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Math homework? Check. Football tryouts? Check. Survive cancer? Check. pg. 15

THE

ORANGE & BLACK

Photo illustration by Haleigh Jacobson

Grand Junction High School

|

1400 N. Fifth St., Grand Junction, Colo. 81501

|

Volume 92 • Issue 6

| April 2010


Index

ORANGE & BLACK

THE p. 7

Now Margeaux Prinster • Baylee Ragar Connection McKenzie Binder • Hannah Cook InSight Sarah Bolton • Katie Langford Scene Jillian Arja • Amy Nelms

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Shake your groove thang

What do YOU want to see in the next issue of the Orange & Black? Tell us on Facebook! facebook.com/ gjhsnews

Scene details the uniqueness of four various dance styles as well as students who participate in each.

14

Jordan Jones

InSight tells the story of sophomore Jordan Jones who survived stage four testicular cancer and now inspires hope in others.

Open to Interpretation Zack Kelley • Natalie Pipe Sports Cody Holman • Grayson O’Roark In Motion Alyssa Behrens • Noelle DePuey Photography Editor Kristin Balbier Advertising Samantha Weinberg • Gillian McLean Carson Laudadio • Alex Proietti

23

Web McKenna Moe • Richard Gonzales

The Sports section explores the new division rivalries in lacrosse between GJHS and its classic cutthroat enemy, FMHS.

Graphic Artists Garrett Brown • Greg Coleman Kyle Rogers • Jonas Cooper Patrick Davenport • Chelsea Shettler Reporters Kaitlin Cain • Kimberlyn Bennett Madison Gurley • Kim Horwitz Hannah Kimmel • Kyleigh Larson Jake Meyer • Regina Papas Ben Peterson • Fawn Puhler Josh Shettler • Mary Steel Devan Thibodaux • Spencer Pendry Photographers Claire Cooper • Sara Harrison Haleigh Jacobson • Maria LeFebre Alexandra Tennant • Cody Blankenship Video Kevin Reed • Cory Casselberry Jenna Maneotis Adviser Rick Jussel

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Newfound rival

Webmasters Zach Bryner • Dylan Arvig Phoenix Boyd

Have an OPINION about something going on at the school? Send a letter to the editor and be heard. Email it to: gjhsnews@gmail.com. Only authored letters will be published, so include your name. Policy

The Orange and Black, a legally recognized public forum for student expression, is published six to nine times a year by the Newspaper Class for students of Grand Junction High School. Expression made by students in the exercise of the freedom of speech or freedom of press is not an expression of District 51 school board policy. The views expressed in The Orange and Black do not necessarily represent the views of the entire staff, adviser, GJHS administration or the School District 51 administration. Board policy regarding student publications (JICE, JICE-R) is available in the journalism room (Rooms 140-141) or in the principal’s office.

Letters to the Editor

The Orange and Black welcomes and encourages letters to the editors. This is a chance to express your viewpoint on important issues. Letters should be limited to 250 words. They will be edited for space and legal considerations, but not for inaccuracies, grammar or spelling. Letters must contain information pertinent to the students of GJHS. The staff retains the right to not publish any letter not meeting these requirements. Unsigned letters will not be published. Please submit typed letters in person to Room 130 or via mail or to gjhsnews@gmail.com.

Cost

Single copies free. Where available, additional copies of this paper are available for purchase for 50 cents each. Contact The Orange

and Black for more information. Taking more than one copy of this paper with the intent to prevent other individuals from reading this edition of the paper is prohibited (C.R.S. 18-4-419). Violators, subject to prosecution and penalty under C.R.S. 13-21-123, will be prosecuted.

Contact

The Orange and Black, Grand Junction High School, 1400 N. Fifth St., Grand Junction, CO 81501. Phone: 970-254-6929. FAX: 970-254-6973. Web site: GJHSNEWS.com. Adviser e-mail: rjussel@mesa.k12.co.us. Some material courtesy of American Society of Newspaper Editors/MCT Campus High School Newspaper Service. © 2009 The Orange and Black Grand Junction High School. All rights reserved.

Orange&Black


Connection

Lifestyles & Relationships

How does the media portray beauty? What makes someone beautiful?

Opinion on beauty ideals

Mary Steel

All about:

Think about how much time you dedicate every morning to getting dressed, doing your hair and putting on makeup. Then consider how much time you think about the news, someone else’s life or thoughts deeper than what boots to wear with your cute new skirt. The answer is depressing. What kind of world have we come to, where so much importance rests on appearance and having the perfect body is essential? According to a survey by the University of Colorado, 73 percent of women hold a conception of an ideal body shape that is 10 percent underweight and generally unhealthy. A further study by Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Eating Disorders, an eating disorder organization, revealed that 80 percent of high school students are dissatisfied with their bodies, and more than half of teenage girls are, or think they should be, on diets. “Our image of beauty is really scary,

Shelby Talbert, 10 Photo courtesy of MCTCampus

more today than I think it’s ever been. My eight-year-old niece has talked about dieting. I don’t ever remember thinking about my weight at that age,” said Barb Elliott, a plussized model. Let’s stop the cycle of people who judge others on their appearance only and focus solely on their own appearance as well. That lifestyle has become too prevalent. For one day, ignore all beauty standards, do not wear makeup, do not do your hair, and do not wear clothes tight enough to suffocate a normal person. Spend the day thinking about other people and improving yourself in areas other than appearance. Stop ignoring intelligence, personality and kindness in favor of well applied makeup and hair.

Advertising’s Image of Women Series Mary Steel Advertisements are everywhere, but people rarely pay attention to how demeaning they can be. An eyeopening video series called “Killing Us Softly: Advertising’s Image of Women” goes into this negative side of advertising

I think (confidence) is key. How you present yourself has a lot to do with how you appear to other people.

and teaches viewers to see the harmful attitudes many advertising companies endorse. “Hearing Jean Kilbourne (the creator) is a profound experience. Audiences leave her feeling she teaches them to see themselves and their world differently,” said Carole Tarantelli, a women’srights advocate. The series can be found on YouTube or by Googling “Advertising’s Image of Women.”

The media creates an image of beauty that is impossibly beautiful. I think they set a pretty high bar in a bad way. Jonathan Holt, 12

(The media’s) ideal body is thin and skinny. Like “starve yourself” models. Fake. Mallory Alcorn, 12

(The media) always looks at the pretty people. I don’t think people need to be skinny to be happy, they need confidence. Mr. Rush, Coach

(The media says) it’s all about the butt. If you don’t have the butt, you don’t have anything. Ryan Mumby, 11

Compiled by Mary Steel Photos by Maria LeFebre

Steps to better body image

The consequences

Breaking the vicious cycle

Begin by living a healthy lifestyle, eating correctly and exercising regularly. Then kill your inner supermodel and realize that your body is beautiful exactly as it is. From now on, when working out, think about what your body can DO rather than what it looks like.

Having a negative body image can result in serious repercussions. Not only can it lead to dangerous eating disorders, it can leave lasting psychological scars, skewing the affected’s vision of reality; unhealthy states of mind and depression are common.

Make an effort to stop buying products from companies that shamelessly exploit women or men. If a company’s advertising reduces people to sexual figures or forces an impossible beauty standard to sell their products, stop buying. Eventually, companies will respond.

Orange&Black

Photos courtesy of Wikipedia and MCT Campus

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Connection

Relationships after graduation The end of the year is approaching, forcing many couples to make tough decisions regarding their relationships after graduation. Is breaking up the best option or should both parties try to make it work long distance? What about going to the same college? Read the following experiences of former GJHS students who have aleady made these tough decisions to better understand each situation. Mary Steel

Going to the same college

04

Billy Berguin and Jenna Coleman, GJHS graduates of 2006, smile happily, still together and attending CSU as a couple. They are both scheduled to graduate this year, 2010.

Sometimes when the time comes to leave for college, the best option is to stay in a long distance relationship. This is a real test for many relationships, however, and should not be entered into lightly. For this kind of a relationship to last, both sides need a deep enough love and strong enough will power to carry on through lonely nights and long distance fights. Many couple have a difficult time remainging close while living separate, distant lives. Another factor to consider is the lack of physical contact for long periods of time, which can be important for some relationships. For Ashley Jones, current senior, and Matt Chapman, Fruita graduate of 2009, having a long distance relationship was the right choice. “About a few days before he left for college, we decided to try it out because we weren’t really ready to stop dating. After two years (at the time), we were still really attached,” Jones said. For many couples engaged in long distance dating, there can be radical changes that are difficult to endure. “It is hard to cope with because you go from seeing each other every day to very little in a month, and at first you’re lost and don’t know what to do with yourself. It took me a few months to get used to hanging out

Breaking up When participating in a light-hearted, laidback relationship, it does not make sense to attempt long distance or go to the same college. In the interest of both parties, it is easier to break the relationship off and not force a weak relationship in a challenging setting. For Ryan Steel and Sarah Baier, graduates of 2009, the best decision after graduation was to break off their relationship. Baier explains why, for her, going into college single is more practical. “College is stressful enough with [a] new school, place, and friends. It’s also hard to stay in long distance relationships, and that can just add onto the stress,” Baier said. “You also want to be able to experience college on your

with friends again,” Jones said. Long distance dating is particularly hard for many because of the inevitable doubts and fears that surface. “I worry that she will find someone else but hope she doesn’t,” Chapman said. Some people might say that being in a long distance relationship is impractical, but Jones disagrees. “I would say that if you really enjoy being around that person and it makes you happy, it’s not a waste of time,” Jones said. “Sometimes it seems unrealistic, but if you take a look at it and see that your relationship is true and that you love and enjoy them, then it no longer matters if it’s unrealistic.”

Graphic by Jonas Cooper

Some of the relationships generated in high school are strong enough to extend beyond graduation. If a relationship is meaningful, serious and has a strong future, going to the same college as a couple may be a good decision. For Billy Berguin and Jenna Coleman, deciding to go to college together was an easy choice to make. “I am glad I went into college with a relationship. It gave me a built in support system for classes and the transition into college. I do wonder what it would be like to date other people, but I am happy with the decision that I made,” Coleman said. Berguin explains why going to college with Coleman was also a good decision for him. “Jenna is one of the best influences that I have ever had in my life. She makes me a better person every day. I can’t see my life without her. I would have been a total pinhead if she wasn’t such a big part of me,” Berguin said. Although Coleman and Berguin were confident in their decision, their families were hesitant at first. “My brothers were not so happy due to their experience with high school girlfriends, and to be honest, both of our families didn’t think it would last. In the long run, I think that it has been beneficial to both of our families. It is nice for my parents to know that there is someone here that can help me during times when they cannot,” Berguin said. As for deciding on going to the same college, Berguin says let the chips fall where they may. “Don’t make the choice about what college you’re going to go (to) based on where someone else goes. Find out what would be the best fit for you and stick to it. If it is meant to be that you’re supposed to be together then that’s what will happen in the end. Just have faith in that,” Berguin said.

Long distance dating

own, and that’s hard when you are driving back and forth to visit your boyfriend or girlfriend.” Steel agrees that going to college single is the way to go. “It seemed like the right idea. College is a lot of fun, and everyone is going to make mistakes late on a Friday night. I didn’t want any of the decisions I made to come back and hurt someone,” Steel said. Being lonely in college is nothing to worry about for Steel. “Don’t worry about being alone when you go to college; there will be another somebody for you. Or another five somebodies if that’s what you’re looking for,” Steel said. When parting ways is unavoidable, Steel and Baier stress being civil and sincere. “Try to end on good terms and stay friends later on. Some of your closet friends come from (past) relationships,” Baier said.

Orange&Black


Connection

Job hunting The City of Grand Junction offers many jobs through Two Rivers Convention Center and the Parks & Recreation Department. Take this quiz to find out which job you may enjoy.

1

You and a few friends are asked to rearrange the desks in a teacher’s classroom. You:

2

While in class, you receive a note to see your counselor. She wants to talk to you about:

3

You drop your binder on the way to lunch. A teacher picks it up and finds:

(a) Take initiative to lead your friends and make a game out of the task. (b) Organize a plan and hurry to finish the job. (c) Stand in the back of the room. It is not your job to move the desks. (d) Make a plan, assign jobs and make sure everybody is working efficiently.

(a) Volunteering to help keep the teachers’ children occupied during parent teacher conferences. They are in need of volunteers to help out, and you work well with kids. (b) Giving tips on organization to the middle school students touring the school later this year. They could learn a lot from you. (c) Entering more of your artwork into local art shows because you excel at art. (d) Keeping up your grades. You have been so focused on athletics that you need to raise your GPA to continue playing.

(a) A messy pile of returned work with good grades. (b) A clean, organized binder. Everything in it has a place. (c) Papers with drawings covering them. The binder is tidy, but it is full of doodles. (d) Late work and blank worksheets. Homework has not been your top priority lately.

4

It is Friday night. Your parents can find you:

If you answered...

Mostly A’s:

Summer Sport Camp Recreation Leader -This position works with

Mostly B’s:

children in a summer sport camp

events at the Avalon Theater and

program.

Mostly C’s:

Dishwasher -A dishwasher cleans the kitchen area at Two Rivers

Set-up Staff -The work with this position requires setting up for Convention Center.

Mostly D’s:

Adult Softball Scorekeeper -This job requires training to

Convention Center and assists with

keep score for the city softball

plating food for events.

league.

Further information and requirements for these positions can be found at www.gjcity.org under the ‘Jobs’ tab.

Orange&Black

Hannah Kimmel Music at dances can make or break the experience. Music in a less than exciting situation can make it bearable. Music played by Grand Junction’s hit radio station, Magic 93.1, is something that many are familiar with, but none as much as senior Eric Gonzalez. As an intern at the radio station, Gonzalez does more than just the paperwork that an intern typically is expected to do. “Sometimes they let me take over, like take in calls or organize the songs on playlists to fit with the schedule of commercials, because that’s how they get money,” Gonzalez said. Gonzalez himself receives no money for his time at Magic, enlarging the differences between his job and the jobs that his peers have. “I have fun. I don’t think people do at other jobs. People don’t really like working in fast food, at Target or at Kohls. They don’t like it, but they need it,” Gonzalez said. Finding a job that he actually enjoys was accomplished with the help of “lovely, beautiful Kathy Larsen,” as Gonzalez said. He continued to explain, “I thank God for her. Hopefully, Kathy will help me turn it into a (paying) job. If not, I’d go apply for it every day, every day, every day.” For Gonzalez, applying for something every single day would not be an extraordinary feat; his motivation is an innate quality. “When I want something, I have to go out and get it. If I don’t, I feel like I’m missing something. It’s hard when things get in the way, but there are always ways to balance things out,” Gonzalez said. The balance between school, extracurricular activities, sports and an internship can be difficult to perfect, but Gonzalez feels it is “lazy” not to try. Lazy is a word that one could not use to describe Gonzalez, the teen who people say has “a face for radio.” The jest is taken lightly by Gonzalez, since he decided to pursue being a radio personality partly because people said he would be good at it. With his motivation, charisma and love of talking to new people, a career in media seems like a great goal for Gonzalez’s future. Someday, when a DJ from Magic is asked to provide music for a GJHS dance, maybe Eric Gonzalez will be the one making that experience great.

Photo Illustration by Cody Blankenship

(a) At your lacrosse game. As soon as that ends, you are heading home to spend some quality time with your little sister. (b) At a friend’s house watching movies or playing games outside. It is time to relax after a long week of school. (c) Hanging out and cleaning your room so your parents will let you spend Saturday and Sunday out with your friends. (d) At the gym. You love a game of racquetball to start off the weekend.

An Intern’s View

05


Connection

Compiled by Hannah Kimmel

Three things for seniors to complete by May 1

Here are three important things for this year’s seniors to add to their to-do list:

1

Caps and gowns can be ordered after May 1, but are limited to what the company has in stock. These are needed to walk in graduation, so be sure to have them ordered.

2

For college-bound students, make a final decision on one school and let the school know along with sending the confirmation fee to that school.

3

If the work force or military is an after-graduation goal, have arrangements for these organized and have future plans already made. Set up interviews or meet with a recruiter.

The L ve Lounge Grayson O’Roark

The Love Lounge is an innovative Q&A for the student body to receive relationship advice. This issue, only Grayson B. O’Roark will respond to these questions. Dear Love Lounge, I have been dating a boy for four months. He never buys me anything or says he loves me, not even on Valentines Day, or on our month anniversary or anything. What am I doing wrong? Should I just dump his butt? -Lonely Girl

Dear Love Lounge, Help! I have found that whenever I try to talk to all the girls in my life, they stare at my chest the whole time I’m talking to them. Are all girls like this? It seems like they all just want a piece of my body, but I’m a real person with real thoughts and feelings. I just want to find a girl who looks me in the eye when I’m talking to her and who doesn’t treat me like a sex object. Is there anything I can do to attract less shallow women (if they even exist)? Are all girls pigs, or just the ones I’m seemingly attracted to? -Concerned Stud 06

OK, Lonely Girl, I will be honest. Your boy sounds a little weak, and it is almost as if he has little to no game to his name. It just seems as if he is not willing to make the effort necessary to sustain a relationship. I may be reading into this wrong, but if you are actively trying to make it work and he is showing no regard or value toward you, the conclusion seems fairly straightforward. With this being said, I am going to hit you with a wake-up call and say you need to assess the situation and see if “dumping his butt” is the best option. Typically, I am not one to break the bonds of love, but it seems like a no-brainer. This kid “don’t want nothin’ to do with you.” I mean, if it has been four months, and he still has not dropped those four letters, then you may have an issue. First off, Concerned Stud, I am a little concerned you may be mocking the Love Lounge system with this question. However, I am under contract to offer a response. Now, if this actually is an issue, which I find hard to believe, then I would just straight up call those girls out. After all, having a great body is in no way your fault. Personally, I am in the best shape of my life. As for drawing attention away from your chest, I would advise moving up a shirt size for a looser look that does not compliment that area. Orange&Black


Now

News and Current Events Photo by Haleigh Jacobson

Suubi a chance to give hope Kim Horwitz

All about:

Suubi jewelry is a popular accessory sold in Grand Junction. The necklaces are hand-made by women in Uganda that work with an organization called Light Gives Heat, which provides a steady income for the women that roll the beads. The beads are rolled from newspaper clippings, among other materials. The Suubi project was launched in 2007 by a family living in Northern Uganda that saw a group a women making jewelry under the tree. Through purchasing their creations, Light Gives Heat triples the usually profit of the sales. The momentum of the organization has been growing and spreading, all the way from Africa to Grand Junction. Want to get involved and help the Light Gives Heat organization?

On Mar. 23, 2010, President Obama’s proposed health care bill was signed into law. The bill will cost roughly $938 billion and will cover 32 million previously uninsured Americans.

I have an iPhone. It is very useful, and it has (a lot) of applications that are cool and fun to use. Melissa Weeks, 9

Just go to LightGivesHeat.org to learn how you can help and buy Suubi pieces. The Suubi Light Gives Heat store in Grand Junction is located at 2507 Weslo Avenue off of 25 road. The store carries an assortment of Suubi necklaces, Epoh bags, and Light Gives Heat apparel. Suubi website: lightgivesheat.org

Pac-Man lite iPod application The famous arcade classic returns in the form of an iPod application. Dodge pesky ghosts by tilting or rotating your iPod. Navigate through the mazes by touching the onscreen Directional Pad. Chomp on dots with the swipe of a finger to advance to the next stage.

I have an iPod touch, and it helps me when I feel inquisitve. Phillip Goyen, 11

It has made my life way more entertaining because of iPods and the computer cameras that make your face all distorted. LeAnn Brock, 12

It is expected to go into effect in 2014. The bill entails everything from insurance and Medicaid to abortion and immigration. It is expected to mainly affect people of high incomes and those without steady incomes that cannot afford health coverage. Currently, the individual mandate states that in 2014, everyone must buy health insurance or pay a $700 fine annually with exceptions for low-income people.

Hold the world in the palm of your hand. Explore the same global satellite and aerial imagery available in the desktop version of Google Earth, including high-resolution imagery for over half of the world’s population.

“ “

I use (technology) daily. I have three iPods. My family has a MacBook. It affects our lives daily. Austin Ridgway, 10

Google Earth iPod application

Orange&Black

“ “

The health care bill Jenna Maneotis

How has Apple technology changed your life?

It has truly helped me through the most boring times of my life...Chem Comm. Amber Nelson, 12

Compiled by Gina Papas , Alex Tennant and Jenna Maneotis Photos courtesy of MCT Campus and Alex Tennant

Q Mosquito iPod application Forget mosquito spray! This application has been proven as the simplest yet most effective method to repel mosquitoes. It generates highpitched frequencies through the speaker that cannot be heard by people and will keep the swarms at bay. 07


Now

No Child Left Behind reform Underfunded program from Bush Administration changed by Obama Kim Horwitz After eight years of trying to improve the public school system with former President Bush’s No Child Left Behind education law, President Barack Obama has decided to change the program. The proposed plan overhauls the old school accountability system that encourages schools to raise test scores every year so every student can read and do math on their grade level by 2014. Obama wants to replace it with his different system of judging schools. In the 2011 budget plan, Obama proposed looking at student growth and schools’ programs, recognizing any growth instead of requiring that students meet a certain standard each year. Obama wants to reward states that show progress toward and internationally benchmarked, nationally- developed standards. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan believes that although No Child Left Behind gives attention to students who need the most help, it does too little to reward schools that show progress. If the No Child Left Behind act is changed, it will affect every school in the country, including teachers, school spending and stan-

dards of students. The 2002 law on education said that core academic teachers must be highly qualified, and states were left to define what qualified meant. Instead, Obama wants to measure teachers by how much their students grow. He also wants experienced teachers to work with disadvantaged students. The budget he proposed would create a $950 million competitive grant program for teacher recruitment and retention. Obama also wants to make federal education spending more competitive to drive schools to do better. He began with the $4.35 billion “Race to the Top,” a competitive grant program created by the economic stimulus. Although this would add another $1.35 billion to the budget, money from other programs would

still be distributed to students with disabilities and lower income families. The president is also pushing states to adopt tougher academic standards, giving states money to align math and science teaching with higher standards. GJHS should be seeing the effects of the new program soon. Photos courtesy of MCT Campus and Alex Tennant

Teacher viewpoints on the old NCLB act:

It has good parts and bad parts. Should teachers be held accountable? Yes. Should it all be based on one standardized test with no feed back for students or teachers? Absolutely not.

~Mr. Brown, English teacher

“ 08

We educate more individuals today in our country than we ever have and NCLB was an effort to improve education, but like much legislation it compromised what we do in the classrom.

~Mrs. Casey, English teacher ~Mr. Templeton, geography teacher Compiled by Gina Papas , Alex Tennant

I think that we will always need accountibility for students. There is always going to be change.

Orange&Black


Now

CSAP not on calendar for 2013? “It pulls the whole state of about the ACT and preparing for Colorado together to see how all the that,” Raaum said. schools are doing,” Taylor said. Johann has a different SAP testing is potentially Not only does CSAP aim to help solution. going to be completely evaluate educational policies and “Get rid of (CSAP),” he said. redone and reformatted by individual schools, but it also helps Although not all students 2013. teachers evaluate their teaching understand the purpose of the Sean Taylor, methods and pinpoint standardized test, the future District 51 Director of “(CSAP) pulls the improvements they benefits of having CSAP have an Assessment, discussed need to make. underlying purpose for students. the possibilities for the whole state of “It’s always helpful “Some colleges are considering future of CSAP. to us as educators Colorado together CSAP as a form of college “Anything’s possible. to see how all the to see what areas we entrance,” Jason Eidinger It’s probably not likely need to focus on,” Principal, said. schools are doing .” Carol Bergman, GJHS Assistant that all standards (of “It is a high-stakes test which the test) will go away, Counselor, said. could benefit a student later on but we don’t know the Some in their academic future (of CSAP) yet,” Taylor said. students, however, do career,” Taylor said. “(CSAP) just As required by the Colorado not find CSAP to be CSAP is meant to reflects someone Department of Education, all beneficial. reflect a students’ students between the third and 10th on a certain day. “CSAP is not what knowledge. grade must take part in the CSAP gets us into college; What it actually Someone could be assessment. it’s three demonstrates is tired or not feeling “There are three wasted often debated “(CSAP) is a way main purposes of days of all that good that within its relevance to determine how CSAP: It is a way school,” as a standardized day, which could to determine how Raaum students learn by test. effect their scores.” students learn by state said. All options, state standards, standards. It’s a good from an electronic it’s a good way way to determine if Jeremy test, to different students have grown Johann, sophomore, to determine if testing standards, to a completely from year to year. agreed. redesigned standardized test, to students have Lastly, the Colorado “(CSAP) just reflects removing the test completely, are Basic Literacy Act grown from year to someone on a certain all on the table for the future of determines if third day. Someone could CSAP. year.” graders are reading be tired or not feeling at their grade level so good that day, which that they can continue could effect their on,” Taylor said. scores,” Johann said. CSAP serves as a medium for Instead, students have alternative Photos by Alex Tennant comparison within the state of ideas about CSAP. Colorado. Graphic by Kyle Rogers “We should be more concerned

Kaitlin Cain

CSAP by the numbers

8

Years a Colorado public school student will have taken CSAP since third grade

4 4.5

Days students spend testing each year

Hours students spend testing each day

2013

Year CSAP reforms are expected to be implemented

.5

Amount of elective credit freshman and sophomores receive per year if they score proficent or above on CSAP

Orange&Black

C

Mr. David Cooper math teacher

“(CSAP does) not (reflect students’) overall intelligence. I think certain students do well on CSAP, but then there are those certain students who are good at math but do not do well on (the math section).”

Mrs. Adrea Tilford English teacher “When kids take it seriously, it can (show a student’s knowledge). The test is a valid test, but the way it gets used sometimes as an educational tool can have consequences, but it can give us a lot of good information.” 09


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Orange&Black


Scene

Arts & Culture

What talent would you perform for the America’s Got Talent competition?

Junction’s Piano Man

Josh Shettler

All about:

Focused, passionate and determined, junior Christian Rock plays the Raindrop Prelude in D Minor by Chopin, the most difficult song he can play on piano. Rock started playing piano when he was in sixth grade. With the skills that he has acquired from his private piano lessons and countless hours of practice, he hopes to achieve his dream of eventually becoming a professional pianist. “My parents wanted me to play the piano, and I went along with it,” Rock said. “After about two years it started to become fun because I could play the piano pretty well, and it wasn’t as hard anymore.” Rock continues to practice the piano for about one hour every day and also has a private teacher. “(Playing the piano) is just doing something that I love,” Rock says. “I really enjoy playing classical music, but I also play more contemporary piano pieces.” However, Rock has more plans for his future other than playing the piano. Rock

Super Rad Art Amy Nelms Students across the valley now have an opportunity to show off their original artwork to an audience. April 19 through May 15 there will be the annual Super Rad art display and competition. All GJHS students are permitted to enter in any of the 18 categories, which range from

I would freestyle rap with Evan Mok-lamme about China because me and Evan got sick beats, homie. Scott Foster, 9

Photo by Cody Blankenship plans to attend college after graduation and will eventually become a doctor. “About one year ago my dad and I were discussing whether I should do music in college. Eventually I decided I would attend college and play the piano in my free time,” Rock says. Rock also says that besides playing the piano professionally, he wants to play it simply for enjoyment. “Playing the piano is something that I enjoy, so if it is something that will earn me extra money, then that will be sweet,” Rock said. “Playing the piano is a lot of fun because you don’t have to be serious about it all the time. Sometimes it’s great to just mess around on or print off some sheet music, and that’s what makes it fun.”

Photography, to Video and Film, Ceramics, Apparal and more. “The categories keep options open for students and create a wide variety of opportunities,” Super Rad coordinator, Naomi Barlow, said. All entries must be submitted to an art teacher by April 16 to be eligible.

My nun-chucks skills. I would totally whip those out over a glass case of water filled with sharks. Sarah Wetzbarger, 11

I would juggle flaming bowling pins and knives while riding a unicycle, on a treadmill, (and) on a moving elephant. Nik Sulley, 10

I’d definitely do something outrageous, something wild. I would show them how to pack things in boxes. Camille Goodsell, 11

Balance on one foot on the top of the Empire State Building and balance a chair on my nose with Carmen Electra on top. Brendan Ryan, 12

Compiled by Kyleigh Larson Photos by Cody Blankenship

Photo courtesy of Naomi Barlow

Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2 review

Mario Kart Wii review

Toy Soldiers review

Although it followed one of the best first person shooters, Modern Warfare 2 was too complicated for its own good. Even though it was entertaining, the sequel was less enjoyable than the first game, but the story line and graphics are a compliment to the Call of Duty franchise.

An addition to the classic, the newest Mario Kart combines new levels with old ones to create a fun game that caters to all age groups and continues to define Mario as one of the greats of the world’s best video games.

With an interesting twist to the tower defense and real-time strategy game, Toy Soldiers proves that creativity can result in great games. With a fun multiplayer and interesting campaign this little known game is well worth the money spent.

Orange&Black

11


Scene

GJHS’ own celebrity Touring from Seattle to New York, senior Tobias Peltier learns what it is like to be on tour. Josh Shettler

Graphic by Kyle Rogers

have to fall into a groove.” Behind the stage curtain, the two guitarists of the Grand When out of town, the group is Junction punk rock band, Made For War, look at each often approached by strangers who tell other and feel an adrenaline rush before performing. The them how much they love Made For drummer counts off, the curtain rises and the song plays War. out to an audience filled with several hundred fans. “There would be times when we The group’s lead guitarist is Grand Junction High School were across the country and there senior Tobias Peltier. would be these people “There would be When Peltier was a freshman, his friend who would come up knew about a band that needed a guitarist. times when people to us and tell us how Peltier then met with the group to audition. would come up to much our music Peltier had already written several songs of us and tell us how has impacted their his own, which he presented to the group. lives,” Peltier said. “We started to jam. It all fell together, and it much our music “It is great to know was the best feeling in the world,” Peltier said. had impacted their that our music helps and Peltier officially joined the band as the inspires people.” lives.” youngest of the six members, most of whom Made For War writes were in their early twenties. songs mostly based on Made For War signed with a booking indusstaying true to your beliefs and about try for gigs, which in turn required the band to be touring a people who work hard to straighten out certain amount of days during the year. the problems in their lives in order to be They began performing in neighboring cities, including happy. Denver, Colorado, Salt Lake City, Utah, and Reno, Ne“We make our lyrics vague so that it vada, and eventually traveled across related to more than one group of people,” the entire country and into parts Peltier says. “We like to better our fans this of Mexico and Canada. way.” This resulted in Peltier Some fans use the group’s lyrics as a conrarely attending school stant reminder for how they want to live their his freshman year, which lives. caused his grades to drop. Fans commonly show their enthusiasm for “For a while I couldn’t Made For War’s songs by getting tattoos of lyrkeep up with my school ics and phrases from the group’s songs. work,” Peltier said. “People show us their tattoos of our lyrics, “But now I can. and they always tell us how much our songs have betYou tered their lives,” just Peltier said. “It really makes us feel good about what we do.” Being a part of this band has a positive impact on Peltier, in addition to his fans. “By traveling so much, I have learned about the world in a way that I otherwise wouldn’t have if I was in school all the time,” Peltier said. “I love to show up to a concert with my best friends and do what we love. There is no feeling like it.”

12

Photos courtesy of Tobias Peltier


Belly Dancing

g n i c n a D mba

Zu

eotis

Jenna Man

JHS. ation at G g it rs e v n o t c a f ss o cla ct ein Zumba, a as been a new subje e excitement after se h , th m in y r, joined Gold’s G at nett, junio n e B n y thought, ‘Th il a d n K a st li ’s gym said. . advertised e description on the ied it out,” Bennett fused tr in th is so w “I sa a fun,’ ise that looks kind dancing is an exerc a Zumb ng with e moves. -style danc atin-based moves alo id. n ti a L h it w nett sa lot of L “There’s a everything else,” Ben a full-body s f e o a little bit mba dancing provid nd abs. The a s Zu g le s, g arm n si p it u t, u o to work vals kee r te in in p u class is set ally . g class we usu our movin e th f o k a “At the pe mmin’ dance to get y ja u’re have a reall ,” Bennett said. “Yo g fun up vin heart rates at workout while ha ves.” o re m g e a c an getting awesome d ss as an opg in rn a le and sy joys the cla Bennett en t loose during her bu le to portunity le. for edu weekly sch ] tell us to just do it n ructors k like a “[The inst have fun. If you loo . nd said ourselves a d for you,” Bennett o idiot, go

Irish Dancing

With an Irish family heritage, Bailey Reiner, freshman, decided Irish Step Dancing was a good recreational choice. “We have a really strong Irish heritage so I’ve wanted to do (Irish Step Dancing),” Reiners, said. Irish Step Dancing consists of a dancer performing various leg movements keeping his or her upper half calmly composed. After finding an advertisement in the paper, Reiners decided to take up this type of dance. “It’s unique and not that many people do it, so those of us that do are really close,” Reiners said. Reiners is currently on an Irish Step Dancing team. They participate in competitions called “feshes” throughout the year. “One of my favorite parts is competing against the other girls, I really like the competition,” Reiners said. Six years after finding the Step Dancing advertisement, Reiners is still going strong. “I like how unique Irish Step Dancing], the competition and the other girls that I dance with,” Reiners said.

Orange&Black

About two months ago, Juliana Liddle, senior, decided to try belly dancing. After one class, Liddle was captivated. “I’ve always thought it was a really beautiful type of dance. A lady I know is an instructor at the studio [Sultan’s pride], so I went along to see what the lessons were like, and I liked it,” Liddle said. Liddle is currently taking belly dancing classes at the studio Sultan’s Pride in Grand Junction. Although Liddle is the youngest member in her group, she enjoys being around the older women in her class. “The other ladies are much older than me and have been dancing much longer, but it doesn’t really matter. They keep emphasizing that it’s all about fun,” Liddle said. Belly dancing is notorious for core isolation and movements, working out the core muscles of the dancer. However, these are not the only reasons why Liddle has continued belly dancing. “Its fun, and it makes me feel really good. It’s just such a beautiful style, and so different from anything else I do,” Liddle said.

Polynesian D a

ncing

After watching Polynesian dan her older sister Virginia grow cing, Katie Stra up w, junior, follow suit. ed “My sister alway and I thought th s did routines in the kitchen, ey were really co ol,” Straw said. Polynesian is a similar to hula.Th traditional island-based dan ce e dancers wear tumes, accompa traditional cosnied by flower leis. “For performan underneath a lo ces, we would wear boy-shor ts ng triangle top,” St skirt that’s tied on the side and raw said. a Polynesian dan ce the dancers since s are also short, which is good fo th through the rout ey usually have their knees be r nt ine. “I think our sh or onds, and the lo test dance was about thirty se cngest was maybe 1:30,” Straw sa Although Straw id . is n o longer in dance class, she and other dance a Polynesian rs participate in Polynesian perf ormances. “The thing I m is around the city s most is being able to go and show peop le dancing the Po lynesian people the type of do,” Straw said .

Photos by Kimberlyn Bennett, Amy Nelms, and Bailey Reiners

Junction finds new ways to move their bodies

Scene

13


Scene

The man behind the scenes F Jake Meyer

14

Photos by Haleigh Jacobson because of mental conditions that caused him to forget who he was. Edens found himself satisfied with the final product. He explains that he originally became interested in film making because of his love for watching movies. “I have a ton of favorite movies. I prefer the ones with unique stories,” Edens said. Along with unique stories, Edens also believes that stunning cinematography can outdo special effects in many circumstances. “I’m not a big person on special effects,” Edens said. “Special effects are a good ad-on, but if you know how to operate a camera and if you can get a really cool looking location, then there is really no need for special effects.” Despite not knowing what career he wants to go into, Edens is still glad to be learning about the art of film making. “I don’t know what I’m going to do with my life, but at least I have my foot in the door in learning this stuff, and it’s something I can look into for the future,” Edens said. “All in all, I think I’ve learned a lot, and it makes me better because of that.” Graphic by Garrett Brown

1. On a Saturday night, would you rather

c. McDonald’s. This is a fast and cheap place to eat.

a. Going to a movie with your crush. b. Hanging out with friends. c. Going to a party.

4. What movie genre describes you best?

be...

2. Your schedule includes...

a. Mostly Advanced Placement and Honors courses. b. Physical education classes. c. Art and music classes.

3. An ideal lunch might be...

a. Taco Bell. Everyone needs some greasy food every once in a while. b. Subway. It is a healthy alternative to fast food.

a. Drama. You have a pretty stressful and dramatic life. b. Comedy. You enjoy filling your life with fun friends and family. c. Action. You love the scary adventures.

5. An ideal career might be...

a. A fire fighter. b. A teacher. c. A policeman.

Mostly A’s “Remember Me.” You crave drama and emotional situations, making this a perfect flick for you. Mostly B’s “Bounty Hunter.” You are lighthearted and enjoy a feel good flick that makes you laugh. Mostly C’s “Avatar.” You love science fiction and interesting graphics,w making this ideal.

What movie best fits your personality?

to the plate. However, you have got to prioritize. As much as I love this class, I don’t need it to or many GJHS students, high school graduate,” Edens said. is a time to pursue passions and get in After taking the class for the second year in a touch with possible careers. Senior Sean row, Edens explains that the class has met up to Edens has discovered his passion in film and his standards and gone beyond his expectations. broadcasting. “It was everything I’d hoped it to At Western Colorado Com“It was everything be and a lot more,” Edens said. “It munity College, Edens attends I’d hoped it to be really took me by surprise because I the Media Technology course and a lot more. It didn’t realize how difficult filmmaking taught by Dane McClintock. was.” really took me by In this class, students are taught Edens explains that the class gets how to operate cameras, how to surprise because I progressively harder because all of the manage an editing system, how didn’t realize how film projects done are required to into take quality shots and how to difficult filmmaking corporate previous lessons into them. write screenplays. “Whatever you learn has to get was.” Devoting the first three periprogressively better. Everything gets a ods of his day to Media Technollittle harder as it goes on,” Edens said. ogy, Edens says how even though He also faces the challenge of time managehe loves the class, he has to balance it with ment to complete projects that take substantially school. longer than he had expected when he started the “It’s a little difficult because it’s just adding class. “There is a lot of work that goes into it,” Edens said. “A simple five minute film may take weeks of your time just in preparation, shooting and editing.” Media Technology has not only taught Edens about filmmaking, but provided him with chances to utilize his creativity. Edens was faced with the project of writing his own script, doing his own filming, editing the production and managing special effects. The final product was the movie “Clean Slate,” where Edens told the story of a man who was exploited by the government and used as an assassin

Orange&Black


InSight

Survivor Jordan Jones celebrates three years of being cancer free.

F

aced with a life-threatening disease at a time when his life had barely begun, Jordan Jones found the strength not only to combat his condition, but to maintain an optimistic outlook and a positive attitude.

Photos by Haleigh Jacobson

Orange&Black

15


percent of men survive testicular cancer at the fiveyear point.

95

Graphic by Kyle Rogers

new cases of testicular cancer will be diagnosed this year alone.

8,400

men died of testicular cancer in 2009.

380

Jordan Jones pushes himself off of his hospital bed and jumps onto his IV cart. He slowly rolls into the hallway and propels himself forward. He flies down the passage of Denver’s Children’s Hospital, quickly picking up speed. Most people would not expect to find a terminally ill boy using his lifeline as a skateboard to glide down the empty hallways of the hospital. Jordan would not allow himself to be hampered by his illness; he grasped every opportunity to enjoy the moments he had left by keeping a positive outlook. In his life, Jordan has had many accomplishments, from receiving an academic letter to making the football team. However, his biggest accomplishment is becoming a cancer survivor. Two weeks before his 14th birthday, October 26, 2007, Jordan was diagnosed with stage four testicular cancer. Tumors wrapped around his abdomen, protruded from his neck and continued to spread, threatening to encompass his lungs. Jordan, a current sophomore, recounts the events that led to the discovery of his illness, approaching the subject nonchalantly. “I was sitting at the dinner table with my mom, and she noticed a lump on my neck,” Jordan said. Alarmed by the strange growth, Jordan’s parents Kim and Jeff rushed him to Docs on Call where blood work found nothing was abnormal. However, days later, a CT scan revealed that tumors were taking over his body. “I didn’t know what to think; I didn’t think (the lump) was a big deal,” Jordan said. Jordan could not have anticipated the toll a seemingly harmless lump would take on his life. He spent most of his eighth grade year receiving treatment at Denver’s Children’s Hospital and at Saint Mary’s Hospital in Grand Junction. “I missed not being home. I missed not seeing all my friends at school and hanging out,” Jordan said. Instead of enjoying his eighth grade year with his friends, Jones three weeks before he was diagnosed. Jordan underwent 10 months of chemotherapy to reduce the life-threatening tumors. ”There are a lot of survivors who didn’t know if they “He always had a smile on his face unless could have kids and could,” he was getting chemo,” Kim said. “I wasn’t eating food Kim said. Although these chemotherapy treatments Kim and Jordan use this were meant to combat the deadly illness raging because every time I ate I would throw rationality to inspire hope through his body, they created other bodily in other cancer patients problems. up. ” and comfort them with the “I didn’t have an immune system because knowledge that cancer can be of the chemo. I wasn’t eating food because beaten. every time I ate I would throw up,” Jordan The pair became motivated after witnesssaid. ing the deaths related to testicular cancer. Jordan had other side effects from the chemotheraDuring Jordan’s stay at the Children’s py, including hair loss. Hospital, he met a fifteen year-old boy who “I ran my fingers through my hair, and it just came eventually died due to testicular cancer. out,” Jordan said. was just scary knowing that the illness “It However, chemotherapy treatment proved futile in I have takes away lives,” Jordan said. fighting Jones’s continually enlarging tumors. “Knowing what we know and what we’ve “It was kind of like ‘why is this happening to me?’,” been through, how could we not want to Jordan said. help?” Kim Jones said. His doctors turned to their last resort for treatment. Kim is the founder of the Testicular Jordan underwent seven surgeries during the duration of Cancer Awareness Foundation, which prohis illness, one of which removed five pounds of tumors vides information to the public about the from his abdomen. disease. Th ey also off er support for men and Jordan’s first operation threatened the mobility of his left their families with testicular cancer. Kim arm and could have affected his chances of playing sports he is hopeful that she can use the knowledge was passionate about, like football and dirt biking. she gained from Jordan’s experience to help “It kind of shocked me that I was told I might not be able to other testicular cancer patients as, like Jordo what I love,” Jordan said. dan, she wondered why the life of her loved Jordan knew that many of his loved ones awaited his safe return from the operating table, and he would not be the only one affected one was interrupted by cancer. Statistics from www.cancer.org “Maybe he went through this so I could from the consequences that he faced. help people,” Kim said. “It was hard on my family because they had to sit in the waitJordan will be speaking on behalf of the organization at various ing room. They always came to the hospital with me and were there events. They have also created a website and Facebook page to proevery minute,” Jordan said. mote their organization and awareness. Jordan made a conscious effort to remain strong for his family’s Jordan is not held back by his journey to survival as he continues sake. to progress in school and his passions, as well as maintain his hunger “I tried not to show my sadness and fear and keep a positive for adrenaline. outlook so I would not get depressed. It would make my mom sad,” He aspires to join the military and continue to play Jordan said. sports. Presently, Jordan does not suffer affects from his treatment, and his He has treaded through the survival war consistent check-ups have revealed no sign of the cancer returning. of cancer and skated down the halls of zone Even so, Kim Jones still feels anxious during these examinations. the hospital that could have been his final “When I see Children’s Hospital calling me, my heart still drops,” residence, but he will not be haunted she said. by what trails behind him, whether However, Jordan may experience ramifications later in life. It is he travels by IV cart or walks with still undetermined whether he will be able to have children. his strong will. “It sucks knowing that I might not be able to have kids because I want them, and I’m not sure how I would feel if I knew I couldn’t,” Jordan said. Kim tries to stay optimistic about this situation.

Fawn Puhler Kimberlyn Bennett

Four years, three hospitals and numerous rounds of chemotherapy later, Jordan Jones has survived more than many experience in a lifetime.

Not your average Jo(nes)


percent of men survive testicular cancer at the fiveyear point.

95

Graphic by Kyle Rogers

new cases of testicular cancer will be diagnosed this year alone.

8,400

men died of testicular cancer in 2009.

380

Jordan Jones pushes himself off of his hospital bed and jumps onto his IV cart. He slowly rolls into the hallway and propels himself forward. He flies down the passage of Denver’s Children’s Hospital, quickly picking up speed. Most people would not expect to find a terminally ill boy using his lifeline as a skateboard to glide down the empty hallways of the hospital. Jordan would not allow himself to be hampered by his illness; he grasped every opportunity to enjoy the moments he had left by keeping a positive outlook. In his life, Jordan has had many accomplishments, from receiving an academic letter to making the football team. However, his biggest accomplishment is becoming a cancer survivor. Two weeks before his 14th birthday, October 26, 2007, Jordan was diagnosed with stage four testicular cancer. Tumors wrapped around his abdomen, protruded from his neck and continued to spread, threatening to encompass his lungs. Jordan, a current sophomore, recounts the events that led to the discovery of his illness, approaching the subject nonchalantly. “I was sitting at the dinner table with my mom, and she noticed a lump on my neck,” Jordan said. Alarmed by the strange growth, Jordan’s parents Kim and Jeff rushed him to Docs on Call where blood work found nothing was abnormal. However, days later, a CT scan revealed that tumors were taking over his body. “I didn’t know what to think; I didn’t think (the lump) was a big deal,” Jordan said. Jordan could not have anticipated the toll a seemingly harmless lump would take on his life. He spent most of his eighth grade year receiving treatment at Denver’s Children’s Hospital and at Saint Mary’s Hospital in Grand Junction. “I missed not being home. I missed not seeing all my friends at school and hanging out,” Jordan said. Instead of enjoying his eighth grade year with his friends, Jones three weeks before he was diagnosed. Jordan underwent 10 months of chemotherapy to reduce the life-threatening tumors. ”There are a lot of survivors who didn’t know if they “He always had a smile on his face unless could have kids and could,” he was getting chemo,” Kim said. “I wasn’t eating food Kim said. Although these chemotherapy treatments Kim and Jordan use this were meant to combat the deadly illness raging because every time I ate I would throw rationality to inspire hope through his body, they created other bodily in other cancer patients problems. up. ” and comfort them with the “I didn’t have an immune system because knowledge that cancer can be of the chemo. I wasn’t eating food because beaten. every time I ate I would throw up,” Jordan The pair became motivated after witnesssaid. ing the deaths related to testicular cancer. Jordan had other side effects from the chemotheraDuring Jordan’s stay at the Children’s py, including hair loss. Hospital, he met a fifteen year-old boy who “I ran my fingers through my hair, and it just came eventually died due to testicular cancer. out,” Jordan said. was just scary knowing that the illness “It However, chemotherapy treatment proved futile in I have takes away lives,” Jordan said. fighting Jones’s continually enlarging tumors. “Knowing what we know and what we’ve “It was kind of like ‘why is this happening to me?’,” been through, how could we not want to Jordan said. help?” Kim Jones said. His doctors turned to their last resort for treatment. Kim is the founder of the Testicular Jordan underwent seven surgeries during the duration of Cancer Awareness Foundation, which prohis illness, one of which removed five pounds of tumors vides information to the public about the from his abdomen. disease. Th ey also off er support for men and Jordan’s first operation threatened the mobility of his left their families with testicular cancer. Kim arm and could have affected his chances of playing sports he is hopeful that she can use the knowledge was passionate about, like football and dirt biking. she gained from Jordan’s experience to help “It kind of shocked me that I was told I might not be able to other testicular cancer patients as, like Jordo what I love,” Jordan said. dan, she wondered why the life of her loved Jordan knew that many of his loved ones awaited his safe return from the operating table, and he would not be the only one affected one was interrupted by cancer. Statistics from www.cancer.org “Maybe he went through this so I could from the consequences that he faced. help people,” Kim said. “It was hard on my family because they had to sit in the waitJordan will be speaking on behalf of the organization at various ing room. They always came to the hospital with me and were there events. They have also created a website and Facebook page to proevery minute,” Jordan said. mote their organization and awareness. Jordan made a conscious effort to remain strong for his family’s Jordan is not held back by his journey to survival as he continues sake. to progress in school and his passions, as well as maintain his hunger “I tried not to show my sadness and fear and keep a positive for adrenaline. outlook so I would not get depressed. It would make my mom sad,” He aspires to join the military and continue to play Jordan said. sports. Presently, Jordan does not suffer affects from his treatment, and his He has treaded through the survival war consistent check-ups have revealed no sign of the cancer returning. of cancer and skated down the halls of zone Even so, Kim Jones still feels anxious during these examinations. the hospital that could have been his final “When I see Children’s Hospital calling me, my heart still drops,” residence, but he will not be haunted she said. by what trails behind him, whether However, Jordan may experience ramifications later in life. It is he travels by IV cart or walks with still undetermined whether he will be able to have children. his strong will. “It sucks knowing that I might not be able to have kids because I want them, and I’m not sure how I would feel if I knew I couldn’t,” Jordan said. Kim tries to stay optimistic about this situation.

Fawn Puhler Kimberlyn Bennett

Four years, three hospitals and numerous rounds of chemotherapy later, Jordan Jones has survived more than many experience in a lifetime.

Not your average Jo(nes)


ADS

Have an OPINION?

Want your VOICE TO BE HEARD?

Write a LETTER TO THE EDITOR! Bring your LETTER to Room 141 or e-mail gjhsnews@gmail.com

GJHS Booster Club Supporting our Tigers since 1954 Investing in our kids’ tomorrow. . . today.

WHO BENEFITS FROM THE BOOSTER CLUB?

The GJHS Booster Club is somewhat unique in that it raises funds not only for student athletics, but all recognized student activities as well — from football to drama, from band to German Club, from Link Crew to Academic Team, from The Orange & Black newspaper to volleyball, from . . . well, you get the idea.

Booster Club has donated over $1,300,000 to Grand Junction High School Student Activities and Athletic Programs; $68,000 was donated just last year To continue this tradition of financial support, we need parent volunteers. Booster Club’s primary fundraiser is Bingo. Volunteers needed to work 1 or 2 sessions a month. Bingo is held on: — Wednesday evening at 7 p.m. — — Sunday afternoon at 12:30 and 3:30 p.m. — Junction Bingo 511 281/4 Road in Grand Junction

Contact Booster Club at gjhsbc@bresnan.net 18

Orange&Black


InMotion

Sports and Health

What is your favorite hiking trail on the Colorado National Monument?

Mixed martial arts

Alex Tennant

All about:

Mixed martial arts is a full contact sport that includes various methods of fighting. The 8th Street Gym, one of Grand Junction’s mixed-martial arts training grounds, provides students with a wide range of benefits. “(It improves your) self-discipline, self-control and self-confidence,” senior Mandy Schabacker said. Not only does mixed martial arts offer multiple self regulations, it also provides many physical benefits. “It keeps you in shape from all of the cardio you do,” Schabacker said. Along with the physical and mental benefits, martial arts is also a good way for students to get out their frustrations. “(When I do mixed martial arts), it relieves my stress and gets out my anger,” junior Jessica Quackenbush said. Although it offers a wide range of benefits, students do mixed martial arts for

Morgan Leany Alex Tennant The spring sports season is well underway and many seniors have been training for their last sports season in high school, including senior Morgan Leany, a varsity soccer player. After playing soccer for 13 years, Leany is training for her last competitive soccer season. “We’re practicing super hard, we [did] our pre-season with a trainer

The Devil’s Kitchen because at the end of the hike there is a legit little cove that is fun to be in. Andrew Murdock, 10

more than just a stress reliever. “It is so much fun that you get addicted really quick,” Schabacker said. Because of the mixed martial arts’ benefits and it’s fun factor, current students who participate in the activity recommend it to others. “I would recommend that others do mixed martial arts because when you do it, you’re strong and confident. You learn to be self determined and you have good discipline and concentration,” Schabacker said. Mixed martial arts is a fun, beneficial way for students to stay in shape and meet new people. who specifically designed a program to help our endurance,” Leany said. It is obvious that Leany will miss her teammates, but that is not the only thing that she will miss. “I really like to intimidate the team we’re playing against (so I will really miss that),” Leany said. Although the excitement of the season has begun, it is bittersweet for Leany. “I’m super sad (that this is my last soccer season here) just because I know I’m not going to play in college,” Leany said.

The Lemon Squeezers because you climb on a lot of rocks.

Sofia Robinson, 9

Independence Trail because sometimes you see big horn sheep and it’s really cool to see them. Abby Dailey, 10

No Thoroughfare Canyon because there are three waterfalls on the trail. Garrick Lemley, 11

Cold Shivers because it has one of the best views off the Colorado National Monument. Danyelle Wiman, 10

Compiled by Alex Tennant Photos by Claire Cooper

Gold’s Gym

Powerhouse Gym

Crossroads Fitness Center

Gold’s Gym offers a social atmosphere as well as state of the art work out equipment, professional trainers and a variety of classes. These classes include spin class, cardio and yoga. Gold’s also has a pool and a juice bar for after workouts.

Powerhouse Gym has a motivating staff and environment, as well as a variety of exercise equipment. The Powerhouse Gym is designed to meet the individuals fitness goals. Students can try Powerhouse Gym free for three days.

Crossroads Fitness Center, with two locations, downtown and on Horizon Drive, offers a variety of classes such as spin, yoga, chisel and pilates. Crossroads also has a fitness program that includes personal training and group exercises classes.

Orange&Black

19


In Motion

Y O R T S E

Five ways to

D

the human body

Alyssa Behrens Madison Gurley

H

igh school is ďŹ lled with unhealthy habits and choices that teens indulge in. What many do not realize are the serious and damaging results of these activities. Chewing tobacco, drinking, tanning, eating junk food and smoking are just a few things that teens may try that can be damaging to a their health. Here are simple explanations of the possible side effects from a few common teenage habits.

Chewing tobacco Chewing tobacco is a common occurrence for guys or girls, in and out of the classroom. This popular habit has its downfalls and serious side effects. Some immediate effects of chewing are yellow teeth, cracking or bleeding of lips and gums, receding gums and bad breath. Long term effects are more serious and include high blood pressure, heart rate and oral cancer. Cancer of the mouth, the stomach lining, the esophagus and bladder are also possible side effects of chewing. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, as many as 20 percent of high school boys and two percent of high school girls use smokeless tobacco. At GJHS, 48 percent of the 200 students surveyed have chewed before, and 20 percent of them have chewed during class. Chewing may not have serious side affects early on, but chewing tobacco has serious long term consequences.

Alcohol Abusive underage drinking is a popular activity throughout high school culture and social life. However, many do not realize the severe dangers behind excessive drinking, especially at a young age. Over 18 million people in the U.S. have an alcohol problem. Alcohol is a factor in roughly 60 percent of fatal burn injuries, drownings, and homicides, 50 percent of severe trauma injuries and sexual assaults, and 40 percent of fatal motor vehicle crashes, suicides, and fatal falls. Though alcohol affects every organ of the body, its most dramatic impact is the liver. Drinking large amounts of alcohol or rapid consumption can lead to alcohol poisoning, sometimes leading to death. Alcohol affects the brain and can lead to vision impairment, loss of judgment, slow reexes, black outs and poor coordination. These effects are very dangerous, especially when one chooses to drive. According to learn-aboutalcoholism.com, eight teens die everyday because of teenage drunk driving. Another risk of drinking is mixing even common medications such as Advil and Tylenol that can lead to rapid heart beat, bleeding and stomach ulcers.

Sources: NIAA, Teen Vogue Magazine, sadd.org and ncadi.samhsa.gov, Teens Health from Nemours

20

Orange&Black


In Motion

Tanning

Junk Food

Over 2.3 million American teenagers visit tanning salons each year. After the long winter, and with prom approaching, the temptation to tan becomes greater. However, tanning beds can significantly harm a person’s health. Recent studies have proven that the use of tanning beds for those in their teens or twenties increases the risk of Melanoma skin cancer. Males and females that have used a tanning bed are 15 percent more likely to be at risk for melanoma (according studies by The International Agency for Research on Cancer). Another study conducted by the National Cancer Institute shows that teens who have used a tanning bed just once are 2.5 times more likely to develop squamous cell carcinoma, another type of skin cancer. With evident and strong proof behind the studies, tanning beds are very risky for a person’s health because of the susceptibility to skin cancer.

Junk food is an everyday option for a high school teen searching for a quick and cheap lunch. It is generally defined as food that has a higher caloric content compared to its weight. These high calorie, high-density foods make people consume more and allow less control of their intake. Junk food consumption can lead to liver failure, heart diseases, diabetes and poor concentration. It contains large amounts of cholesterol that sticks to the linings of blood vessels, causing liver problems and clogged arteries. The blockage of the arteries and blood vessels require the heart to perform its job of pumping blood throughout the body. Also, the excessive sodium levels in junk food increase blood pressure, leading to future health problems. An unhealthy diet can even affect student’s schoolwork and ability to concentrate. Taking the extra step to a healthy diet can help a student perform in the classroom and in other activities.

Smoking There are over 60 known cancer-causing chemicals in tobacco smoke. In the U.S., smoking leads to more deaths than murders, car accidents, alcohol abuse, suicides, AIDS and drugs combined. Smokers are four times more likely to develop heart disease than those who do not smoke. Smoking is especially dangerous for teenagers, according to experts. “Teens are much more susceptible than adults to getting addicted after just one cigarette,” Andrea Girod Espinoza, M.D., said. Also, according to the BMJ medical journal, smoking also causes premature graying of a person’s hair, not to mention lung cancer. Smoking damages every part of the human anatomy, inside and out.

Chew on this

Sources: The Skin Cancer Foundation and Enzine Articles

Orange&Black

42% Of 200 GJHS students surveyed have chewed or chew consistently

1 in 12

GJHS students have used a tanning bed.

20% Of these students have chewed during class

21


Sports

Field

f Dreams

Five Grand Junction High School baseball players choose to follow their dreams and further their careers in hopes of making it to the big leagues can improve and get more experience,” Brock said. After these three seniors attend a junior college, they then plan to transfer to a four-year program. For seniors Aaron Berk, Tyler Stanford, Charlie Reicks, On the other hand, Gastineau and Reicks are Tim Gastineau and Jayke Brock, baseball has always been a both choosing to attend a four-year college right off part of their lives. the bat for education purposes. Because this is their last year in high school, these five “It will be harder to play (at a four-year, rather have chosen to take their favorite sport to the next level and than a two-year) because I will be playing against play in college. juniors and seniors in college,” Reicks said. Two of these players are choosing to attend a four-year Reicks knows that as a freshman and sophomore college, while the other three are choosing to he may sit the bench more than he play at a junior college first. likes, but he is going to focus more on “(At college) For Berk, attending a two-year college makes academics and is excited to be around everybody is more sense because he wants to start playing as a new team. a freshman. going to be good. “The competition will be much “The thing about a four-year college is you better, but I hope to get better (along Everyone is going have to wait until your junior year to even get way) also,” Reicks said. to be at their level, theGastineau looked at, so you have to be committed for three has a similar attitude or higher, but if years,” Berk said. toward his education and is not relyBerk will be able to play his freshmen year they want to play, ing too much on his baseball career. and be looked at by minor and major league “I’m excited to go to college and they are going to scouts after just one year. be on my own. I just want to play do just fine” However, one downside of a junior college (for) as long as I can,” Gastineau can be the academics. said. The classes can be basic, but along with Berk, Stanford and No matter which college these athletes choose Brock are looking to get all the required classes out of the way to attend, they have the support of their high and obtain their associates degrees. school coach, Kyle Rush. Like many college-bound students, Stanford has not yet “(In college) everybody is going to be good. decided what he would like to study for a career. He is just Everyone is going to be at their level, or higher, excited to go ‘anywhere to play’ baseball. but if they want to play, they are going to do just Stanford does not expect any downsides by attending a fine,” Rush said. junior college. All five seniors are confident and looking for“I’ll get to play right away, it’s cheap, the college I’m goward to their first year at college, none of them ing to is not that far away from home, and it’s a nice town,” are intimidated to face a new experience. Stanford said. “If you want to be there, you’re going to Unlike Berk and Stanford, Brock has not signed with a make it work,” Berk said. junior college yet but is in the process of looking. “(At a two-year college) you get to play for both years, and I

Kyleigh Larson

Tyler Stanford

Charlie Reicks Where: Regis University Position: Pitcher Signed: Not yet signed, in the process with Regis University

Where: Salt Lake Community College (JC) Position: Pitcher Signed: March 3

Tim Gastineau

Where: Looking at four-year colleges: Regis University, Mesa State or University of Northern Colorado Position: Shortstop Signed: Not yet

22

Jayke Brock

Where: Looking at junior colleges in eastern and central Arizona, or California Position: Outfield Signed: Not yet

Aaron Berk

Where: Salt Lake Community College (JC) Position: Catcher Signed: Jan. 15

Orange&Black


Sports

Just Laxin’

(Fruita) has a lot more returning varsity players, but we split the offense and defense pretty evenly.” “A lot of our talent on the girls team got split (between GJHS and Fruita). Junction has all of Division of the Grand Valley the defense and (Fruita) has all of the offense, so United team creates tension we had to find new offense and they had to find new defensive players,” three year veteran and coAlex Proietti captain Charis Abeloe said. With the split teams, the boys team has only After grueling hours of running, sweating six returning varsity members, which leaves a lot and hard work, the GJHS lacrosse teams are for new players to learn on both the girls and boys ready to finish the season on top. team. This new rivalry between GJHS and “I think we have (new) girls with a lot of Fruita Monument made this season more potential. They just have to work hard to gain the exciting than the previous ones. (same) skills as the older girls,” Abeloe “(Splitting Fruita and GJHS) said. has created a huge rivalry because “Playing friends will Many students are excited about those are all the kids we’ve make it a lot more lacrosse becoming a new spectator sport. been playing with since middle “I played last year so I want to see all intense” school,” five year veteran and my former team mates beat Fruita, even co-captain Taylor Watkins said. though we all used to be one big team,” “Playing friends made it much more intense. junior Maggie Johnston said.

The GJHS boys lacrosse team gets fired up before facing Durango. Photo by Haleigh Jacobson

Behind the Clipboard

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Orange&Black


Open to Interpretation Opinion

How will the dress code affect you and your friends with the onset of spring?

Words of Wisdom Mr. Unverferth The following words, coming from a variety of sources, have been posted at various times in Mr. Unverferth’s windows in Room 218 during his 25 years at GJHS.

All about:

The more you know, the more you know you don’t know. Or, strange how much you know before you know how little you know. You only get out of something what you put into it. It is better to be hated for what you are, than liked for what you are not. -International Forum class, 6th hour, second semester. “You can observe a lot by watching.” -Yogi Berra “The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt.” -Bertrand Russell Control your destiny, or someone else will. The main accomplishment of almost all organized protests is to annoy people who are not in them. A person who is nice to you but rude to the waiter is not a nice person. Insanity is hereditary. You get it from

Chaco sandals Natalie Pipe This shoe company founded in Colorado manufactures hiking footwear. Two of their most popular hiking sandals are the Z/1 and Z/2, as pictured. They are appropriate for less arduous hikes and outdoor activities,

There’ll be so many girls wearing short shorts and they can’t go around stopping everyone. Cammi Muhr, 12

your kids. B.S.-ing is a life skill. Make it idiot-proof and someone will make a better idiot. “The illiterate of the 21st century will not be those who cannot read and write, but those who cannot learn, unlearn, and relearn.” -Toffler Thirty years from now, it won’t matter what shoes you wore, how your hair looked, or the jeans you bought. What will matter is what you learned and how you used it. Become the kind of person you want to live with for the rest of your life. A smooth sea never makes a skillful sailor.

Compiled by Ben Peterson such as river rafting. According to ChacoUSA.com, their shoes have a BioCentric™ footbed, which “ensures a supported, comfortable stride in any activity and as a result, has been awarded the Seal of Acceptance by the American Podiatric Medical Association.” They range in price from $95 to $105. In Grand Junction, Chacos are sold at Brown’s Shoe Fit, REI, Summit Canyon Mountaineering and Whitewater West. They can also be found online, often for a discount.

I can’t wear short shorts or spaghetti straps anymore. I’m kinda bummed. Mark Stern, 12

A lot of us girls like to wear tank tops, which could kind of be an issue. A lot of people wear their shorts too short. Aubri Wiley, 10

“As a guy, it doesn’t necessarily affect me. I don’t go around wearing tube tops or short shorts. Ben Skinner, 9

I’m ready to break out the shorts and the tank tops for sure. I don’t think they’ll enforce the rules much. Anna McGinnis, 11

Compiled by Jenna Maneotis Photos by Sara Harrison and Cody Blankenship; photos courtesy MCT Campus

Fruita Fat Tire festival fun for bikers

A-Basin open until June

Bike trail from Fruita to Moab

The Fruita Fat Tire festival attracts bikers from across the country to enjoy free events and ride epic, local single-track bike trails. The 15th annual festival will be held in downtown Fruita from April 29 to May 2.

While many ski resorts close prior to the summer months, Arapahoe Basin is not planning to close until the first week of June. The resort has one of the longest ski seasons in North America. They are located about 1.5 hours out of Denver off of Highway 6.

The 142-mile Kokopelli Trail connecting Fruita, CO, and Moab, UT, is an ambitious trek for mountain-bike enthusiasts. The ride on average requires three to six days to complete and is best completed in the spring while temperatures remain bearable.

Graphic by Garrett Brown

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Open to Interpretation

Banter Advisory

DT: It is useful. It’s an opportunity for students to get to know their Advisory teachers throughout high school and keep on track for graduation. CL: That’s what counselors are for. We do not need another teacher to focus on in a class we never get anything out of. DT: I see why you wouldn’t like Advisory—a failure like you won’t make it to college. Advisory allows us to spread out our college planning process during over four years so we won’t stress about it as seniors. When else are we going to have teachers available to help us plan for college or prepare for a test,

Photo by Richard Gonzales

Devan Thibodaux: Why do students hate Advisory so much? Carson Laudadio: There’s no use for it, and it takes time out of our day.

especially a teacher that you have for more than a year? CL: That works for maybe the two kids in the class who actually think about college before the fall of their senior year. Why rush the process of growing up? DT: “Normal” teenagers don’t want to focus on college during their own time. That’s the entire point of Advisory. The class is also beneficial for getting updates in the happenings of school. CL: Who actually cares about what is going on around the school? If the students want to find out about what is going on in school, get a newsletter.

Student irresponsibility leads to stress Devan Thibodaux

Graphic by Garrett Brown 26

Teenagers stress out about many factors of their lives, but one of the biggest stresses is high school. Unfortunately, students allow work from many classes to build and build until that work is close to its due date. This, adding to the stress of daily life and extracurricular activities, causes students to panic, and the stress sinks in. Since some teenagers do not know how to handle the stress, it spirals out of control and prevents them from excelling academically, putting a major strain on their futures. Many students excuse their low grades by blaming their stress. They complain about the piles of homework that they cannot complete on time, but they rarely accept that the resulting incomplete homework and failing

grades are their fault. Some stressed students often blame their failures on their teachers, which is purely lazy behavior. By shifting the responsibility to someone else, students refuse to accept that they cause their own failure. Accepting responsibility is difficult for most, but it’s a skill that teenagers need to learn before entering the real world. Being able to accept this responsibility and actively deal with stress is what determines a student’s success in a class. Most stress is caused by the habit of procrastinating. We do everything in our power to put off our obligations until the last possible moment. Unfortunately, we fill homework time with unproductive activities such as TV, video games and the internet. This not only causes stress, but prevents students from putting in

-I think I can maverick that. -I verbed it. -Just imagine eating chocolate cake and looking at that floor. It’d be so satisfying. -It’s like you have a fishtank between your thighs. -The front of my shirt is really wet, but I have to pee. -That’s not a gheto booty. That’s a table booty; I could eat my lunch off of that thing. -Are we going to Cold Stone? If not, I’m going to pee my pants. -I wouldn’t want grandmas driving as fast as me. -It’s like a tango on my forehead. -That just bedazzled my mind. -I have a new game to play with your mouth. -If I eat lettuce, will I impregnante myself? -I would have to curve around your stomach and be your muffin top. -I want to Zombieland your dog. -I said stupid your shut mouth. the time necessary to produce a quality product. With the piles of work and only a limited time to finish it all, procrastinators can only skim through their work and not use their full ability for each individual task. Investing this time in homework as opposed to entertainment ensures better success in school. Further, this would reduce stress, making life that much easier. It is important that students find a way to manage their stress and take responsibility for their obligations. Many challenging times await us such as college, jobs and other serious responsibilities. Finding a positive and constructive way to handle stress is an essential skill for the future, and we must begin to master it now.

Orange&Black


Opinion Graphic by Chelsea Shettler

Later starting time would benefit students Carson Laudadio

I

walk into my first-period class like many others: tired, half-awake and counting down the hours until I can fall asleep again. I, like many other GJHS students, have not had enough rest. The problem lies with our school starting too early. According to CNN, the effects on the body from lack of sleep are similar to those of consumption of alcohol. The University of California-San Diego conducted a study proving that sleep deprivation is comparable to attending school intoxicated. Less than six hours of sleep coordination, reaction time and judgment, and is hazardous to one’s health. Sleep is said to be the time when our brain sorts information, solves problems and replaces important chemicals. On average, every person needs at least eight hours. In addition, the British Medical Association reported that lack of sleep can cause higher levels of stress, anxiety and depression. Sleep deprivation affects students’ academics, social lives and health by hindering quality performance. Due to lack of concentration, conversation, homework and school work become more difficult, and quality suffers. If lack of sleep inhibits students’ ability to learn, they end up being less successful. While babies need 12 to 15 hours of sleep and adults and elderly require seven to eight, teens need eight to 10

hours. Most students wake up around 6 a.m., so to obtain a sufficient same amount of sleep, the average student must go to bed between 8 and 10 p.m. This bedtime is almost impossible, as many have jobs and extracurricular activities that go past that time. Counselors, teachers, parents and colleges encourage extracurricular activities, but this requires staying awake and alert into the night. Currently, Central, Fruita and Palisade High

Letter to the editor Gay article was offensive, inappropriate The February issue of the Orange & Black ran a short article called Banter: Gays In the Military. It appears to have been an attempt at humor, but the tone and message had a much different affect on me and several students with whom I have spoken. In 1993, the Military Personnel Eligibility Act, better known as “don’t ask, don’t tell”, was passed, disallowing questions about sexuality on recruitment forms or during interviews. Despite this provision, more than 12,000 service members have been dismissed since Orange&Black

1994 based on their sexuality. But like it or not, rules, secrecy and intimidation will not keep homosexuals out of the military. Throughout history, the number of gays in the military has reflected their percentage

School start Mondays at 8 a.m. GJHS needs to move toward adopting a similar policy. Pushing school start time another hour is a good start, but to truly fix the problem we need to put it in affect every school day. Right now the only solutions are to sleep through the first few classes or sacrifice involvement in extracurricular activities.

in our own society. Just as there are a certain number of gays in our own community and school, there are a certain number in our military. The Williams Institute estimates that there are currently more than 50,000 homosexuals serving in the military, and I believe that all of those brave men and women would take offense at the characterizations and stereotypes perpetuated by the Orange & Black. To equate homosexuality with being a wimp is ignorant, to profess it is irresponsible. I sincerely hope that the attitudes of the students with which I have spoken are more representative of our

student body than those put forward in our school paper. Remember, as Voltaire said, “prejudices are what fools use for reason.” Mr. Hindman To Mr. Hindman: We fully recognize that the article was inappropriate. Our intention was not to make fun of or put down homosexuals; it was to approach a newsworthy matter in a humorous way, as to attract teenagers. However, we failed to do this appropriately. 27


Open to Interpretation

Not all underage drinkers are irresponsible when partying Adults perpetuate a false stereotype that all teenagers lack judgment Ben Peterson

W

hen it comes to teenage drinking in the Grand Valley, many adults are quick to determine that underage drinking is irresponsible. When a report by the National Institute of Drug Abuse finds that 75 percent of American teenagers have consumed alcohol, it is evident that teenage drinking is prominent in our society. The image, though, representing the nature of this drinking is created solely by the parties that go wrong and are ended by police. However, for every party ended, more go unnoticed and uninterrupted. Many teenagers of the valley are good at keeping their parties under the radar; they go unnoticed because the music is not too loud, no one drives home drunk and no one ends up at the hospital. These parties are maintained and kept under control. While the main motivation for this is to reduce the chance of being found by police,

keeping the drinking under control at lots of Ds.” This suggestion is not only stereotypical--it is all shows a large amount of responsibility by the teens. They take the keys simply false. There is a large number of students of other students at the door of some who ace their Advanced Placement classes and parties to ensure no one will be leav- drink on the weekend. For this reason, stereotypes cannot be applied to this situation. ing and driving under However, I do not condone unthe influence. They do “It is wrong for derage drinking because I do not adnot drink then vandal- adults to accuse vocate breaking the law. ize schools or public all teenagers of Yet it is wrong for adults to deem monuments. underage drinkers irresponsible beMany adults in the being immature cause they believe teenagers are imvalley have a common and therefore mature; this stereotype is not applimisconception of teen- irresponsible cable to all teenagers and therefore agers who drink, and drinkers; this should not be perpetuated by adults this is perpetuated by in our society. many members of our stereotype should It is unfair to underestimate teencommunity, who do not be perpetuated agers based on the few incidents that not understand the sit- by adults in our surface in the media. uation as well. society.” Adults should not accuse all unIn Gary Harmon’s derage drinkers of being bad stucolumn on what he calls the valley’s teenage drinking problem, dents. Adults should not think them irresponsible he stated that teenagers who drink members of society. Adults should not attack teens “have more MIPs than they have Ds when they do not understand the situation. on their report cards, and they have

Graphic by Patrick Davenport

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Orange&Black


Staff Editorial

We are a dying generation. apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance e are not dying from a medical disease that threatens indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • millions. We are not dying from the various poisons ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference we willingly ingest every day. • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • Instead, the disease•killing our generation is apathy. indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy Somehow, the power and inspiration that was so ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference •vital apathy • ignorance • indifference to our parents’ success •was never passed on. Somehow • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • we never absorbed it.• Th ey marched in peace•rallies and shouted passionately indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference apathy • ignorance indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy from street corners to fi ght for their exploding world; we sit in docile submisignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference sion, allowing injustice, corruption and deceit to infi ltrate our government, • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • our •lives and our world. indifference • apathy • ignorance indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy• Th e political of the United States •isn’t much diff•erent from what is ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignoranceplight • indifference • apathy ignorance indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference was in the 1960s and 1970s. • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance of our •friends and neighbors have died in a war on foreign soil •indifference • apathy • ignoranceTh•ousands indifference apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • whose motive is a mystery to a many in this country and around the world. ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference Our•national climbs higher each year; politicians rampant with our • apathy • ignorance • indifference apathydebt • ignorance • indifference • apathyrun • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance money and resources, spending millions with no concern for the giant hole indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • they’re digging us into. Unfortunately, no concern about it either. ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathywe• have ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance apathy • ignorance Instead of fi ghting, the vast majority of teens at GJHS and the U.S. ei• indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • in apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ther ignore the issues plaguing the world or are completely ignorant. Neither ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference excuse •isapathy legitimate. Out of laziness, we do nothing, and the world suffers • apathy • ignorance • indifference • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance because of it. •indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • unacceptable to know more about the last episode•ofindifference “Gossip Girl”• apathy • ignorance • indifferenc ignorance • indifference • apathyIt•isignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance than the revolutionary social reform legislation that was passed recently,• mak• apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance indifference • apathy • ignorance ing history. indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • unacceptable to care more• about petty gossip than• the fact that slavery ignorance • indifference • apathyIt• isignorance • indifference apathy • ignorance indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference is more prominent today than at any other time in history, or that 8-year-old • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance girls•are kidnapped •and forced•into prostitution every day. • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • indifference • apathy • ignorance indifference apathy ignorance • indifference Unfortunately, being slapped in the face with the realities of the world• isapathy • ignorance • indifference ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference necessary—it is the only way we wake up our apathetic generation and • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • can indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance begin to repair what we’ve turned our backs on. •indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • than letting the plight •ofapathy the world depress you• or make you feel ignorance • indifference • apathyRather • ignorance • indifference • ignorance indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference hopeless, let it inspire you to make a change. Don’t merely buy a T-shirt that • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • promotes the idea of saving the environment—or the whales. Th e generations indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy before us created these problems, •and it is in• our hands to• fiindifference x them. Cur-• apathy • ignorance • indifference •ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference apathy ignorance rently, we perpetuate them. • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance But•we can change •theapathy state of• things. Whether you march •onapathy Capitol•ignorance Hill • indifference • apathy • ignorance indifference ignorance • indifference • indifference • apathy or write a letter to a state legislator, we, as individuals and as a generation, •ignorance • indifference • • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance have the power to change the course of history. • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy It’s not important how or why you change• the world; it’s important ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy ignorance • simply indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference that you actively make an eff ort to try. • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance •indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy •ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance • indifference • apathy • ignorance •

W

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GJHSnews

GJHSNews.com Courtesy of mctcampus.com

New hookah lounge comes to Grand Junction Gina Papas the taste is strong,” senior Julie Cormier said. “It’s a nice (alternative) to GJ Scores or the movies,” Hone said. The pool tables, couches and oxygen bar at the lounge provide a place for people who do not smoke hookah to hang out as well. “The oxygen bar was cool because it gave me energy,” senior Jenny Kelly said. “I love the enviornment. It is classy and chill,” Hone said. The bar’s additions make it even a more enjoyable place to hang out. “The decorations make it a really cool place to just chill,” Cormier said. “The lights are low, and it is a really relaxed atmosphere.” The bar includes pool tables, Foosball, a Juke box, Flat screens, and free wifi.

Photos by Richard Gonzales

Smoking hookah is quickly becoming a popular past time among young adults 18 and older. Grand Junction has been hit by this recent craze with the opening of the hookah lounge, The Grand Central Smoke Shack, on March 1. “I opened the bar because I saw a demand,” owner Michelle Barnum said. Hookah is an oriental tobacco pipe with a long flexible tube connected to a container where the smoke is cooled by passing through water. Originally invented in India, it gained the most popularity in the Arab world and has now made its way around the globe. It is traditionally used for smoking flavored tobacco. The new bar features over 40 different flavors of tobacco and a flavored oxygen bar. Barnum says the most popular flavor of hookah shisha is “Code 69,” which tastes like sour gummy bears. “There were plenty of flavors to pick from, and the couple I got were really good,” senior Johnny Kaley said. There is a large selection of flavors. “I like the selection,” senior and Smoke Shack employee Shelby Hone said. “There are so many different combinations to be made.” Students agree that the variation of flavors is worth the cost. “They have great flavors; the shisha is Starbuzz brand, so

The Last Song McKenna Moe Nicolas Sparks brings to life another love story in his latest novel to film, The Last Song. The novel as well as the movie relates to the transition from child to adult through tough times, love and death. Ronnie, played by Miley Cyrus, is forced to live with her father over the summer in a small southern beach town. Ronnie has not spoken to her father, played by Greg Kinnear, since he and Ronnie’s mother got divorced. The summer starts off very rocky but becomes a summer of growth for all the characters in the movie. The Last Song shows the challenges of young love as Ronnie and Will fight to stay together even though he is moving to Tennessee in the fall and Will’s wealthy family disapproves of Ronnie. Ronnie and Will represent the innocence of summer love and enforce the idea that you never forget your first love. Although the cast lacks star power, it portrays real human... Read the rest of this review and more at GJHSnews.com

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Mesa County Valley School District 51 Grand Junction High School 2115 Grand Avenue Grand Junction, CO 81501

NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION U.S. POSTAGE PAID PERMIT NO. 207 GRAND JUNCTION , COLORADO

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2 Senior Stuart Foster, 15, and junior Casey Walker battle for the ball at the varsity lacrosse game against Steamboat Springs on March 27. The boys lost 13-7.

4 3 Senior Jayke Brock prepares to launch his rocket in physics class on March 22.

Sophomore Cassie Fanning, left, and junior Cassie Walker bundle up while watching the varsity girls lacrosse team defeat Fruita Monument on April 8.

5 Freshman Christian Richardson carves his wooden masterpiece during tech ed on April 8.

Claire Cooper (1), Haleigh Jacobson (2), Carson Laudadio (3), Alex Tennant (4), Kristin Balbier (5)

Freshman Rebecca Hansen drives the ball down the ďŹ eld during the varsity soccer game against Moffat County on April 3. The Tigers won 7-0.

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& Math homework? Check. Football tryouts? Check. Survive cancer? Check. pg. 15 Photo illustration by Haleigh Jacobson Grand Junction Hig...

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