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THE

ORANGE&

BLACK

? SPECIAL ISSUE

Grand Junction High School

|

1400 N. Fifth St., Grand Junction, Colo. 81501

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Volume 91 • Issue 4

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December 2008


INDEX

The Orange and Black is... Spotlight 9 Dejan Jestrovich Now 9 Jenna Hansen • Stephani Soto Connection 9 Jessa Dearth • Chelsea Tomasi

FEATURES

InSight 9 Nic Murdock • Lesley Wharton Scene 9 Kayden Horwitz • Kirstin Maska

Scene explores the true origin of beauty • p. 11

Open to Interpretation 9 Bekah Gallegos • Dylan Proietti In Motion 9 Emily Dohm • Brionne Griffin Advertising Manager 9 Jenny Jessup Advertising Assistants 9 Jessica Gillis • Samantha Weinberg Webmaster 9 Tom Nelson Web Assistants 9 Zachary Bryner • Jon White

Connection takes you into the deepest recesses of your mind • p. 15

Open to Interpretation tells you what it feels like • p. 30

Photography Editor 9 Shreya Pokharel Graphic Editor 9 Nick Powell Graphic Artists 9 Garrett Brown • Greg Coleman Kyle Rogers Reporters 9 Jillian Arja • McKenzie Binder Moriah Black • Sarah Bolton Kaitlin Cain • Cody Holman Zack Kelley • Katie Langford Eric List • McKenna Moe Grayson O’Roark • Emilie Pearson Kurt Peterson • Margeaux Prinster Baylee Ragar Photographers 9 Kristin Balbier • Alyssa Behrens Cody Blankenship • Hannah Cook Noelle DePuey • Richard Gonzales Amy Nelms • Natalie Pipe Video 9 Philip Shellabarger • Kevin Reed Austin Ross Adviser 9 Rick Jussel

02 ORANGE&BLACK | DECEMBER 2008

Letter from the editors

Now breaks down poverty in Grand Junction and around the world • p. 19 Policy The Orange and Black, a legally recognized public forum for student expression, is published six to nine times a year by the Newspaper Class for students of Grand Junction High School. Expression made by students in the exercise of the freedom of speech or freedom of press is not an expression of District 51 school board policy. The views expressed in The Orange and Black do not necessarily represent the views of the entire staff, adviser, GJHS administration or the School District 51 administration. Board policy regarding student publications (JICE, JICE-R) is available in the journalism room (Rooms 130-131) or in the principal’s office.

What makes a person beautiful? What exactly does it feel like to have Asperger’s Syndrome? How much is your kidney worth? In this issue of The Orange and Black, we wanted to dedicate some time to answering the questions that are left unasked and unanswered. While we may think we know what poverty is, or what it requires to take care of your body, not everything is as it seems. It turns out that common knowledge is not as common as most people think. Our job is to entertain and educate our readers. So in accordance with that purpose, we present to you our Special Issue: Questions Answered.

They will be edited for space and legal considerations, but not for inaccuracies, grammar or spelling. Letters must contain information pertinent to the students of GJHS. The staff retains the right to not publish any letter not meeting these requirements. Unsigned letters will not be published. Please submit typed letters in person to Room 130 or via mail or email. Contact The Orange and Black, Grand Junction High School, 1400 N. Fifth St., Grand Junction, CO 81501. Phone: 970-254-6929. FAX: 970-254-6973. Web site: GJHSNEWS.com. Adviser e-mail: rjussel@mesa.k12.co.us.

Letters to the Editor The Orange and Black welcomes and encourages letters to Cost the editors. This is a chance to express your viewpoint on Single copies free. Where available, additional copies of important issues. Letters should be limited to 250 words. this paper are available for purchase for 50 cents each.

Contact The Orange and Black for more information. Taking more than one copy of this paper with the intent to prevent other individuals from reading this edition of the paper is prohibited (C.R.S. 18-4-419). Violators, subject to prosecution and penalty under C.R.S. 13-21-123, will be prosecuted. Some material courtesy of American Society of Newspaper Editors/MCT Campus High School Newspaper Service. © 2008 The Orange and Black Grand Junction High School. All rights reserved.


[ What is Poverty?] pov•er•ty n. deprivation of common necessities that determine the quality of life

ORANGE&BLACK | DECEMBER 2008

05


Homeless man walks next to Grand Junction’s soup kitchen.

Two-year-old Davidson Pierre gets treated for malnutrition in Haiti.

Tim Johnson/MCT

Miami Herald/MCT

Courtesy of Audrey Dohm

Victoria, 13 years old, carries step-sister Jennifer to the market in Ghana.

A Chinese woman takes a break from manual labor.

United States

China

Haiti

Kenya

Graphic by Greg Coleman

Turkey

The numbers are overwhelming—more than 900 million people in the world are hungry. Water problems affect half of humanity. Of the 2.2 billion children in the world, over 1 billion of them live in poverty. The effects of poverty differ from situation to situation, person to person. Disease, malnutrition, famine, war, mental illness and drug dependence are just some of the causes and effects of poverty. Around 34 million people are living under the poverty level in America today. >> United States Life expectancy: 77 years Literacy Rate: 99% Access to an improved water source: 100%

Baylee Ragar

>> Kenya Life expectancy: 50 years Literacy Rate: 74% Population living on less than $1 per day: 23% Population living on less than $2 per day: 58% Access to an improved water source: 61%

04 ORANGE&BLACK | DECEMBER 2008

>> Haiti Life expectancy: 53 years Literacy Rate: 52.9% Population living on less than $1 per day: 54% Population living on less than $2 per day: 78% Access to an improved water source: 54%

>> Turkey Life expectancy: 70 years Literacy Rate: 87% Population living on less than $1 per day: 3% Population living on less than $2 per day: 19% Access to an improved water source: 96%

>> China Life expectancy: 73 years Literacy Rate: 91% Population living on less than $1 per day: 17% Population living on less than $2 per day: 47% Access to an improved water source: 77%

Cover photos from top, left to right: Richard Gonzales, courtesy of Audrey Dohm, Cody Blankenship, Baylee Ragar, Jenna Hansen.

Cadimy Genilus, 15 months old, looks up at his father in storm-destroyed Haiti.

Cody Blankenship

Miami Herald/MCT

NOW


Faces of

1

3

2

POVERTY

5

4

6

Jillian Arja 7 One hundred and seven people die in the world every minute. Seventeen people die of starvation, eight die due to the lack of sanitized water and six die of AIDS. In Grand Junction, homeless people loiter on street corners begging for spare change, three generations are crammed into one home and 500 students in District 51 are homeless.

A

t Grand Junction High School, 24 percent of students qualify and choose to eat the free and reduced meals. This represents the number of students at GJHS who live below the poverty line. Freshman Troy Monger is one of the students living below that line. His mother’s income barely covers the cost of daily necessities, but it gets them by. Before Monger was born, his 26-yearold mother had a nervous breakdown and was diagnosed with schizophrenia, causing her to lose custody of Monger’s two older sisters and to stop working. Monger’s mother continued to have problems with unemployment after he was born. When the cost of rent rose in their apartment, the welfare check they received was no longer enough to cover it, and Monger and his mother lost their home. They were forced to move from motel to motel until they found a townhouse in Clifton that they could finally afford. The continuous instability and uncertainty was difficult for Troy. “(The worst part) was wondering if we would have a home the next day,” he said. Unfortunately, other difficulties came with his mother’s mental illness. Troy was responsible for ensuring they

8 had electricity, heat and water by organizing the finances and making sure the bills were paid. However, despite all of these burdens, his mother is still the person he looks up to. “My mom is my role model. We have everything we’ve got because my mom tries so hard,” he said. Monger never accused his mother or anyone else “(The for his problems and responsibilities. worst part) “There is always a reason (that things happen the was won- way they do),” he said. “It’s not good to blame everyone else for it.” dering if Henry *, another GJHS student, is also affected by we would poverty, but he does not blame anyone either. have a “It’s my problem,” he said. However, poverty is a big responsibility for any high home the school student. He works from 4-10 p.m. Tuesday next day.” through Sunday so that he can help make ends meet at home. He began working to support his family when he was 15 and currently pays $600 each month, almost his entire paycheck, to support his family. At age 18, he is one of the main supporters in his family of seven, but he does not mind it. “I like working. It gives me an excuse to get out of the house,” he said. “I want to eventually become a manager so I can have a step up in life.” Maintaining his hectic schedule is difficult and often tiring, but he manages to persevere through it. Henry has 35 hours of school every week in addition to homework, and after that he has 36 hours of work. “My mom tells me that school is more important, but she (also) tells me to (keep) my job,” Henry said.

A

man standing next to his pregnant wife is wearing a pair of shorts, a t-shirt and a nice pair of Nike tennis shoes. They are a normal couple; the only difference is that they are living in Grand Junction’s homeless shelter, Homeward Bound. Steven and Jewel moved to Grand Junction because Steven had a job opportunity with a friend on an oil rig. When they finally arrived from Texas, the job was not available, and their friend left them, taking Steven’s identification with him. Without official identification, Steven was unable to get a job. Now he is waiting to receive his paperwork from the government, but it is a long process. Once he receives it, he will be able to look for a

Richard Gonzales (1,3,4,8); Cody Blankenship (2,7); Audrey Dohm (4); MCT (6)

POVERTY

job, and then hopefully they will be able to buy their own house and car. Another man stands across from this couple in tattered jeans and tennis shoes. His name is Rooster, and he is also homeless. He, however, does not refer to his situation as poverty. “This is not poverty. Poverty is what those folks faced during Katrina,” he said. “This is hope.” The director at Homeward Bound, Jordan McGinnis, said that too many people in this community are unaware of the true reality of homelessness. “The community really needs to be educated on what the face of homelessness looks like. It’s a diverse group,” he said. “It’s much easier to not see these people as persons, (when) actually, it’s just a group of people in a bad situation.” McGinnis said they are good people who have just hit a rough stretch in their lives. “We are not all bad,” Rooster said. “Whether you walk through Homeward Bound or Wal-Mart, there is good everywhere.” Whether people are out sitting on a corner, standing in line at a soup kitchen or simply wearing old clothing, McGinnis stresses that everyone should treat people in poverty with respect because everyone has the same basic necessities. “People just want to feel like people. Nobody wants to be pitied. Love, respect, food and shelter—that’s all we need,” McGinnis said. *Editor’s Note: Name has been changed for the protection of the source. ORANGE&BLACK | DECEMBER 2008

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NOW

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Catholic Outreach helps the community The soup kitchen accepts canned and packaged goods, fruits, vegetables, meats and produce from farmers, orchards, comMcKenna Moe mercial farmers and grocery markets. Donations benefit a wide range of people from stranded “There are so many people in need individuals to evicted families. and nowhere else for them to turn,” “Many (people) are just struggling to get enough money to Sister Karen Bland, director of Cathobuy food, and they turn to the soup kitchen for help,” Bland lic Outreach, said. said. Catholic Outreach works Gene Bash, a to provide people in need with volunteer at the soup various forms of assistance. It kitchen, started volunwas founded in teering with Catholic “It makes the 1970s by a Outreach in 1997 and group of Cathoa huge has been volunteering lic sisters who there ever since. difference quit their jobs Now Bash and his for the as teachers to friend Sam Salatino people in provide food for take care of the dishes people in need. after meal times and the comNow Sister are two of the 450 munity.” Karen Bland volunteers that help faces difficulties, at the soup kitchen but she is confident in her job, she every year. said, because God brought her to For many, includit. ing Bash and Salatino, “It makes a huge difference (for) volunteering is not the people in the community,” Velonly about what they erie, a frequent visitor of the soup are giving, but what kitchen, said. they are getting in Visitors who receive food are return. sometimes asked to help out by do“We found we ing chores, but most do not mind. were good for some“As long as they feed me, it’s Photo by Richard Gonzales thing,” said Salatino the least I (can) do,” said “J-Bird,” Catholic Outreach’s Soup Kitchen dining hall jokingly. another regular guest at the soup “This keeps me going,” closes down after lunch on Wednesday. kitchen. said Salatino. “We greatly appreciated the Not only do the volunteers feel the benefit but so do those meals and hospitality,” Velerie said. who are employed there. “(We wanted) to contribute back.” “I get more out of being here than anybody who comes,” Catholic Outreach served 71,809 Bland said. meals last year and serves about 200 to Catholic Outreach runs 12 different programs, some that 250 people every day. Meals are made give away donated food, clothing and books, while other possible by donations from businesses, programs help released convicts stay out of jail and homeless churches and people in the commufamilies and individuals find homes. nity. Catholic Outreach is located at 245 South 1st St. where “That’s how we exist,” Bland said. volunteers, donations and anybody in need are welcome. Donations are accepted Monday “Anyone and everyone is welcome,” Bland said. through Friday from 9 a.m. to 11 p.m.

06 ORANGE&BLACK | DECEMBER 2008

Kayden Horwitz

ive Can I a helping hand How you can help Homeward Bound Homeless Shelter

We want everyone to come here and volunteer. Whatever you would do at your home bring it here and let’s do it here.” - Homeward Bound director, Jordan McGinnis

Location: 2853 North Ave. Contact: (970) 256-9424 Working with the homeless shelter helps individuals in the community who need a safe place to sleep.

Heifer Project

The Heifer project is a really creative program which invests in families in poor areas by giving them the basic need of livelihood.” - Koinonia church pastor, Mike Burr

Contact: www.heifer.org The Heifer project works to provide animals to less fortunate people in other countries.

Salvation Army Giving Tree

It helps out kids who may otherwise not have a Christmas.” - Marketing assistant, Jennifer Hobbs

Location: Mesa Mall Contact: (970) 242-0008 Pick a tag from the tree and buy a Christmas present for a child in need from Nov. 28 to Dec. 22.


MONEY IN THE BANK

Central Park

WINTER WONDERLAND

AT GLACIER ICE RINK January 9th 9:30 -11:30 p.m. tickets $4 presale $3

Available at Mesa County Courthouse and Glacier Ice Rink 2469 River Road Grand Junction, CO 81505 970-241-7529 www.BananasFunPark.com Check our our website for specials & winter hours

gjhsnews.com gjhsnews.com gjhsnews.com gjhsnews.com gjhsnews.com gjhsnews.com gjhsnews.com Have an OPINION? Want your VOICE TO BE HEARD? Write a LETTER TO THE EDITORS...

Bring your LETTER to Room 131 today!

WINTER SPECIAL $16.50 Unlimited

Includes Unlimited mini Golf and Lazer Tag, 5 Go kart rides or Go kart passenger.

Clifton Grand Junction

• Dental Implants

ORANGE&BLACK | DECEMBER 2008 07


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Our generation is the hope for a brighter future so, in order to portray the hopes and dreams of today, The Orange and Black asked students at Grand Junction High School what would make a better tomorrow.

“Social Peace.”

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”Not having to worry about my liberty and the safety of America.”

“ C l e a n e r A i r .”

“World Peace!”

“A world without war and racism.”

“True love.”

ORANGE&BLACK | DECEMBER 2008 09

“A tomorrow better would be hearing that my brother Darrel was comming home from Iraq.”

“Snow, just snow.”


ADS First Presbyterian Church You’re always welcome to join us...

Go Tigers!

3940 27 1/2 Rd.

(970) 242-1923

SPEECH T S . R E I RELIGION V F I F THE S YOU ASSEMBLY PETITION IG VE PRESS

GREAT LUNCH IN A HURRY! HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT LUNCH SPECIAL $5.00 (PLUS TAX) PEPPERONI OR CHEESE PERSONAL PIZZA AND DRINK Opens @ 10:45 For Students CALL WHEN YOU LEAVE SCHOOL WE’LL HAVE IT READY WHEN Daily Until 4:00 Dine In Only YOU ARRIVE! Next To Safeway On Horizon 970-245-6425

GJHS Booster Club Supporting our Tigers since 1954 Investing in our kids’ tomorrow. . . today.

WHO BENEFITS FROM THE BOOSTER CLUB?

The GJHS Booster Club is somewhat unique in that it raises funds not only for student athletics, but all recognized student activities as well — from football to drama, from band to German Club, from Link Crew to Academic Team, from The Orange & Black newspaper to volleyball, from . . . well, you get the idea.

Booster Club has donated over $1,300,000 to Grand Junction High School Student Activities and Athletic Programs; $68,000 was donated just last year To continue this tradition of financial support, we need parent volunteers. Booster Club’s primary fundraiser is Bingo. Volunteers needed to work 1 or 2 sessions a month. Bingo is held on: — Wednesday evening at 7 p.m. — Friday afternoon at 1 p.m. — — Sunday afternoon at 12:30 - 3:30 p.m. — Gold Mine Bingo 511 281/4 Road in Grand Junction.

Contact Booster Club at gjhsbc@aol.com 10 ORANGE&BLACK | DECEMBER 2008


WHAT IS

?

BEAUTY With an identity as diverse as all the faces of the world, beauty upholds an enduring status of divine that is as familiar to the human race as the air we breathe. But what exactly is beauty? It has started wars, inspired the greatest works of art, and is one of the most valued aspects of life. Yet defining the framework of physical beauty parallels describing color. what makes a person physically beautiful? History illustrates beauty in constant transformation and diversity as it is stretched across all the cultures of the world. Science has explored the concept of beauty and has deciphered it as a mathematical art form. The definition of beauty that has evolved over time and overseas is as colorful as the infinite perceptions by which it is recognized.

ORANGE&BLACK | DECEMBER 2008

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SCENE

BEAUTIFUL

Dove redefines ‘real beauty’ Sarah Bolton Natalie Pipe

12

ORANGE&BLACK | DECEMBER 2008

United States

Peru

“Beauty comes in all shapes and sizes here. Being skinny doesn’t make someone beautiful. Latin women are known for having curvy bodies and big hips. In the United States, women don’t value that. Americans value women who are skinny and look a specific way. In contrast, most Latin girls are proud of their curvy bodies and they are not afraid to flaunt it. In a way, being curvy shows their femininity. Being able to accept your body and feeling comfortable in your own skin is what makes one beautiful.”

“Americans see beauty as model perfection with no flaws. Beautiful women are skinny, tall, clear skinned, have shiny hair, soft hands, perfect makeup, shaved legs, have a fit but curvy body at the same time, no vulnerability and be completely the same as everybody else.” – Cayla Bresch, Junior Grand Junction

–Marina Gomez Lima

Beauty Through the Ages

Photo courtesy Unilever

In a society where beauty becomes less attainable every day, Dove’s Campaign for Real Beauty breaks the mold by redefining the standards. According to a survey by the company, only 2 percent of American women would describe themselves as beautiful. In response to studies revealing low self esteem of American women, Dove hopes they can use their established status to make some changes. 81 percent of women in the United States strongly agree that “the media and advertising set an unrealistic standard of beauty that most women can’t ever achieve,” according to Dove’s website. Grand Junction High School students agree. “Everybody is held to a higher standard of beauty in the media,” freshman Monique Armstrong said. “It’s not realistic.” Dove has launched three campaigns to change today’s typecast image of beauty and promote women to embrace a positive self image. In the campaigns, which began in 2004, Dove uses real women in their advertisements instead of professional models. Representing a variety of ages, shapes and sizes, these women help widen the scope of beauty and advocate diversity in today’s body image. “It’s about making all women feel beautiful every day,” Silvia Lagnado, global brand director for Dove said. The campaign, including self esteem workshops, has already reached over 2 million women and girls and is striving to expand their message to 5 million by 2010. “I think that Dove’s Campaign for Real Beauty is more legitimate than other companies because they show women of all ages and all shapes and sizes, which is how beauty campaigns should be,” junior Emmie Madison said.

400-1400 Women with high foreheads and pale skin were considered to be the most beautiful. To achieve the desired look, women would pluck their hairline and wear white lead paint on their faces, as well as plucking their eyebrows and coloring their lips with red dye.

1450-1550 Contradictory to today’s ideal beauty voluptuous women carrying a few extra pounds were most desirable of the time, as can be seen in renaissance art. Women wore white lead paint on their faces, accompanied by “beauty marks” made from black velvet that covered pimples and scars.


BEAUTY

WORLD

China

“Modern-day China is encountering a tremendous shift in what people perceive as beautiful. Traditionally, the Chinese associated beauty with pale skin, small feet and conservative, yet elegant clothing. Recently — in a historical sense — China has undergone many changes. The eye of the people is no exception to this vicious trend; beauty now is associated almost directly with the style, manner and livelihood of the Western people. What is beautiful in the eye of the Chinese people may soon match the perception of the people of the greater west.

Europe

“I think everyone is beautiful. People in Europe are more beautiful because it’s not about how they look, they act more elegant. They don’t burp in public places and are more interesting.” –Katarina Cornakova Junior GJHS Student, Exchange student from Slovakia

India

South Africa

“In India, a fuller and more curvaceous body is considered more beautiful. However, with globalization, the concept of beauty is starting to be more similar to the United States and Europe. I think with time, it will be the same.”

“An ordinary African woman likes to look and feel beautiful with minimum effort and affordable prices because we don’t make enough money to endulge ourselves as much as we like. I happen to think I’m beautiful in “the African Way,” I mean, besides dressing comfortably, my most valuable asset is my face.” –Noma Maxongo Johannesburg

1558- 1603 Queen Elizabeth’s extravagant red wigs and pale complexion were attractive for women. Freckles were not appreciated and eyebrows were shaved off and replaced with mouse skin.

1920s

–Henry Carlson, Shanghai

–Pallavi Desai, Balia

Representing their increasing liberation, women wore bobbed hair in contrast to previous long hair preferences. However, primping did not lose its value as women began to imitate famous movie stars such as Clara Bow and other 1920s actresses. Women continued to pursue pale complexions with white powder, red lips and plucked eyebrows.

1970s

1950s Women’s beauty gained enormous significance with the rise of conservative ideals during the 50s. Striving to meet the “50s housewife” standard of beauty of maintaining a house and their own appeal at the same time, women were extremely done up with huge hair and heavy makeup similar to Marilyn Monroe.

Reflecting the revolutionary statements of freedom, men and women wore their hair long and natural in imitation of trendsetters such as Farrah Fawcett. Following in rebellious fashion, facial piercing also became popular during this time.

ORANGE&BLACK | DECEMBER 2008

13


SCENE

Down To A Science Why is one person more beautiful than the next? What are the characteristics that define beauty? Are we born with it, or does society create it for us? McKenzie Binder People may think beauty is in the eye of the beholder but it turns out that beauty is fairly scientific. All people subconsciously weigh thousands of variables based in biology and genetics every time they see a new face or body. Babies less than a day old have been known to gaze at striking faces longer than unattractive ones, proving that at least some appearance preferences are genetic and not merely cultural. From an evolutionary standpoint, men are simply attracted to good genes. Certain subtle traits that lead men to believe women are stronger, more reproductively beneficial or healthy, transfer directly to attraction, and therefore beauty. “Judging beauty has a strong evolutionary component. You’re looking at another person and figuring out whether you want your children to carry that person’s genes,” said Devendra Singh, a professor of psychology at the University of Texas. One of the most discussed qualities of beauty through the ages has been facial symmetry, which goes beyond general aesthetics and is essentially based on biology. Starting at conception, all human bodies develop by dividing cells. If every division were to go perfectly, the left and right sides of each person would be perfect mirror images. Genetic mutations,

environmental pressures and non-perfect divisions distort symmetry, creating less than flawless faces. Perfect symmetry, an attractive quality, shows that an individual has good genetics and well dividing cells. Facial features and facial structure are also influenced by genetics and chemistry. For women, estrogen develops smaller, pointier chins, fuller lips, rounder cheekbones, high eyebrows, prominent eyes and a narrower lower face. For men, testosterone helps develop larger jaws, more prominent brows and cheekbones, larger noses, smaller eyes, thinner lips, facial hair and a longer lower half of the face. Either sex displaying these traits are seen as beautiful because they advertise reproductive health and a balance of hormones. Women are attracted to manly faces because they signal strong immune systems and high fertility, while men are attracted to delicate, feminine faces for the same reason. Scientists have found that body shape is also important, specifically one measurement called the WHR ratio. The WHR ratio, or “Waist to Hip Ratio” is calculated by measuring a woman’s waist circumference and dividing this number by their hip circumfer-

ence at its widest part. Studies show women with a 0.7 waist to hip ratio, displaying a waist seven-tenths smaller than the width of their hips, are seen as more beautiful. Jessica Alba, Audrey Hepburn, Kate Moss and Marilyn Monroe all have ratios of 0.7 or lower, as do the majority of Playboy models and Miss America contestants. Because where body fat is deposited is determined by sex hormones, if a woman produces the correct amount and mixture of estrogen, her ratio will fall naturally into the desired range. People in this range, regardless of weight, are less susceptible to disease and have less difficulty conceiving. It is remarkable that so much scientific principle goes into determining beauty. Hundreds of thousands of years of primitive humans choosing mates and reproducing have left humans with unpredictable and surprising instincts for picking genetically healthy partners. Even little things that people do not consider as important are involuntarily absorbed, and even things they may not notice have a hidden scientific basis. It turns out beauty is deeper than skin deep, but not in the way many people would have imagined.

Symmetrical Asymmetrical Facial symmetry is a large factor in determining physical attractiveness. The appeal is hardwired to the human brain as it demonstrates healthy genes and the ability to produce healthy children.

14 ORANGE&BLACK | DECEMBER 2008

What about makeup? Local makeup artist Chelsea Shaw offers her opinion on makeup and beauty. Orange and Black: What do you think the purpose of makeup is? Chelsea Shaw: I believe the purpose of makeup is to enhance your natural beauty. Being a makeup artist, I love every aspect of it. There really isn’t only one way to wear your makeup, Have fun with it and create a different look to fit your styles. O&B: How much makeup is too much? CS: You want to wear the makeup, don’t let it wear you. You want the makeup to be noticeable, but you still want people to see your face, not just the makeup. O&B: Does makeup enhance beauty or create it? CS: There are people out there who don’t need more than mascara and lip gloss. There are some, like myself, who feel they need a bit more. I believe it enhances your natural look. You see the magazines of stars without their makeup on but not everyone looks glamorous when they get out of bed. If you are happy with your end result of putting your face on, then you were beautiful before you even started. O&B: Why do think so many women wear makeup? CS: (They) wear makeup because it is something that has always been around, and they feel it’s only natural to wear it. It’s fun to play with, create different looks. Some women are against it because they feel it’s pushed upon them. I think it is a wonderful way to help someone feel better about themselves.


What is the price of a human body?

Photo illustration by Richard Gonzales ORANGE&BLACK | DECEMBER 2008 15


I

n the United States, 20,000 lives were saved last year because of organ transplants. For every person who decides to donate their organs and tissue, up to 100 people can be helped, and a single donor can save eight lives. The reality of organ donation is found as close as in the halls of Grand Junction High School. Sophomore Brayden Jueschke was born six weeks early with three holes in the left side of his heart. He received a transplant after a week of being in the system, which rarely happens. “I think we got very lucky,” he said.” “(The donor and I) had exactly the same blood type.” At five months of age, Jueschke underwent a six-hour heart transplant to save his life. During a heart transplant, after the patient is anesthetized, he is put on a Swanz-Ganz catheter, which delivers blood to the lungs, and a breathing tube is inserted. After the first cut is made, a heart and lung machine is started, taking over the heart’s functions and allowing it to be removed. After the new heart is in place and reattached to the arteries, the heart and lung machine is disconnected, and the

Katie Langford heart typically restarts upon stimulation. If not, an electric shock is given to restart it. A heart transplant costs between $90,000 and $290,000, depending on the patient. Transplants involve risk and can include complications and lifelong side effects. For Jueschke, the complications of his transplant followed him long after he left the hospital. Jueschke takes a medicine called Ciclosporin, an immunosuppressive used to stop his body from rejecting the donor heart. Without the medicine, his blood cells would attack the transplant, sending him into cardiac arrest, but the rising prescription prices has Jueschke worried about the financial toll on his parents. A one-month prescription costs around $300. Other than the financial toll, Ciclosporin weakens bones, making the patient prone to fractures. While taking the medication, Jueschke has fractured his left arm, elbow and forehead. There is no way to prevent the breaks except for using caution, because Jueschke must take the medicine for the rest of his life. Every three months, Jueschke receives a heart check up, including an Electrocardiogram (EKG),

Compiled by Eric List

Sources: organdonor.org, yourtotalhealth.ivillage.com

which records the electrical activity of the heart, and an Echocardiogram (Echo), a sonogram of the heart. Jueschke will never be able to play contact sports like football and lacrosse because of his transplant. If he was hit too hard, Jueschke would go into cardiac arrest. Instead, he likes playing table tennis and pool on the weekends, when he is not spending time with family and friends. Jueschke loves reggae music, especially the band Matis Yahu, and works at Bin 707. Besides the 22 scars that pepper his chest and back, it is impossible to notice he had a transplant. Jueschke is also passionate about a topic that many teens think of with apathy or not at all. He is without a doubt going to be an organ donor. “It’s like giving someone life,” he said. ”(It’s like) being a hero.”

Sources: mamashealth.com, nlm.nih.gov, mic.ki.se

Bone marrow produces red and white blood cells and platelets from stem cells found in the marrow. The most common reason for a bone marrow transplant is aplastic anemia, where the marrow does not produce enough blood cells for the body. Price: $30,000-250,000

Bone Marrow

The large intestine absorbs excess water from digested foods and transports it back into the bloodstream. Hirschsprung’s disease, abnormalities in the muscles of the intestine that prevent it from functioning properly, and enterocolitis, inflammation of the large intestine, are two of the common reasons for having colon replaced. Price: $132,000-220,000

Large Intestine

The pancreas contains cells that produce insulin and glucagons which, when introduced into the blood, regulate the levels of glucose in the blood. Diabetes can result in patients having a pancreas transplant as an alternative to regular diabetes treatment. Price: $110,000-140,000

Pancreas

The lungs take inhaled air and transport the oxygen from the air into the bloodstream, and remove carbon dioxide from the bloodstream during exhalation. Lungs may be replaced when one or both lungs cannot exchange oxygen and carbon dioxide. Price:: $150,000-290,000

Lungs

Photo illustration by Alyssa Behrens, Garrett Brown, Nic Murdock

The skin protects the body from the environment and infection and prevents the body from losing excessive amounts of water. Patients most commonly receive skin grafts to treat large wounded, burned, or infected areas of skin. Price: $2,000-18,000

Skin

The kidneys process blood to sift out waste products and extra water that become urine, helping to balance fluids in the body. Kidneys may need to be replaced because of kidney failure due to a loss of bodily fluids or kidney diseases. Price: $15,000-145,000

Kidneys

The liver produces substances that break down fats, converts glucose into glycogen, filters harmful substances from the blood, stores vitamins and maintains a proper level of glucose in the blood, among other functions. Liver failure results mainly from Hepatitis, too much consumption of alcohol, or malnutrition. Price: $25,000-290,000

Liver

The heart supplies the body with oxygenated blood and transports deoxygenated blood to the lungs. Transplants may be needed due to heart failure or severe disease. Price: $90,000-290,000

Heart

The cornea is the clear front part of the eye covering the iris and the pupil. It focuses light onto the retina. A cornea can be damaged from injuries or infections, hereditary diseases, or other eye conditions. Price: $7500-11,000

Cornea

INSIGHT

Photo illustration by Lesley Wharton


I

n the United States, 20,000 lives were saved last year because of organ transplants. For every person who decides to donate their organs and tissue, up to 100 people can be helped, and a single donor can save eight lives. The reality of organ donation is found as close as in the halls of Grand Junction High School. Sophomore Brayden Jueschke was born six weeks early with three holes in the left side of his heart. He received a transplant after a week of being in the system, which rarely happens. “I think we got very lucky,” he said.” “(The donor and I) had exactly the same blood type.” At five months of age, Jueschke underwent a six-hour heart transplant to save his life. During a heart transplant, after the patient is anesthetized, he is put on a Swanz-Ganz catheter, which delivers blood to the lungs, and a breathing tube is inserted. After the first cut is made, a heart and lung machine is started, taking over the heart’s functions and allowing it to be removed. After the new heart is in place and reattached to the arteries, the heart and lung machine is disconnected, and the

Katie Langford heart typically restarts upon stimulation. If not, an electric shock is given to restart it. A heart transplant costs between $90,000 and $290,000, depending on the patient. Transplants involve risk and can include complications and lifelong side effects. For Jueschke, the complications of his transplant followed him long after he left the hospital. Jueschke takes a medicine called Ciclosporin, an immunosuppressive used to stop his body from rejecting the donor heart. Without the medicine, his blood cells would attack the transplant, sending him into cardiac arrest, but the rising prescription prices has Jueschke worried about the financial toll on his parents. A one-month prescription costs around $300. Other than the financial toll, Ciclosporin weakens bones, making the patient prone to fractures. While taking the medication, Jueschke has fractured his left arm, elbow and forehead. There is no way to prevent the breaks except for using caution, because Jueschke must take the medicine for the rest of his life. Every three months, Jueschke receives a heart check up, including an Electrocardiogram (EKG),

Compiled by Eric List

Sources: organdonor.org, yourtotalhealth.ivillage.com

which records the electrical activity of the heart, and an Echocardiogram (Echo), a sonogram of the heart. Jueschke will never be able to play contact sports like football and lacrosse because of his transplant. If he was hit too hard, Jueschke would go into cardiac arrest. Instead, he likes playing table tennis and pool on the weekends, when he is not spending time with family and friends. Jueschke loves reggae music, especially the band Matis Yahu, and works at Bin 707. Besides the 22 scars that pepper his chest and back, it is impossible to notice he had a transplant. Jueschke is also passionate about a topic that many teens think of with apathy or not at all. He is without a doubt going to be an organ donor. “It’s like giving someone life,” he said. ”(It’s like) being a hero.”

Sources: mamashealth.com, nlm.nih.gov, mic.ki.se

Bone marrow produces red and white blood cells and platelets from stem cells found in the marrow. The most common reason for a bone marrow transplant is aplastic anemia, where the marrow does not produce enough blood cells for the body. Price: $30,000-250,000

Bone Marrow

The large intestine absorbs excess water from digested foods and transports it back into the bloodstream. Hirschsprung’s disease, abnormalities in the muscles of the intestine that prevent it from functioning properly, and enterocolitis, inflammation of the large intestine, are two of the common reasons for having colon replaced. Price: $132,000-220,000

Large Intestine

The pancreas contains cells that produce insulin and glucagons which, when introduced into the blood, regulate the levels of glucose in the blood. Diabetes can result in patients having a pancreas transplant as an alternative to regular diabetes treatment. Price: $110,000-140,000

Pancreas

The lungs take inhaled air and transport the oxygen from the air into the bloodstream, and remove carbon dioxide from the bloodstream during exhalation. Lungs may be replaced when one or both lungs cannot exchange oxygen and carbon dioxide. Price:: $150,000-290,000

Lungs

Photo illustration by Alyssa Behrens, Garrett Brown, Nic Murdock

The skin protects the body from the environment and infection and prevents the body from losing excessive amounts of water. Patients most commonly receive skin grafts to treat large wounded, burned, or infected areas of skin. Price: $2,000-18,000

Skin

The kidneys process blood to sift out waste products and extra water that become urine, helping to balance fluids in the body. Kidneys may need to be replaced because of kidney failure due to a loss of bodily fluids or kidney diseases. Price: $15,000-145,000

Kidneys

The liver produces substances that break down fats, converts glucose into glycogen, filters harmful substances from the blood, stores vitamins and maintains a proper level of glucose in the blood, among other functions. Liver failure results mainly from Hepatitis, too much consumption of alcohol, or malnutrition. Price: $25,000-290,000

Liver

The heart supplies the body with oxygenated blood and transports deoxygenated blood to the lungs. Transplants may be needed due to heart failure or severe disease. Price: $90,000-290,000

Heart

The cornea is the clear front part of the eye covering the iris and the pupil. It focuses light onto the retina. A cornea can be damaged from injuries or infections, hereditary diseases, or other eye conditions. Price: $7500-11,000

Cornea

INSIGHT

Photo illustration by Lesley Wharton


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Tel: (970) 245-2826 On Call: (970) 640-7367


How Do I Think?

ORANGE&BLACK |DECEMBER 2008

19


CONNECTION

THE RIGHT BRAIN By the time we reach high school, we are familiar with how we learn best, whether it is from a lecture or reading out of a book, individually or in groups. However, do we understand what causes us to think and learn the way we do? Something turns on inside of us at a young age that decides what side of the brain will become dominant for the rest of our lives. Which side do you use? Right-brained individuals tend to be more creative and more spatial while left-brained people are more verbal and more logical, according to Grand Junction High School psychology teacher, Brad Cronk. “Right brain dominant people usually excel in drawing, art, music and go out of the box with design,” said Cronk. “Two great examples are that of architects and entertainers such as actors.” Those favoring the right side of the brain are skilled in movement. They express themselves through body movement and generally have a good sense of balance and hand-eye coordination. Individials skilled in body movement are also very creative, and respond both to what they hear and feel. Musically inclined learners are incredibly sensitive to their environmental sounds, while they are also able to learn through the space around them, physically interacting with objects. The right side of the brain creates an interpersonal intelligence, which is the ability to relate to others. Those using the right side of their brain can easily find insight into relationships and are empathetic to others through open communication. The variations in dominance of the left or right brain alters learning styles for all students, making it impossible to teach one universal style. However, there are different ways to teach and relate to each style. “The importance of differentiating instructions to cater to students needs is increasing, but there are ways to do it. For example, my son is in elementary school and he has to learn the basics like math and spelling but there is (not) just one way of doing it,” Cronk said. “(He) and his peers are given options that include playing learning games on the computer rather than just pen and paper learning,”

20 ORANGE&BLACK | DECEMBER 2008

Skillful in body movement

Artistically inclined, thinks in sounds and patterns

Kinesthetic learner, interactive thinker

Interpersonal intelligence

ook

an

C nah

Pho

t

yH os b


THINK

THE LEFT BRAIN Skilled in math and science

Thinks logically, uses reasoning and strategy

Verbally and linguistically skilled

Intrapersonal intelligence

Left-brained individuals are drawn to mathematical methods, problem solving and abstract concepts. They are logical thinkers, using strategy and reasoning to think through everything practically. Verbal learners think in words rather than pictures, and linguistic learners have highly developed auditory skills. They are typically elegant speakers, can remember information and easily analyze words and their usage. Many people favor using the left side of their brain for physical movements because the left brain controls right sided muscles. If a person is right handed, they are dominately left brained, which means that the majority of people are physically left brained. As far as teaching to the left side of the brain, “It comes down to designing assignments that provide enough structure for left brained students, and enough lee-way for right brained students,” said faculty member Kari Allerton. Intrapersonal individuals are very understanding of themselves and their inner feelings. Those generally using the left side of their brain are able to recognize their own strengths and weaknesses and analyze themselves. Linda Malesich, GJHS language arts teacher, said, “I am definitely right brained, so it is difficult for me to try and relate to the left side.” She says language arts is especially difficult to teach to leftbrained students because writing tends to involve more talents from the right brain. However, Malesich tries to incorporate certain articles in her lesson that might attract the left brain to more of her lessons. “The grammer units are typically easy to teach to the left-brained students,” she said.

Pages compiled by Grayson O’Roark

To find out what brain you think with, visit gjhsnews.com

ORANGE&BLACK | DECEMBER 2008

21


CONNECTION

Maturity comes with nurture

Paroni said she believes it is primarily nurture, not nature, affecting her, “Nurturing people and being nurtured, that (is) what is natural to me. We make things happen, not because of a genetic (predisposition,) but because of morals and what we are shown growing up.” The favored part of this debate is nurture, future actions are shaped by previous actions. Some scientists suggest that nature and nurture coexist. Do you act in accordance to the way you were raised or abiding by the genetics handed down from your ancestors? Cognitive and moral developments shape maturity, said Brad Cronk psychology teacher. Maturity is influenced by both Nature and Nurture. “Social and emotional development have the largest impact on an individuals maturity and as physical and hormonal changes occur, there is an effect on temperament and the way the individual behaves,” said Cronk. “What people are taught early on become the glasses that they see the world through,” says Cronk. “Patience is a great example of that.” Cronk emphasized the importance of social interactions on behavior and maturity, “Their norms are depicted by Nurture, the way they go about doing things changes with their environment,” said Cronk.

– The ‘gay’ gene, claiming homosexuality is naturally occurring and not a choice. – Studies have shown that if nurture were true, then fraternal twins would be very similar if reared under the same conditions, regardless of differences in their genes. Studies show that fraternal twins more closely resemble each other than, they are strikingly similar even when reared under different conditions.

21 ORANGE&BLACK | DECEMBER 2008

Whitney Robison, junior it “Nurturedepends on the

area you grow up in and what you’ve been through. That builds character and that changes you.

Bryan Waite, junior

Photos by Hannah Cook

obviously. “ Nurture, Think about it;

Opinions on Nurture – Harvard psychologist B.F. Skinner proved that he could train pigeons. He later proved that humans could be trained in the same way.

Brenda Aceves, sophomore You’re around “people your whole

Julie Essman, sophomore It has to do with “ Nurture. how you are raised, the

– A study in New Scientist magazine suggested that a sense of humor is a learned trait, influenced by family and cultural environment, not heredity. – If environment did not determine one’s personality, then identical twins, even when raised under different conditions, should be exactly the same in all respects. However, studies show that they are never exactly alike, despite being remarkably similar.

genetics should not alter your personality. It’s all about who you’re around and the consequences of your actions.

life; the people around you make you who you are. As the group of people you hang with change, so does your personality.

hardships you have been through and the friends you hang with.

Source: about.com

– The search of ‘behavioral’ genes to explain a persons’ actions, such as an excuse to criminal activities.

The Orange and Black interviewed GJHS psychology students about their take on the Nature vs. Nurture debate.

Opinions on Nature

?

Nature or Nurture?

Where does one get the drive to become a star-athlete? How does a person acquire such a tall stature? How do some become such skillful singers? Many characteristics are naturally determined by genetics, like eye color or skin tone, but there are other traits that are uncertain as to whether they are learned or are inherited. Nature vs. Nurture is a debate determining whether certain aspects of personality are inherited or are influby their environ“We make enced ment, The areas affected things and most discussed by happen, Nature vs. Nurture are and moral because cognitive development-behavior. of morals Cognitive development is the growth in and what management of perception, memory, lanwe are guage, concepts, thinkshown ing, problem solving social cognition. growing andMoral development involves many up.” definitions of right and wrong and the process behind deciding whether an action is justified. Monika Paroni, junior, explained how pressure from others in her life was negatively affecting her fore-planning and thought process. “People keep saying you need to think about your future but I (do not) want to grow up,” said Paroni. “Now, in high school, I think to the point of getting headaches. When I was little, all I had to think about was being a dinosaur, now everything is just too fast.”

Compiled by Zack Kelley


( FEELS ) WHAT IT

LIKE. . .

. . . TO HAVE ASPERGER’S SYNDROME . . . TO HAVE A SEX CHANGE . . . TO BE A GIRL . . . TO BE A BOY . . . TO DIE . . . MORE GJHSNEWS.COM

ORANGE&BLACK | DECEMBER 2008

23


OPEN TO INTERPRETATION

. . .to have asperger’s syndrome His wide smile is infectious as he looks across the table, chatting about what he wants to be when he grows up. “I take animation classes at WCCC every day. I want to be a filmmaker when I grow up,” sophomore Jacob Below said enthusiastically. Bouncing on his chair, Below looks around, distracted by noises in the background, but his attention is easily regained. “I also love to draw,” Below said. “I mainly like to draw cartoons and comic strips. It will help me out with my filmmaking someday.” Once again, Below’s attention is drawn to a noisy group of students behind him. “I really don’t like how one student’s bad behavior will affect everyone else around that student,” Below says quietly. “This is a library and those kids are going to get in trouble.” Once again Below refocuses on the topic at hand. “I want to travel the world,” Below said. “I have already been to a lot of countries with my family, but I want to “We are all go to Geneva and Paris specifiintelligent in cally and as soon as possible.” our own way, While Below is an intelligent, and we just kind and funny 15-year-old boy, he also carries a burden have to figure that most other 15-year-old out what way boys do not— Asperger’s syndrome. that is.” Asperger’s syndrome is a subbranch of high functioning autism, characterized as having difficulty with communication, focus and interacting in society. “Einstein had Asperger’s syndrome,” Below says. “He didn’t go to school, he didn’t have friends, but his family helped him out a lot with it.” The noisy group of students behind Below are reprimanded by a librarian and Below once again must pause to regain his train of thought. “A lot of highly intelligent, famous people that you hear about have Asperger’s syndrome,” Below says. “We are all intelligent in our own way and we just have to figure out what way that is.” For Below, anything creative is his muse. From playing the viola, to drawing, to swimming and ski

24 ORANGE&BLACK | DECEMBER 2008

racing, Below has a wide range of activities that he is highly skilled at. “I do watch a lot of TV. I watch TV to actually learn from it though, not to waste my mind,” Below says. “It’s really sad though because most of the TV shows today are completely unoriginal and uncreative.” For Below, school is all about challenges, growing and learning. “Sometimes, it feels good to be getting straight-A grades,” Below says. “But I really hate testing. The school system focuses way too much on testing and grades. It should be about molding the students’ minds.” Below waves casually to another student as he enters the library and the student waves back. Below smiles and asks what he was talking about as he stands up, looks around and then settles back into his chair. “Making friends is pretty easy for me,” Below says. “I just don’t get along very well with other kids my age. I get along best with teachers.” While it is easy to see that Below is easily distracted and struggles to focus on one thing at a time, it makes vast amounts of sense. “My brain is always so busy, trying to keep up with my schedule and classes and all the things I need to get done,” Below says. “It’s not easy trying to keep up with everyone else when I am not like everyone else.” Below is not like everyone else at all. Genuine and caring to his core, he endeavors to make the world a better place, if just with a smile and a wave. “I just want to make a difference. I want to make the world smile more,” he says.

Photos by Kristin Balbier

Moriah Black


WHAT IT FEELS LIKE

. . .to have a sex change

. . .to die

Moriah Black

Kurt Peterson

Photo Illustration by Kristin Balbier

It takes only three minutes of oxygen deprivation before the human brain begins to deteriorate. After five minutes the brain has been permanently damaged, suffering an irreversible cessation of active function. The person is technically dead. Anthony Manuppella was three years old when he died. It was an ordinary vacation at Lake Powell. Manuppella and his cousin were on the family houseboat, dropping scraps of food in the water to feed the fish, but little Manuppella leaned over too far and plummeted headfirst into the lake. Pandemonium ensued. Manuppella’s mother leapt into the water, swimming for her drowning child, while his father jumped on a jet ski and raced for Manuppella’s prone body, but by the time they fished him out of the water and had brought him back onto the boat, Manuppella had stopped breathing. “What I remember most is the shimmering water, big and expansive water, with a colorful reef at the bottom. There were lots of fish and tons of these sharks. It was surreal. Later on, I figured out that it all must have been a hallucination, because there is nothing like that at Lake Powell,” said the freshman, as he sat in a worn cafeteria chair and recalled his near death experience. “Then I was brought up out of the water and my dad did CPR on me and resuscitated me.” Manuppella did not stay dead that day at Lake Powell. Although he stopped breathing and his heart had ceased beating, repeated CPR kept his blood flowing and maintained his brain functions until his lungs were cleared of water and began to function again. For several years he was paralyzed by a fear of water. Successive trips to therapy did nothing to alleviate this phobia. Then one day when he was six, he jumped into the lake again and “was fine. I forgot all about (the accident).” Today he is an avid mountain biker and also, despite his ordeal, jet skis and swims during his family’s vacations to Lake Powell. Manuppella is still curious about death. “I do not know what happens, really, after life. I don’t think anyone does. I mean they say that if you’re good you go to heaven, and if you’re bad you don’t. I have died, technically, but I still don’t know what happens when you die forever.” The episode has given Manuppella a unique perspective on the time he has left. “I don’t know what it feels like to die. You don’t feel death, what you feel is whatever is killing you. But I do know what it feels like to live. And that is what I plan on doing for a long time now.”

A 14-year-old boy stares at his reflection in the mirror. Something is not right, he thinks. Something is not fitting together. A 56-year-old woman stares at her reflection in the mirror in her bathroom. Something is not right, she thinks. Oh yes, I forgot to put on my mascara. For Connie Lela Rice, life has been a double-sided mirror since she was a 14year-old boy named Charles Leland Rice going through puberty. “I had this feeling that I should have been born a female,” Connie said. Charles began his investigation in 1994. His goal was to figure out why he had these feelings that a young man commonly did not possess. “I spent a lot of time on the Internet trying to figure out why I had these feelings,” Connie said. “What it came down to was that I felt trapped in a male body, and something needed to be done about it.” However, at that time, Charles was raising two children as a single parent and felt he had to suppress his feelings. By 2002, Charles felt an intense need for change once again. This time, it was not denied. “I started some intense research and made the decision that I would start my transition as soon as my children graduated from high school,” Connie said. There are many ways to say what Charles wanted: gender reassignment surgery, gender confirmation surgery, or simply, a sex change. In 2006, Charles informed his son and daughter of his decided sex change. “My daughter accepts me,” Connie said. “My son, however, left home the very next day, and I no longer have any contact with him.” Connie’s other family members reacted in many different ways. “I have no contact with my three brothers or with my father,” Connie said. “My two sisters have in their own ways accepted me and I exchange e-mails with my mom on a weekly basis.” It is not just Connie’s family that struggled to accept her choice. “I lost all of my previous friends,” she said. “However, I have made better and closer friends since that time.” There are lengthy steps involved with having a full and legal sex change. “First of all, one has to be at peace

with themselves once they make the decision,” Connie said. Next, Charles had to undergo therapy to have his papers signed by a physiologist for the surgery. After the therapy, Charles began the procedures that lead to the full sexual reassignment surgery. “I am in my sixth month of electrolysis to remove all of my facial hair,” Connie said. “I “I honestly do had surgery in not have any May of this year remove my regrets about to Adam’s apple and have had my choice. augmenToday I feel breast tation.” confident Connie takes estrogen and and happy anti-androgens about my to kill her male decision and testosterone, which she has changes.” been taking since April 2006. “Many transgenders do not undergo sexual reassignment surgery due to the cost,” Connie said. “It can be upwards of $20,000.” Connie plans on having her sex change in about four years. In the meantime, there are not only physical aspects of having a sex change but legal ones as well. “Having legally changed my name and gender identification has made life simpler,” Connie said. “My driver’s license says ‘female,’ and I live life fulltime as a female.” Connie is currently going to school to become a nurse. “My days are much like anyone else’s. I wake at 7 a.m. or so, chat online for a while and get breakfast,” Connie said. “Being a student, I spend some time studying before showering. I get dressed, put on my makeup, fix my hair and head off to school.” While Connie’s life is out of the ordinary and filled with numerous obstacles, the man on the verge of becoming a woman has chosen to be true to herself despite the repercussions. “I honestly do not have any regrets about my choice,” Connie said. “Today I feel confident and happy about my decision and changes.” ORANGE&BLACK | DECEMBER 2008

25


OPEN TO INTERPRETATION

...to be a girl ...tofrombe a boy a girl’s perspective from a boy’s perspective It is a typical day for high school senior Molly. She wakes up to the buzzing of her alarm clock at precisely 5 a.m. and begins her morning routine. She starts her day with a casual morning stretch and walks down the hall, reaches for the faucet and takes a lukewarm shower. Her day includes school, boys, volleyball practice and shopping for the perfect outfit for the upcoming dance. Her schedule runs through her mind as she begins to coordinate an outfit to match her new bracelet. It was a gift from her boyfriend that she received for their one-year anniversary. According to freshman Garrett Harrison, this is why girls have boyfriends. “All a (girl) wants is a boyfriend to pay and take care of her, which will in turn make her popular,” he said. A girl’s life, in Harrison’s opinion, is not only extensive but also somewhat complicated. It starts off much like Molly’s day and includes waking up early. “Girls wake up early so that they can straighten their hair, pick an outfit out and make sure that they are looking fresh. Girls always want to stand out and impress everyone.” Harrison also believes that girls do not eat breakfast because they have to stay skinny and maintain their image. Once it is time for school, “they do what they want,” which includes text messaging and socializing. “They never run out of things to say,” Harrison said. If girls need to use the restroom, they have a strange habit of “going all together in groups. It’s a wonder as to what they do in there.” After school, Harrison said that “some (girls) do sports and others do homework. I’m implying that they don’t do much.” Although he thinks they might not do much after school, their overall lifestyle is “harder than a guy, that’s for sure. They actually care about what they look like and stuff. They need to stop caring so much because it doesn’t matter. We guys don’t care,” he said. In social aspects, Harrison believes that girls express themselves better and have an easier time making friends. “Girls are easy to make friends with. If they have one friend, then they are bound to have at least 50 more through that one person.” Girls’ overall lifestyles “revolve around clothes and themselves,” said Harrison, making girls’ lifestyles seem self-centered and even a bit dramatic from a guy’s point of view.

26 ORANGE&BLACK | DECEMBER 2008

Waking up 10 minutes before class and stumbling into the bathroom for a quick shower, Max does not have a worry in his mind. His main focus is to try to get to class on time. Clothes are scattered across his bedroom floor, and he picks up the first article of clothing he sees. He proceeds to quickly sniff the armpit of a shirt and notices a small stain at the bottom where he had spilled ketchup two days earlier. The shirt does not smell that terrible, and he remains unconcerned about the small stain. He throws it on while grabbing the same pair of dirty jeans he wore yesterday. According to junior Mandy Schabacker, a guy’s life is pretty simple. It starts off much like Max’s morning did. “They wake up five minutes before school and just go in their pajamas,” Schabacker said. “They never care about how they smell or look and just go wherever looking like slobs.” Once they get to school, “they sleep during class, listen to iPods and do not pay attention.” She thinks that if a guy is under stress at school “they will usually fight someone,” giving them the dominant male status they crave. During lunch, boys go and “pig out at places like McDonalds,” Schabacker said. She once witnessed a guy who ordered and consumed eight cheeseburgers. After school “they go get all sweaty at practice,” and then proceed to “go home and eat like a slob (once again) all while watching South Park and Family Guy.” Schabacker said that guys “do not care about anything in their life except their sports and their video games.” They are different from girls in a social aspect, too. “Boys are very laid back and easy to talk to,” she said. A guy’s everyday lifestyle from a girl’s perspective is simple: “It’s so much easier to be a boy.” But who can truly know what it feels like to be a boy? Unless you are a boy, of course. Likewise for boys as well as girls, the stereotypes perpetuated by society may never allow boys and girls to end the soStories by Kaitlin Cain called “battle of the sexes.”


How can I achieve total health? Achieving total health is a lot like a game of Tetris, you have to carefuly arrange and monitor each piece to construct ideal fitness. Teenagers today often find themselves working into the dim hours of the night on mountains of homework, eating fast-food for lunch every day and binge drinking at weekend parties. Often times, these harmful practices do not faze teens, as we believe that we are indestructible, but in reality, we must care for our bodies just as well as adults and children do. In order to effectively take care of our bodies and stay as healthy as possible, it is crucial that we understand how our body works so we can nurture it accordingly. To fully understand the body, we must first take a look at each part individually to understand how it contributes to the whole system, just as bricks build upon one another to create a building. Not only must we understand the physical part of our bodies, but we must also understand the emotional components becuause achieving total health comes from having good physical and mental health. Using this knowledge, we must effectively determine how to care for our different parts which, as a whole, sustain our existence.

3

ORANGE&BLACK | | DECEMBER ORANGE&BLACK MARCH 20082008 27


IN MOTION

Under Your Skin: Know the Parts Everyone knows their body is a composition of many organs that work together toward one main goal: sustaining life. Yet, what exactly does each part do, and what do we need to do to keep everything healthy? Here is what you need to know:

Stomach The stomach produces and regulates acidic gastric juices that break down food into small particles and nutrients the body absorbs. The average adult stomach is 12 inches by 6 inches at its widest point.

Heart The heart pumps oxygen and nutrientrich blood throughout the body. The heart beats 100,000 times a minute and pumps 2000 gallons of blood every day. A normal heart beats 50 to 99 times a minute. Exercise, emotions and fevers can cause the heart to beat faster.

Graphic by Greg Coleman

Liver The liver is a meaty organ, weighing about three pounds and is protected by your rib cage. The liver filters the blood from the digestive tract, detoxifies chemicals and makes proteins that help with blood clotting and other functions.

Muscles The muscles hold the skeletal system together and make movement possible. There are approximately 750 muscles in the human body and they can be categorized in three groups: smooth, cardiac and skeletal muscles.

28 ORANGE&BLACK | DECEMBER 2008

Brain The brain is a jelly-like tissue that contains100 billion nerve cells. There are four major regions of the brain and each controls different parts of the body. The brain controls movements, emotions and all the functions of everyday life.

Lungs The lungs take in oxygen and release carbon dioxide. Oxygen passes through the windpipe and into your bloodstream where it is then taken to tissue and organs. We breathe between 2100 and 2400 gallons of air each day.

Kidneys The kidneys are bean-shaped organs that manage the waste from digestion in the blood stream. The kidneys get rid of the waste before it becomes harmful to the body. They also release important hormones into the body.

Skin The average adult’s skin is eight pounds and measures 22 square feet. It is waterproof and guards against chemicals and extreme weather. Skin is composed of three main layers: epidermis, dermis and subcutis.


TOTAL HEALTH

Taking care of your body Beneficial Suggestions

Avoid...

Alcohol Exercise is rewarding for your entire body. Exercise reduces heart diseases, maintains bone health, moderates blood pressure and helps prevent breast and prostate cancer. There are seven main components of fitness: body composition, cardio respiratory function and flexibility, muscle strength, endurance, balance, and coordination. Studies show that people should be exercising at least 60 minutes each day and at the very least, 30 minutes a day. Exercise releases endorphins that are hormones in the brain, which helps reduce symptoms of depression and enhances psychological fitness.

Your metabolism regulates how efficiently and quickly your body turns food into energy. Every person’s body metabolizes food at different rates, but many factors can either speed up or slow down this process. Eating healthy foods like whole grains, produce, fish and beans, along with a fitness routine involving interval training and dealing with stress constructively will speed up your metabolism and help you lose weight. Eating fast food for some people can seem as though it does not cause any problems, and this can be true for the current time, but once people reach middle age, health problems begin to rise to the surface from previous years of unhealthy eating.

For more information: Log on to these websites to find more information about exercising, nutrition, weight loss and custom-workouts to help you acheive total health: MensFitness.com: tips for sculpting your perfect body WomensHealthMag.com: tips for the female athlete WellnessLetter.com: health tips from UC Berkeley MyPyramid.gov: for nutritional guidance Webmd.com: credible source for health information

Long-term effects of consuming large quantities of alcohol can lead to: — permanent damage to vital organs — several different types of cancer — gastrointestinal irritations, such as nausea, diarrhea and ulcers — malnutrition and nutritional deficiencies — sexual dysfunctions — high blood pressure — lowered resistance to disease

Tanning beds

Significant UVA and UVB exposure can result from indoor tanning, especially in newer marked lamps which emit UVA doses that are 10 times greater than that of the sun. Significant research indicates that UVA is a carcinogen. Frequent tanning can lead to: — severe skin/corneal burns — skin infections — photoaging — skin cancer

In a survey asking180 Grand Junction High School students whether they go to a tanning bed:

24

said yes

While sun exposure is notorious for causing skin cancer, recent studies show that increased sun exposure may actually be beneficial to people and may even protect against cancer. A deficiency in vitamin D increases the risk for cancers and various other diseases including Type1Diabetes and Tuberculosis. It is vital that people receive an adequate amount of sun daily.

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Antioxidants are substances or nutrients that are vital in preventing damage to the body. By producing oxygen, the body creates free radicals like viruses that can cause damage to the body such as heart disease, macular degeneration, diabetes and cancer. To prevent such problems it is vital to eat fruits and vegetables with high amounts of vitamin C and vitamin E.

said no

Omega-3 fatty acids help maintain a healthy cardiovascular system, regulate healthy joints and improve brain function and memory. Omega-3 fatty acids cannot be produced in the body. Therefore, they must be obtained from an outside source like a supplement or simply consuming fish. Experts say to eat fish at least two times a week.

Sources: encarta.com, righthealth.com, webmd.com ORANGE&BLACK | DECEMBER 2008

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IN MOTION

Your Body Speaks What Your Mind Thinks

D

odgeball, kickball, steal the cone—the staples of P.E. classes across the nation. Physical education is incorporated in the curriculum of most American schools, and from an early age kids are trained to develop body movement and athletic ability. We are all taught that exercise and body awareness is vital to maintaining a healthy lifestyle. But what if students were required to attend a class called mental education (M.E.)? How important is it to also develop our minds outside the realm of simply thinking? Are emotions, moods and states such as compassion trainable mental skills? Richard Davidson, a neuroscientist from the University of Wisconsin at Madison, believes that the positive state is a trainable skill. In 2002 Davidson conducted a study of the brain activity of Tibetan Buddhist monks, some of whom had spent more than 10,000 hours of their lives in meditation. The monks were compared to a control group of college students who had no previous experience with meditation, and the results were astonishing. The monks produced gamma waves that were 30 times as strong as the students, indicating intensely focused thought. One of the most striking differences was in an area in the left prefrontal cortex, which is the site of activity that marks happiness. While the monks were generating feelings of compassion in their meditation, activity in the left side dominated the activity in the right, which is associated with negative thoughts.

The controversial results suggest that empathy and other emotions can be trained like a muscle. All of us could use some more focus on this kind of training. The ancient Greeks believed in sound body, sound mind—the idea that we must devote equal attention to our intellect and emotions as well as our physical self in order to have a truly healthy being. Detrick Snyder, senior, started meditating his sophomore year. He practices “awareness of breathing” meditation, clearing his mind by breathing in and out, in and out until he reaches what he calls “a place of pure consciousness.” Snyder focuses on living in the moment—existing rather than living for the past or the future. He realized how much of his life was caught up in stress. “All this...it’s only temporary,” he said. Along with the clarity of consciousness he said he achieves with meditating, Snyder has a better understanding of the interconnectivity of his body. “I have a pretty high pain tolerance,” he said. “I am able to control my mind better than I used to.” “One of the most permanent things we have is our mind,” he said. “If we can better understand our mind, we can better understand our world.”

Control Stress Stress is a cause of physical, emotional, and psychological strain. It can cause mild to serious health problems, from headaches to obesity to possibly cancer. Here are some simple ways to relieve stress… Smile Smiling even when you are sad can decrease any negative feelings you may have. While smiling is good, laughing is the best because it helps you calm down, while giving your body an internal workout. In and out When you are upset you tend to breathe shorter and shallower than normally. If you take in deeper breathes it calms the body and also gives the needed oxygen to your brain and other body parts. Be realistic You can create stress by making too busy of a schedule and not managing your time wisely. Prioritize your tasks and give yourself enough time to finish them. Diet and exercise Having a healthy diet keeps your body strong enough to deal with stress. Exercise makes people happier and calmer because it makes your body release a chemical called serotonin that decreases depression and anxiety.

Emily Dohm

Laughter...

relaxes the muscles.

decreases stress hormones that constrict blood vessels and suppress immune activity. triggers endorphins, hormones which function as natural pain relievers. is aerobic, providing a workout for the diaphragm and increasing the body’s ability to use oxygen. Adding a little humor to your day can completely alter your outlook on life. Laughter not only provides us with a happier attitude, but is also clinically proven to provide the body with innumerable healthy benefits:

All information compiled by Alyssa Behrens, Cody Holman, Emilie Pearson and Margeaux Prinster 30 ORANGE&BLACK | DECEMBER 2008


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ORANGE&BLACK | DECEMBER 2008 31


FUTURE

January 1, 2009 Adults of drinking age wake up from the previous night’s New Years celebration to find that the streets are a mess and the rum is gone. Children are blamed . . . January 20, 2009 President Obama is sworn into office only to find clear gelatin in all the toilets in the White House and the Oval Office’s chair missing. George W. Bush hung a banner in Obama’s stateroom that said, “Mission Accomplished!” February 3, 2009 “Karma Chameleon” by Boy George becomes the new national anthem. December 21, 2012 A giant meteor is on a crash course to Earth. Steve Jobs invents iProtection. The meteor immediately turns around and hits Pluto, doubling it in size, and legally classifying it as a planet. People rejoice and Apple’s sales increase exponentially. August 30, 2014 Wikipedia becomes a publicly traded company and the only credible source for mankind. The Library of Congress is uploaded to the site three hours before it is burned down. One employee says, “Those books took up too much space anyway.” May 16, 2021 After several years of sales losses to Apple, PC users rise up in retaliation against Mac users with an even sleeker, more futuristic look. Due to their technology being run on Windows Vista, the rebellion is quickly supressed. January 1, 2027 Adults of drinking age wake up from the previous night’s New Year’s celebration to find that the streets are a mess, and the rum is gone. Children are blamed . . . again. April 28, 2034 Explorers find giant, intelligent penguins in Antarctica. The explorers are held captive for 10 years then released in return for a third of Russia’s nuclear arms. The explorers stated upon return, “They were kind of cute.”

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August 30, 2035 At the post service in Leadville, Keith Richards finally dies at the age of 91. His son snorts his ashes, becoming immortal under the condition that he will always be worse at guitar than the other, lesser-known guitarist in his band. September 2, 2035 Keith Richards’ son sneezes and Keith comes back to life. He says, “Hey mate, I wasn’t dead. I was just taking a nap.” January 1, 2038 The Bible is lost after books are discovered to cause leukemia, much to the delight of the major television networks and Google executives whose ratings and traffic almost double. November 17, 2039 It is revealed through DNA research that dinosaurs were the most intelligent and advanced civilization in history. They had schematics for air travel and even the iPhone. The only thing that prevented them from actually building these technologies was their tiny arms. March 13, 2041 A new endless energy source is discovered after finding the Energizer Bunny in Machu Picchu and capturing him. He is then hooked up to a containment facility in Greenland and supplies the world’s energy. September 29, 2042 Children are charged with theft of the world’s rum supply. The children admit to committing the crime. February 11, 2056 Oprah enlists the space pirate army and takes over the world through tactical financial and military moves. The magazine “O” becomes the only publication of mankind.

3

February 14, 2056 Space travel becomes the main method of transportation. A fourth of the population decides to become space pirates. Eye patches become fashionable.

November 22, 2067 Conditions on earth are miserable. The children of the earth request an audience with the Supreme Empress Oprah. The children engage Oprah in a high-stakes double-dutch competition. They wager the world’s rum supply against control of the world. The children lose, and Oprah becomes more powerful than ever. January 23, 2068 The Bible, lost since 2038, is found mowed into South America, which has become an overgrown grassland. Harrison Ford, who, like Keith Richards, never died, is enlisted to adventure through the grassland and write down the Bible — all 774746 words of it.

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2069-2081 No recorded history. July 4, 2086 Oprah finishes Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows and models her life after Voldemort. On the same day, a child is born in America. They call him the Rum Runner and prophets say that he will defeat Oprah one day. July 5, 2087 The day after the Rum Runner’s birthday, Oprah attempts to kill the infant in his sleep with a spell. Because Oprah is not a witch, the spell does not work and the young child’s parents discover her. The enraged parents defeat Oprah and end her 31-year reign. She is banished to a far away galaxy by the wizard Criss Angel. 2087-2100 The Big Three immortal beings, Harrison Ford, Keith Richards and Steve Jobs, rule the world in peaceful coexistence. On January 1, 2100, all the rum disappears.

Mesa County Valley School District 51 Grand Junction High School 2115 Grand Avenue Grand Junction, CO 81501

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What will happen in the 21st century?

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