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Drama Department debuts highly anticipated and technically challenging musical, “Willy Wonka.” p. 7

THE

Photo illustration by Natalie Pipe

ORANGE & BLACK

Grand Junction High School

|

1400 N. Fifth St., Grand Junction, Colo. 81501

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Volume 92 • Issue 5

| February 2010


Index

ORANGE &BLACK

THE p. 7

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Athlete injuries

15

Helping Haitians

TJ Downey, sophomore, adopts three Haitiian children in a rush due to the earthquake that damaged the orphanage in which they were being housed.

InMotion looks at the reality athletes face in the realm of injury and how to best avoid these mishaps yourself.

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What do YOU want to see in the next issue of the Orange & Black? Tell us on Facebook! facebook.com/gjhsnews

Fast Track slowing down

Now goes in depth as to why District 51 has tightened up eligibility for its Fast Track option for students who wish to hasten the pace of their education.

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Sext inbox full

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Get your six on

The Orange & B lack’s sport section offers a sneak peak into six different spring sports that are just around the corner for GJHS.

Connection details the damages ‘sexting’ can do to a high schooler’s reputation as well as listing the legal consequences offenders may face.

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Got an OPINION about something going on at the school? Send a letter to the editor and be heard!! Email it to: letters.gjhsnews@gmail.com. Only authored letters will be published, so include your name. Policy

The Orange and Black, a legally recognized public forum for student expression, is published six to nine times a year by the Newspaper Class for students of Grand Junction High School. Expression made by students in the exercise of the freedom of speech or freedom of press is not an expression of District 51 school board policy. The views expressed in The Orange and Black do not necessarily represent the views of the entire staff, adviser, GJHS administration or the School District 51 administration. Board policy regarding student publications (JICE, JICE-R) is available in the journalism room (Rooms 140-141) or in the principal’s office.

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Letters to the Editor

The Orange and Black welcomes and encourages letters to the editors. This is a chance to express your viewpoint on important issues. Letters should be limited to 250 words. They will be edited for space and legal considerations, but not for inaccuracies, grammar or spelling. Letters must contain information pertinent to the students of GJHS. The staff retains the right to not publish any letter not meeting these requirements. Unsigned letters will not be published. Please submit typed letters in person to Room 130 or via mail or to letters. gjhsnews@gmail.com.

Cost

Single copies free. Where available, additional copies of this paper are available for purchase for 50 cents each. Contact The Orange

and Black for more information. Taking more than one copy of this paper with the intent to prevent other individuals from reading this edition of the paper is prohibited (C.R.S. 18-4-419). Violators, subject to prosecution and penalty under C.R.S. 13-21-123, will be prosecuted.

Contact

The Orange and Black, Grand Junction High School, 1400 N. Fifth St., Grand Junction, CO 81501. Phone: 970-254-6929. FAX: 970-254-6973. Web site: GJHSNEWS.com. Adviser e-mail: rjussel@mesa.k12.co.us. Some material courtesy of American Society of Newspaper Editors/MCT Campus High School Newspaper Service. © 2009 The Orange and Black Grand Junction High School. All rights reserved.

Orange&Black


Spotlight

Fa(s)t food diet Devan Thibodaux

Funky Scholarships Weird, wacky and legitimate scholarships Josh Shettler

“I’ve spent most of my time in Many Americans today are all about quick this bathroom, but I am finally and easy solutions, which is why fast food is losing some weight! Their food is now the number one choice for weight loss. like tasty laxatives, and I just can’t For those Americans who have not called contain myself,” Sataf said from Jenny Craig, many fast food establishments in the bathroom. now have diets for their customers who want Taco Bell has been overto lose weight but do not want to abandon whelmed with their loving relationship with “Their food is like customers since their nacho cheese and beans. tasty laxatives, and diet started showing With less fat and more carbs, Taco Bell’s Fresco menu is fast I just can’t contain weight loss results, which all began after food’s biggest phenomenon since myself.” one woman, ChrisJared, the Subway mascot. tine Dougherty, lost “I was very embarrassed about weight using Taco Bell’s drivemy image, so after seeing Taco Bell commerthru diet. cials, I decided to make a diet plan out of their “I didn’t want to cut out my new menu,” Bubba S. Sataf, a junior at GJHS fast food, so I started choosing trying to get slim fast, said. Fresco items from the Drive-Thru Sataf tried out-of-date methods such as low Diet® menu and making other calorie dinners and even actual exercise in his sensible choices. I reduced my desperate attempt to lose weight. Unfortudaily calorie and fat intake by 500 nately, none of these benefited him. calories to 1250 calories a day, “I did about 15 sit-ups a day, but I didn’t and, after two years I ended up feel any healthier afterwards. I tried to drink losing 54 pounds! Th ese results raw eggs like people on TV, but it was gross. aren’t typical, but for me they I kept trying this for a week, but I got salmowere fantastic,” Dougherty said. nella and only lost two pounds. I had to try Following in her footsteps, something different,” Sataf said. people everywhere have been Sataf decided to think outside the bun, and choosing fast food to lose weight. after one month of Taco Bell’s fresco diet, he lost 20 pounds after gaining up to 200 from Taco Bell’s regular menu in the first place.

Scholar Athlete Milk Mustache of the Year Award The Scholar Athlete Milk Mustache of the Year Award gives its winners a $7,500 scholarship to a high school athlete for submitting a picture of him or herself with a milk moustache. In addition to the scholarship, the winners will receive a trip to Walt Disney World and will be featured in a “Got Milk?” advertisement campaign. However, entrants must stand out from the rest of the crowd in order to win.

Culinary Institute of America Apple Pie Contest This scholarship awards its money to the student who can make the best apple pie. However, the recipe must be original and a high school transcript must be submitted along with a 500-word essay on apples. The grand prize is $25,000, followed by a second prize of $15,000 and a third prize of $10,000.

The Potato Industry Scholarship

Every year, the National Potato Council awards up to $5,000 for students who plan to graduate in a potato-based major. Every year, the United States produces more than 44 billion pounds of potatoes, and at only 110 calories per medium-sized potato, many people feel that potatoes are not given the credit that they deserve.

-Wait, where is the KFC guy from? Kentucky?

-How can one child have three dads? -If sex is a myth, then that makes me a mythbuster.

-Jasmine is blossoming into a sexy young cow. -It’s like cleaning up thermonuclear war with a toothbrush. -I’m always lost and confused when it comes to my coffee cup. -When I listen to this song with my eyes closed, it sounds angular.

Watch Your Mouth

-If you were a mime, an invisible wall would hurt. -They’re like bacon bits. They are good at the beginning, and they suck at the end. -Oh my god, what is that? It’s a kid, but what’s wrong with it?

-I always go hunting with my bagpipes.

-Yes, I crocheted a bumble-bee costume for my cat.

-Orange juice turns you black.

-You can’t tell under all this, but I’m belly dancing.

-I am going to throw you out of a one story building! Orange&Black

Graphic by Kyle Rogers 03


Spotlight

GJPocalypse presents

Graphic by Jonas Cooper

A beacon of hope in the dark A prophet arrives in the halls of GJHS to help during the apocolyptic chaos.

small dark out-of-the-way rooms that allowed her followers to elude administrators and survive the turmoil of the hectic hallways and outer fields. t has been 12 weeks since the She had, according to her newfound apostles, beginning of the quarantine turned water into energy drinks, walked on the of Grand Junction High School, water of a flooded auditorium, and defied the and all order and control has been lost. Suddenly, a savior ap- laws of physics by turning seven loaves of bread and a few dead fish into a feast fit for all her folpeared in the midst lowers and a few hangers-on. of the violence and “The Because of the modern-day mirachaos at the school Thompsonites cles, the Prophet’s 12 closest apostles, – a prophet arrivwere viligantes, known near and not-so-far away as the ing in an aura of Thompsonites, set out to right what light, offering safety wandering the and salvation to the halls of the school they deemed wrong in the halls of the school. defenseless, the cor- ostensibibly In the beginning, the Thompnered, the weak. protecting the sonites were vigilantes, wandering the The prophet nerds and geeks.” halls of the school ostensibly protectinstantly became a ing the nerds and geeks in the name of new power at the justice and good will. Along the way, school, gaining a they recruited new members to their band, often following of students and staff while on missions trying to find snacks for their members who were desperate Prophet. for answers and protection. Her One of the initiation rites the Thompsonites powers were mesmerizing, alused in those early days was the dropping of lowing her to hold the attention skunk oil into the many trash cans surrounding of all within shouting distance. the math building, the temporary headquarters of She offered safety in several the administration. This rather pathetic required

Ben Peterson

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act of vandalism backfired on the mouth, could feed the giver with four Thompsonites who were hoping cake. to become martyrs in the eyes of the The Thompsonite-Jockitch school population when a group of battle ended with a victory for Scrog-Dogs beat them to the punch the Thompsonites, who in the and confessed to the crime. end teased the weightlifters and Other rumors were reported, gridiron stars by waving calculaalthough not confirmed, of the tors and A-laden report cards in Thompsonites setting off fires during their faces. dances and even occasionally going “The Thompsonites completeover the walls of GJHS to score ly defeated us,” said Chandon tacos, Dairy Queen and medical Flower, a well-known meathead. supplies. “They waved all those things The most famous mission of the in our faces and then started apostles became known explaining simple “They waved all as “The Recapturing math to us. My head of The Virgin.” When those things in our started hurting so the Thompsonites bad I had to go out faces and started most holy relic was to my truck my dad stolen, the apostles and explaining simple bought me and listen their band of followers math.” to some country and clashed in battle with dream about beating the Jockitches, who had been holed up some gays.” up in the gym and locker room area. Yes, the Thompsonites had The Prophet sent her followers gained control of the school beto retrieve the relic, a small, sparkly coming the arm of justice – and statue of the Virgin Mary, which the hope for the future. when it had money placed in its

Prepare for part six of the Gjpocalypse ongoing drama series in the next edition of the Orange & Black. 04

Orange&Black


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05


Scene

Arts & Culture

Metal Club

What is going on around GJHS The Cottonball semi-formal dance will be held Feb. 27 at Bananas Fun Park in the event pavilion. Pictures will be at 5 p.m. and the dance will begin at 7 p.m. and go until 11 p.m. The theme will be Under the Sea.

Staff Playlist A look at the music that the Orange and Black staff likes to listen to.

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Gillian McLean, 11

Mary Steel

attle Decapitation, Beneath the Massacre and Dimmu Borgir are just a few favorite musicians making noise at the recently created GJHS Metal Club. The unusual club of about 25 members meets every Monday after school in Mr. Arroyo’s Room 132, to exchange music, play guitar, discuss bands and socialize. The uniqueness of this club makes it quite popular. “(The club) has a very high level of interest. The kids that come really enjoy talking about what the music speaks to them,” Arroyo said. There are many things that metal club offers to different individuals who had never found a place to belong. “Students who are in this club find a sense of belonging, a common interest among them. People that might not have joined school clubs have joined this one,” Arroyo said. The Metal Club has opened doors for its members, especially member Sena, who is now a DJ for the college radio station KMSA.Besides the music that is expressed in this club, the other attraction is the people that partake in it. “I like going to Metal Club because I can relate well to the people there. My closest friends go there and we all attend shows sometimes,” Sena said. But like all good ideas, it will spread, and the distinctive connection this club shares with GJHS will be short lived. “It’s sick. No one has really done this before, other schools are probably going to catch on. I heard Central already has one,” said Frank Proctor, another regular. From listening to music to playing it, from DJ-ing for a radio station to joining in on Pepsi pong, metal club has started a trend that has created a new style of life for many people.

Bobbi With An I - Phil Vassar This is a great song to belt out to while in the car. (It’s) a funny country song that makes fun of a beefy man going to the bar in a dress.

The Drama Department’s spring show will be “Hamlet.” Auditions for the show will be held Feb. 19 after school in the auditorium. A Shakespearean monologue will need to be prepared to audition.

Rise Against- Swing Life Away This is a great mellow song to unwind to. The lyrics and rhythm remind me of taking it easy and enjoying simple pleasures. Kaitlin Cain, 12

In the Dark With You- Greg Brown Driving up on Little Park road to an outlook of the city with this song in the background is sure to mesmerize.

Zack Kelley, 12 On Feb. 22, GJHS will be hosting a concert and clinic of the Grand Valley high school Wind Ensembles. The concert will be held at 7 p.m. in the auditorium. The event is free and open to anyone.

F-Stop Blues - Jack Johnson Between work, newspaper, and three classes, life can be overwhelming. This song helps me relax. Katie Langford, 12

Carry Out- Timbaland The song is catchy and has a great beat. I love any music that I can dance to, and Carry Out definitely fits the bill. Richard Gonzales, 12

Student Reviews

Compiled by Amy Nelms

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“I saw “Avatar” the weekend it came out, and I absolutely loved it. Although the movie lasts a staggering two-anda-half hours, the experience is more than worth it.” -Ashley Funke, 10

“Wild at Heart, by John Eldredge, is a book that dives into the heart of man, aiming to awake the childhood boy and develop them into a masculine heart. Eldredge says there are three desires that have become lost. -Jenna Maneotis, 10

“A heartwarming tale of a compassionate family, “The Blind Side” is one of the best movies that has come out in the last year.”-Laura Lockwood, 10 Orange&Black


Scene

The Making of a Wonka

Cast members’ views on the show

Izzy Huskinson, junior Oompa Loompa

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Photo by Haleigh Jacobson

“There’s always something going on. It’s not one of those lame musicals you want to sleep through.”

of genre in musicals, with over 80 students auditioning for “Willy Wonka.” “Willy Wonka will be more open to everybody because a lot of people or the past couple of years, Grand Junchave seen that movie compared to tion High School’s Drama last year’s musical, My Fair Lady,” Department has been noJohn Maier, sophomore, said. torious for their traditional But along with the excitement musicals set in the early 1900s. of putting on a kid-friendly musi“We haven’t really drawn high cal comes an audience familiar with school crowds in like we wanted,” “Willy Wonka.” Mr. Whiteford, drama director said. To make high expectations However, this year Mr. Justin come to life, a technical crew Whiteford has decided to produce has been working to put the sets Willy Wonka, a musical that is both together. musically and technically challengGJHS senior Hazel Gibson ing. and junior Kendra Strickland are “We wanted to cater to high “Willy Wonka’s” cast rhearses a scene on heads of the tech crew and split school, middle school and elementhe responsibilities that the tech tary school audiences. We don’t want the stage. crew has. them to be blocked by the history of “I am most excited to unveil the grandeur of all the sets. There are the old fashioned musicals,” Whiteford said. so many pieces that are really cool,” Gibson said. Students at GJHS have reacted to the change

Jenna Maneotis

Behind the Chocolate Fountain as they can but there’s a lot of safety issues with that.

Orange & Black asks about “Willy Wonka”

“It’s the first that has real humor. There’s a bunch of innuendos. It’s a funny play. I am extremely entertained. (The best part is) probably the nut part, John’s nuts.

Photos by Haleigh Jacobson Graphic by Greg Coleman

Orange&Black

O&B: In terms of tech, what makes “Willy Wonka” special? KS: “Willy Wonka” is special because we were told we couldn’t do it, and it’s become

O&B: What challenges have you encountered designing tech for “Willy Wonka”? HG: Making an idea come to life is a lot easier said than done. It takes a long process to get there, and it can be really frustrating getting to the vision in real life.

Dani Perry creates a bright gumball to accent the stage.

O&B: What reaction do you think people will have to the tech and props of “Willy Wonka”? KS: We’re going for a stunning reaction. Everything is bright and flamboyant, and sort of in your face. We’re hoping for “wow” and awestruck. HG: I hope (the audience) is blown away. We’re always topping the last show. I think this will be the best musical Junction has ever seen both technically and musically. From my experience here, it’ll make the top.

really extravagant. HG: It’s incredibly challenging compared to other shows. (The audience) is going to want to see Compiled by Jenna Maneotis as much of the movie on stage

Photo by Kimberlyn Bennett

Bryce MogliaMacEvoy, senior. The Candyman

Orange & Black: What made you want to be part of tech, especially “Willy Wonka”? Kendra Strickland: I got here on accident. I wandered in here (drama room) as a freshman and got adopted by the head of tech. I did it this year because I really loved it last year. Hazel Gibson: I originally wanted to be an assistant director to fulfill my high school life by doing things I’ve never done before. It’ll be a great learning opportunity.

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Scene

Pro-Start Prepares for Competition GJHS Pro-start preparing for the Western Slope Regional CompeAmy Nelms tition. This is GJHS’s first year competing in the cooking team competition because the class is only two years ith most old. high school share some tips “I have confidence, but this is Junction’s first student’s,

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cooking expertise extends to peanut butter sandwiches and Ramen noodles, some GJHS students have learned to create gourmet meals through the Pro-Start cooking program. “It is a good class not for the credits but for what you do,” senior Quinton Fletcher said. Most recently the Pro-Start class has been

year so it could be pretty messy. We will go for the gold but probably won’t get it,” senior Kim Oviatt said. After a class competition, seniors Peter Volkman, Jasmine Reyes, Kim Oviatt, and Quinton Fletcher will be representing GJHS in the competition. The competition requires the students to prepare an appetizer, main dish, and dessert with two burners in one hour. “It is essential that everyone is fast. If someone is out of line the whole team falls apart,” Fletcher said.

GJHS Students Kim Oviatt, Quinton Fletcher, Peter Volkman and Jasmine Reyes will be representing GJHS at the regional cooking competition. They share their best cooking advice. “Don’t burn yourself. Don’t season until the very end. Cut open the meat. The more you know, the more you can apply.” Quinton Fletcher, 12

The competition will be held at Western Colorado Community College on Feb.19.

From skatepark to mural

parks: Eagle Rim by the Orchard Mesa Middle School, soon followed by Split Bone LongBoards, Westlake, and Monument. kid tags a brick wall with spray paint Barlow explains her reasoning and inspiration behind the and doesn’t think twice about it bedevelopment. ing illegal. In a literal sense graffiti “It’s a living project that is compiled by people from the and arousal art are community who are working toone in the same; gether to help each other increase the only apparent their art knowledge,” Barlow said. disparity is the fact She continues to add that this that one is legal project benefits the community by while the other one dressing up otherwise bleary parks is not. Similarly, and has other positive aspects for they require paint, the skaters and others who enjoy the an artist and a park. splash of creativity. “When projects like this were Naomi Barlow, done in California and Europe they substitute teacher, were very successful because they is trying to add this provided a nicer environment for creative edge to skaters and deceased graffiti in the some of the parks area,” Barlow said. around town. When Barlow’s inspiration for the spray paint meets project comes from her overall love skate parks a Mural of art. Jam is the result, “We support art growth, espeand credit can be cially in the younger generation. We appointed to the want to provide as many opportunihost, Naomi Barties as we can for all the different low. It takes place at varieties of art,” Barlow said. various parks in the Because she is trying to push art Valley every spring forward, anyone is invited to join in and is a mixture of on the free fun; all a person needs are loud music, a raging her own materials for painting and skating competian idea of what she wants to design. tion, and a painting Photo courtesy of Naomi Barlow On average each person will receive contest at the end. a 10 by 10 foot square to paint on. Barlow and her friend Jason are the leaders “It depends on what people come to us with; if they have of a nonprofit organization called the Super a bigger design layout we can give them more space. We are Rad Art Jam. This non-profit organization is pretty accommodative,” Barlow said. responsible for putting together the project of This eye catching project provides great opportunity for crepainting the skate parks in the Valley. Current- ative hands or anyone interesting in making this town a better ly, they are working on the first of five skate place one skate park at a time.

Mary Steel

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“Keep a trashcan and a food waste bowl. Remember a little goes a long way. Always do a taste test.” Kim Oviatt, 12 “Don’t burn anything. For crepes, use sugar, flour, milk and creme. For the topping, chocolate is the best.” Peter Volkman, 12 “Never follow the recipe because everyone does not like how the recipe tastes. Just adjust to how you want it to taste.” Jasmine Reyes, 12 Photos by Amy Nelms

Orange&Black


Scene

You’ve been unplugged 50% of teenagers illegally download music nationwide. At GJHS, 75% of kids do as well.

Kyleigh Larson

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fter a grueling day of high school, heading home, grabbing a bite to eat and logging onto the computer has become routine for some

students. Along with new entertainment options online comes a craze that has captured today’s generation. Senior Taylor Watkins is just one of many students who illegally download thousands of songs every year. According to an Orange & Black survey, 75 percent of GJHS students illegally download music. Out of those students, 74 percent are not afraid of being caught. “I used to be an oblivious little guy, and didn’t think much about what I was doing,” Watkins said. Now, at least he knows what can happen if he gets caught. Catching illegal downloaders is a lengthy process that takes excess time and effort. First, Napster noticed that their music files were being illegally downloaded. Then they contacted Adelphia, the internet service that the computer was using, in order to track down the individual computer that was engaged in illegal activity. Only internet providers can find computers through an Internet Protocol (IP) address. After Adelphia tracked down Watkins computer, they relayed his information to Napster and immediately shut off his internet. “(When it happened) I was like oh ----. Sorry mom, it was all (my brother) Logan’s fault,” Watkins said. A few days later, Watkins received a 12page notice in the mail from Napster’s copyright company. The packet stated that if the fine of $4,500 was not paid, Watkins’ parents would be sued for up to $150,000. Criminal penalties for first-time offenders who are caught illegally downloading can include up to $250,000 in fines or up to five years in prison. Civil penalties can be a minimum fine of $750 per song, but luckily Watkins was only fined $4,500 for all of his songs. Watkins thought his fine was OK because he realized it could have been a lot worse. “I do not know anyone who has $250,000 to just hand away, and illegally downloaded music is not worth ruining someone’s life.” Sophomore Rebecca Roskowski chooses not to illegally download for personal reasons. “It seems wrong. If you do get caught, you’re not only in trouble with the authorities,

Orange&Black

ays they get caught

Recording Industry Association of America The RIAA contacts universities making them aware of illegal downloaders and leading to suspension or expulsion. Copyright Companies Companies contact the internet provider, resulting in the internet being shut off until the music is deleted and fines are paid. FBI The FBI sends notices and fines for illegal downloading.

Photo illustration by Haleigh Jacobson and Amy Nelms but your parents are the ones who have the consequences,” Roskowski said. Although he has been caught, Watkins continues to illegally download music using BitTorrent. This program uses torrents, packages of illegal files that can be uploaded to a website such as Pirate Bay. After these files are uploaded to the website, Watkins can download them to his computer for free using the client software, BitTorrent. This software is quickly becoming popular because it is harder for copyright companies to track files and punish individuals, so instead they target the main website. “It’s not a big deal (illegally downloading) because so many people do it, and songs should only be 25 cents not one dollar,” Watkins said. “I don’t feel bad downloading a song from a multimillion dollar artist, but if it’s an up-and-coming

artist you shouldn’t do it,” he said. Many high school students are unaware of the work it takes to create one song, let alone a whole album. “For every artist you can name at the top of the Billboard music charts, there is a long line of songwriters, sound engineers, and label employees who help create those hits. They all feel the pain of music theft,” the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) said. In a study done by the Institute for Policy Innovations, they found that music piracy in the U.S. economy loses $12.5 billion every year, 71,060 U.S. jobs are lost and workers lose $2.7 billion in earnings. “Illegally downloading is bad for the economy. People are undermining the system. (The music industry) is a symbiotic relationship; if one part goes, everything else goes,” Roskowski said.

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ays to get music cheap emusic.com 42 to 50 cents per song lala.com Listen to music for free and buy songs at 10 to 79 cents per song mp3.com 50 cents per song Rhapsody.com Offers a $15 a month subscription. Qtrax.com All music downloads are free 09


Open to Interpretation Opinion

Words Doug Fledderjohn GJHS Science Teacher

Photo illustration by Maria LeFebre and Natalie Pipe

of Wisdom

Three GJHS briefs

Never get into the mindset that you can’t do it because you can. (Happiness is) a state of mind: being more than satisfied with your life. What makes you happy now probably won’t make you happy in the future. Get out of your comfort zone and try something different. Education opens up opportunities to you as an individual of who you are and what you can become. No matter what happens to you, the outcome is determined by you and not somebody else. Success is being happy. Make goals a priority in your life. It may mean you have to put other things on hold. Get involved, try something, join stuff, do stuff.

Sean Silva, senior, was informed on Feb. 5 that he is one of 15,000 National Merit Scholarship Finalists. He will be informed in March or June if he is one of the 8,200 recipients of one of three possible scholarships offered.

How often do you associate with students of a different race at GJHS?

I have a best friend who is Asian and Mexican so I guess every day. But other than that not really that much.

Alex Castle, 11

I don’t associate with students of a different race a lot because of the fact that they think we are different.

GJHS Speech and Debate held its home tournament Feb. 13. This was coach Myers’ first tournament he has run at GJHS. The team is competing in Moffat County for the Districts tournament on Feb. 26-27. The state tournament is March 11-13. Jesse Smith has recieved a $10,000 a year scholarship for up to four years at Arizona State University. After his acceptence he was automatically considered for the New American Scholarship and was pleased with how it would cut down on tuition fees for the pricy out of state college.

It’s nice to have a plan, but sometimes it is nice not to have a plan. Life needs spontaneity.

Vanessa Laborin, 10

I associate with them pretty much everyday. There are a couple of kids of different races on my basketball team. I don’t really have a lot of close friends that are (though).

Jesse Smith, 12

“Probably just in my classes when I’m working with them. It seems racist I just never ended up with any Hispanic friends. It’s not a race thing.”

Ellie Gossage, 9

There are not a lot in my close circle of friends, but I associate with them pretty much every day.

Calloway May, 12

Compiled by Madison Gurley

People are individuals. It’s okay to deal with the ramifications of society in the realm of your personality.

Foreign Favorites

Compiled by Fawn Puhler

1

“My favorite thing about America is the food. I like Taco Bell the most because it’s not like Burger King, McDonald’s or Wendy’s. Taco Bell is better because it’s tasty and it has more ingredients in its food.” -Nerzius Anthony from St. Lucia

Orange&Black

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“I love the school. It’s so different from my school in Italy. Here you go from class to class, but in Italy we are stuck in one class all day. Here is really free, and I love the dances and all the activities that students are able to get involved in.” Alessandra Rossi from Italy

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“I love the people here because they are really nice. You can just talk to people here, especially the office ladies. In Germany, strangers don’t really talk to you as nicely as they do here.” -Sebastian Henn from Germany 10


Opinion

Production and consumption cycle endangers environment, people Madison Gurley

Americans have become lazy. We choose not to think about the consequences of mass consumption. In order to comply with the law of supply and demand, a linear system has been created. The linear system consists of the cultivation of natural resources, production, distribution and waste. This process, however, has many negative effects. Corporations produce immense amounts of pollution. And, the government today seems to protect them. The massive burning of essential resources such as oil, timber and water are necessary in order to produce the ridiculous amount of goods that Americans demand. This nasty fact will create a huge problem in the future. Depletion of resources and the toll that production has on the en-

CARS

CLOTHES

vironment will be detrimental on the earth in the future. However, most Americans have chosen to ignore this. The United States makes up only 5 percent of the world’s population but consumes 30 percent of the world’s natural resources. After depleting natural resources that are vital to human existence, companies add several of the 100,000 synthetic chemicals that are detrimental to the environment in order to keep their costs down. Further, products purchased bring thousands of harmful chemicals into consumer’s homes each day. Four million pounds of toxic chemicals are released each year from production in the United States. The distribution of goods causes even more pollution. The mass media perpetuates the cycle of consumption. Advertisements convince us we need more junk because everything we already have isn’t good enough. Major corporations like Wal-Mart are one of the best examples of how the linear system works. They employ object obsolescence, selling cheaply produced junk to a consumer who looks for cheap and convenient buys and keeps production costs at a minimum. Through object obsolescence they put out poorly made goods

CASH

designed to break so the consumer must go back to the store and buy more poorly made products, perpetuating the cycle. Continuing in ignorance will simply make this problem worse. The average American accumulates 4.5 pounds of garbage each day and this ridiculous amount creates more waste when it is taken to the dump to either be incinerated or left to sit. If incinerated, the toxins in the products are released into the atmosphere. Materials such as plastics never biodegrade, forever building up toxins. America’s consumption pattern creates a nasty cycle. The way to break the linear system is investing more in local business rather than big corporations. Graphics by Garrett Brown and Natalie Pipe

Study hall used ineffectively Fawn Puhler

Paper airplanes, condescending comments and rumors fly through study halls at warp speed. Study halls are not being used to their full advantage as nearly half of all freshmen have at least one D or F, and they are all required to take the class. Students who mess around in study hall are wasting their time and disrespecting others who care about using their time to study. Most know that there are more important ways to spend their time than origami jet fighter planes and paper cuts. There are 67 and a half hours of study hall scheduled for the half credit of the class required for graduation. Imagine what one could do with this wasted time if they used it efficiently. The daily 45 minutes of this class could

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be spent working on homework for class and help a student pass a class they would otherwise fail and retake. Retaking classes wastes valuable time that could be spent on moving forward and preparing for college classes and can be avoided with organization and concentration. Quiet is often needed for students to concentrate. Students should have the common courtesy to hush if there are a students working nearby. It is an issue of respect. Further, the current state of study

hall creates a mindset of procrastination. Students pick up the habit of not placing academics first because they socialize instead. Students should learn to use this time and prevent having to retrain themselves later in life. In college, study halls are not scheduled like in high school, and college students have to choose when and how they can study while balancing other aspects of life. Study halls are supposed to implement study skills, but its monitors spend their time battling cocky comebacks in their attempts to help students help themselves. Attempts to solve these problems such as seating

charts, confiscating phones and Parent Bridge observations do not aid a student in understanding their subject or raise their grades. Instead, mentors and teacher volunteers are needed to tutor students who are falling behind so the class would become less of a babysitting service and more of a step forward in education. It is in the students’ best interest to transform this current babysitting time into productive steps toward their futures by doing homework or preparing for tests. Make study hall worth more than paper airplanes. Graphic by Garrett Brown 11


Opinion

Props to:

-

Flops to:

-The themes of Blackout Spirit Week -Teachers occupying student parking spaces -Unorganized scheduling -The wave of Senioritis attacking the class of 2010 -Cutting off Miestersingers and West Winds when they sing the National Anthem at basketball games -Students throwing paper towels on the ceilings of the bathrooms -Pot holes going unrepaired in the alley -Disgarded chew in toilets and other “convenient” spots -Poor conditions at the Olympics -Students being disrespectful toward at teachers -FMHS students for booing at the GJHS poms team during halftime -No soap or paper towels and toilet paper in the bathrooms 12

Students and school cheers hypocritical Meaningless, derogatory and contradictory, all characteristics of our school cheers. As students of Grand Junction High School we have enjoyed making up many creative cheers. Derogatory in nature, these cheers are deemed inappropriate by school administrators although we students believe they express school spirit. Inevitably this has caused countless arguments and started petty controversy of no value. Subsequently, while whining about this futile issue, we have failed to see the bigger picture, hypocrisy. Every day we concern ourselves constantly with demonstrating school spirit and our high school’s prestige. Doing so is an essential part of our high school culture. However, we are hypocrites and contra-

dictory. We put so much effort into elevating our school’s image and try to render ourselves as the topmost schools in the valley. Contrary to our pride, we attempt to preach our school’s superiority through inappropriate chants that consequently bring shame to our school. We want to be a respected school. How are we to do so through bad sportsmanship and dim-witted rhymes? Students cannot get angry about the actions our school administrators have taken; they are only trying to uphold what dignity our school still retains. Do we Tigers not posses the

ability to construct more creative cheers than those that spell s-e-x, maybe cheers that truly demonstrate our genuine Tiger pride? I hope so. We Tigers must practice what we preach, PRIDE: Personal responsibility, Respect, Integrity, Dedication and Empathy, not bad sportsmanship through distasteful derogatory cheers. I challenge all the disgruntled students to STOP being hypocrites, stop whining, move on and practice what you preach: Tiger Pride! Dakota Hutchinson, senior

Have an opinion? Want to be heard? Email a letter to the editor at gjhsnews@gmail.com.

Banter

Gays in the military Gillian McLean: Did you hear that the government is trying to lift the ban against gays in the military? Cory Casselberry: Yeah! Go gays who want to yield guns. GM: No, this is a bad thing. They are too sensitive to handle heavy machinery. CC: Just because they are attracted to the same gender does not mean they cannot be trained to use a gun. GM: Being too sensitive does not mean they cry all the time. They just do not have what it takes to be rugged enough to shoot someone. CC: Well, if they cannot handle that, they should not join the military, but I am sure some of them can handle it. GM: I am not so sure. There is a reason this ban was put in place: to

Photo by Haleigh Jacobson

+ -The bubble machine at Blackout -NHS picking trash up before parent teacher conferences -Good sportsmanship at basketball games -Pep band playing at basketball games -The end of college application season -Jazz Band for holding the Jazz Dinner Dance -The hard work that has gone into “Willy Wonka” -A new and original location for Cottonball, and the unique theme, ‘Under the Sea’ -GJHS students who support their peers and classmates by attending “Willy Wonka” -Students who visit GJHSnews. com to stay informed about what is going on at GJHS -Students who have helped in Haitian relief projects -Students who balance a job and school

Letter to the editor

keep the wimps out. CC: I am sure there are already a lot of wimps in the military. GM: Only the strong survive in the military, and the wimps simply perish. CC: Just because they are gay does not mean they have no muscle mass. GM: Everyone has some sort of muscle mass, but they have to know how to use it in order to be in the military. CC: I think if they join the military they are willing to learn how to use their muscles, for the sake of justice. Orange&Black


Staff Editorial

Confrontation Avoiding confrontation hinders effective communication and problem solving

TEENAGERS, MORE THAN OTHERS, ARE QUICK TO COMPLAIN, SLOW TO ACT Poor communication and lack The next step involves confron- ments of effective communicaof understanding prevent effec- tation itself, which scares many tion. Making assumptions is easy, tive problem solving, and today’s away. Confronting problems is far more so than trying to dig up teenagers are especially plagued by difficult and requires confidence, the truth. so people create alterOther problems are solved most this. Mundane issues “Problems will not native solutions that effectively when the true root of between people only solve themselves help them avoid true those problems are exposed, which is done through effective commuexist because people with time; the confrontation. do not make the ef- only way to The easiest way to nication. fort to communicate solve problems deal with a problem Effective communication reeffectively. Whether is simply to ignore it quires that people make a concreated by this is out of sheer laand hope it goes away. scious effort to clarify their ideas ziness or hesitation to miscommunication Due to the nature of and ensure that the person on the confront an issue, it is through more most problems, leav- other end fully understands othcommunication. ” worsens problems. ing them unsolved ers’ ideas and thoughts. Both sides Simple miscomcauses them to fester, must focus to fix this. munication occurs not disappear. Over The solution to this is simply daily, and most of it naturally time, tension builds, overcommunication solves itself. However, some in- and problems worsand clarification, “Effective stances of miscommunication or en. which never hurt a total lack of communication do An equally easy communication situation. not naturally work themselves out way out is to compen- requires that Problems caused people make a and in fact grow even bigger. sate for the complete by miscommunicaToo common are the instances truth with half-truths conscious effort to tion only exist bein which a person has a problem and hints. cause people do not clarify their ideas with another person, and the frusHowever, these and ensure that confront them. The trated person avoids confronting only convolute situa- the person on the problems worsen the other; they usually justify this tions further. Truth is other end fully when they are further through complaining as if it is un- absolute, and it must avoided, the route understands.” solvable. be treated this way. usually taken. While acknowledging it is an People naturally Problems will not important step in the process, assume that other people un- solve themselves with time; the most people stop making the ef- derstand something just because only way to solve problems created fort to solve a problem at this they themselves do. Assumptions by miscommunication is through point. are one of the most basic impedi- more communication.

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Want your VOICE TO BE HEARD?

Write a LETTER TO THE EDITOR! Bring your LETTER to Room 141 or e-mail gjhsnews@gmail.com

GJHS Booster Club Supporting our Tigers since 1954 Investing in our kids’ tomorrow. . . today.

WHO BENEFITS FROM THE BOOSTER CLUB?

The GJHS Booster Club is somewhat unique in that it raises funds not only for student athletics, but all recognized student activities as well — from football to drama, from band to German Club, from Link Crew to Academic Team, from The Orange & Black newspaper to volleyball, from . . . well, you get the idea.

Booster Club has donated over $1,300,000 to Grand Junction High School Student Activities and Athletic Programs; $68,000 was donated just last year To continue this tradition of financial support, we need parent volunteers. Booster Club’s primary fundraiser is Bingo. Volunteers needed to work 1 or 2 sessions a month. Bingo is held on: — Wednesday evening at 7 p.m. — — Sunday afternoon at 12:30 and 3:30 p.m. — Junction Bingo 511 281/4 Road in Grand Junction

Contact Booster Club at gjhsbc@bresnan.net 14

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InSight

Lives blend as GJHS family adopt Haitian orphans

Graphic by Chelsea Shettler

The journey of adoption is one that is long, tedious and expensive, but also one that is incredibly rewarding. For sophomore TJ Downey and family, the process of adopting three Haitian orphans was fraught with worry and complications. Despite the obstacle of January’s earthquake, siblings Jose, Joselito and Juliana have found home at last.

Photo courtesy of Jennifer Eddins

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Photos by Haleigh Jacobson 15


Haitian orphans find home with GJHS student Kim Horwitz Jake Meyer

Sophomore TJ Downey and family adopt three siblings in hopes of giving them a better life

T

hree Haitian siblings hesitant when he first heard his run and play in the yard mother’s decision, but he soon of their new home in came to appreciate the idea of being an older sibling. Grand Junction. Less “At first I didn’t want to do it than a month ago, they were living because it was going to be such a in the destroyed city of Port au Prince, Haiti, not knowing if they huge change, but then I realized would ever see their adoptive family. that would be a really cool experiJose, Joselito and Juliana survived ence,” Downey said. “It’s cool to be the worst earthquake Haiti has an older brother, to be a protector experienced in a century. and just to be there for them.” In June, they traveled to Haiti The first shock of the massive to meet the children earthquake that hit Haiti on Jan. 12 caused ”At first I didn’t want of the orphanage. When Downey the walls of the For to do it because it and Eddins arrived, His Glory Orphanage was going to be such they were greeted in Port Au Prince to collapse. One hundred a huge change, but with a taste of the and thirty orphans Haitian culture. then I realized that and their caretakers “They met us on would be a really slept outside under a the porch singing to cool experience” tarp that night and for us in Creole,” Eddins many nights after. Desaid. After spendspite the destruction caused by the ing mere days with the orphans, quake, the three siblings were able Eddins felt a connection. to find hope in a GJHS family. “I fell in love with them,” In March 2009, sophomore TJ Eddins said. Downey and his mother, Jennifer “Jose is more outspoken and Eddins, decided to adopt three rambunctious. Joselito is the Haitian orphans. quieter one, but he has a “I feel really strongly about big heart,” Eddins said. helping these kids. I believe that “Juliana is stubborn, God was calling me to adopt. I was but she has two older drawn to it,” Eddins said. brothers and that typiDowney, an only child, was cal family relationship

Quickly adapting, brothers goof around on a sunny day in Grand Junction.

of having to stick up for yourself with two older dren’s native language, Creole, which is French culture. brothers is expected, but she is also very sweet.” slang with Spanish and African influences. Al“We are getting used to each Downey bonded with his new siblings as he though they began learning English in Haiti, the other. It’s weird being a big brother realized they are not so different from because I’m not used to family is faced with a language barrier. him. “We end up gesturing a lot, and sometimes it yet,” Downey said. “When we went “One day when we were visiting it is frustrating, but (we) are getting better every Eddins believes to pick up Thothem in Haiti, a car drove by and her adopted kids will day,” Eddins said. mas from school, The new family also differs in eating habits. it was bumping hip-hop. They got have opportunities for “We are going to be eating a lot of different really into it because they liked the education and success Joselito was saying foods now. It is kind of a challenge but they are beats,” Downey said. in the U.S. that were how Thomas is his unavailable in Haiti. Nine-year-old twins Jose and doing okay,” Eddins said. “The other day (the big brother; they kids) wanted a mayonnaise sandwich.” “(In the U.S.) they Joselito and eight-year-old Juliana are enamored with will get to go to college, Eddins hopes that her kid’s new lives will have lived in the For His Glory and I hope that they combine the best of their previous and curOrphanage for three years after their him.” would want to go back rent homes. Despite nerves over the brand new mother gave them up because she could no longer feed them. to Haiti experience, Downey is excited to be “We are getting to help people with the At the orphanage, they were provided with a part of his sibling’s lives. education they get here.” used to each other. showers, three daily meals and attended school “It’s cool and exciting, but I’m also kind of scared because it’s goEddins said. year round. It’s weird being a ing to be a whole new part of my Despite that Jose, January’s earthquake sent the adoption process big brother because life. I’m stoked because I get to see Joselito and Juliana will into a tailspin for Downey and Eddins. Much of I’m not used to it a totally different side of things,” grow up in a different the essential adoption paperwork was lost when yet” culture, Eddins hopes Downey said. the U.S. Embassy was destroyed. her kids stay close to Jose, Joselito and Juliana are After weeks of confusion and waiting, Jose, Joselito and Juliana escaped their demolished their roots. equally excited about their new family. homeland and met their new family. “We really want to keep their “When we went to pick up Thomas from In Grand Junction, all three siblings are facing heritage [strong] so they don’t forget school, Joselito was saying how Thomas is his big challenges as they adjust to a new family and where they came from.” brother; they are enamored with him,” Eddins said. Part of that culture is the chilDowney and his mother are trying to slowly introduce American culture. “I’m kind of worried about them. I want them to feel comfortable in their new life,” Downey said. All three kids are starting school at Tope Elementary on Monday, two weeks after arriving in Grand Junction. The entire adoption process has changed Downey’s outlook on life. “I now want to adopt when

Shy Juliana earns a smile from mom Eddins as her older brothers play in the yard with their new brother TJ.

I’m older. I can give these kids a chance (at a better life). They come from such poor countries, and here they have a chance to make something of themselves,” Downey said.


Haitian orphans find home with GJHS student Kim Horwitz Jake Meyer

Sophomore TJ Downey and family adopt three siblings in hopes of giving them a better life

T

hree Haitian siblings hesitant when he first heard his run and play in the yard mother’s decision, but he soon of their new home in came to appreciate the idea of being an older sibling. Grand Junction. Less “At first I didn’t want to do it than a month ago, they were living because it was going to be such a in the destroyed city of Port au Prince, Haiti, not knowing if they huge change, but then I realized would ever see their adoptive family. that would be a really cool experiJose, Joselito and Juliana survived ence,” Downey said. “It’s cool to be the worst earthquake Haiti has an older brother, to be a protector experienced in a century. and just to be there for them.” In June, they traveled to Haiti The first shock of the massive to meet the children earthquake that hit Haiti on Jan. 12 caused ”At first I didn’t want of the orphanage. When Downey the walls of the For to do it because it and Eddins arrived, His Glory Orphanage was going to be such they were greeted in Port Au Prince to collapse. One hundred a huge change, but with a taste of the and thirty orphans Haitian culture. then I realized that and their caretakers “They met us on would be a really slept outside under a the porch singing to cool experience” tarp that night and for us in Creole,” Eddins many nights after. Desaid. After spendspite the destruction caused by the ing mere days with the orphans, quake, the three siblings were able Eddins felt a connection. to find hope in a GJHS family. “I fell in love with them,” In March 2009, sophomore TJ Eddins said. Downey and his mother, Jennifer “Jose is more outspoken and Eddins, decided to adopt three rambunctious. Joselito is the Haitian orphans. quieter one, but he has a “I feel really strongly about big heart,” Eddins said. helping these kids. I believe that “Juliana is stubborn, God was calling me to adopt. I was but she has two older drawn to it,” Eddins said. brothers and that typiDowney, an only child, was cal family relationship

Quickly adapting, brothers goof around on a sunny day in Grand Junction.

of having to stick up for yourself with two older dren’s native language, Creole, which is French culture. brothers is expected, but she is also very sweet.” slang with Spanish and African influences. Al“We are getting used to each Downey bonded with his new siblings as he though they began learning English in Haiti, the other. It’s weird being a big brother realized they are not so different from because I’m not used to family is faced with a language barrier. him. “We end up gesturing a lot, and sometimes it yet,” Downey said. “When we went “One day when we were visiting it is frustrating, but (we) are getting better every Eddins believes to pick up Thothem in Haiti, a car drove by and her adopted kids will day,” Eddins said. mas from school, The new family also differs in eating habits. it was bumping hip-hop. They got have opportunities for “We are going to be eating a lot of different really into it because they liked the education and success Joselito was saying foods now. It is kind of a challenge but they are beats,” Downey said. in the U.S. that were how Thomas is his unavailable in Haiti. Nine-year-old twins Jose and doing okay,” Eddins said. “The other day (the big brother; they kids) wanted a mayonnaise sandwich.” “(In the U.S.) they Joselito and eight-year-old Juliana are enamored with will get to go to college, Eddins hopes that her kid’s new lives will have lived in the For His Glory and I hope that they combine the best of their previous and curOrphanage for three years after their him.” would want to go back rent homes. Despite nerves over the brand new mother gave them up because she could no longer feed them. to Haiti experience, Downey is excited to be “We are getting to help people with the At the orphanage, they were provided with a part of his sibling’s lives. education they get here.” used to each other. showers, three daily meals and attended school “It’s cool and exciting, but I’m also kind of scared because it’s goEddins said. year round. It’s weird being a ing to be a whole new part of my Despite that Jose, January’s earthquake sent the adoption process big brother because life. I’m stoked because I get to see Joselito and Juliana will into a tailspin for Downey and Eddins. Much of I’m not used to it a totally different side of things,” grow up in a different the essential adoption paperwork was lost when yet” culture, Eddins hopes Downey said. the U.S. Embassy was destroyed. her kids stay close to Jose, Joselito and Juliana are After weeks of confusion and waiting, Jose, Joselito and Juliana escaped their demolished their roots. equally excited about their new family. homeland and met their new family. “We really want to keep their “When we went to pick up Thomas from In Grand Junction, all three siblings are facing heritage [strong] so they don’t forget school, Joselito was saying how Thomas is his big challenges as they adjust to a new family and where they came from.” brother; they are enamored with him,” Eddins said. Part of that culture is the chilDowney and his mother are trying to slowly introduce American culture. “I’m kind of worried about them. I want them to feel comfortable in their new life,” Downey said. All three kids are starting school at Tope Elementary on Monday, two weeks after arriving in Grand Junction. The entire adoption process has changed Downey’s outlook on life. “I now want to adopt when

Shy Juliana earns a smile from mom Eddins as her older brothers play in the yard with their new brother TJ.

I’m older. I can give these kids a chance (at a better life). They come from such poor countries, and here they have a chance to make something of themselves,” Downey said.


Connection

Lifestyles & Relationships Photo courtesy of MCTCampus

How to know a relationship is ready for sex: Partners are physically and mentally ready. Some people claim they are ready to have sex at age 16, while others are ready at age 20. It is different for everyone. If there are any doubts, then wait.

How could a member of the opposite sex grab your attention?

Partying

Three ways to be noticed 18

Abby Jennings, 12

I’m not trying to sound shallow, but if they’re pretty, maybe a babe, that helps, outgoing and looks like Megan Fox.

Kaitlin Cain It is finally Friday night, and after a long week of school it is time to unwind and relieve the week’s stress. Going out with friends to parties is a common social activity that many high school students partake in. For one anonymous Grand Junction High School senior, partying is just another part of being a teenager. “I party because I like to have a good time. I dance, I play beer pong and have fun while drinking with my best friends,” she said. The senior says her friends take safety precautions at their parties to prevent unfortunate incidents. “I worry about getting (a Minor In Possession), but the parties I go to, we lay down the law. We take your keys, (and) you have to stay for the night,” the senior said. Although many teenagers say they “lay down the law,” a teen’s possession or consumption of alcohol can result in more than the misdemeanor charge on a personal record. The charge also includes a fine up to $250, up to 24 hours of community service, alcohol treatment or alcohol classes and driver’s license suspension. However safe partygoers try to be, different types of accidents could occur while drinking alcohol. “One time, I woke up clueless on the floor in the laundry room with a guy. I was so confused, and the fact that I woke up by a guy I barely knew, scared me. I got up, got my keys and left. (Later) he told me we had sex, but I didn’t remember. I was terrified that I might be pregnant or have an STD,” the senior said. The fun of partying may result from both the social and drinking aspects, but serious consequences accompany this “good time” no matter the precautions taken.

When they are a proper gentlemen. The yes ma’ams and no ma’ams. It’s more about the way they make me feel.

Personal values are considered. Think about it beforehand, and figure out the reasons to have sex. The consequences of a first sexual experience will reflect those reasons. Consider religious views and moral values as a couple. If the decision might turn into a regret, then wait.

Evan Mok-Lamme, 9

When someone is genuine about who they are and what they are passionate about, that is most definitely an attention grabber. Dani Perry, 12

I like it when they’re flirtatious, clean cut, and have some personal hygeine. Extra niceness and a good sense of humor is number one.

Kyle Klements, 11

Risks and consequences are understood. Pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases are some of the most serious. Couples who understand these should practice safe sex by using contraceptives. If these sources of protection are unavailable, sex is less safe.

When people post a lot of stuff on Facebook or Myspace it catches my attention, just not always in a good way.

Lexi Anderson, 10

Compiled by Kaitlin Cain

Be confident. People will care of appearances. Show some charm. Try to 2 Take 3 put 1 Along with how one carries always respect and look up a smile on their face by themselves, looks are the first thing to someone who is confident. telling jokes or complimenting

An assertive person is more attractive than someone who is not sure of themselves.

that others notice. A person who takes care of themselves is more attractive because they appear to be more likely to take care of others.

them. Make them feel special, and pay attention to them. It is hard to ignore someone who is genuinely kind.

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The Alex Proietti Thirteen years of senior Hannah Potter’s life have been spent attending public school. However, this could not prepare her for the untraditional path she is taking for the next four years of her life as a girl in the military. “Serving our country is what I want to do,” Potter, 18, said. Potter has high aspirations for herself in the Army, one of which is to become a health care specialist after her four-year service. “I volunteered at the (Veteran Association Hospital) all of my freshman year, so hearing all the stories and pride (the veterans) gained from (serving), I knew I wanted to do it,” Potter said. With tremendous support from her family and friends, Potter is ready to take the next step in her life. She has been preparing for boot camp, where she will begin her journey in the Army. To prepare, she is working out with a trainer and hopes to beat the boys. “I’m training three times a week and studying. I got a tutor to study my ASVAB (Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery), which is the test you have to take to get in,” Potter said. “The more tests you pass (before you go in), you can get up higher, and you are paid more. So, if I can pass the boys’ test, get a good score on my ASVAB and do drills before I go in, I can be ranked higher,” Potter said. Girls are often thought to be at a disadvantage in the military, which is the reason Potter is driven to pass the boys’ test. “(Girls) cannot do as many jobs as the boys,” Potter said. “But I love (being a girl in

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Connection

Calls and Hannah Potter answers

the army). It gives me a sense of independence and that I am strong.” Potter is looking forward to the traveling and the training she will receive and all the experience she will gain. “I hope I am on a beach,” Potter said with a laugh. “But, the schooling without having to sit in a college will be really nice,

too.” Potter is both nervous and excited to leave for the military. “(I am scared) of not coming back and leaving my family and friends. It is going to be hard, but I’m pretty confident,” Potter said. Potter has a great support system with her family and friends, who have helped her on the journey thus far. “(My family) is really supportive of me. My mom is really pumped about it,” Potter said. “My friends are pretty OK with it, too. I mean, they don’t want me to leave, but they are pretty supportive of it.” Fortunately, she is not alone in this experience and has friends who can relate to it. “My friend just went into boot camp two weeks ago, and our other family friend is in the military also,” Potter said. Potter is excited about going into the Army and fulfilling her goals. “(Being in the Army) is serving your country and protecting people, and I think you gain a lot out of the experience,” Potter said. “After I get out, I have a guaranteed job at any VA hospital (as a health care specialist),” she said. Potter has plans for her future and is taking all necessary steps to achieve her goals of serving her country, as well as preparing for life after her service.

Photos by Haleigh Jacobson 19


Connection

Photo courtesy of MCTCampus and Wikipedia

sexting:

{the act of sending sexually explicit text messages or photos between cell phones}

*

Sexting at Grand Junction High School is a prevalent issue. Here are the details to truly understand what it entails and what legal issues it presents.

One GJHS student’s sexting experience Maria LeFebre “It got started with me and this kid dating for a long time, and he was like ‘send me a picture.’ Then someone took his phone and just sent it to everybody,” said one GJHS student, who wishes to remain anonymous, about her sexting experience. She, like many other teens who sext, had no intention for others to see the picture and was upset and embarassed when she found out that the picture had gone beyond her boyfriend. The picture quickly spread throughout the GJHS student population and had significant

consequences for the rest of the student’s year. “(I felt) sick to my stomach. Half the teachers at the school saw it and gave me (crap) during class. I didn’t want to come to school at all. It was horrible. I would go home crying.” For this student, gossip was unavoidable whether she was at home or at school. “People would text me from random numbers and be like ‘hey, nice picture.’ So I just put my phone away for a month just to try to get away from it.” From this firsthand experience, this student realized the embarrassment that others have felt when pictures have been passed around. “I never send pictures (anymore). It’s so pointless.” She wishes that others would have had the empathy

Out of 100 students at GJHS

31% 42% 65% 47% 51% 20

have sent a dirty picture message have sent a dirty text message have received a dirty picture or text message would be embarrassed if their parents read their messages say texting is their primary method of communication

for her that she has now. “If I see a picture or hear about it going around, I tell everyone to stop sending it because it’s a bad situation to be in.” Teens must decide how they are going to let a situation effect them. In this case, the student learned from her decisions and has grown because of it. “(It made me) stronger but weaker at the same time. I know I’ve learned from the situation, but people still talk about it and it’s upsetting when someone brings it up. I definitely regret it, but everybody makes stupid decisions, and you learn from them, which I did. It happens, but it’s really hard.” Though sexting may seem innocent, it can lead to a devastating situation for those involved. Hopefully other students will learn from this experience as well and have more compassion for students who suffer from a bad decision that they now regret.

The consequences of sexting:

* *

Teens who forward pictures of minors or send photos of themselve while they are under 18 could face prosecution for obscenity or child pornography. If convicted, they must register as a sex offender.

*

Sexting can cause a relationship to progress much faster than it would in person, pressuring couples into performing sexual acts with which they are uncomfortable.

Though many inappropriate pictures are sent under the impression that they will remain private, many end up on the internet or are forwarded to other people. Not only is this emotionally traumatizing, pictures can be notoriously difficult to remove, possibly affecting future employment.

Source ABCNews.com

Orange&Black


Connection

An entire day without texting One intrepid O&B reporter explores life without a cell phone Maria LeFebre

Monday, 10:24 p.m:

As I prepare myself for tomorrow, the idea of it hangs over me heavily. Tomorrow I must give up my phone. I must turn it off tonight before I go to bed and leave it on my nightstand when I leave for school. I must forge fearlessly through my day, phone-less. How will I keep track of the time in the morning before the school day starts? What will I do in less important classes, if not play brickbreaker? I have already solved the problem of lunch time by making plans today and planning to meet in the commons. How will I get through a block of chemistry, isolated from reality for an hour and a half, lacking any means of communication with the world outside the cave of a classroom? I might actually have to deal with those awkward situations that I always try to make less awkward by pretending to text someone. This will not be fun.

12:24 p.m:

Tuesday, 6:50 a.m:

“Embrace this opportunity to unplug yourself from the world,” my mom tells me over breakfast. “It will be a good experience.” I roll my eyes, but as I get ready to leave, I think about what she said. Maybe I really can learn from this.

7:20 a.m:

Knowing that I don’t have my phone today, friends tell me they are going to send me very important texts all day and that I will be severely missing out. One even offers to give me his phone, saying “we’re working the system.”

10:04 a.m:

Normally I would be sending a text to confirm my lunch plans for today. I forgetfully reach into my pocket to check up with my friends, only to be disappointed. I nevously wonder if they will forget me.

10:45 a.m: I walk to the commons, hoping that my lunch date is easy to find. I hate being the fool who wanders aimlessly for several long, painful minutes before finding who they’re looking for. Mission accomplished. I realize that technology is really not needed in this situation, just confidence and trust.

I feel like I have made it successfully through my phone-less day so far. But a problem presents itself when I go to check out an Orange & Black camera for the basketball game tonight. There are no cameras left in the camera closet. I have to borrow a phone from someone to text a photographer so I can ask them for a camera.

9:18 p.m:

Over the course of this day, I instinctively reached for my phone 13 times. When I finally turn my phone back on, messages come in for 10 minutes. I count 35 new messages.

Conclusion: It was inconvenient for me to not use a phone today, given the circumstances. Through this experience, I have learned that once one becomes addicted to technology, it is nearly impossible to stop using it. It is very difficult for someone who is used to having the luxury of texting to go a day without it, but maybe I could learn to live without it. Or maybe not.

The L ve Lounge The Love Lounge is an innovative Q&A responselike method for the student body to have a chance to receive relationship advice. Each issue, a female lounge guest and Grayson B. O’Roark will respond to these questions. “I have recently had some troubles in my long distance relationship with my girlfriend of nine, maybe ten months, but who is counting? We send each other the names of songs that are really sweet and supposed to explain our feelings for each other, but she sent me one last week that tripped me up. “Let Me See the Booty” by The Dream is not the kind of song that is on the emotional level I am looking for from her, and I don’t know if I should be offended or not.“ -Anonymous Orange&Black

Fawn Puhler

It seems like your girlfriend is uncertain of where your relationship is on the emotional level, so let her know that you are looking for more depth from her. Actions speak louder than words, so if she has sent you sweet songs like, “Truly Madly Deeply,” by Savage Garden in the past, she clearly cares for you and is probably trying to make you laugh. It is complimentary that she would want to see your booty in the first place, so you could continue the joke and send her, “Baby Got Back,” by Sir Mix-A-Lot.

Grayson O’Roark First off, I am going to flag you down on the “who is counting” statement. If you are more concerned with some song that may be a joke than you are with the timetable of your relationship, you may want to check yourself before you wreck yourself. As for your main issue, I would straight up disregard her one emotional lapse. However, if she continues to hit you with subpar songs, you may want to holla at her. For the time being, I think the nine to ten month timetable shows you guys are too good to be phased by a minor off beat song.

21


Now

Current Events

Political changes Gov. Bill Ritter recently announced he will not seek re-election for a second term so he can spend more time with his family. “This (decision) will allow me to concentrate on the things that are most important,” Ritter said.

How has President Barak Obama performed his first year in office?

He hasn’t lived up to what he promised, but nonetheless, he’s done a pretty good job.

Sean Silva, 12

It’s too soon to tell. Real damage has been done to our country, and he can’t fix everything at once.

Haiti Hurt Ben Peterson The country of Haiti was hit by the deadliest natural disaster in five years and the seventh deadliest earthquake of all time on Jan. 12. With the epicenter of the 7.0 magnitude earthquake only 16 miles away, the Haitian capital of Port-au-Prince suffered the heaviest damage. 170,000 bodies have been accounted for in Haiti. According to the UN, an estimated 1 million people were left in need of shelter. Because of the widespread destruction in Haiti, the American Red Cross almost immediately ran out of supplies, requesting more only one day after the quake. Fifty three nations have sent or pledged aid to the crippled island, including $130 million and two warships from Canada, 20,000 tons of rice from Thailand, 2,200 pounds of tea from Sri Lanka, and a region in Senegal for Haitians to move to. To help the relief effort, GJHS students have started collecting money. Blair Thurman, junior, has begun passing around a hat during class, raising funds for the relief effort. “We have so much that we take for granted. If we just give a little bit, it can make a big impact,” Thurman said. It is estimated that it will take at least one generation to completely rebuild the Haitian cities, but the combined relief effort from the various nations around the world is doing all that they can to bring relief to the damaged nation.

President Obama plans to overhaul the No Child Left Behind education law. In his budget plan for 2010, Obama proposed assessing student growth from one year to the next. Schools who perform well will receive incentives and rewards.

Allisyn Thompson, 10

He hasn`t done anything at all. He is just sitting around.

Cordero Marez, 9

He has had a lot of difficulties to deal with, but so far he’s done a good job.

Republican Scott Brown has been elected to fill the late Edward Kennedy’s U.S. Senate seat for Massachusetts. His promise to use his crucial vote to block the Democrats’ congressionial health care reform bill helped him secure the seat.

Joey Frampton, 11

Frankly, I think he’s the most dangerous president we’ve had in recent American history.

Paul Harmon, 11

Compiled by Ben Peterson

Three Cool Clubs

Photos courtesy of MCT Campus and Wikipedia

22

1

Interested in rockets, robotics, forensics, or biology? Science club is an excellent way to get involved in these subjects. “We have speakers come in from different venues,” Ms. McDougal, Science Club sponsor, said. The club meets every Monday at lunch in room 502.

2

French Club offers a more in-depth study of the French language and culture. Mardi Gras is a big focus, and the club watches movies and has special French food days. They also go on a trip to France over the summer. They meet every Thursday in Room 203 at lunch.

3

German Club gives members a taste of German culture beyond what is offered in the classroom and a broader view of the German language. Activities include working Oktoberfest and foreign exchange. Orange&Black


Fast Track Run Out?

Now

School financed higher education opportunities now limited due to budget cuts Alex Tennant

With limitations scheduled to be added to the Fast Track program next year, budget cuts will soon start to affect students’ education more than ever. Currently, Fast Track allows students who have completed all of their graduation requirements and have scored at least a 19 on every sub-score of the ACT to attend classes at Mesa State College full time, paid for by District 51. Without certainty as to the future However, starting next year, District 51 will of Fast Track, counselors struggle to only offer funding for students to Fast Track give students scheduling advice. for one semester with a maximum of 13 cred“With some of the changes being its, according to Carol Bergman, counselor. made right now, we don’t know Though the new restrictions the effects that they on the Fast Track program may will have on students, “(Limiting Fast be disappointing, they will help which makes it hard Track) is a good allow the District to meet next for us to advise sophoway to save money. mores,” Plantiko said. year’s budget. The amount of “(Limiting Fast Track) is a The elimination of good way to save money. The money (that will be Fast Track would likely amount of money (that will be saved) is huge. I feel hit students hard. saved) is huge,” Counselor Lori “(Not having Fast that the AP classes Track) limits students’ Plantiko said. “I feel that the AP help students more abilities to excel. A lot classes help students more when they look at college entrance and . . . than the classes of people can’t pay for scholarships than the classes at college so (eliminatat Mesa do.” Mesa do.” ing Fast Track) limits AP classes may offer students the number of people many benefits, but it is still preferable to keep who can go because when students the Fast Track program up and running. get credits out of the way (in high “Its better to have (the Fast Track program) school) they don’t have to pay as reduced than eliminated,” Principal Jon Bilbo much for college,” sophomore Bailey said. Hilty said. However, according to Plantiko, it is posIf further cuts are made to Fast sible that further budget cuts may mandate Track, it may force students to turn more limitations. to other options.

Orange&Black

and we want to continue to get “I think a lot of students go to Mesa before they’ve really exhausted as creative as we can so that we their options here,” School-to-Career can keep offering them,” Executive Director Bill Coordinator Cathy Larsen said. Larsen said. “(The “We really Although not all Fast Track program) may eventustudents have explored believe that ally have a different all of their options post secondary name, and it may at GJHS before Fast opportunities are eventually look a Tracking, they have all benefited tremendously great, and we want little different, but to continue to get I don’t see it going from the program. completely away.” “(Fast Tracking) as creative as we has prepared me a lot The changes can so that we better for when I’m scheduled to be can keep offering on my own at college made to Fast Track and not living with my them.” will allow students to continue benparents,” senior Emilie efiting from the Pearson said. “It gives program while also providing you a taste of what college is like the school with a way to fulfill without overwhelming you. Though Fast Track may be at risk budget cuts. of getting cut, its wide range of benefits will likely prevent it from being completely dismissed. “(The school board and the administration) really believe that post Photo by Claire Cooper secondary opportunities are great, 23


Now

Teachers going, going gone Retirement incentive sends longtime GJHS teachers into retirement Kimberlyn Bennett

“Classes are already overcrowded, (and) if they put inexperienced teachers in, we’ll lose knowledge, and it will be harder for us in college,” Calloway May, senior, said. However Hauschulz thinks that the opportunity could be beneficial. “Moving on . . . gives (new teachers) a chance,” he said. Hauschulz and fellow art teacher Susan Metzger are both accepting the retirement incentive. “I’ve seen a lot of principals come and go and (Bilbo is) a good one. He’ll hire good teachers,” Hauschulz said. GJHS social studies teacher Jerry Unverferth, who is retiring this year but the incentive, Retirement incentive information without has mixed feelings about new teachers takFaculty members who are 50 years old and ing positions. have been a district employee for at least 15 “Inexperienced years before June 30, 2010 are qualified for the teachers also bring incentive. Alternatively, teachers who are on fresh ideas, but I’d step 13 of the pay scale and are one stipulation also hate to see the above are also eligible. experience leave too,”

24

Photo courtesy of Gary Hauschulz

G

ary Hauschulz, current GJHS art teacher, stares thoughtfully at a tiger one of his first classes painted. His voice becomes distant as he speaks of the group of students who painted the piece. Hauschulz has taught 25 years worth of students whose artwork covers the halls of GJHS. However, Hauschulz will not be returning next year. With an $8 to $12 million budget shortage, District 51 has had to create alternative means to make up for the deficit, one of which is a retirement incentive for certain District 51 employees. Faculty members who are 50 years old and have been a district employee for at least 15 years before June 30, 2010, are qualified for the incentive. Alternatively, teachers who are on Step 13 of the pay scale and are one stipulation above are also eligible. The incentive would give extra benefits for qualified retiring staff members. “(We will) give them a pretty nice deal if they decide to retire,” said Kirtland. Eighty-four percent of district expenses come from salaries and benefits. In an effort to save money, retiring teacher’s positions would be filled with lower-waged teachers. “They can hire two beginning teachers for my salary,” retiring food science teacher Susan Unverferth said. However, this loss of teachers also means a loss of experience. “As an administrator, I don’t want to lose teachers with 20, 25 years of experience unless they want to leave,” Jon Bilbo, GJHS principal, said. Some GJHS students are opposed to the idea.

Retiring Art teachers Gary Hauschluz, Susan Metzger and Sal Salas stand in front of GJHS in 2000. mer,” Susan Unverferth said. Unverferth said. Another teacher who plans Although positions may be filled to take a vacation sometime in with new teachers, some positions may not be occupied at all next year. the near future, is art teacher Sal Salas. Nevertheless, Salas will be retiring District 51 believes You don’t do this most general teachat the end of the year ing positions will be for 32 years and after teaching for 32 taken, according to years, 20 of which not miss this. It’s Kirtland. were spent at GJHS. who I am. However, the ex“You don’t do this act effects of the refor 32 years and not tirement incentive are still unknown miss it. It’s who I am,” Salas said. until March, according to Bilbo. He has plans to move on and Susan Unverferth is not worried spend his time in the student about the prospects of her classes no teacher program at Mesa State. longer being taught. Metzger also has plans for “Our department has always her future after GJHS. been really full, so I’m not worried,” “This is time where we’ll be she said. able to do our own artwork,” she Without concern for next year’s said. position issues, Unverferth is retiring Hauschulz looks forward to with peace of mind. Next year, she spending his time the same way and husband plan to travel, which but will miss GJHS. includes spending a month at a “I think I’ve become a Tiger,” California beach with their grandhe said. children. “I think it’ll be an endless sum-

Orange&Black


• Dental Implants

Dave F. Proietti, D.D.S., P.C.

Diplomate, American Board of Orthodontics 2558 Patterson Road Grand Junction, CO 81505

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25


InMotion

Sports & Health Photo by Haleigh Jacobson

Winter sports wrap-up Hannah Kimmel Hours in chlorine-saturated water, propelling forward in the pool is not for everyone. Swimming, with its necessary high endurance that can leave the participants physically drained, is not an easy sport. Anna Mercado, junior, was a part of Grand Junction High School girl’s swim and dive team this year, regardless of her poor depth perception and sensory integration dysfunction. Sensory integration dysfunction is a neurological disorder which affects the way the five basic senses of the body are processed. Her disorder “seemed like ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell’ because it’s something you never know if the person will want to talk about,” teammate and fellow junior Jordyn Madsen said. As a swimmer, Mercado showed tremendous growth. “Anna went from hardly being able to swim to swimming a 100 meter butterfly, which is tough. She is impress for her skill level,” said Madsen. Mercado did not only leave an impact upon Madsen with her development as a swimmer, but also with her personality....

An athlete’s quick food fix:

Who is the best professional athlete?

Athletes must keep hydrated and nourished. Here are some tips for doing so.

My favorite is Mark Sanchez because he is a rookie and went to USC. When he was in college, he was my favorite college quarterback.

1. Protein Shake Blend together frozen or fresh raspberries, ice, milk, yogurt, a splash of vanilla, protein powder, a banana or other fruits.

Dylan Lucas, 9

Derek Jeter. He’s a great baseball player and inspires me to try harder. And the Yankees are my favorite team.

Dylana Gross, 11

2. Protein Bar Protein bars are widely available. Keep a few handy in case of an energy deficiency.

Brett Favre because he works really hard to be as old as he is and still be one of the NFL’s best quarterbacks.

Kamron Medina, 11

Roger Federer because he dominates his sport with class.

Charlie Reicks, 12

3. Dried Fruits Dried apricots have lots of protein and are perfect to snack on between classes or before practice.

LeBron James. He is amazing at what he does. He also helps people that don’t have as much as others. He’s really humble.

Marcus Wirth, 10

What 100 calories looks like

To read the rest of the story, visit GJHSNews.com.

26

1

25 PISTACHIOS. Each pistachio nut has four calories and is high in protein. The fat content of nuts can be high, but it is typically monounsaturated fat, which lowers cholesterol.

2

HALF OF A HERSHEY’S MILK CHOCOLATE BAR. Besides the taste that many people craze, antioxidants are abundant in chocolate, according to Hershey’s website.

3

TWO CUPS OF STRAWBERRIES. Fruits are generally full of minerals, vitamins and other nutrients in addition to their low number of calories.

Orange&Black


In Motion

Damages of athletic injuries Gillian McLean Alyssa Behrens They shatter dreams and end from a successful swimming career. careers. They ruin scholarships and “Breaking a wrist or collarbone change the course of a life. Injuries does not even compare with the are always at the forefront of an mind-numbing pain associated with athlete’s mind, a constant threat to totaling (my) knee,” Pearo said. their future and well being. GJHS Recovering from a broken bone student athletes are no exception. takes no more than a few months, Senior Renata Cote but recovering from “Injuries are the is a diver, and for her torn ligaments may the threat of an injury take over a year, often worst thing that became a reality. She involving surgery. can happen in recently ruptured her However, Pearo’s sports, but they eardrum and damaged circumstances have left make you want to him with permanent the mallus bone inside damage in the long her ear, ending her get stronger and run. senior year of diving. better so it never His sophomore seaHer aspiration this year happens again.” son of swimming only was to compete at the consisted of one meet. state tournament, but For the remainder of the season hindered by her injury, she sat on he provided moral support for his the pool deck, watching her team teammates. continue without her. “I was immensely angry and frus“Being so close to the water and trated watching my team, wishing the (diving) boards, but (unable) to touch them is torture,” Cote said. I could have been participating,” If Cote got any water in her ear, Pearo said. or if her ear experienced too much Pearo is now pushing through the pain in an attempt to compete with pressure, it would damage her ear his teammates this spring. and lead to surgery. She was faced High school athletes imagine with difficult circumstances. themselves to be invincible and often “I saw in my head three years when they become injured, they try of working my (butt) off was now to ignore the damage and continue pointless,” Cote said. Cote’s situaplaying. tion is a prime example “I was immensely “Some (athletes) of an athlete slowed have trouble acceptdown by an injury, but angry and the image of them injuries are a common frustrated watching ing barrier for high school being injured, they my team, wishing athletes. reimagine the injury, I could have been Junior Cyrus Pearo and replay the injury has a list of injuries to occurring in their participating.” his knees that occurred head,” Dr. Mitchell over the course of his Copeland said. sports career. He tore his ACL and Charlie Willett, junior, is yet MCL in his right knee, his ACL, another athlete that has worked MCL and lateral meniscus in his through the challenges of a sports left knee, all during his freshmen injury. and sophomore years. Pearo spent a “Injuries are the worst thing that can happen in sports, but they make lengthy amount of time recovering you want to get stronger and better from his right knee injury, only to so it never happens again, which in injure his left knee not long after. These obstacles are keeping Pearo turn improves your performance,”

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Photo illustration by Alyssa Behrens and Claire Cooper

Willett said. During the first football game of the season, Willett dislocated his shoulder and tore his labrum, forcing him to sit on the sidelines and rehabilitate for the remainder of the season, ending his junior year of fall and winter sports. “The only positive thing about being injured is working harder than you ever have so it doesn’t happen

again,” Willett said. GJHS athletes are aware of the imminent threat of injuries while playing; yet they play anyway. Injuries can be building blocks for an athlete’s career, a way for them to reflect their past, and anticipate their future. After an injury, an athlete must get back to their sport, get over their fear, and enhance what they do best. 27


In Motion

Injury prevention

Athletes affected by injury Renata Coté “I was prepping my front one and a half fulls, when I decided to throw one, I lost balance, and when I opened my eyes the water was right below me. To avoid the slap, I turned my head and the water ruptured my eardrum.”

Photos and graphics by Haleigh Jacobson and Kyle Rogers

Gillian McLean

28

There are many ways to become injured, but first athletes need to consider how they can prevent injuries. “Start with conditioning and strength training prior to any season. Preparing your overall strength, balance and endurance is very important in all sports,” Dr. Michael Reeder said. Most coaches stick to the routine of conditioning and strength training, but if they do not teach the correct technique, that itself can bring injury. In addition athletes need to remain flexible because excessive muscle tightness can lead to injury. The reader also stredded that working on conditioning before injury is better than working on conditioning after an injury. Athletes are not fond of being out of the game, and none of them enjoy the pain of an injury. Take these steps to remain pain free and in the game.

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, these eight steps are a great start to preventing injuries: Wear the right gear Strengthen muscles Increase flexibility Use proper technique Take breaks Play safe Stop the activity if there is pain Avoid heat injury by drinking plenty of fluids before, during and after exercise.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Charlie Willett “Going through an injury like this is something I pray never happens again. The only thing positive thing about being injured is working harder than you ever have so it does not happen again, and you can take advantage of all the chances you get to play.”

Cyrus Pearo “My injury permanently set me back. My knees will never be 100 percent again, but I am thankful I at least have a chance to swim again.”

Orange&Black


The

4-1 - 1

Sports

from the fans in the stands

The fans’ perspective on different sporting events at GJHS

The

Gridiron

The

Hardwood

The

Diamond

To many Americans, watching football is more than just coming together to watch a sport. Watching football is an entire social event in itself. In high school, this is certainly true. At the majority of the games, the “student section,” the area dedicated to student fans, overflows and infiltrates the seats of other observers. Students become fans at the games for more than a love of watching the actual sport - they love the atmosphere as well. The atmosphere at football games, according to senior Brendan Ryan, is an “uncontrollable chaos that fills the stadium, spreading like a virus as every single person there yells and screams like crazy.” “Even though the sport creates the atmosphere of the crowd, I’d have to say I go to games for the atmosphere,” said Ryan. Although the football games were “exciting to watch” as well as one of sophomore Alicia Copp’s “favorite sports to watch,” the school spirit is what guides Copp to the football games. Stating it as an obvious fact, Copp said, “I think football is the most important sport to go to because it’s what we start off with at the beginning of the school year. And it’s the biggest sport!” The raw energy at football games transfers with the crowd to basketball, and some like junior Kevin Martin prefer to watch basketball. The enclosed space of a basketball court, allowing the crowd to stand mere inches away from the action of the game, makes a difference to the fans’ experience. “At basketball games, you are closer to the game and can see everything that happens. It is also inside so the weather doesn’t affect it. It’s like football though because they are both intense and have a lot of cheering,” Martin said. Martin contines to say, “It’s just more fun to watch than football. It’s more up close and personal.” Like football, fans either go to watch the sport, go for the feeling generated from the crowd or, like senior Johnny Kaley, go for a combination. “Some people I’ve noticed don’t really watch the game and are focused on being social, but others enjoy watching the game. Personally I am in the middle and go for both of those reasons,” Kaley said. “I like the social aspect of it, everyone getting together and cheering together - I think it’s pretty sweet. But I go because I love the sport, one of my best friends is on the team and to support my school,” Kaley said.

Similar to football or basketball games, the fans that attend Junction baseball games generally go to the games for a mix of the sport and the crowd. Senior Sarah Davidson said she definitely plans on going to baseball games this year, even though “baseball doesn’t seem as exciting. It’s not like football and basketball where you have the big student section and everyone is going crazy cheering the whole time.” Excitement and the energy of the crowd are important to sophomore Katie Paregien as well as Davidson. Although some, like Davidson, will certainly frequent baseball games, others will only be seen at a few games, like Paregien. Paregien plans to go to only a couple games, saying that baseball is “a little more confusing than exciting. So I’ll just go for a little support.”

Stories by Hannah Kimmel Orange&Black

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6 VI

Sports,

T

LACROSSE

Sports

SOCCER

A

ccording to seniors Stuart Foster and Rachel Romero, the newly established GJHS Lacrosse teams will have successful seasons. “I think we are going to dominate. We have core people coming back that have been playing for four to five years,” Foster said. “This year we’re going to adapt to new coaches and catch the new girls up to speed with their skills in order to be competitors,” Romero said. Dedication and effort by both the boys and the girls are being made in pre-season to prepare the Tigers for a victorious season.

T

he upcoming season challenges GJHS Coach Darrell Simonton to put together a track team that sends his athletes to state. “The biggest challenge is to get young kids to believe in what you are doing. You have to get them to believe in the coaches,” Simonton said. Jonathan Wright and Allie Grasso, athletes who made state last year, are expected to return and make state again. To make state, athletes must place 18th in their division. The team is working hard in pre-season to prepare and quailify as many athletes as possible this season.

L

TRACK TRACK

BASEBALL

irls golf is supposed to be in the midst of their preseason as of mid-February, but the snow has necessitated alternative methods of training. Jordan Fellhauer, senior, is using this time to prepare for the season and make her goals a reality. Last year Fellhauer was expected to make state, but one bad day kept her from qualifying. This year she is devoted to make the top five at state. This is an important time for the team to be working on their endurance for the upcoming season. “If you’re not in shape, you won’t do well. It will kick you in the butt. Golf is a constant four hours or hard work,” Fellhauer said.

G

GOLF GOLF

30

BASEBALL

Stories compiled by Carson Laudadio

T

he 2009 girls tennis season had an outstanding finish. After qualifying the entire team for the state tournament, the girls exhibited aggressive playing that carried them to a fourth place finish at state. Last year’s team possessed a lot of experience and a strong bond. Losing four seniors and another player to an ACL injury, this will be a year for rebuilding. “We had such a tight team last year. Losing that many people will be hard to replace. I liked going to practice because all my friends were there,” junior Maddy Hayduk said. “Last year we had more experience, so we added strategy. We are going to start in the beginning with the experience this year,” coach Carol Elliott said. Losing all three singles player to graduation, the higher doubles players will have to make the transition. “With doubles you have someone to depend on. With singles you are out there by yourself. Singles is a more disciplined game,” Hayduk said. Not only with new coming players but the transition of doubles player to a singles position, the players will need to get acquainted with a new coaching technique. In past years, the team has not lost a duel in the Southwestern League, and despite the many struggles this year, the returning varsity player and Coach Elliott plan on continuing their impressive legacy.

he GJHS baseball team started early in hopes of improving on last year. Senior Jayke Brock has been using the batting cages and the bull pin at Gene Taylors during pre-season. “I won’t let the team down. (I) have to make the school proud,” Brock said. With six returning seniors, the Tigers are building from last year’s experience. Coach Kyle Rush has high hopes for the team despite losing Geoff Baldwin to graduation. Last year closed at a total of 15 wins and four loses, and the Tigers are eager for their expected comeback. “We need to make playoffs no matter what and make a run at the state title,” Rush said.

TENNIS

Previews.

ast year’s GJHS girls soccer team had a season that was far from their expectations. Besides a remarkable victory in an intense overtime game against Central High School, the season faced them with many defeats. However, things look brighter this year. With only one senior having graduated last year and a returning team full of experience, Coach Adrea Tilford believes the upcoming season is going to be their “time to shine.” Coach Tilford expects the majority of her varsity team to be upperclassmen. Eager to start the season, a few girls expecting to be on varsity have started their pre-season early by practicing indoor. If the team expects to win on the Front Range, they will need a solid pre-season to do so. “It has been a long winter. Teams in the east have the advantage of playing all year long, so when girls are out practicing early it makes a huge impact on the team,” said Tilford.

Teams,

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Tiger Tracks Mesa County Valley School District 51 Grand Junction High School 2115 Grand Avenue Grand Junction, CO 81501

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1 Sophomore Stephanie Skinner warms up for the hundred-meter fly event at a swim meet on Jan. 23 23.

3 Freshman Rory Wick faces off against his Central High School rival on Jan. 21.

Freshman Tate Hegstrom rehearses for his lead role as Charlie in “Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory.”

2 Senior Sam Morgan and junior James Wilkinson fight for the ball during the basketball game against Fruita Monument High School on Jan. 29.

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5 Junior Alex Castle and sophomore Kara Deimer tear up the dance floor at the Jazz Dinner Dance on Feb. 6 at the Lincoln Park Barn.

Senior Renata Cote prepares to dive on Feb. 3. Cote placed second on the Western Slope.

Claire Cooper (1), Haleigh Jacobson (2,4,6), Carson Laudadio (3), Kimberlyn Bennett (5)

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& Drama Department debuts highly anticipated and technically challenging musical, “Willy Wonka.” p. 7 Photo illustration by Natalie Pipe...

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