Page 1

D A

2012-2013

O R

B

O

W S

Prospectus

D R

Hall Cross Science & Mathematics College

K U

P

O R

F O


Introduction

F O

Hall Cross is a community comprehensive school with Specialist School Status in Science and Mathematics.

O R

Our Vision

I A centre of excellence in learning in our

O R

D A

B

W S

O

D R

K U

P

community and in the borough where the success and development of all is of paramount importance.

Our Values and Beliefs

I An individual learns best in a secure, ordered, respectful and positive environment.

I Learning should be personalised involving appropriate curriculum, time, assessment, ICT and other providers.

I We are a vibrant community with

outstanding teachers and support staff, enabling each young person to achieve their best and so contribute positively throughout their lives.

I A centre which aims to help students to develop a secure self image based on success.

I Our school community is a happy, well ordered environment in which all feel respected and valued. Our overall aim is to provide an education which enables each student to realise his/her potential in as many areas of life as possible. The School is committed to equal opportunities in learning and the safeguarding of children. Mr P. Marshall Chair of Governors

Introduction


School Philosophy This can be broken down into more specific areas:

Our overall AIM is to provide an education which enables each student to realise his or her potential in as many areas of life as possible.

Pastoral Aims

Curriculum Aims

I To provide a BROAD, BALANCED, RELEVANT and DIFFERENTIATED curriculum which brings each student into contact with the major areas of learning and experience (viz. aesthetic and creative, human and social, linguistic and literary, mathematical, moral, physical, scientific, spiritual and technological).

D R

K U

I To provide the major areas of learning

O

namely skills, knowledge, concepts and attitudes.

W S

I To help students develop lively, enquiring

B

O R

D A

F O

I To create a sympathetic and caring ethos,

minds, with the ability to question and debate rationally.

O R

in which there is mutual respect between students and staff.

I To create structures and systems which are

P

positive in their use and where the needs of individuals do not get lost in bureaucracy.

I To support students’ needs.

I To establish strong relationships and links between school and home.

I To use outside agencies effectively to support individual development.

I To give students recognition and to enable them to show their work and value in as many ways as possible to the School and the community.

I To provide knowledge, skills and attitudes which will prepare them for life after school.

I To help students understand the world in

which they live, humanity’s achievements and aspirations, and the inter-dependence of groups, individuals and nations.

I To instil respect for and tolerance of other

religious and moral values, and other races and ways of life.

I To provide equality of opportunity for all students. Hall Cross is a widely mixed, multi-cultural community which welcomes diversity and encourages tolerance.

School Philosophy

1


New Intake of Students into Year 7 Our students will only spend one seventh of their waking lives at school, the rest of the time they learn at home under the guidance of parents. Both the School and parents must work together for the benefit of the students. Students achieve most when parents talk with teachers. If you have any worries or concerns please contact the School. If a member of staff is teaching they will return your call when they are free.

O R

B

In the academic year prior to transfer to Hall Cross, the following arrangements are made:

I Visits to all our partner primary schools to meet parents, talk about the School and answer questions about its organisation.

I A prospectus, giving information about the School, is sent to all parents, via the contributory schools.

I Visits to all our contributory schools are made by the Head, Phase Leaders and Departmental staff in charge of liaison, to introduce ourselves to the students, to give them an opportunity to ask about the School and to ensure that the transfer to Hall Cross is as smooth as possible.

2

New Intake of Students into Year 7

O

W S

D A

K U

For some years Hall Cross has had one of the most multi-ethnic student populations in Doncaster. A recent monitoring both surprised and delighted us by the diversity and cosmopolitan nature of the results: in summer 2009 17% of our students were from various ethnic minorities speaking a variety of languages at home, ranging from Cantonese to Farsi and Turkish to Nepali. Indeed, students within the School community have family links with some 38 countries in the world.

D R

New students entering Year 12 should see the separate Sixth Form Prospectus available from the office at our Upper School site.

Appointments The Headteacher and other senior staff with pastoral or curricular responsibilities are available to see parents by appointment at any mutually convenient time. Please contact the School by telephone or by letter, should you wish to see any of the following: Headteacher

Pippa Dodgshon

Deputy Headteacher

Gordon Watts

Head of Lower School Head of Upper School Head of Sixth Form Assistant Headteacher Assistant Headteacher Assistant Headteacher Assistant Headteacher

Mike Cattrall Dave Douglass Jill Croskell Sharon Carroll Sian Stockham Simon Swain Alison Whittaker

Business Manager

Mike Swift

Lower School KS3 Phase Leader, Care and Guidance

O R

KS3 Phase Leader, Learning & Progress

P

F O

Paul Tyrer Patrick Wymer

Upper School

KS4 Phase Leader, Care and Guidance

Alison March

KS4 Phase Leader, Learning & Progress

James Harris

KS5 Phase Leader, Care and Guidance

Emma Kelly

KS5 Phase Leader, Learning & Progress

Tracy Blake


Important Dates Proposed Term Dates/School Holidays – 2012/13 Academic Year* School Closes

School Opens

Autumn Term

-

Monday 3rd September 2012

Autumn Half Term

Friday 26th October 2012

Monday 5th November 2012

Christmas Holiday

Friday 21st December 2012

Thursday 3rd January 2013

Spring Half Term

Friday 15th February 2013

Monday 25th February 2013

Easter Holiday

Thursday 28th March 2013

Monday 15th April 2013

May Day

Friday 3rd May 2013

Tuesday 7th May 2013

Summer Half Term

Friday 24th May 2013

Monday 3rd June 2013

End of Term

Friday 19th July 2013

O

* five Training Days are to be added

W S

School Sessions Registration

Period 4 Period 5

June

Year 8

March

Year 9

December

10:55 - 11:15

Year 10

March

11:15 - 12:15

Year 11

November

Year 12

April

Year 13

October

O R

9:55 - 10:55

Break

Lunch

D A

B

These are planned as follows: Year 7

8:55 - 9:55

Period 2

Period 3

Parents’ Evenings

8:45 - 8:55

Period 1

D R

K U

P

O R

F O

12:15 - 1:05 1:05 - 2:05 2:05 - 3:05

Precise dates will be sent to parents during the course of the School year.

Important Dates

3


O R

D A

B

4

Day to Day Issues

W S

O

D R

K U

P

O R

F O


Day to Day Issues We must re-iterate that mobile phones are not allowed in school - if your child needs a phone for the journey either to or from school it must be left at the School office during the day for safekeeping.

School Meals A midday meal is available for all children attending school. Students may purchase from a wide range of hot and cold food including healthy options. The cost of a dinner ticket is presently £2.10. Parents are asked to send a cheque or money in a sealed envelope, each week to cover the cost of five tickets; cheques should be made payable to DMBC. For further information, including the provision of free meals, please see Part 6 of the Local Authority’s booklet ‘Admission to Secondary School and Other General Information’. The School encourages students to stay on the premises at lunchtime to eat a school meal or to bring a packed lunch.

Equipment

Valuables

O R

B

W S

D A

All students require certain items of equipment, such as a pen or biro, pencil, ruler, rubber etc. and all clothing, including P.E. and Games kit, should be clearly marked with the owner’s name. This makes the identification of lost items that much simpler.

It is preferable that valuable items are NOT brought to school but, where it is found necessary to do so, they should be kept on the person or handed to a member of staff for safe keeping. During P.E. and Games lessons, watches, money etc. must be handed to the teacher in charge. Portable media players, games players and mobile phones must not be brought to school. If students disobey this rule and such items are found, the offending items will be confiscated. If they are lost or stolen, the School will not be held responsible. Whilst we do all we can to trace lost or stolen items, the School accepts no responsibility for items lost or damaged on the School site unless caused by the actions of members of the School’s staff. Parents are advised to consider taking out appropriate insurance cover for the protection of their child’s personal possessions whilst at school.

K U

We support the message that school attendance is a high priority, and our attendance figures are consistently above the national average. It is considered really important that every child attends school regularly. Time off is considered detrimental to a child’s education. We have a School Attendance Officer on each site, as well as ongoing support from Learner Engagement.

O

O R

Punctuality

Attendance

D R

If there is a problem with your child’s attendance then please speak to your child’s Year Manager or the School Attendance Officer. Please note that unless school is given a valid reason for the absence it will be recorded as unauthorised on the pupil’s Annual Report. DfE guidelines state that only the School may authorise an absence.

Absence Notes Parents are asked to telephone school on their child’s first day of absence (preferably before 10 a.m.). Government legislation requires schools to indicate absences which are authorised (i.e. confirmed by a note from parents) and those which are unauthorised (where no note is sent). It is the School that is charged with determining if an absence is deemed authorised or not. The latter indicates truancy and will be indicated on students’ Annual Reports which remain with them throughout education and into work.

F O

amount of leave granted exceed ten days in any one year. No parent can demand leave of absence for the purposes of a holiday as a right.”

P

It is ESSENTIAL that all students develop an awareness of the importance of punctuality.

Text Books and Library Books All text books must have a suitable protective covering. The cost of text books and library books lost or damaged must be met by the parent or guardian.

School Societies Fund This is a voluntary School Fund to finance activities and clubs within the School, to provide additional amenities and subsidise games fixtures and educational visits. It seems that parents would prefer a single subscription to three annual payments. Therefore, we should be grateful if, during the first half term of Year 7 your son/daughter could bring the £3 contribution to his/her Form Tutor. When students move to the Upper School a similar request will be made.

Absence for Holidays If you would like to take your child out of school for an annual holiday during term time then prior permission must be obtained by completing a holiday request form. In respect of holiday absences the regulations state: “School has a discretionary power for leave to be granted for the purpose of an annual family holiday or an annual holiday during term time. Only in exceptional circumstances may the

Day to Day Issues

5


Charges for School Activities The Education Reform Act of 1988 enables schools to charge for certain activities. The Board of Governors for Hall Cross has resolved to adopt the policies of the Local Authority with regard to charges which may be made for certain school activities, and the remission of these charges in certain cases. The main intention of the 1988 Act is, of course, to ensure the provision of free education and, with one or two exceptions, does not allow parents to be charged for activities which take place during school hours, or for those which take place outside school hours, but which are required by either a syllabus for a prescribed public examination, in connection with the National Curriculum, or religious education. This Authority’s policy with regard to charging is as follows:

I Costs incurred for the board and lodging

element of residential trips during school time are to be passed on to parents, subject to the remissions policy in Section 2 of these guidelines.

I Costs incurred for residential, or other visits

K U

held out of school time, which are regarded as “optional extras� are to be passed on to parents in full. When such visits are provided as a required part of the syllabus for a prescribed public examination, or required in relation to the National Curriculum or religious education, then only the board and lodging element may be passed on to parents.

O

W S

D R

I The cost of examination fees, where the

O R

D A

B

examination preparation has not been carried out at school is to be charged to parents.

I Where, in the opinion of the Governing Body, there are educational reasons for not entering a student for a particular examination, should the parent still wish to enter the student, then the fees are to be recovered.

I Parents may only be charged for, or asked to supply ingredients or materials for design technology lessons when they have indicated, in advance, that they wish to own the finished product.

Remission of Charges

I Costs payable by parents for the board and lodging element of residential trips held during school time, or outside school hours in accordance with paragraph 1(b) of these guidelines, are remitted where parents are in receipt of Income Support or Family Credit.

I There is no other remission of charges.

6

Day to Day Issues

Health and Safety

F O

I Any accident resulting in personal injury to a student must be reported immediately to a member of staff or the School Nurse.

O R

I If a student is taken ill he/she should report the fact to a member of staff or to the School Nurse.

P

I If it is necessary for a student to bring to school medicines, tablets or other medical preparation of any kind, such items are to be left with the office at Lower School or the School Nurse at Upper School during school hours for safe-keeping.

I Fire instructions are posted in every

classroom and all students must acquaint themselves with the details.

I Students may not enter the swimming pool, laboratories, workshops, gymnasia, music rooms, art rooms, and design technology rooms nor use the stage without the permission of a teacher.

I Students may not leave the School premises at mid-morning or lunch break. Any student leaving the premises during school hours, must first report to the School Office and sign the book provided for this purpose. A note giving parental approval is required.

School Transport A special bus service is provided at the end of school to Cantley for Lower School students. Currently the bus is boarded on the School site. Students who want to use the service are allowed to travel on the bus only if they have an identifiable boarding pass and observe the code of conduct drawn up in conjunction with the bus company, First Mainline, to ensure safe and sensible behaviour. Unacceptable conduct will result in the boarding pass being withdrawn. Parents are asked to provide a passport sized photograph for the bus pass.


Environment Food and drink must not be consumed in classrooms or corridors. Chewing gum must not be brought to school.

Leaving the Premises Students must not leave the premises at break or lunch time. Written permission from parents is required if a student has to be absent during school hours.

Smoking Cigarettes, matches or lighters must not be brought to school. Offenders will be punished with a school detention or further school sanctions if appropriate.

Code of Conduct

Rewards

For the School as a community to work effectively and to the benefit of everyone a basic Code of Conduct must be followed by all and the rights of everyone must be respected.

The School has a positive behaviour policy whereby we seek to reward success both large and small. Our rewards system includes the collection of day-to-day credits awarded for:

I a good piece of homework/classwork;

Courtesy

I an excellent contribution to a

I Students are expected to be courteous at all

class discussion;

times both in and out of school.

I a high or much improved test result;

I Students and staff are entitled to work in a

helping out in the department, e.g. giving out books, collecting equipment and tidying up.

Responsibility

I Everyone has responsibilities which

to both school and lessons.

D A

I Students should come to school with the basic equipment to carry out the work scheduled for the classes of the day.

O R

I Incidents of bullying and harassment should be reported to a member of staff as should racist and other discriminatory behaviour.

Dress

I For security as well as appearance all students must keep to the required school dress.

I Jewellery must be kept to a minimum: one watch and one pair of plain stud earrings are permissible. Students are not allowed to wear rings/chains/bracelets. (In practical subjects staff may ask for any item to be removed and placed in safe keeping.) NB Students disobeying this rule will have the offending articles confiscated to be made available at the end of the school day.

O

W S

I All students are required to be punctual

B

D R

These eventually lead to certificates, and in some cases, prizes that are presented in school assemblies.

contribute to the smooth running of each day.

Bullying

K U

I taking initiative and on a regular basis

pleasant environment. Anti-social behaviour is unacceptable.

At the end of each term every department nominates two students, one for outstanding achievement and one for outstanding effort, within their subject. These students are rewarded with a certificate given out in a presentation assembly. At the end of each academic year departments nominate two students in the same categories for an overall year prize; the winners of these awards are presented with a trophy at our Annual Awards Evening.

For persistent or very serious offences, students will be sent to the School Time Exclusion And Monitoring unit, the STEAM room, for one or more days. In this unit, students are expected to work in total silence. After a period in the STEAM room, students are only re-admitted after we have seen them together with their parents. Additionally, fixedterm exclusion from school used in combination with the STEAM room may be employed. In the most serious cases, such as persistent violence or the sale of drugs in school, students will be permanently excluded. Thankfully such instances are rare at Hall Cross. Students must note that amongst incidents which will normally result in exclusion from school we include:

I Violence and threatening behaviour towards

F O

staff and other students.

I Obscene language directed at members

O R

of staff.

I Racist behaviour, religious abuse, sexist abuse and other serious forms of antisocial behaviour. (Racist incidents are recorded and details passed to the LA.)

P

I The possession, use or sale of drugs or

alcohol on the School premises or on the way to and from school.

I Possession of fireworks/laser pens. I Possession of offensive weapons.

Students should be aware that if they persist in the above behaviour, they will be permanently excluded from Hall Cross.

Our expectation is that each member of Hall Cross will give of his/her best. Targets are set for all students based on their previous performances. We will work hard with our students in our attempts to see that these targets are met.

Sanctions With regard to sanctions, these begin with simple reprimands in the first instance, and move up to teacher detention and school detention as offences become more serious. The School Code of Conduct and stages of sanctions are displayed in every classroom. Parents should be aware that detentions take place after school and there are no exceptions to this rule.

Day to Day Issues

7


The Curriculum

Music Physical Education/Games Religious Education Spanish Technology/Art

Key Stage 3 (Years 7 – 9) Organisation of Teaching Groups For timetabling purposes, our large Year groups are divided into cohorts of approximately 80 110 students of all abilities. Block timetabling then allows subject departments to have the flexibility to set students according to their ability in each subject. The cohorts are divided into 3 - 5 sets, or teaching groups, depending on the size of the cohort and the subject being taught. Form units in Years 8 and 9 are mixed ability groups (average size 25/26). In Year 7 they are streamed.

Courses of Study All students study a curriculum throughout Key Stage 3 which complies with the National Curriculum requirements. The 25 period week is allocated as shown for Years 8 and 9:

O R

Subject

Year 8

English Mathematics Science Drama/Performing Arts French Gateway Geography History ICT

B

4 3 3 1 1 2 2 1

Year 9

3 3 4 1 1 3 2 2 1

2 1 2

In Year 7 students will follow a thematic, skillbased curriculum. The aim of this model is to help students develop the key skills needed to become powerful, successful learners in the future. The students will be assessed using English APP levels which form the basis of their tracking. Some of the themes to be covered during the year are: Us and Our World, Human Rights, Human Wrongs, Classical Elements and Inventive World. They will spend three and a half days per week with their Base Tutor but will be taught Mathematics, Science and Physical Education outside the tutor base by specialist staff.

O

W S

D A

Number of Periods Per Week

1 2 1 1 3

D R

K U

Basic Skills Students who have been identified as having special educational needs are offered a programme of support. This programme includes in-class support, structured literacy programmes and individualized computer literacy and numeracy courses. Progress is carefully and routinely measured. Students are encouraged to be actively involved in monitoring their own progress.

Choosing Subjects for Further Study During Year 8 pupils will be offered varied programmes of study within the Applied Learning Gateway and then during Year 9 when students make their subject choices for Key Stage 4 (Years 10 and 11 at the Upper School) the following arrangements are made:

I General advice on careers is given by both form teachers and subject teachers and members of the Careers Department.

I A KS4 booklet is sent to all parents of

Year 9 students, giving information about the courses available and guidance about making choices.

8

The Curriculum

F O

Parents are then invited to school for a parents’ information evening where parents and students have the opportunity to discuss the progress of their child with subject teachers.

O R

Students are then required to make their subject choices, having considered with their parents all the information available, and the choices are then discussed and confirmed after an interview with a member of staff. The purpose of the interview is to ensure that, as far as possible, all students follow a broad and balanced curriculum which takes advantage of their particular abilities and interests and also keeps their options open with regard to further study and/or career aspirations later on.

P

Key Stage 4 (Years 10 – 11) Organisation of Teaching Groups During Key Stage 4 at the Upper School, teaching groups are organised according to the examination level and the nature of the course being followed. Students find themselves in several different teaching groups as they move from subject to subject. In the National Curriculum Core subjects, students are taught in sets. There may be some setting in Option subjects but on occasions there may be only one group on the timetable. In these circumstances, this will have to be a mixed ability group.

Courses of Study Once the National Curriculum requirements have been met, students have some choice in how the remainder of their timetable is made up. An increasing proportion of students follow a vocational pathway as well as the more traditional GCSE route.

Compulsory Core Subjects English/English Literature Mathematics Science Physical Education ICT PSHE (including RE)

3 periods 3 periods 4 periods 2 periods 1 period delivered in Stand Down days throughout year


Assessment & Exam Patterns Optional Subjects

Subject

The following optional subjects were offered in 2011/12:

Compulsory Courses English Language English Literature Mathematics Science - Year 9/10 Additional Science - Year 10/11 or Applied Science - Year 10/11 or Triple Award Science - Year 10/11 ICT- OCR Nationals

GCSE Art & Design Business Studies Business and Communication Systems Classical Civilisation Dance Design & Technology (Resistant Materials, Graphic Products and Food Technology) Drama French Geography Geology History ICT (OCR National) Leisure Music Philosophy and Ethics Photography Physical Education Sociology Spanish Statistics Textiles

BTEC

B

Hospitality and Catering Sport Travel & Tourism

Applied GCSE Business Health and Social Care Media Performing Arts Social Sciences

D R

K U

Option Courses Art & Design Art & Design Business Studies Business and Communication Systems Classical Civilisation Dance Design & Technology Drama Geography Geology Health and Social Care History Hospitality and Catering ICT – OCR Nationals Leisure Media ML French ML Spanish Music Performing Arts Philosophy and Ethics Photography Physical Education Sociology Social Sciences (Foundation) Sport Statistics Travel & Tourism

O

W S

D A

O R

Type of Course GCSE GCSE GCSE GCSE GCSE

O R

P

GCSE

F O

Exam Board

WJEC WJEC OCR AQA AQA AQA

GCSE GCSE equivalent

AQA OCR

GCSE BTEC GCSE GCSE GCSE GCSE GCSE GCSE GCSE GCSE Applied GCSE GCSE BTEC GCSE equivalent Applied GCSE Vocational GCSE GCSE GCSE GCSE GCSE GCSE GCSE GCSE Applied GCSE BTEC GCSE BTEC

AQA Edexcel AQA AQA AQA AQA AQA/Edexcel AQA AQA WJEC Edexcel AQA Edexcel OCR Edexcel OCR AQA AQA AQA AQA AQA AQA AQA AQA Edexcel Edexcel AQA Edexcel

Assessment & Exam Patterns

9


Additional Course Information I The role of pressure groups, charities and

Personal Development All students follow a course in Personal Social and Health Education (PSHE). In Key Stage 3 delivery of the programme will be via a series of focused days when the normal teaching timetable will be suspended. One lesson per week is provided at Key Stage 4. PSHE is a different subject, unlike all others. For this reason, great emphasis is placed on developing discussion, thinking skills and the forming of opinions. Less importance is placed on written work, and more on debating and group or pair work.

trade unions in society. Students are encouraged to develop as active citizens of their school community and society. They will have the opportunity to participate in the decision making process via their School Council. Debating skills are further developed, to encourage active, but structured and responsible participation.

O

As part of PSHE all students study:

I Careers Education. Guidance is provided I I

I I I

on Option choices for future study and advice on study skills. Health Education. Students are provided with information on drug abuse, sexual health and personal hygiene. Cultural Studies. Students are made aware of the existence of other cultures and languages. The importance of racial tolerance in school and society is studied. Citizenship. Students learn the skills to become informed citizens of their country. Financial Capability. Students improve their financial knowledge, understanding and confidence. Library Skills. In Year 7 students are taught how to make effective use of the school library.

B

Citizenship At Key Stage 3 Citizenship is delivered as part of the PHSE programme. However, students will be starting to follow modules of Citizenship in many of their other subjects. Students study:

I Rights and responsibilities in school and in society.

I The workings of parliament and political parties.

I How the law functions. I The power of the media. I Global issues. 10

Additional Course Information

D R

Religious Education

W S

D A

O R

K U

Students are asked to take part in assessment of their own performance in activities, in addition to formal, traditional assessment by the teacher.

Key Stage 3

This subject is an essential area of educational entitlement which will give children the opportunity to explore philosophical and religious ideas and concepts and fundamental questions about what it means to be human in today’s plural and multi-cultural twenty-first century Great Britain. This subject will encourage the children to question, analyse and discuss a range of philosophical, religious and moral issues. They will be able to use a variety of learning styles to enable them to build up the use of skills like empathy, analysis, reflection and evaluation so that they can express their understanding by using reasoned argument. At Key Stage 3, students tackle ultimate questions such as: Is there a God? Is there life after death? What is the meaning of life? The students look at those questions from their own viewpoint and that of the main world religions. Students also engage in discussions on a variety of moral issues such as prejudice and discrimination, and Rastafari. Again, the views of the main world religions are considered. Pupils will be assessed at the end of each unit of study using a variety of assessment techniques allowing all learning styles to access the topics studied. This assessment will be based on the current eight level scale outlined in the Doncaster Agreed Syllabus.

F O

Philosophy and Ethics Key Stage 4

O R

Religious, philosophical and ethical education is a legal requirement and each pupil will follow the GCSE Short Course for one period per week and sit an examination at the end of Year. The topics covered include: drug abuse, matters of life (IVF, genetic engineering etc.), matters of death (euthanasia, life after death etc.), world poverty, crime and punishment, and rich and poor in society. Those students with a deeper interest in Philosophy and Ethics can study it as an Option at Key Stage 4 enabling them, after taking external examinations at the end of Year 10 and Year 11, to attain a GCSE qualification.

P

Sixth Form There is opportunity for students to pursue philosophical and theological concepts at A level by studying the WJEC specification units which deal with issues like the problem of evil, arguments for the existence of God, euthanasia, animal rights, fundamentalism, and religion and psychology including Freud and Jung.

Physical Education Physical Education is compulsory for all students up to Year 11. At Hall Cross, through practical participation in sporting activities, we encourage young people to adopt a healthy lifestyle and stimulate their confidence in their own skills and abilities.

Sex Education A coherent sex education programme is delivered to all students throughout the School, as described in the School’s sex education policy. Both biological and emotional aspects are addressed, largely through work done within PSHE lessons. Every effort is made to ensure that the content and nature of lessons is appropriate to the age, maturity and needs of the students involved.


Sixth Form Students Many students at Hall Cross decide to stay on into our large and long established Sixth Form one of the largest in the North of England (over 500 at present). There are four possible courses of action at 16:-

Courses Currently Offered in the Sixth Form

I Sixth Form (Years 12 and 13). I Further Education course at

Students are offered courses at various levels: A2; AS level; some vocational BTECs and GCSEs in English and Mathematics.

AS/A2 Subjects

Doncaster College.

I A one or two year bridging course at Armthorpe Sixth Form. I Workplace training. During Year 11, students receive a considerable amount of information and guidance about these various possibilities. For those considering staying on at Hall Cross the procedure is:-

D A

I Teaching staff indicate the suitability of

O R

students for Sixth Form courses - GCE A levels, AS levels or BTEC at Level 3.

I The Sixth Form Prospectus is made

B

available to students who have expressed an interest in staying on.

I An information evening for parents and students is arranged during Year 11.

I Taster sessions are offered towards the end of Year 11.

I An individual interview is arranged for all candidates who wish to join the Sixth Form to discuss their application.

I Following the publication of examination

O

W S

I Initial interest in the Sixth Form is

established by Careers staff during Careers lessons in Years 10 and 11.

Applied Business Art & Design Classical Civilisation D & T Food Economics English Literature Further Mathematics History Media Studies Photography Physics Psychology Sociology Theatre Studies

K U

Biology Chemistry Dance D & T Graphics English Language French Geography Mathematics Music Physical Education Politics Religious Studies & Ethics Spanish

D R

F O

Personal Development In addition to their studies, all students in Year 12 are expected to take part in our personal development and enrichment programme on Wednesday afternoons. Students can choose to take part in a sport or recreational activity or undertake some voluntary work or work experience. In this way they can combine working towards a healthy lifestyle with making preparations for their future careers.

O R

P

Much more information on Upper School life and organisation can be found in the separate and more detailed Sixth Form Prospectus made available to students who have indicated an interest in entering the Upper School.

Advanced Applied GCE Course Business Studies Health and Social Care Information & Communication Technology Leisure Studies Medical Science Performing Arts Sport Education

Enrichment Courses Critical Thinking AS Duke of Edinburgh’s Award Extended Project General Studies AS Survival Cookery Young Enterprise

results, students will confirm their places on their chosen courses.

Sixth Form Students

11


Inclusion I Subject Departments and the Access to

Access to Learning Department

Learning Department must work closely to ensure that information relating to a pupil’s special need will be used to inform planning and benefit the child.

The aim of the school in making provision for pupils with special educational needs, including those with emotional and behavioural difficulties, is to ensure that the pupils have the right of access to a broad and balanced curriculum which meets their needs. The emphasis is on a positive pupil-centred approach starting from what the pupils can achieve rather than from what they cannot. This is realised in the following ways:

I Staff should be familiar with the School

I all pupils receive their entitlement to a broad

identification and assessment arrangements and review procedures for pupils with special needs and understand the increased responsibility placed upon them, by the Code of Practice, in meeting pupils’ special needs.

and balanced curriculum regardless of their individual needs;

I The successful realisation of the policy is a

I all teachers will endeavour to meet and address the needs of these pupils;

I the curriculum is appropriate and accessible while offering opportunities for success and growth;

I pupils with special educational needs are

D A

and diagnosed difficulties of these pupils and to support their progress and development.

O R

Students with emotional and behavioural difficulties may be referred to the Access to Learning Department so that additional support for their problems may be given. These students may be given Keyworker support in some lessons and/or removed from some mainstream lessons for a limited time. During this time they may continue with curriculum work or take part in a variety of re-engagement projects.

B

Where students are withdrawn from lessons they will follow a closely monitored, reintegration scheme. All Year 9 pupils are screened for access arrangements for public examinations; other pupils may be referred by staff for assessment.

Broad Guidelines

I Each Department is required to plan a curriculum differentiated in pace and designed to meet a wide range of individual needs. The match between a pupil’s ability and an appropriate curriculum is vital.

I Departmental schemes of work are

supported by assessment procedures that offer opportunities for all pupils to exhibit knowledge and learning and gain success.

12

Inclusion

D R

At Key Stage 3 and 4 the School operates a system of in-class support through the use of classroom assistants. Some students are withdrawn for extra help. Lunchtime sessions are provided for those students who wish to have extra tuition.

O

W S

identified and their difficulties diagnosed;

I strategies are devised to meet the identified

K U

shared responsibility to be developed and delivered across the curriculum and pastoral care system.

At Key Stage 3 the School offers a carefully structured curriculum, supported by a streamed approach for students in Year 7 who are vulnerable or who have significant learning needs. These students are identified as a result of close collaboration with the School’s feeder primary schools. The School also offers a LEAP group in Year 8, aimed at enabling pupils working just below the expected threshold level to quickly progress towards this level. In Year 9 a Nurture group has been established to offer an alternative progression pathway for students for whom the traditional curriculum, for a variety of reasons, may not be appropriate. Courses started within this group in Year 9 can lead to GCSE qualifications during Years 10 and 11 if the pupil decided to continue with this curriculum option. At both Lower and Upper School, there is early morning support, in the form of a Breakfast Club, for students with special educational needs who require assistance with homework, coursework, reading and revision. The ‘Hub’ also exists, on the Upper site, to support pupils who are experiencing difficulty in keeping up-todate with coursework deadlines. Pupils are generally referred here by their class teachers. The knowledge, views and experience of parents are vital. Effective assessment and provision will be secured where there is the greatest possible degree of partnership between parents and their children and schools, the Local Authority and other agencies.

Student Support Officers Student Support Officers will work with individual students who have specific barriers to learning. Students are referred to Student Support Officers by Year Mangers and Phase Leaders. Support is aimed to encourage each student towards positive self-development which identifies both short-term and long-term solutions to their problems/issues. The Student Support Officers work in partnership with teaching staff, outside agencies, parents and carers to help students address their barriers to learning.

O R

P

F O

The ‘Hub’

Key Stage 4 Students have provision here to support them in achieving their target grades or additional qualifications, where they may be falling short. The ‘Hub’ is staffed by three academic mentors who offer in-class support and also provide a withdrawal facility for 1:1 tuition.

English as an Additional Language (EAL) We have a significant number of students at Hall Cross for whom English is a second or other language and there are dedicated bases at Lower and Upper School where students can improve their English by studying in a small group, and by working on a useful computer programme. The EAL staff offer in-class support and pastoral help where needed – especially when students are new to the school. They encourage the students to complete homework tasks and coursework by running sessions at lunchtime and after school and generally help them to access the curriculum. Some students who come into the School at a later stage can be entered for alternative English tests which give them a certificate of competence at different levels of English and which can then be carried with them to further study.

Global Community The School has formal links with secondary schools in India and South Africa and is developing an e-twinning programme with European schools.


General Information Careers Education The main aims of the careers programme in school are as follows:

I to promote the development of the individual;

I to extend each student’s thinking about education and vocational opportunities;

I to prepare students to make considered

and the part they might play in it;

I to help students develop the skills and understanding which they will need, to achieve as smooth a transition as possible from Hall Cross to the next stage in their education or career.

B

Various school careers information booklets are issued to students during their progress through school. Close links are maintained with Connexions whose representative establishes contact with students during Year 9. All students within the School can request a careers interview when required.

We value very highly the contact we have with our parents. We feel that most of the problems and misunderstandings that may occur can be solved when parents and school work closely together.

K U

The overall purpose of the pastoral system at Hall Cross is on the one hand, to enable students to make sense of their school life and take advantage of the opportunities it offers, and on the other hand, by developing personal and social skills, to produce considerate and selfconfident young people by the time they leave us. Although a large school, Hall Cross is organised on a Year system, with a team of Form Tutors led by two Phase Leaders in each Key Stage; one for Care and Guidance and one for Learning and Progress. They are supported by a Year Manager for each of Years 7 to 11 and one shared by Years 12 and 13.

O

W S

D A

The School Careers Library contains a wide range of information on individual career areas and entry to the various forms of training, further and higher education. Students are encouraged to use this facility which remains open throughout the day.

Details of the complaints procedure relating to the Curriculum and related matters are available from either the School or from the Education Department, P.O. Box 266, The Council House, College Road, Doncaster.

At Hall Cross we have developed a caring and effective pastoral system which supports the academic work of the School and looks after the needs and welfare of our students.

I to help students consider the adult world

O R

Contact with Parents and Carers

Pastoral Care at Hall Cross

choices;

Students receive a programme of advice and guidance throughout their years in school. In Year 9 a day is given over to helping pupils prepare for choosing their Option subjects. This is then continued through Years 10 and 11 with whole days being given over to careers education and guidance at the appropriate time of the year. In the Sixth Form detailed instructions and guidance are delivered at the appropriate time to those wishing to enter higher and further education. Personal advisors also give advice and guidance to those who do not wish to enter higher or further education.

Complaints about the Curriculum

D R

Form Tutors Although all staff are concerned with the general welfare of students as well as their academic achievement, each form group is placed under the particular care of a Form Tutor. The latter is of great importance within our pastoral system and is directly concerned with the day-to-day welfare, behaviour, attendance and punctuality of all the students in the form.

O R

F O

Parents are encouraged to contact the School if they are concerned about the welfare or progress of their child. In the first instance, the person to contact is the Form Tutor or to make an appointment with a Phase Leader if the matter cannot be immediately resolved. If a Form Tutor or Phase Leader is not available, the matter may be referred to the attention of the Head of School or an Assistant or Deputy Headteacher.

P

Learner Engagement The role of the Education Welfare Officer from Learner Engagement is that of social worker, counsellor and facilitator in an educational setting. The EWO is concerned to ensure that the emotional, physical and educational needs of the child are met. Learner Engagement assists the School, family and child in order to enable the child to receive the full benefits of the education system.

Phase Leaders The Form Tutors in each of the Years, as well as being responsible for their own forms, are also part of a pastoral team led by Key Stage Phase Leaders and co-ordinated overall by the Head of School. The Phase Leaders are responsible for the day-to-day management of their particular Key Stage and deal initially with most of the problems that may occur. They also praise and encourage students both in terms of achievement and effort.

General Information

13


Homework Requirements

Detention

Homework is set as a matter of school policy to provide the opportunity for independent study and, although not excessively heavy in Years 7 9 (probably two or three subjects per night at half an hour each), it increases in amount as students progress into Years 10 and 11 and then the Sixth Form (Years 12 and 13). The demands of external examination and assessment courses are such that homework is essential if students are to do themselves justice. Because of changes in assessment brought about by GCSE examinations, homework may well involve continual assignment work rather than the traditional set exercises.

Detention is an integral part of the School’s behaviour policy. A three tier system is used:-

Every student is provided with a School Planner in which to write a brief summary of the homework set. This acts as a reference for students, parents and the School. It would be much appreciated if parents became involved in their child’s homework commitment by:

I checking that homework has been done;

I checking that the work is completed to as high a standard as possible;

I signing the School Planner each week.

K U

Behaviour for Learning

B

O

W S

D A

O R

Students are encouraged to develop a positive attitude to their own learning and to support the learning of their peers in the classroom. Students are consulted about their views on how behaviour is managed and this information is used to inform school planning. A rewards system operates that encourages all aspects of positive behaviour for learning, including attendance, and acknowledges achievement at all levels throughout the School. The Classroom Code of Conduct acts as a means of achieving consistency of facilitating learning. Students are reminded by all staff, their Form Tutors and in assemblies about placing the learning needs of themselves and others as their main focus when in school.

D R

When this commitment is not realised, the School operates a tiered level of sanctions, including teacher and department detentions and a school detention for one hour. Parents are informed of all detentions after school that are longer than 15 minutes. Students’ conduct and work ethic may be monitored by report and in a few more serious cases, exclusion and School Governors may become involved. The School strives to work in partnership with students, parents and carers to encourage and acknowledge positive behaviour for learning.

14

General Information

I An individual teacher can detain students for up to 30 minutes.

I Heads of Department and Phase Leaders can detain for up to 45 minutes.

I For the most serious offences there will be a school detention of one hour. Parents will be given at least 24 hours notice in writing for detentions of more than 15 minutes. For detentions of less than 15 minutes no notice will be given.

Equal Opportunities As a school we are committed to a policy of equal opportunities for all our students regardless of gender, race or disability. This includes equality of opportunity throughout the Curriculum, for example, in subject Option choices and careers guidance.

O R

P

F O

We encourage students to treat everyone with respect, regardless of their sex, cultural background or physical ability and treat ALL harassment very seriously.

Bullying In School All Bullying is UNACCEPTABLE Ours is a school that unreservedly believes that every individual is entitled to repect. ‘Bullying’, however perceived, will be swiftly addressed. Any behaviour that causes hurtful effects, emotionally or physically, to any member of the School community will not be tolerated. The School has put into practice a number of strategies and provisions including; the facility for students to make online reports of instances of intimidation, support and guidance from Student Support Officers and Year Managers, and a wider working relationship with South Yorkshire Police. The staff will work to ensure that students will be free from intimidation and will treat victims of bullying in a supportive manner. We recognise the harmful effect on student performance which can be occasioned by bullying and are committed to controlling all bullying behaviour. We will try to help the bully modify his/her behaviour and create a positive climate which encourages all, those bullied and those who have knowledge of bullying, to report the incident. Extreme cases of proven persistent bullying may result in permanent exclusion from Hall Cross.


KS3 sports kit can be purchased from the Lower School Office.

School Dress - Years 7 – 11 I White shirt/blouse – worn with top button

fastened. No polo shirts between September and Easter holidays. After Easter blue polo shirts with the Hall Cross logo can be worn for the summer term.

I Dark socks or dark/flesh coloured tights.

(In Key Stage 4 plain navy sportswear may be worn. This includes polo shirt, overtop or sweatshirt and rain jacket. Items with a school logo including white/navy polo shirts and navy hooded sweatshirts are optional and can be purchased from the Upper School.)

I Dark sensible outdoor coat (no denims or

It is highly recommended that students buy and use shin pads and a gum guard for use in contact activities such as rugby and hockey.

I School clip-on tie – worn to cover top button and waist button of shirt.

I Navy blue V-necked sweater/sweatshirt with the Hall Cross logo in red.

I Black trousers/skirt (no jeans, ski pants, leggings or combat trousers) – skirt of appropriate length, just above the knee.

I Black shoes (NO trainers or Ugg boots). hooded sweatshirts).

PLEASE ENSURE ALL YOUR CHILD’S EQUIPMENT IS CLEARLY NAMED.

School uniform embroidered with the School logo is available to purchase in school.

Attendance Figures – 01/09/10– 08/04/11

Sports Kit Boys’ P.E. Indoor Activities/Athletics Plain or logo white polo shirt Plain or logo navy blue/black shorts Training shoes - white socks Swimming - navy blue or black trunks

Number of students of compulsory school age on the roll for at least one session

Number of authorised absences

Outdoor Activities Maroon/white rugby shirt Plain or logo navy blue/black shorts or plain navy/black jogging bottoms Maroon socks

Indoor Activities/Athletics Plain or logo white polo shirt Plain or logo navy blue/black shorts Training shoes - white socks Swimming - predominantly navy or black one piece swimsuit

O R

Outdoor Activities Plain or logo maroon sweatshirt or maroon/white rugby shirt Plain or logo navy blue/black shorts or plain navy/black jogging bottoms Maroon socks

O

408271 25089

F O

Course Assessment

Marks or grades are given for class work and homework and students whose work reflects a high standard of achievement or effort, may be awarded a teacher’s Commendation Certificate. Course assessment also plays a significant part in many of the examinations in Years 10 and 11 and in some cases, at Sixth Form level.

O R

P

External Examinations Years 10 and 11 will have external examinations in May and June. Years 12 and 13 will have module external examinations in January, May and June.

Number of students with at least one authorised absence

1491

Number of unauthorised absences

6731

Precise dates of these and any internal assessments and examinations will be sent to parents at appropriate times during the year.

Number of students with at least one unauthorised absence

493

Annual Reports

Percentage attendance

92.2%

Percentage authorised absences

6.2%

Percentage unauthorised absences

1.7%

W S

D A

Girls’ P.E.

B

D R

Number of students sessions

K U 1626

Assessment, Examinations and Records

Annual Reports are usually sent to parents, via students, on the following occasions: Year 7 June Year 8 March Year 9 December Year 10 March Year 11 November Year 12 April Year 13 November Precise dates of publication of these Annual Reports will be sent to parents at appropriate times during the year.

General Information

15


Extended Schools We feel that extra-curricular activities play an important part in the life of the School and what is offered reflects as far as possible the skills and interests of the students. Thus, some activities may become less popular and other new ones may take their place. However, we do expect students to take advantage of what is offered and play an active part in the corporate life of the School.

mentoring, representing the school in a sport or drama production to life guarding and music; while also encouraging them to develop a new skill or talent.

It is not possible to list all the activities and, of course, many visits, trips and courses are arranged during the school year as the opportunity or need arises.

It is possible to do programmes at three levels which lead to a Bronze, Silver or Gold Duke of Edinburgh’s Award. Each involves an expedition of either two, three or four days during which 47 pupils build teamwork and engage in route planning, camping, cooking and navigation. The expedition locations are the Peak District, the Yorkshire Dales and at Gold level, Norway.

Our sporting record for both boys and girls is excellent, with representation at local, regional and national levels. We expect students to give a regular commitment to teams and practices and to maintain high standards of conduct and appearance in whatever sport they participate. As well as providing sports where students compete against other schools locally, regionally and nationally, we also cater for the recreational performer both in team and individual activities.

B

Sports offered are:-

athletics, badminton, basketball, canoeing, cricket, football, hockey, lifesaving, netball, rounders, rugby, swimming, tennis, trampolining, volleyball and water movement. When the School takes part in outdoor activities we adhere to LA and national guidelines. In all of these ventures, we are fortunate to have the use of two school minibuses to reduce the otherwise very high costs of public transport.

The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award Duke of Edinburgh is an award scheme that allows Key Stage 4 and 5 pupils at Hall Cross to help people or the community, get fitter, develop skills and become self-sufficient on expedition. The award recognises activities that our students are already pursuing from peer

Extended Schools

O

The Performing Arts Department is made up of Music, Dance and Drama and is a thriving and growing aspect of school life with examination courses as an ever popular choice. We have well equipped facilities at both Lower and Upper School sites and the recent investments and development are further enhancing the work that we do.

W S

D A

O R

16

D R

Performing Arts

Sport

K U

All students experience Music and Drama at Key Stage 3 and there are a range of courses to choose from at Key Stage 4 and 5. Students are strongly encouraged to take part in the number of activities and groups that are run within the Department such as the various instrument, dance and drama groups. Through these groups there are various opportunities to perform both in and out of school. We also offer a range of trips to various concerts and performances for all of our Performing Arts students. Each Year group and course will have representatives on the Performing Arts Council who will help to influence the work that we do as a Department.

Music We offer instrument lessons to all Year groups in conjunction with the Music Centre and these are heavily subsidised, with the School asking for only a proportion of the actual costs from parents. All we ask in return is that these students take part in one of the ensemble groups and contribute to the performance evenings.

F O

We currently offer GCSE and A level Music at Hall Cross and we have recording and computer facilities to aid the students in achieving their best on these courses. Again, it is expected that those students studying Music take part in the wider life of the Department which in turn will help them achieve their full potential through broadening their music experience.

O R

P

Dance We offer GCSE and A level Dance. We have a specialist Dance studio with sprung floor and mirrors. Students are encouraged to participate in extra-curricular dance groups, visits and submit work for the annual Dance Showcase.

Drama We offer GCSE Drama and A level Theatre Studies and students are very successful on these courses. We have recently had the studios at both sites developed and we have a new rehearsal studio at Upper School. Students are very committed to the Department and their involvement has helped shape a new vision for this aspect of the Performing Arts. In addition to the above pure courses, we also offer Applied GCSE and A Level courses in Performing Arts. These are combined discipline courses. Once again, students are encouraged to take part in the extra-curricular work of our Department and to submit and direct work for the student run Performing Arts Showcase evenings.

Clubs Other clubs and societies cater for interests such as art, ICT, science, Christian Study, books, films and board games.


Key Policy Summary Attendance Policy The aim of this policy is to raise levels of achievement by ensuring the highest possible levels of attendance, punctuality and involvement in the school.

Religious Education Policy

Our aim is to be a school which provides an atmosphere for learning based on equal opportunities for all and which incorporates the multi-cultural nature of the school and society.

The Education Reform Act 1998 (ERA) states that, among other things, the school curriculum should promote the ‘spiritual’, moral (and) cultural development of students. Religious Education is a statutory part of the basic curriculum. Unlike the subjects of the National Curriculum, Religious Education is administered at a local rather than national level through an agreed syllabus. All maintained schools must provide Religious Education for all students. This includes students in the Sixth Form.

Examinations Policy The purpose of the exam policy is to ensure that the planning and management of exams is conducted efficiently and in the best interest of candidates; and the operation of an efficient exam system with clear guidelines for all relevant staff.

Behaviour Policy Hall Cross encourages mutual respect and aims to provide pupils with an environment in which they feel safe and valued as individuals. It has a clear structure of expected standards of behaviour, enhanced by a positive attitude to discipline. We believe that effective education is achieved when school and home work in partnership through a developing relationship of respect, openness and understanding.

Extended Schools Policy Hall Cross, in line with government policy, through the Extended Schools initiative aims to provide a range of services and activities, often beyond the school day, to help meet the needs of children, their families and the wider community. This will embrace the ‘Every Child Matters’ agenda and have as its focus the raising of attainment/standards at Hall Cross by engaging all the stakeholders positively in learning.

Charging Policy This policy informs staff and parents about charging for school activities. It conforms to guidance included in the Fair Funding Scheme for Financing Schools and the Guide to the Law for School Governors.

Governors’ Visits Policy

Child Protection Policy Hall Cross fully recognises the responsibility it has under section 175 of the Education Act 2002 to have arrangements about safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children. This policy sets out how the school’s Governing Body discharges its statutory responsibilities relating to safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children who are pupils at the school.

Curriculum Policy

O R

Disabled Access and Facilities Policy

This policy states that whilst on either of the Hall Cross sites; people with a disability have the right to expect to be treated no less favorably than anyone else; wheelchair users should not be required to negotiate steps; people with a disability should be able to pass through doorways easily and that people with a disability have the right to expect the same levels of service as anyone else.

e-Safety Policy This policy has been written by the School, building on the Doncaster e-Safety Policy and government guidance. It is part of the School Development Plan and relates to other policies including those for ICT, Behaviour for Learning, Bullying and Child Protection.

K U

Every Governing Body has a statutory responsibility to establish and monitor its school’s policies and evaluate the effectiveness of the school and its curriculum. Governors are also held to account for their own school’s performance; one of the best and most effective ways in which a Governor can get to know about their school is to visit during the school day and see it at work, talking to staff and pupils and finding out what happens in the school and the classrooms.

O

W S

D A

The curriculum is the whole experience of the student in the school and is the vehicle for achieving the aims of the school. The curriculum must be: broad, balanced and relevant; differentiated; coherent; organised; progressive; active and empowering; self monitoring, evaluated and reviewed.

B

Equal Opportunities Policy

D R

Health and Safety Policy The aim of the Governing Body is to provide a safe and healthy working and learning environment for staff, pupils and visitors. It believes that the prevention of accidents, injury or loss is essential to the efficient operation of the school and is part of the good education of its pupils.

Racial Equality Policy Hall Cross is proud of the multi-ethnic nature of the school. We value and respect the resulting diversity of culture and languages. Hall Cross values every individual. We support the right of everyone to learn, work and live in a just community and to be treated with respect. All forms of racism and racist behaviour are unacceptable to us. We aim to work to eliminate unlawful racial discrimination, and to promote equal opportunities and good race relations. Hall Cross has a vital role to play in preparing young people for life in Britain’s diverse and multi-ethnic society.

Sex & Relationship Education Policy Hall Cross believes that SRE is best taught as part of Personal, Social and Health Education (PSHE). The PSHE programme goes beyond National Curriculum Science and seeks to promote the spiritual, moral, cultural, mental and physical development of pupils, as well as preparing pupils for the opportunities, responsibilities and experiences of adult life. The programme incorporates the major strands of the National Healthy Schools Standard.

O R

P

F O

Substance Use and Misuse Policy This policy seeks to highlight key issues concerning drug education within Hall Cross as well as to address the strategies used in the management of drug-related incidents. Hall Cross policies are approved by the Governing Body and are reviewed on an annual through to tri-annual basis, dependent upon statutory requirements. In addition, Hall Cross has adopted LA policies covering amongst others: admissions guidance, complaints procedure, exclusion, staff code of conduct and whistleblowing.

Additional Notes The information in this prospectus is correct at the time of publication. It should not be assumed that there will be no change affecting either the relevant arrangements of some particular matter contained therein before the start, or during the school year, or in relation to subsequent school years. Further, more detailed information about the admissions process can be found in the Admission to Schools Booklets; available from the School or the Local Authority. All documents relating to the Education Reform Act can be seen or obtained from the School or the Local Authority. Up-to-date information about the School, copies of policies and our most recent inspection report can be accessed via the School website.

Notes

17


Hall Cross is a community comprehensive school with Specialist School Status in Science and Mathematics for students aged 11 to 18 years.

The Upper School Hall Cross, Thorne Road, Doncaster DN1 2HY Tel: 01302 320626 Fax: 01302 322190

O R

B

The Lower School Hall Cross, St. Michael’s Road, Bessacarr, Doncaster DN4 5LU Tel: 01302 535559 Fax: 01302 533960

Email: hxadmin@hallcross.doncaster.sch.uk Website: www.hallcross@doncaster.sch.uk Headteacher Pippa Dodgshon Deputy Headteacher Gordon Watts Director Children and Young People’s Services Mr C. Pratt P.O. Box 266 The Council House Doncaster Tel: 01302 734444

W S

D A

Addresses and Contact Numbers

O

D R

K U

P

O R

F O

Keystage 3 Prospectus  

Hall Cross School Doncaster

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you