities who don’t get the opportunity to try something, to come out and try this,” said Olga Pavlovich, a Hamilton Accessibility Sports Council board member.

“Come out and see what we have available in our community.” She noted there are more than 25 different sports for disabled athletes offered in Hamilton. Such sports don't get a lot of attention, said Pavlovich. That's something the council, the seventh formed in the province under the ParaSport Ontario umbrella, is hoping to change. "There is a huge group of people here who need a voice and we want to be that voice for them and help them as we can," said Pavlovich. There will be sledge hockey and bocce demonstrations at this Sunday's event and the chance for people to participate. Sunday's session, which is being held in conjunction with ParaSport Ontario, runs from noon until 4 p.m. at the Huntington Park recreation centre, 87 Brentwood Dr., on the east Mountain.

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• THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2011 • MOUNTAIN NEWS • WWW.HAMILTONNEWS.COM

SPORTS NEWS

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Roller girls start season at Mountain arena

Focus on Youth Hamilton is hiring students to help with community summer programs!

Need a Summer Job? Location of Programs:

In some elementary and secondary schools across the city

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The Hammer City Roller Girls return to action in a doubleheader May 7 at the Dave AndreychukMountain Arena. The newly re-aligned Hammer City Harlots team will face off against the Luscious Lunch Ladies at 6 p.m. followed by the Hammer City Eh! Team and the Thames Fatales. Last year, HCRG's home teams swept the flat-track roller derby series against London's Thames Fatales in competitive home-andhome bouts. The HCRG will also host bouts at the Mountain arena on June 11 and July 9. Tickets are $13 in advance and $15 at the door; a portion of the proceeds will be donated to the Soroptomist Club Stoney CreekNiagara. See www.hammercityrollergirls.ca for details.

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Ontario champs The 1998 Hamilton Jr. Bulldogs won the All Ontario Peewee AAA Championships. They beat the Toronto Marlies 4-2 in the championship game to win gold. The team, led by head coach Anthony Susi, went undefeated in the regular season and is the first team from the Jr. Bulldogs organization to not only win back-to-back OMHA championships, but also to win a medal at the provincial championships. Pictured from left are: front row - Louie DelSordo, Brandon Saigeon, Nicholas Caamano, Andrew Albano; middle - Michael Fortino, Jonathon Pace, Johnathon Schaefer, Dawson Shackelton, Griffin Roubos, Justin Mignardi, Lucas Ippolito and Jacob Maltese; back - Curtis Zahorodni, Brendan D'Agostino, Austin Irvine, Jonah Capriotti and Owen Norton.

Show time

TO APPLY: Complete the online application form found at www.hwdsb.on.ca/focusonyouth For more information, e-mail focusonyouth@hwdsb.on.ca or call 905-527-5092 If selected, students will be interviewed the week of May 16, 2011 Deadline for Applications is May 11, 2011 Applications will be available online April 20, 2011

Felicia Bonitatibus (left), Katie Hunter and Jessica Wiskar warm up for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Monopoly On Ice,â&#x20AC;? the Hamilton Skating Clubâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s carnival, held last weekend at Dave Andreychuck-Mountain Arena. About 500 members of the club took part in the two shows. The trio represented the boot token from the game. PHOTO BY GORD BOWES

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SUBMITTED PHOTO

Blessed Sacrament Yellow Jackets Atom girls competed in the provincial championships March 25-27 and brought home a silver medal. The team had a season record of 21-3. The Jackets beat Newman (4621), Blessed Sacrament #2 (38-19),

Steve Cowie rolls 746 and 706 triples BY JIM MARGUERATT SPECIAL TO THE NEWS

Steve Cowie, a longtime Mountain resident, is very pleased with his current 205 average which was helped greatly with triples of 746 (266) and 706 (279) at Skyway Lanes. Cowie was the association secretary for many years, the job now held by Barb Hollands. Tim Enoksen blasted a 684, Kyle Marquette 673, Ron Colling 650 (258), Carmen Sarnelli 645 (2650, Vince Iacozza Jr. 634 (252), Ed Margueratt 629, a 235 single and a 192 triplicate. Chris Marquette gave 300 a go in Westinghouse play, but a high hit left him with a seven count and a 297 game and 723 (192, 234, 297) triple. There has been nine 300s in this league by Jim Kompare, Graham Hartley, Marty Stokes, Lionel Lewis, Rob Brookes, Rob Gray, Art Oliver Jr., Mike Anderer and Wendell Harrison. Super singles are Cory Davies 279, Todd Downey and Ryan Dickenson 278, Matt Glidden 277 and Doug Schatz cranked 815 (268, 278, 268) for his last three games. Mannix Dellaire finished with 22 consecutive strikes for an 802 (223, 279, 300) triple at Burlington Bowl. The local record for consecutive strikes is 23 by Stewart Shea, Ed Maurer and Jayson Legg. The 802 is the record ninth of the season while the 300 is number 22. For the Splitsville youth, Gordon Male 619 (226, 222), Michael Allen 562 (235), Louis Kiss 199, Jordan Lang 195, Jerren Pottruff 187, Kyle Dickenson 190 and Chase Oliver used a 243 third game for a 614 triple. The Splitsville adults have struggling lately with Steve Smith the best at 802 for four games.

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and Oakville Venon (37-21) in round-robin play. In the semifinal, the Jackets beat Transway in a close game 40-38. In the championship game, the Blessed Sacrament team had to come from behind to tie the Scarborough Blues and put the game into overtime, but lost 52-48.

Leafs win title The MHMHA peewee Leafs beat Dundas 5-2 in the city championship on March 27. Pictured from left are: front Joey Simons; second row - William Ghesquiere, Alexander Geske, James Taylor, Lucas Pidgeon, Steven Olds and Brennan Wood; third row - Max Garrett, Joel Bisson, Aaron Campbell and Jake Pantitis; fourth row - coach Alban Olds, Corey Murray, Josh Smith, Sinclair Jeejeebhoy, Andrew Copeland and Callum Hanson; back row coaches Mike Simons, Bill Bisson and Rick Geske.

37

• THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2011 • MOUNTAIN NEWS • WWW.HAMILTONNEWS.COM

Yellow Jackets earn silver at Ontario final


THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2011 â&#x20AC;˘ MOUNTAIN NEWS â&#x20AC;˘ WWW.HAMILTONNEWS.COM â&#x20AC;˘

38

Gold medalists

Storoschuk and Gavey named to millennium golf team

The Blessed Sacrament major bantam boys won gold at the Blessed Sacrament tournament recently. The championship game victory (66-47) against the Peel Halton All Starz was their fifth win of the weekend. They are ranked No. 1 in the province and will be competing in the provincial championship this weekend. Pictured from left are: front row - Logan Keen, Nathan Bruzzese, Derrick Sealy, Josh Nardini, Marquel Fraser, Adrian Mendoza, Justin Andrew, Fans: Darren Clarke, Daniel Moro and Jamieson Narain; back - coach Perry Bruzzese, J.R. Calura, Kingsley Campbell-Olsen, Adam Carnicelli, Andy Ngobila, Nolan Narain, Jaylen Clarke, coach John Nardini, and coach Junior Clarke. SUBMITTED PHOTO

Two former Mohawk athletes have been named to the Ontario Colleges Athletic Association AllMillennium Golf Team. Mohawk Hall of Famer Pat Gavey led the Mountaineers to an OCAA gold medal in 1991, while picking up an individual silver medal. He also captured a bronze medal two years earlier. Gavey played from 1989 to 1992. Dave Storoschuk was a Mohawk golfer from 1977 to 1979. He led the Mountaineers to the OCAA championship in 1978, and won two straight individual silver medals. Storoschuk and Gavey are two of only eight people named to the All-Millennium team and will be honoured as part of the OCAA Hall of Fame Induction Class of 2011, May 4, at the Fairmont Royal York Hotel in Toronto.

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