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HALI Project

Steps to Investigate a Disease Event Step 1: Be safe! Characterize the disease event: do you need to put on your protective equipment before starting to observe the scene? If yes, put on the equipment first, and then approach the animal or carcass(es). Step 2: Observe the animal or carcass for signs of disease. Was the animal killed by a predator/hunter or disease? Are there signs of bleeding? How long has the animal been dead? Step 3: Record your observations on a disease event report form or in your notebook. Record the date, time, location of the event, your name, and all observations about the animal, carcass, and surroundings. Think like a detective at a crime scene! Are there signs of scavenging? Are there other animals dead nearby? Take pictures if you have a camera, and record your location on a GPS if you have one. Step 4: Are you specially trained to take specimens? If no, then proceed to Step 6. If you have been trained and authorized to conduct necropsies and collect samples from animals, including how to protect yourself with appropriate gear during sample collection, then proceed with sampling. Remember, you should already be wearing your protective equipment, so you may take out your sampling gear and take all necessary samples (See Section 2 above for instructions on sampling). Step 5: Make sure all your samples are labeled appropriately (see Section 2 above), and stored in leak-proof/break-proof containers in ice coolers if necessary. Step 6: Cover the carcass with vegetation to prevent other wildlife from potential exposure through scavenging, or from environmental contamination from flies and other vectors. Step 7: Report the disease event to the relevant authorities. Each area should have its own reporting system that may rely on cell phones, or personal reporting to headquarters or the ranger station. If you have a cell phone, call or send a text message to other scouts or the ranger station immediately to report the event. Step 8: Submit your disease event report to the relevant authorities. This report will act as the first responder report, and will help the local veterinarians, district game officers, ecologists and wardens to characterize the event, determine a cause, and design prevention and control options.

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Profile for Hali Project

Wildlife Health Handbook  

A guide to recognizing, investigating, and reporting diseases of concern for wildlife conservation and human health. This HALI handbook was...

Wildlife Health Handbook  

A guide to recognizing, investigating, and reporting diseases of concern for wildlife conservation and human health. This HALI handbook was...

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