Page 1


Table of Contents A.

INTRODUCTION LETTER .............................................................................................................................................................................................. 1

B.

ADVANCING STANDARDS ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 1 1.

ACCREDITATION AND LICENSING ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 2

2.

HAWAII COUNCIL OF PRIVATE SCHOOLS (HCPS) BOARD OF DIRECTORS ........................................................................................................................... 2 ADVOCATING ............................................................................................................................................................................................................. 1

C. 1.

LEGISLATIVE OVERVIEW .................................................................................................................................................................................................... 2

2.

HAIS PRIORITY BILLS - PASSED ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 2

3.

HAIS PRIORITY BILLS - FAILED ............................................................................................................................................................................................ 2

4.

ARTS FIRST PARTNERS ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 2

D.

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS ............................................................................................................................................................... 1 1.

HAIS HEADS AND TRUSTEES’ CONFERENCE ....................................................................................................................................................................... 2

2.

NAIS STRATEGY & DESIGN PROGRAM ............................................................................................................................................................................... 2

3.

HAIS & UH MASTER’S DEGREE PROGRAM IN PRIVATE SCHOOL LEADERSHIP .................................................................................................................... 2

4.

HAIS LEARNING WALKS...................................................................................................................................................................................................... 2

5.

HAIS INSTITUTE FOR 21ST CENTURY TEACHING AND LEARNING ........................................................................................................................................ 2

E.

SPECIAL PROGRAMS .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 1 6.

SCHOOLS OF THE FUTURE ................................................................................................................................................................................................. 2

7.

HENC VIDEOS ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 2

8.

GROW HAWAII................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 2

9.

STUDENT VOICES ............................................................................................................................................................................................................... 2

10. HAIS/KAMEHAMEHA SCHOOLS CHARTER SCHOOL ACCREDITATION................................................................................................................................. 2 11. HAIS ANNUAL RECOGNITION DINNER ............................................................................................................................................................................... 2 F.

STUDENT PROGRAMS ................................................................................................................................................................................................ 1 1.

KAMEHAMEHA SCHOOLS KIPONA SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM ............................................................................................................................................ 2

2.

HAWAII SCHOOLS DIGITAL MEDIA GRANT......................................................................................................................................................................... 2

G.

HAWAIIAN EDUCATIONAL COUNCIL ........................................................................................................................................................................... 1 1.

H.

HAWAII EXECUTIVE CONFERENCE ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 2 CONSTITUENCY GROUPS ............................................................................................................................................................................................ 1

1.

ADMISSIONS DIRECTORS ................................................................................................................................................................................................... 2

2.

BUSINESS OFFICERS ........................................................................................................................................................................................................... 2

3.

COUNCIL OF ADVANCEMENT OFFICERS............................................................................................................................................................................. 2

4.

RELIGIOUS LEADERS........................................................................................................................................................................................................... 2

5.

STUDENT ACTIVITIES DIRECTORS ....................................................................................................................................................................................... 2

6.

SUMMER SCHOOL DIRECTORS........................................................................................................................................................................................... 2

7.

TECHNOLOGY COORDINATORS.......................................................................................................................................................................................... 2

I.

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS AND REPRESENTATIONS ............................................................................................................................................... 1

J.

HAIS BOARD OF DIRECTORS ....................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

K.

HAIS STAFF ................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 1


INTRODUCTION LETTER Dear Colleagues and Friends, As Executive Director and Associate Director of the Hawaii Association of Independent Schools (HAIS), we are pleased to provide this 2011-12 fiscal year report on your association, its programs and activities. Over the past year we have made a concerted effort to expand our collective voice for schools to advance your interests and maintain your independence, support accreditation and regular evaluation to stimulate continuous school improvement, and plan for the exploration of new educational opportunities and perspectives to move us well into the future. HAIS board, staff and members worked diligently to strengthen and expand learning opportunities, specifically in the area of higher education programs. HAIS also launched its online media campaign “HAISconnect� on Facebook, Twitter and Youtube. In the months ahead, we will be rolling out additional online community-focused services which build, as well as deepen, the dialog with our members and community. The success of HAIS is due in large part to our member leaders. We especially thank our board members for their outstanding leadership during the past year. We also thank our members and strategic partners for their continued engagement and commitment with HAIS In 2012. Working together to develop relevant conferences and programs, sponsor important initiatives and publications, and shape a bold new strategic plan helped us to achieve success on behalf of our island community. As we move into the 2012-2013 fiscal year, we look forward to continuing our collaboration with all of you to expand our voice and action for independent education here in Hawaii. Sincerely,

Robert Witt Executive Director, HAIS

Roberta Bishop Associate Director, HAIS

THANK YOU FOR YOUR SUPPORT AND PARTICIPATION The Association membership for the 2011-2012 School Year was: Full Members: 59 Provisional Members: 3 Association Members: 6 Affiliate Members: 32 Total Members: 100 2


ADVANCING STANDARDS HAIS is committed to helping schools improve themselves and the education they offer through a recognized accreditation process. Throughout the year, HAIS staff and member schools were active in a number of initiatives focused on advancing efficient and effective standards and operations.

ACCREDITATION AND LICENSING Volunteer Leadership for the HAIS Accreditation Program Rod Chamberlain (Kamehameha Schools) begins his term as HAIS delegate to the Accrediting Commission for Schools at WASC. Dan White, Island Pacific Academy, served as chair of the HAIS Secondary Commission, and Bob Peters (Hanahau`oli) served as chair of the HAIS Elementary Commission. Robert Witt served on the NAIS Commission on Accreditation. Roberta Bishop and Megan Kawatachi served as staff for the HAIS school improvement and evaluation programs. Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC) Robert Witt and Roberta Bishop attended the WASC Winter Commission meeting in San Diego. 25 accreditation visits were convened jointly with WASC. Partners at CAIS, WCEA, AWSNA and AMS HAIS continues to be accreditation partners with the California Association of Independent Schools (CAIS), Western Catholic Education Association (WCEA), the Association of Waldorf Schools of North America (AWSNA), the American Montessori Society (AMS). The CAIS/HAIS Accreditation Task Force continues to jointly review and revise the CAIS and HAIS accreditation protocols.

ACCREDITATION AT A GLANCE 2011- 12 25 Accreditation Visits

10 Full Self-Study Visits

6 Mid-Term Visits

3 Three-Year Revisits

2 Initial Visits

4 Substantive Change visits

82 Volunteers on Visiting Committees Full Visits Chairs:

CAIS – 6

WASC – 1

WCEA – 1

HAIS – 1

International – 1

Hawaii Council of Private Schools (HCPS) Unaccredited private schools in Hawaii are participants in our licensing program, implemented under the auspices of the Hawaii Council of Private Schools (HCPS). HCPS conducted fifteen licensing visits this year and welcomed two new member schools: New Hope Christian School and Hoaloha Kai Montessori School. Mark Sugimoto (Hanalani Schools) continued to serve as chair of the HCPS Board of Directors, and Edna Hussey (Mid-Pacific Institute) continued as vice chair. Roberta Bishop serves as HCPS executive director, and Myrna Medeiros serves as the organization’s secretary/treasurer. Criminal History Record Check Program The Criminal History Record Check Program, operated out of the HAIS office, is another important activity of HCPS. This year, 1545 background checks were processed for new school employees at HAIS member schools. Kamehameha Schools Criminal History Record Check Program HAIS continues to provide criminal background checks for all prospective employees of Kamehameha Schools on Oahu and the neighbor islands. 3


Hawaii Council of Private Schools (HCPS) Board of Directors OFFICERS Mark Sugimoto (Chairman) Superintendent Hanalani Schools

Edna Hussey (Vice Chairman) Principal – Elementary Mid Pacific Institute

Roberta Bishop Executive Director HCPS Administrative Office

Teryl Loeffler Superintendent of Schools Hawaii Conference of Seventh-Day Adventists

Florence Teruya Principal (Ret.) Waolani Judd Nazarene School

DIRECTORS Jyo Bridgewater Borg Principal (K-8) ASSETS School Jocelyn Romero Demirbag Chair of School Haleakala Waldorf School Mark Gallagher Head of School Kaimuki Christian School

STAFF Myrna Medeiros Executive Secretary HCPS Administrative Office

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Kate Mulligan Head of School Hualalai Academy Rebecca Sanchez Ovitt Principal - Elementary Hawaii Baptist Academy

Russell Valente Interim Principal Saint Louis School Robert Whiting Head of School Holy Nativity School


ADVOCATING This past year, there were several legislative matters of major interest or concern to Hawaii’s independent schools. A priority for HAIS was to maintain communication with members of the Hawaii legislature and provide state officials the “independent school viewpoint” and promote HAIS member interests.

Highlights of the 2011 Legislative Season Legislative Overview HAIS enjoyed a reprieve from measures that would reduce or eliminate tax exemptions for non-profit organizations, schools, hospitals, etc. and focused on initiatives that directly impact member schools. Entering the 2012 legislative session, HAIS was cautiously optimistic that legislators would not pursue antibusiness or burdensome tax initiatives. House and Senate leadership committed to balance critical needs with resources and pledged to hold the line on new taxes or expansion of state programs through major general fund increases. Political uncertainty related to reapportionment, court challenges to proposed district boundary lines, and the upcoming elections supported a balanced approach to policy-making. Not surprisingly, healthcare, human services, and education were banner issues during this election year. This session saw a rare extension of the conference period to give legislators additional time to negotiate an agreement on an $11.2 billion supplemental budget. This provided authorization for $3.2 billion in state construction projects intended to bolster jobs and the state’s continuing economic recovery. Legislators also came to a last-minute agreement over an $11.2 million grant-in-aid appropriation for several non-profit and social support service organizations. By the end of the session, 345 of the 2,291 bills introduced were passed by the legislature and transmitted to Governor Neil Abercrombie for consideration while 201 of the 708 resolutions introduced were adopted. The governor has until July 10 to veto, sign, or allow a bill to become law without his signature. If the governor chooses to veto a bill, the notice of intent to veto must be provided to the legislature no later than June 25. To override a veto, the legislature may decide to convene a special session, unlikely given the timing of the August primary election. HAIS Priority Bills - PASSED The 2012 Legislature saw the passage of important education bills. •

Special Purpose Revenue Bonds (SPRB) – Support HAIS shepherded three special purpose revenue bond (SPRB) initiatives – drafted and introduced a bill for Hawaii Preparatory Academy and supported two others (Hawaii Pacific University and Le Jardin Academy). All measures are expected to become law. Status: transmitted to the Governor.

Charter Schools Omnibus Overhaul and Funding - Support SB 2115 repeals the current charter school law and replaces it with a new chapter governing charter schools based on model charter school law and recommendations of the Charter School Governance, Accountability, and Authority Task Force. Once implemented, this will drive many changes including the adoption of performance contracts outlining expectations between charter schools and the charter school commission. A second bill requires the board of education to contract for an implementation and transition coordinator and makes a $500,000 appropriation. Status: both measures were transmitted to the Governor.

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Exemptions from Child Care Licensing – Support Exemptions for any kindergarten, school, or program licensed by the charter school review panel, the Hawaii Council of Private Schools, or any federal agency and certain child care programs conducted by the counties from child care licensing by the department of human services were approved this session. At HAIS’ request, the measure is effective July 1, 2013. Based on strong support by member schools, HAIS actively lobbied on this measure and collaborated with the Department of Human Services and the Governor’s early childhood coordinator, Terry Lock. In light of a veto effort by HAEYC, HAIS is working with the Governor’s Policy Office to rally support for this measure while developing an action plan for capacity-building and implementation. Status: transmitted to the Governor.

Business Registration Law Housekeeping - Support HAIS has supported this Department of Commerce and Consumer Affairs housekeeping initiative for two years. Status: transmitted to the Governor.

Early Learning (Executive Office on Early Learning) – Support Establishes the Executive Office on Early Learning and the Early Learning Advisory Board to replace the Early Learning Council. This also requires that students be at least five-years-old by July 31 of the school year in order to attend kindergarten at a public school. Status: transmitted to the Governor. HAIS supported the confirmation of Alfred Castle and Christina Cox to the Early Learning Council. Status: transmitted to the Governor

Concussion Awareness Program - Monitor Requires the DOE and the Hawaii High School Athletic Association to develop a concussion awareness program to provide guidelines for public and private schools. Status: transmitted to the Governor

Employment Bills - Monitor Legislators worked expeditiously to move out a bill to extend the discounted unemployment insurance (UI) contribution rate for employers. This also temporarily provides a 75% weekly benefit amount of UI claimants. Act 6 (2012) expires December 31, 2012. Unless legislative action is taken again, the employer contribution rate will revert to a higher fee schedule.

In tandem with the first bill, legislators passed a measure to provide a graduated increase of the UI contribution rates for employers from 0.2% to 1.2% with the highest rate at 6.6%. The intent is to increase rates for employers that have more “experience” with providing former employees with UI claims that are charged against their accounts. This legislation is effective January 1, 2013.

HAIS Priority Bills – FAILED Several bills calling for teacher evaluations, collective bargaining reforms and a state-mandated bell schedule failed to pass this session as did a number of measures of interest to HAIS. •

Special Purpose Revenue Bonds (SPRB) for Charter Schools - Support Proposes a constitutional amendment to authorize the State to issue special purpose revenue bonds to assist charter schools, not-for-profit corporations that support charter schools, and community development financial institutions that support charter schools.

Tax Code Adjustment Re: Cap on Itemized Deductions – Support Though it was not likely to pass, HAIS joined with the non-profit community and the Hawaii Alliance of Nonprofit Organizations to support a measure to repeal the temporary limit on the amount of itemized deductions that may be claimed by certain taxpayers. This limit is likely to impact donations from wealthier taxpayers, though impacts have not been reported by member schools.

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ARTS First and Grow Green/School Garden Initiatives (bills and resolutions) - Support

Technology in Schools Resolution – Support Requesting the Board of Education and Department of Education, in collaboration with the Hawaii Association of Independent Schools, to examine local and national models of best practices for technology use in schools, and recommend any new guidelines to increase internet access to allow the responsible and positive integration of social media in the classroom, while ensuring necessary protections to prevent abuse.

Employment Bills - Monitor While there were a number of bills introduced to mandate meal breaks and paid sick and safe leave benefits to address abusive work environments and to make significant changes to the workers’ compensation law, only a few workforce-related bills made it through the session.

“Safe Schools”/Cyberbullying - Monitor Establishes an offense of harassment by cyberbullying as a class C felony. The department of education and board of education have both rules and policies governing cyberbullying. Legislation was passed in 2011 to require the monitoring and enforcement of these policies, however concerns were raised that this legislation would not provide protection during non-school hours or to non-department of education students and the general public. This was one of several "safe schools"/anti-bullying bills introduced this session. Concerns were raised by the school community that the language was silent on what responsibilities a school would have in terms of monitoring and enforcement. Given the national dialog on this matter and support from the GLBT community, a bill is likely to be introduced again next session. The private school community may want to take proactive steps to develop policies which may support exemption from a state policy.

ARTS FIRST Partners The ARTS FIRST partnership brings together agencies to strengthen arts education in Hawaii. ARTS FIRST was initiated when the Hawaii State Legislature enacted ACT 80/99, with HAIS being one of the mandated and original partners. Among the many programs and initiatives offered in the 2011-12 school year, the ARTS FIRST Partners supported House Bill 2407, an Arts Education bill which appropriates funds for high quality, integrated, meaningful arts education, requesting $250,000 for Artists-in-the-Schools Program and $750,000 for Professional Development for classroom teachers for in-school arts integrated curriculum and teaching artists who work collaboratively with educators. Although it passed the State House Arts and Culture committee with amendments, the bill did not move forward during this legislative session. ARTS FIRST Partners: • • • •

College of Education, University of Hawaii College of Arts and Humanities, University of Hawaii Hawaii Arts Alliance Hawaii Association of Independent Schools

• • • •

Hawaii State Department of Education Hawaii State Foundation on Culture and the Arts Honolulu Theater for Youth, Affiliate Partner Maui Arts & Cultural Center, Affiliate Partner

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BUILDING LEADERS Developing high quality, challenging and innovative professional development programs for teachers and administrators was a major focus for HAIS in 2011, helping to increase participants’ knowledge, skills, attitudes and beliefs, and impacting student learning at all levels.

PROFFESIONAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS HAIS & UH Master’s Degree Program in Private School Leadership HAIS and the Educational Foundations Department of the College of Education of the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa jointly operate a master’s degree program, which focuses on educational leadership in the unique setting of the private school. The program is designed to meet the needs of leaders and aspiring leaders in independent schools, be they administrators, teachers or other types of educators. The program curriculum blends research-based knowledge with the wisdom of experienced private school leaders. Cohort IV concluded their studies on July 22, 2011 with a Graduate Celebration convened at Punahou School, celebrating the accomplishments of these 23 leaders. Cohort IV Students • • • • • • • • • • • •

Ella Browning, Mid-Pacific Institute Verena Denove, The Wesley School Todd Fleming, ‘Iolani School Sarah Flowers Kealoha Ho‘omana-Heffernan, Kamehameha Schools - Kapālama Middle School Brad Jackson, San Domenico School Todd Jinbo, Mid-Pacific Institute Brian Johnson, Punahou School Toni Kaui, Kamehameha Schools Bob McIntosh, Mid-Pacific Institute Lauren Medeiros, Punahou School Mike Moses, La Pietra – Hawaii Schools for Girls

• • • • • • • • • • •

Stacey Olson, St. Mark Lutheran School Katy Roybal, Trinity School Michael Samale, The Bishop's School Susan Sanger Keith Sarkisian, Brentwood School Wai‘ale‘ale Sarsona, Ho‘olako Like Sione Thompson, St. Louis School Tatiana Fox, Kamehameha Schools – Kapālama Middle School Kirk Uejio, ‘Iolani School Noriko Vergel, Island Pacific Academy Jesse Wooten, Santa Barbara Middle School

HAIS Institute for 21st Century Teaching & Learning One of the early insights from the HAIS Schools of the Future Initiative funded by the Hawaii Community Foundation in 2009 was the great need for coursework and collaborations that would help educators and administrators understand the demands of current digital learning environments, rebuild and refine their knowledge and skills, and design curriculum and performance-based strategies that meet the educational needs of today’s and tomorrow’s students. To fill that need, HAIS decided to form a new Institute for 21st Century Teaching & Learning.

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The design of the Institute is the result of research and discussions over a one-year period by members of a Design Team who were invited by the Executive Director of HAIS to help create new adult learning opportunities for Hawaii’s teachers. The Design Team included heads of school, teachers, university administrators, education researchers and consultants from a broad spectrum of Hawaii’s education community. Generous funding from the Harold K. L. Castle Foundation, the Omidyar ‘Ohana Fund of the Hawaii Community Foundation, and the Kamehameha Schools provided support for the initial implementation and ongoing work of the Institute’s Design Team. The Design Team worked to enhance visibility of existing programs currently being offered by various institutions in Hawaii, and also to create new graduate level opportunities in “instructional leadership” for teachers that would assist in “retooling” current in-service teachers for the challenges of teaching and learning in the 21st Century. The Design Team included: Phil Bossert , Lisa Leong, Bob Peters, Joe Rice, Brandy Sato, Bruce Schauble, Alyson Silverstein, Paul Singer, Dan White, and Robert Witt with participation from Rod Chamberlain, Will Hancock, Leigh Kincaid and Phyllis Unebasami. In the Fall semester of 2011, the Institute, in cooperation with Chaminade University, launched a new master’s degree program (MED) in Instructional Leadership which is delivered in both an online format and as an intensive summer cohort -- a format that has been so successful with HAIS’s MED in Private School Leadership over the past decade. In the spring of 2012, the Institute partnered once again with Chaminade and also with Kanu o ka Aina Learning Ohana (KALO) to offer a second MED in Educational Leadership for Charter School Administrators. For both of these programs, the Institute is responsible for recruitment of students, identification of appropriate faculty, course offerings and provisioning of venues. Although the Institute is an initiative of HAIS, the programs of the Institute support the educational needs of Hawaii’s public, charter, parochial and independent schools. The Institute is currently in discussion with representatives from several of these constituencies concerning research initiatives, as well as additional collaborative degree and certificate programs to meet specific needs identified by the K-12 community. HAIS Learning Walks The Learning Walk is a new HAIS program featuring school visits with the purpose of sharing knowledge and building collaboration. Host schools invite HAIS faculty members into selected classrooms with a focus on a particular theme. The day begins with a large group assembly introducing attendees to the host school and providing background information about the selected theme in the context of the school. The group then breaks into small groups for classroom observations. A debrief over lunch with the classroom teachers concludes the school visit. Learning Walks convened on February 24, 2012 at Hanahau‘oli School, Island Pacific Academy, and Le Jardin Academy, and April 27, 2012 at Honolulu Waldorf School and Punahou School, with a total of 40 teachers who participated. HAIS Heads’ & Board Chairs’ Conference The HAIS Heads’ and Board Chairs’ Conference convened on January 18, 2012 at Aulani with 56 attendees. The morning focused on leadership through partnership between the head of school and board chair with Roger Bass facilitating. During the afternoon session, the HAIS board led by Rod Chamberlain facilitated a discussion on the working draft of the HAIS Strategic Plan. 9


INNOVATING To meet the needs and enhance the effectiveness of member schools, HAIS continued to take a leadership role in developing key initiatives, conferences, programs and workshops for teachers, administrators, parents and students.

SPECIAL PROGRAMS SCHOOLS OF THE FUTURE INITIATIVE The Hawaii Community Foundation (HCF) funded and HAIS managed Schools of the Future (SOTF) initiative continued into its third program year during 2011-12. 16 projects involving 18 HAIS member institutions were funded for a third year in May of 2011.

• • • • • •

Academy of the Pacific Assets School Hanahau‘oli School Hanalani Schools Hongwanji Mission School Hualalai Academy

• • • • • •

‘Iolani School Island Pacific Academy Le Jardin Academy Maui Preparatory Academy Mid-Pacific Institute Montessori Hale O Keiki

• • • • •

St. John Vianney School and St. Anthony School in Kailua Sacred Hearts Academy St. Joseph School in Hilo St. John the Baptist School and St. Anthony School in Honolulu

2011 SOTF Study Tour The third year was launched with a group Study Tour to the Building Learning Communities conference in Boston at the end of July, but participating schools were also allowed to use their travel funds to attend the annual conference of the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) in Philadelphia at the end of June. Almost 100 SOTF team members attended one or the other or both events, and participated in HAIS organized “debriefing” sessions at which members shared information and insights. SOTF Community of Learners Participants from each of the projects also continued to meet on a quarterly basis to share challenges, opportunities, issues and best practices that they are encountering in the process of transforming their respective learning environments. Four face-to-face workshops were convened on November 17, January 20, March 9 and May 10. Three of the gatherings brought together two to five persons from each of the 16 projects for a day of collaboration around a specific theme, and provided an opportunity to exchange information among participants. The March 9th session brought together the head of school and a trustee from each of the projects to get their impressions of the SOTF initiative and discuss ways to sustain its results beyond the grant period. Another important activity that began during year three was visitations among the schools. Teams of teachers from one project arranged to spend a morning or an entire day at another school observing teaching practices and discussing what they saw and learned with the host teachers. This aspect of the SOTF initiative has been very beneficial – and even inspirational – for many teachers and will be expanded during the fourth year of the grant activities.

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2011 SOTF Conference The 2011 SOTF Conference was held on September 8th at the Sheraton Waikiki Hotel Almost 1,000 educators from across the State turned out to hear keynote speakers Alan November and Marco Torres, as well as a series of standing-room-only breakout sessions provided by teachers from the participating projects. In addition, students from six of the project schools set up presentations in the lobby and exhibited how they are learning as a result of SOTF initiatives at their schools. An important outcome of the 2011 SOTF Conference was a request from the Hawaii Department of Education (HDOE) to jointly sponsor the 2012 conference with HCF and HAIS. Almost 300 public and charter school teachers and administrators were among the attendees of the 2011 SOTF Conference. A planning team was formed and a decision made that the 2012 SOTF Conference will become a two-day event – October 23 & 24 – held at the Hawaii Convention Center. The 2012 SOTF Conference will be jointly sponsored by HCF, HAIS, HDOE and the newly formed Hawaii Society for Technology in Education (HSTE) which is the local affiliate of ISTE, the formation of which is also a direct result of the 2010 SOTF Study Tour to the Denver ISTE conference. Other SOTF Highlights The Hawaii affiliate of the International Society for Technology in Education was formed during 2011 as a direct result of the large number of SOTF teachers that attended the 2010 ISTE conference as part of the 2010 SOTF Study Tour. Hawaii was the only state in the US without an affiliate, and a group of individuals from the SOTF projects took the initiative to invite colleagues from the HDOE as well as the University of Hawaii and Chaminade University to form a board of directors and launch the Hawaii Society for Technology in Education. HSTE was formally approved by ISTE as an affiliate during the summer of 2011 and now has over 120 members from across the state. The SOTF Initiative also was one of only six projects to be selected as part of a national research project by the Grantmakers for Effective Organizations (GEO) to study the effective use of communities of learners. The final report – The Power of Learning: How Learning Communities Amplify the Work of Nonprofits and Grantmakers – published in the spring of 2012, highlights the results of the community of learners that is an integral part of the SOTF initiative. HAIS is grateful for the partnership with the Hawaii Community Foundation (HCF) in this important education initiative. Our association continues to benefit from the leadership, vision and support provided by Chris Van Bergeijk, Pi’ikea Miller, Natalie Nimmer and Caroline Miyashiro at HCF. Grow Hawaii Now completing its second year, Grow Hawaii is a three-year effort designed to make meaningful impact on food behavior and build capacity with cafeteria managers at twelve private independent schools, two public charter schools, and one public school using garden programs as the leverage point for change. Thus far, we are encouraged by progress made toward (1) increasing awareness of locally grown food while simultaneously reconnecting youth back to the natural world; and (2) piloting school garden programs to serve as mission critical dimensions of school life for those schools actively adopting new 21st century teaching and learning practices. During the 2011-2012 school year, Grow Hawaii piloted an Eat Local Day with five independent schools and one charter school; serving 2,191 lunches made from locally sourced ingredients, including produce harvested from school gardens! 11


Grow Hawaii uses HAIS’ independence, innovative culture, nimbleness, and proven problem-solving capacity to enhance the value proposition for offering scalable and replicable approaches capable of imbuing new behaviors and attitudes in sustainability. The Grow Hawaii community of schools: • • • • • • •

Academy of the Pacific American Renaissance Academy Ewa Makai Middle School Hongwanji Mission School Honolulu Waldorf School ‘Iolani School Kamaile Academy (PCS)

• • • • • • • •

Kamehameha Schools - Kapālama Campus Punahou School Sacred Hearts Academy Saint Louis School St. Anthony Parish School – Kailua St. Mark Lutheran School University Laboratory School (NCPCS) Windward Nazarene Academy

Funding and thought partnership for Grow Hawaii comes from the Ulupono Fund of the Hawai‘i Community Foundation, the Atherton Family Foundation, and the State of Hawai‘i Department of Agriculture; corporate support provided by Whole Foods; and program partners include Kokua Hawai’i Foundation, Holoholo General Store, the Culinary Institute of the Pacific at Kapiolani Community College. Student Voices HAIS is proud to partner with HONOLULU Magazine and Upspring Media in constructing this new program, devoted to empowering youth as socially responsible learners and engaged citizens. This inaugural year, students were asked to engage with the theme, “Hawaii’s Relationship with Social and Environmental Justice.” The 2012 HAIS Student Voices publication, an anthology of work selected by a student Advisory Board from over 200 student-submitted essays, short stories, drawings, and poems, will be featured in the July issue of HONOLULU. Like our annual Private School Guide, production and distribution of Student Voices by HONOLULU Magazine makes the quality of learning that occurs in Hawaii private schools evident to prospective parents, fellow educators, and colleagues of HAIS, as well as the general community at large. The companion website to the print publication, where the full extent of student submissions is available for viewing, can be found at http://studentvoices.hais.org/. As the program grows over the years, it will serve as a vital clearinghouse and archival site of student work which will be retrievable by school, year, grade, theme, and media type. HAIS thanks the schools whose teachers and students participated in this inaugural year. Their willingness to share student demonstrations of learning and support a culture of transparency among our community of schools is deeply appreciated.

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Hawaii Educational Networking Consortium (HENC) In collaboration with ‘Olelo and the Hawaii Educational Networking Consortium (HENC), HAIS produces videos focused on current and relevant educational practices, ideas, and/or themes in schools and educational organizations across Hawaii. These 30-minute videos are aired on DOE TEACH channel 356. 2011-12 Videos • • • • • • • •

Art and Creativity: Pomaika‘i Elementary School Design-Thinking ePortfolios Gardens as Living Classrooms Growing Greener Schools Importance of Early Learning Integrated Garden Curriculum Kids Going Google

• • • •

Kipuka Kalani‘iki: A Look at Kalani High School's Sustainability Program Linking Garden Lessons Thoughts on Education with Drs. Michael Chun and Val Iwashita Waimea Middle Public Conversion Charter School: Integrating Cultural Values into Curriculum

HAIS/Kamehameha Schools Charter School Accreditation In the 2011-2012 school year, HAIS continued its partnership with Kamehameha Schools, Ho‘olako Like, Charter School Support Department by providing technical assistance, professional development, and coaching to Hawaiian-focused charter schools (HFCS) seeking accreditation with the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC). The first five HFCS that earned Candidacy for Accreditation in Year One of the collaboration with KS are joined by another five HFCS in Year Two. All ten HFCS are currently engaged in the rigorous process of SelfStudy by continuing to participate in HAIS trainings and workshops, serving on HAIS Visiting Committees, and engaging all constituents of the school community in the discussion and action of continuous school improvement. Another three HFCS are currently completing their Initial Visit Applications and will be ready for their Initial Visits in Fall 2012. It is anticipated that two schools will host their first Full Visit for accreditation in Spring semester 2013. HAIS Reception at NAIS Annual Conference On Wednesday, February 29, the HAIS Reception at the 2012 NAIS Conference convened at the Sheraton Seattle Hotel with 100 educators. The Reception was a great opportunity for catching up with old friends, meeting new people within our community and NAIS, and hearing from world-renowned keynote speakers and distinguished practitioners. HAIS Annual Recognition Dinner Moving tributes and amusing stories highlighted the evening on Wednesday, May 2 at the HAIS Annual Recognition Dinner as colleagues and friends from the HAIS academic community were honored: Mike Chun, Grace Cruz, Lily Driskill, Stan Fortuna, Jane Heimerdinger, Pat Ho, Val Iwashita, Ed Keyes, Kate Mulligan, James Nelligan, Ruby Ovitt, Carol Riley, Bob Whiting, and Cynthia Winans-Burns. This year’s event included a performance by the La Pietra Show Choir and an art gallery featuring student work from Hanahau`oli School, Holy Nativity School, and ‘Iolani School.

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STUDENT PROGRAMS Kamehameha Schools Kipona Scholarship Program In an effort to transition the scholarship program from the original 3-year pilot into its status as a regular, ongoing KS program, a decision was made to give the program a name that represents the keiki participating in the program. The name "Kipona" was selected reflecting a style of lei known for using various types of flowers, shells, or foliage to weave a lei. On their own, the components are beautiful, but when combined and expertly crafted these lei are exquisite and befitting an Ali'i. Keiki participating in the Kipona program are individually beautiful, but woven together as a group these keiki represent a lei of beauty and diversity befitting Ke Ali'i Pauahi. Inspired by a new name and decision to continue the program, this fourth year of offering needs-based scholarships to students attending non-Kamehameha private schools went very well. In the 2011-12 school year, 489 students were awarded scholarship funds to attend private schools in Hawaii. The Kipona program supplements financial assistance programs provided by participating private schools and organizations. Participating schools are accredited through HAIS or Hawaii Catholic Schools. Hawaii Schools Digital Media (HSDM) Grant HAIS, in conjunction with the Hawaii Educational Networking Consortium and the Hawaii State Department of Education, awarded 56 grants ranging from $500-$2,500 to Hawaii’s emerging K-12 video producers. This annual grant allows public and private schools statewide to develop or expand a digital media video program and create original school-based videos aired on the DOE TEACH channel 356. HAIS awardees are listed below. • • • • • • • • • •

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Assets High School Christian Academy Christian Liberty Academy Damien Memorial School Hawaii Preparatory Academy Ho'ala School Hongwanji Mission School Huakailani School Hualalai Academy ‘Iolani School

• • • • • • • • • •

Island Pacific Academy Island School Le Jardin Academy Maryknoll School Mid-Pacific Institute Montessori Hale O Keiki Montessori School of Maui Parker School Punahou School Sacred Hearts Academy


BUILDING AND UNITING COMMUNITIES When people come together and work toward a common goal, a community is formed. At HAIS, that goal is learning – learning from thought leaders and learning from each other. In 2011, HAIS continued to bring together leaders from their respective fields together to foster collective action.

HAWAIIAN EDUCATIONAL COUNCIL Hawaii Executive Conference The 49th Hawaii Executive Conference, an annual forum for Hawaii’s CEO community was convened this year on Hawaii island by co-chairs Bert & Susan Kobayashi of Kobayashi Development Group LLC and Tim & Robin Johns of Hawaii Medical Service Association. One of the highlights of this conference is that it brings business and thought leaders from a variety of fields together to learn from one another, engage in compelling dialogue, and develop both local and global strategies for positive change based on their new learning. Featured speakers included Janine Benyus (Biomimicry Institute), Brett Brewer (AdKnowledge), Jean Case (Case Foundation), Brian Garrett (CrossCut Ventures), Paul Hawken (OneSun, Inc.), Jim Lally (Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers) and James Wei (WORLDVIEW Technology Partners).

CONSTITUENCY GROUPS Admissions Directors For a second consecutive year, Lori Carlos (Maryknoll School) chaired the admission directors group with Kelly Goheen (Holy Nativity School) as co-chair. Meetings were hosted by HAIS admission directors at their respective schools: Teddi Yagi, Hongwanji Mission School; Tim Kaneshiro and Kathy Lee, Hawaii Baptist Academy; Betsy Hata, Punahou School; Sandy Robinson, La Pietra – Hawaii School for Girls; Susie Taylor, Le Jardin Academy; Joshua Clark, Hawaii Preparatory Academy; and Bev Crum, Hanahau‘oli School. In September, Punahou School hosted HAIS school heads, admission directors, and business officers for SSATB Executive Director Heather Hoerle’s “Listening Tour”. Heather was touring the country, meeting with admission professionals to learn about how SSATB can better support its members now and into the future. HAIS Admission Directors were invited to Hawaii Preparatory Academy for their December meeting. Big Island hospitality was at its best with HPA providing transportation, lunch and a tour of the school and Energy Lab. Parker School also opened its doors and provided a tour of its campus. Business Officers The HAIS Business Officers Group (HAISBO) hosted several speakers this year discussed topics related to employment law, human resources and accounting issues, and outsourcing operational services. Two surveys

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were conducted: (1) Annual Compensation and (2) employee benefits. The Annual Compensation Survey was conducted by the Hawaii Employers Council. Council of Advancement Officers The Council of Advancement Officers (CAO) under the leadership of Jane Heimerdinger, ‘Iolani School and Lissa Schiff, Punahou School offered workshops with the Council for Advancement & Support of Education (CASE) on September 21, 2011. The workshops included information and discussion on the expectations on today’s philanthropists and staying proactive in an uncertain economy. The CAO gathered on December 7, 2011 for an Educational Holiday Luncheon featuring presentations on alumni relations and HAIS initiatives. In June 2012, the group will gather to celebrate Jane Heimerdinger’s retirement at the end of the month and to thank her for founding and leading the CAO. Religious and Spiritual Leaders On Friday, August 26, 2011, religious and spiritual leaders from the HAIS community convened at Punahou School to share ideas and discuss current issues. Following this meeting, a survey polled the group to determine the need and desire to gather regularly. Based on the survey results, the group will convene three times during the 2012-13 school year. Student Activities Directors The Student Activities Directors continue to communicate and collaborate by email with a focus on sharing contacts and recommendations about vendors and program ideas. During the summer, Jason Wagner, Assets School, coordinated and led the group in contacting every HAIS school to help update the group’s database. Summer School Directors Casey Agena from Punahou School continued the leadership this year for the summer school directors. The group met in mid-November to discuss summer programs at the fall meeting hosted by Iolani School. The focus of the meeting was Innovation, Collaboration and Possibilities for the Future of HAIS Summer Programs. Of particular note, was the planning involved in cross-school partnerships, professional development opportunities, and public school partnerships. Technology Directors The HAIS Technology Group had two gatherings during the 2011-2012 year – a presentation in November at Hanahau‘oli School by Douglas Kiang, Technology Resource Teacher at Punahou, on “challenge-based learning”, and a presentation in May at ‘Iolani School by Its All About Kids on strategic technology planning. The group has decided that it will try to return to a regular monthly meeting format during the 2012/13 school year in order to give members a chance to visit the technology infrastructures at 6 to 8 different schools that will host the meetings starting in September

PROFFESIONAL AFFILIATIONS AND REPRESENTATIONS •

Bob Peters (Hanahau‘oli School) and Dee Jay Mailer (Kamehameha Schools) are co-chairs of the State of Hawaii Early Learning Council (ELC).

Jim Scott (Punahou School) serves on an Advisory Board for the Klingenstein Center at Teachers College at Columbia University.

Mark Sugimoto (Hanalani Schools) is the HAIS delegate to the Council on American Private Education (CAPE).

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Rod Chamberlain begins his term as WASC Commissioner representing HAIS at the Accrediting Commission for Schools at the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC).

Rod Chamberlain (Kamehameha Schools) serves on the Hawaii P-20 Council.

Robert Witt, HAIS executive director, serves as a member of the NAIS Board of Directors, chairing its Public Policy and Government Relations Committee, along with serving (past chair) on the NAIS Commission on Accreditation. Additionally, he is a member of the Ho‘okako‘o Corporation Board of Directors, which is responsible for governing several public conversion charter schools that are recipients of assistance from Kamehameha Schools; he is a member of the Advisory Committee to the College of Education at the University of Hawaii at Manoa and the Advisory Committee of the Hawaii Education Policy Center.

Robert is also CEO of the Hawaiian Educational Council (HEC), the education nonprofit organization with which HAIS continues to share its office and staff. Among its many activities, HEC most notably convenes the annual Hawaii Executive Conference.

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HAIS BOARD OF DIRECTORS Mahalo to HAIS president Sandra Theunick for her exceptional leadership. Sandra is now completing her first year of a two-year term (2011-2013). OFFICERS Sandra Theunick (President) Head of School St. Andrew’s Priory School

Val Iwashita (Vice President) Headmaster ʻIolani School

Robert M. Witt Executive Director HAIS Administrative Office

Roberta Bishop (Secretary/Treasurer) Associate Director HAIS Administrative Office

DIRECTORS D. Rodney Chamberlain Vice President, Campus Strategies Kamehameha Schools Michael J. Chun President & Headmaster, Kamehameha Schools – Kapālama Patricia Hamamoto Principal, Saint Louis School Robert G. Peters Headmaster, Hanahauʻoli School Joe C. Rice President, Mid-Pacific Institute

EMERITUS Will Hancock National Association of Business Officers (Ret.)

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Joseph J. Schmidt Headmaster, Seabury Hall James K. Scott President, Punahou School Nancy Shaw Head of School Trinity Christian School Carl M. Sturges Headmaster, Parker School Mark Y. Sugimoto Superintendent, Hanalani Schools

Patsy H. Tom Head of School Montessori Community School Betty White Head of School Sacred Hearts Academy Daniel E. White Headmaster Island Pacific Academy Cynthia Winans-Burns Head of School Montessori School of Maui


HAIS STAFF Member Services Team • • • • • •

Robert Witt, Executive Director Roberta Bishop, Associate Director; COO and Accreditation Director Lisa Leong, Program Director Myrna Medeiros, Financial Officer Susan Nakamura, Communications and Community Relations Director Erin Tyrrell, Assistant Program Director/Receptionist

Professional Learning Communities Team • Phil Bossert, Schools of the Future Initiative and HAIS Technology Directors Constituency Group Manager • Megan Kawatachi, Accreditation Coordinator for Charter Schools Program Team • Leyla Cabugos, Grow Hawaii Director • Kendra Ozaki, Grow Hawaii Coordinator

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HAIS_Annual_Report 2012  
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