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editor letter

O

nce upon a time an adventurous designer was trying to find her way through the forest called life. She started at a large castle in the middle of the grand land of the University of Michigan only to discover that her true castle awaited on the golden coast. Once at her castle at the University of Southern California, she encountered many other princes and princesses on their journey, fighting their own dragons to win their throne and live happily ever after. One successful wizard adviced her to create something truly her own to show the world her power, her drive, and her creative spirit. For this princess, the happy ending will come along after she has created her own kingdom where creativity flows freely and, of course, where she has her very own prince (maybe even a little prince on the way). In what other form could this princess venture on this path than through expression of design, photography, illustration, collaboration, and, above all, her love for Disney, then through a magazine created specifically to showcase all of these talents? AEI stands for All Ears In and somewhere along the way became an editorial magazine mixed with elements of an art zine. The idea for a magazine filled with collages, vintage Disney elements, and personal photography projects came about after a bit of soul searching. I was in dire need of a project that expressed my two favorite things, design and Disney, in a productive, functional, and interpersonal way. Although I am first a designer, I have a passion for photography, an appreciation that has grown from my editorial and print experience. My hope is that AEI can grow into a national publication that reaches out to other designconscious, Disney loving, fact-finding fans who can appreciate AEI for what it is. This

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publication could not be possible without the dedication, inspiration, and motivation from my family and friends who have always taught me to pursue and push through. As this being the first issue, AEI would be distributed quarterly to share unique artwork and photography as well as articles about the ghost of Disneyland’s past. Each issue features a VM (Vintage Mickey) section which has a food, travel, style, feature, and attraction spread, all vintage inspired. Also included is a Walt Disney interview, featured fairytale, and Hey Mickey advice column. Disney inspired fashion shoots can also be found in each issue. This issue features the original Little Red Riding Hood tale and two magical photo shoots inspired by Mickey and Mortimer Mouse and Pinocchio. Each collage was made by yours truly as well as most of the photography, unless otherwise stated. Illustrations were submitted by some very talented artist friends. However, I claim no writing skills so most of the copy has been provided by other sources, as sited throughout the magazine. What better way to start off a publication than with some of my favorite images, fairytales, and characters? So please do me a favor and, if I bored you to death in my first editor’s lettter, ignore everything I wrote, give AEI a chance, and explore the following pages of my own personal fairytale. Enjoy the journey! AEI magazine has no affiliation with The Walt Disney Company and is a personal project intended to showcase my professional skill sets in hopes of becoming a creative director or integral cast member at a Disney affiliated company.

EDITOR IN CHIEF


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AUTUMN

04

EDITOR LETTER

08

MASTHEAD

BLACK & WHITE RIVALS

50

COMICS

10

CONTRIBUTORS

14

VINTAGE MICKEY

28

HEY MICKEY

3-2

LITTLE RED

36

WALT DISNEY INTERVIEW

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40

52

PINOCCHIO FASHION

62

LOOK AHEAD


EDITOR IN CHIEF HAILEY NOWAK

VM Travel YESTERLAND VM Food ALL RECIPES//DISNEY INSIDER VM Style WALT DATED WORLD VM Feature YESTERLAND//HAILEY NOWAK VM Attraction YESTERLAND Mulan Illustration MARISA MERCURIO Hey Mickey DISNEY WORLD FORUM Red BROTHERS GRIMM Disney Interview REIMAGINEERING

BLACK & WHITE RIVALS Photography HAILEY NOWAK Model PAULINE BRENNER Model LIZZIE HOYLE Model HANNAH NOWAK Comic Strip COMIC ART FANS

PINOCCHIO Photography IRENE LEE Model DANIELLE PRICE

LOOK AHEAD Photography IRENE LEE// HAILEY NOWAK//YESTERLAND

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contributors irene lee

Irene is a graphic designer, artist, DIY enthusiast, wannabe hippie, and lover of sparkly things. She has never met a cupcake she didn’t like. Irene is about to complete a BA in Fine Art at the University of Southern California and hopes to continue making art with brilliant people. Irene played a key role in the creation of AEI by including her illustrations and photography as well as assisting in the editing process. u

marisa mercurio

Marisa is a senior at DePaul University in Chicago. She studies English and French and will be studying in London in the autumn. Marisa would like to be a writer and illustrator who one day lives in a quaint little cottage in Northern England where her only means of transportation is a blue Vespa. Marisa contributed the exquisite Mulan illustration for AEI. u

hannah nowak

Hannah has a list of talents as long as her legs from modeling to surfing to running to fashion. this young passionate soul hopes to one day work as an Imagineer for Disney. Hannah is not only the sister of the creator of AEI but the youngest contributor, a sophomore at San Clemente High School. Not only did Hannah help produce the identity of the magazine but her influence is also seen throughout the pages particularly as a model in the Mickey & Mortimer shoot. u

danielle price Danielle is a cat-squirrel stuck in a human’s body with a healthy obsession for all things vintage. You can usually find this nostalgic heart frolicking in lipstick and glitter, baking, or perusing antique stores. She is enrolled in film school at the University of Southern California and aspires to be a writer, production designer, and expert on all things lovely and fabulous. Danielle’s passion for fashion was exposed as she modeled and styled herself in the Pinocchio shoot. u

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TRAVEL

THE

MARC ELINE I KNEW

The following article was written for the Marceline News describing the place Walt called home for a short time in his early childhood. (Below) Walt’s family home in Marceline, Missouri. (Upper Right) Ruth Beecher and a 9 year old Disney. (Lower Right) Walt’s parents Flora and Elias Disney. u

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I WAS EXTREMELY GLAD to receive your letter asking me to write some impressions of Marceline as I remember it from my childhood days. To tell the truth more things of importance happened to me in Marceline than have happened since—or are likely to in the future. Things I mean, like seeing my first circus parade, attending my first school, seeing my first motion picture. I know you’ll agree with me that such childhood “first” as those are of utmost importance in any human being’s life. I went with my family to live in Marceline when I was five years old and I stayed there until I was nine. I clearly remember the day we arrived there on the train. A Mr. Coffman met us in his wagon and we rode out to our house in the country just outside the city limits. I believe it was called the Crane Farm. My first impression of it was that it had a beautiful front yard with lots of weeping willow trees. The Taylors lived on one side of us and Doc Sherwood on the other. One of my fondest childhood memories is of Doc Sherwood. He used to encourage me in my drawing and gave me little presents for my efforts. One time I think he must have held a horse of his nearly all day so that I could draw it. Needless to say, the drawing wasn’t so hot, but Doc made me think it was tops. My brother Roy reminds me of another flyer I took in the line of art at that time. I painted one side of our house with pitch. The outcome must have been slightly frightening to say the least and I wasn’t thanked for my efforts by the family. I can remember the big red brick school house as if it were yesterday. Maybe if I saw it today it wouldn’t look so immense but it did to my young eyes. My first teacher’s name was Miss Brown. And what fun used to have on winter days going down the hillsides lickety-split on a sled. Everything connected

with Marceline was a thrill to us, coming as we did from Chicago. The cows, pigs, chickens gave me a big thrill, and perhaps that’s the reason we use so many barnyard animals in the Mickey Mouse and Silly Symphony pictures today — who knows. You know what the psychologists say about the importance of childhood impressions. An especial event in connection with my life in Marceline was the day I got to go down in the old No. 1 coal mine which was just a short distance from our place. Before we left Marceline, we moved from the farm into town for awhile where we lived between the Wheelers and the Moormans. Mr. Moorman was the high school principal and Mrs. Moorman, I must confess, was my first “dream girl”. Of course, I was all of eight or nine at the time, but I can remember what pretty red hair she had. Other random remembrances include the fact that one of the prides of my life was my uncle Mike Martin, who was an engineer on a train running from Marceline to Ft. Madison, Iowa. After all if you can’t be an engineer yourself, the next best thing is to have a relative who is one. I’m glad I’m a small town boy and I’m glad Marceline was my town. Thanks a lot for letting me write my impressions, and say hello to all the folks. In addition, here is wishing you all congratulations and success in connection with your Golden Jubilee. l Best regards, Walt Disney from the Marceline News

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FOOD

Walt’s love for his favorite meal, chili and beans, was common knowledge so why not feast like Disney with this delicious recipe? Prep Time: 20 minutes Cook Time: 20 – 30 minutes Level: easy Serves: 4-6

ROUND UP THE SUPPLIES 3 tablespoons vegetable oil 1 medium red onion, chopped 3 cloves garlic, chopped 2 tablespoons chili powder 2 teaspoons ground cumin 1 poblano chile pepper, seeded and diced 2 portobello mushrooms, stemmed and chopped 2 cups frozen corn (preferably fire-roasted), thawed 2 14-ounce cans no-salt-added pinto beans 1 14-ounce can no-salt-added diced tomatoes Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper Shredded cheddar cheese, sour cream and/or torn fresh cilantro, for topping (optional) 8 corn tortillas, warmed

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LET’S GET STARTED Heat the vegetable oil in a large pot over medium heat. Add all but a few tablespoons of the chopped red onion. Stir in the garlic, chili powder and cumin and cook, stirring occasionally, until the onion begins to soften, about 3 minutes. Add the poblano, mushrooms and corn and cook, stirring occasionally, until just tender, about 3 more minutes. Add the beans, tomatoes, 1 1/2 cups water and 1/2 teaspoon each salt and pepper. Bring to a boil, then stir and reduce the heat to medium. Simmer, stirring occasionally, until the vegetables are tender and the chili is thick, about 20 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. Divide the chili among bowls. Top with the cheese, sour cream and/or cilantro; sprinkle with the reserved red onion. Serve with the tortillas. from Food Network Magazine, June 2013

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STYLE

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EARS FOR YEARS

For just about every Disney milestone of my childhood, I seemed to have a different pair of Mickey Mouse ears. As a kid, I didn’t know that the classic Mickey Mouse Club ears were designed by Roy Williams and based on a gag from a 1929 Disney cartoon called “The Karnival Kid”. I just knew I was crazy about Mickey and the Mouseketeers and the ears were the perfect way to let the world know it. In 1977, Disney came out with a new syndicated version of the Mickey Mouse Club. This was a really big deal for a four year old. Because there were no DVRs or internet then, it was really a treat to see Disney cartoons outside of an occasional movie or episode of “Wonderful World of Disney”. I knew there had been an “old” version of the Mickey Mouse Club (the successful syndication of it actually led to the new version) and I thought the new show was the best thing to ever air on television. I wanted to be a Mouseketeer and get to ride in their flying ship and dance around Disneyland. I loved all of the Mouseketeers, especially pre “Facts of Life” Lisa Whelchel. Depending on the day, the Mouseketeers wore different outfits but my favorites were the colorful polyester jumpsuits with matching ears that had a black visor brim. I already had a pair of black mouse ears with a bow that someone had given me from Walt Disney World so I would proudly wear them while watching cartoons on the

show such as “The Ugly Duckling” or “The Old Mill” or while playing around the house. When Mickey Mouse turned 50 years old in 1978, The Walt Disney Company had a huge promotion built around it called “50 Happy Years”. When Mickey made an appearance at Wieboldt’s department store to celebrate his birthday, I happily posed with him while wearing bright magenta mouse ears that were a tie-in from “The New Mickey Mouse Club” show. I later got blue and purple ears. Unbelievably, when I went to Walt Disney World for the first time in 1978, my mouse ears didn’t get packed. I ended up buying a Donald Duck cap with a beak that squeaked instead of mouse ears. I think the logic was that since I already had so many ears at home, it was better to get something different. To this day when I look at the pictures, it just doesn’t seem right when I see a duck on my head instead of a mouse. It felt like I was cheating on Mickey. When I went back to the Magic Kingdom a few years later, I made up for it by getting a red pair that that had white velvet ears. During the rest of my childhood, Mickey Mouse ears seemed to be on my head all the time. I would wear my purple ears while looking at Disneyland View-Master slides. I’d plop my blue ones on before playing the Mickey Mouse Disco album and of course I’d wear them when any Disney show came on TV. Recently one of my friends got to attend a press event for the opening of New Fantasyland at Walt Disney World. He said he had gotten a special promotional item during the event that he was going to give to me. Is it any surprise that it was a pair of Mickey Mouse ears? The next time I go to the parks, I’m going to make sure they get packed this time. l from Walt Dated World

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FEATURE

IN DISNEYLAND, THE CARNATION ICE CREAM PARLOR was a Main Street institution dating back to opening day in 1955. In 1977, the restaurant expanded to fill West Center Street with an outdoor dining area. In January 1997, the Carnation Ice Cream Parlor closed. Guests could no longer enjoy a sundae while sitting on a tall stool at the spectacular ice cream counter. The outdoor area survived as the Carnation Café after an extensive remodeling, completed March 1997. Guests could order from a traditional breakfast menu or new lunch and dinner menus Around the same time, Nestlé, which had acquired the Carnation Company in 1985, phased out the Carnation Ice Cream brand in favor of their other brands (including Edy’s, Dreyer’s, and Nestlé). Disneyland was allowed to keep the Carnation name. The space that had been occupied by the Carnation Ice Cream Parlor since 1955 became the counter-service Blue Ribbon Bakery, hosted by Nestlé Toll House. uu

from Yesterland

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ATTRACTION

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The Chicken of the Sea Pirate Ship and Restaurant was a Disneyland landmark from 1955 until 1982, although the name changed to Captain Hook’s Galley when Chicken of the Sea dropped their sponsorship in 1969. You may remember that in Walt Disney’s 1953 animated classic, Peter Pan, our hero Peter flies the pirate ship back to London, thanks to pixie dust from Tinker Bell. The Pirate Ship at Disneyland flew once too. Originally, Captain Hook’s Pirate Ship sat in a simple pond. In 1960, the pond became an exotic, tropic setting from Peter Pan with the addition of Skull Rock. u

from Yesterland


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There’s so much to learn about Walt Disney World! I don’t have much time before my trip -- can you tell me the top five (or ten) things you wish every WDW visitor knew? Thanks! - Jeff from NY (1) Start planning early and get informed. At least six months in advance, get Disney guidebooks and the free travel planning video, subscribe to online newsletters, listen to podcasts. Knowledge is power and the more informed you are, the more power you have to plan a great vacation. (2) Make dining reservations as soon as possible, especially for ANY must-do meal. (3) You can’t do everything. I have been to WDW dozens of times and still find new experiences. WDW is as big as a city. You could make yourself crazy trying to go everywhere and do everything. Don’t even try and you’ll be much happier. (4) Your vacation is unique. A neighbor once asked me for Disney planning advice. I spent hours telling her tips about every corner of WDW. On the first day of her trip, she took her kids to the Magic Kingdom. They LOVED it and begged to go back the next day. So she took them back - five days in a row. They never made it past the MK and had a magnificent time. Her trip was different than mine, but it was exactly what her family needed. (5) Give EVERYONE in the family some special time. Mom and Dad are on vacation too. Get a sitter one night and have a romantic dinner. Go to a spa. Or play golf. Happy parents make a happy family. (6) Relax and let the magic happen.

What are the best places to go for Character Dining? - Ladonna from GA Hi Ladonna! Here are my top character dining picks: Chef Mickey’s is a loud, fun and altogether good time! ‘Ohana Best Friends Breakfast with Lilo and Stitch is great for boys and girls! Cinderella’s Royal Table is a highly coveted restaurant that’s every princesses’ dream. My Disney Girl’s Perfectly Princess Tea is very expensive, but so beautiful and girly!

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the second is back in Fantasyland near the Mad Tea Party attraction. While in California Adventure Park, be sure to visit Los Feliz Five and Dime on Buena Vista Street for all of your embroidery needs. They also carry the finest selection of hats and ears in old Hollywood!

I have the Southern California pass and wondered if I can upgrade to deluxe or premium if so how do I? - Cristi from CA Yes, you can upgrade your Southern California Annual Passport to a Deluxe or Premium Annual Passport by paying the difference between the value of your current Passport and the price of the upgraded Annual Passport of your choice. If you have an existing monthly payment contract, it can’t be altered, so the amount must be paid in full at the time of upgrading. You can upgrade at any time during your Annual Passport year, but the expiration date of your current Passport will remain the same. Upgrades can’t be made online, so you will need to visit the Disneyland Resort Main Entrance Ticket Booth for details.

Is there a location that shows pictures of all the autographs of the Disney characters at Disneyland? There is an autograph that we are not able to determine who it belongs to. - David from CA I have been in your shoes a time or two and I am happy to report that there is a really cool unofficial site that has done a great job of compiling pictures of many of the characters’ autographs. The site is called “Unofficial Disney Character Hunting Guide” and you can get there by searching the web. They even include some really rare characters as well!

Is there anywhere in Disneyland to get some Mickey Ears embroidered? - Sarah from OH

We are planing a trip to Disneylad in September. We are a little lost as to where the meal plan tickets are accepted and if we will need to make reservations every time we want to eat. Also could you fill us in on what exactaly premium character dining is? - Mark from CA

In my opinion, no trip to the Happiest Place on Earth is complete without the purchase of some snazzy new “Ears” with some cute personalization on the back. The Mad Hatter is the place to go for your embroidery needs and there are two locations within Disneyland Park. The first is near Great Moments with Mr. Lincoln on Main Street and

You don’t need dining reservations for every meal. There are many quick-service dining options throughout the resort. However, if you plan to enjoy any table-service or character dining meals at places like Blue Bayou, Carthay Circle Restaurant or Goofy’s Kitchen, I do recommend you make reservations. They can be made up to 60 days in advance by


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calling Disney Dining at (714) 781-DINE (3463). The dining plan’s snack and meal vouchers are redeemable at dozens of cafes, snack spots and restaurants throughout the Disneyland Resort, including the theme parks and hotels. However, be aware that the dining plans available at the Disneyland Resort are based on a pre-paid meal voucher system that is designed more for convenience than money savings. Change isn’t given when the price of your meal is less than what the voucher is worth. The Premium Character Dining voucher may be used at Ariel’s Disney Princess Celebration (for lunch or dinner) at Ariel’s Grotto in Disney California Adventure Park, or for the character breakfast, lunch or dinner buffet at Goofy’s Kitchen in the Disneyland Hotel.

I was wondering how people become members of Club 33? Do you guys have any suggestions? - Amanda from PA You have asked the age old question about this iconic club and I wish there was a better answer! Club 33 is a members-only club located within Disneyland Park and members include the likes of celebrities, executives, and even dignitaries and nobility. Originally there was a membership waiting list which spanned up to 14 years, but last I’ve heard, the club is no longer accepting additions to this coveted list and there had been no word on when the “list” may reopen to prospective members of Walt’s special “club.” Currently the only way for non-members to enter this luxurious establishment is to be “signed in” by a member in good standing. On very rare occasions, members have auctioned off dinner at Club 33 for charity, but Disney prohibits them from outright selling admission. DisneylandClub33.com is a non-official site which contains lots of fabulous information pertaining to Club 33 including historical and current photos, menus, reviews, and even the address for those who wish to inquire about membership! I have spent many hours drooling over this site and have even considered writing in just to see what happens! When you visit Disneyland, be sure to locate the obscure entryway to Club 33, located in New Orleans Square near Blue Bayou, and take a moment to pose by the signature numerals as they are regally, yet inconspicuously displayed for those of us on the “outside.”

Is their a minimum age requirement for Walt’s Footsteps Tour? My son will be 10, hoping we can do this tour, it sounds amazing! - Cathy from OH Your son will totally be able to experience this magical journey. Walking around the parks with a Disney tour guide all dressed in those awesome plaid costumes makes you feel like a celebrity.

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My best friend & I are thinking about coming to Disneyland to celebrate New Years this year; I wanted to ask if anyone has done it before or if they do anything special for NYE; we are both over the age of 21 & will not have any children with us. - Tommy from NE Disneyland sure knows how to celebrate, and New Year’s Eve is no exception. Concrete details have not yet been announced, but if history repeats itself, there’s sure to be lots of excitement in both theme parks, Downtown Disney, and even over at the Disneyland Resort Hotels! You can take a look at past year’s events here. For starters, Disneyland and California Adventure always stays open late on New Years Eve and you can bet there’ll be a fireworks show that will surely rival any you’ve seen in the past! There is always extra entertainment, a special parade, and many other surprises! Over at DCA, dance the night away at the Mad T Party and expect live music and a Champagne toast at Paradise Gardens! If you plan to be in either park on NYE or New Year’s Day, please be aware that these are two very busy days. The parks will most likely reach capacity and close to new guests, so be sure to arrive early and plan to stay. Downtown Disney is home to several restaurants with fun bars, so two adults could find lots to get into, especially on New Years Eve! I imagine there will be no shortage of excitement and possibly even some live outdoor music! For an extra special start to your evening, consider a delicious dinner at the award-winning Napa Rose restaurant located in the Grand Californian hotel. Each year, this highly acclaimed restaurant offers a special New Year’s Eve dinner event that is limited to two (2) seatings, one at 5:00 and one at 8:30 pm. The first seating consists of a 4-course meal for $100/ person while the later seating costs $195/person and begins with a Champagne reception in the lounge followed by a 5-course meal with live music, party favors, and a “midnight moment.” This experience can be reserved by calling Napa Rose at (714) 300-7170.

Is there pet care at Disneyland. CA - Jan from GA Disneyland Resort offers some great pet care while you go enjoy the parks. Kennel facilities for the Disneyland Resort are located to the right of the Main Entrance of Disneyland Park. As reservations are not accepted, availability is on a first-come, first served basis.The coat is $20 per pet. Make sure your pets have the correct vaccinations or they will not be accepted. If you have questions about the facilities, please call (714) 781-4565. I hope this assists you. I will see you at the parks. l from Disney World Forum


Mulan is my favorite movie but I wish there were more Mulan attractions at the Disney Parks... - Kelsey from OH We love Mulan! One AEI reader and fellow Mulan fan submitted this wonderful illustration.

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The classic Brother’s Grimm tale of Little Riding Hood is a classic that should always be retold. Walt’s retake on several Brother’s Grimm stories have their own wonderful Disney twist to them but the original stories can often be just as magical...and sometimes the Grimm darkness can be even better. 32 | ALL EARS IN


NCE UPON A TIME there was a dear little girl who was loved by everyone who looked at her, but most of all by her grandmother, and there was nothing that she would not have given to the child. Once she gave her a little riding hood of red velvet, which suited her so well that she would never wear anything else; so she was always called ‘Little Red Riding Hood.’ One day her mother said to her: ‘Come, Little Red Riding Hood, here is a piece of cake and a bottle of wine; take them to your grandmother, she is ill and weak, and they will do her good. Set out before it gets hot, and when you are going, walk nicely and quietly and do not run off the path, or you may fall and break the bottle, and then your grandmother will get nothing; and when you go into her room, don’t forget to say, “Good morning”, and don’t peep into every corner before you do it.’ ‘I will take great care,’ said Little Red Riding Hood to her mother, and gave her hand on it. The grandmother lived out in the wood, half a league from the village, and just as Little Red Riding Hood entered the wood, a wolf met her. Red Riding Hood did not know what a wicked creature he was, and was not at all afraid of him. ‘Good day, Little Red Riding Hood,’ said he. ‘Thank you kindly, wolf.’ ‘Whither away so early, Little Red Riding Hood?’ ‘To my grandmother’s.’ ‘What have you got in your apron?’ ‘Cake and wine; yesterday was baking-day, so poor sick grandmother is to have something good, to make her stronger.’ ‘Where does your grandmother live, Little Red Riding Hood?’ ‘A good quarter of a league farther on in the wood; her house stands under the three large oak-trees, the nut-trees are just below; you surely must know it,’ replied Little Red Riding Hood.

She was surprised to find the cottage-door standing open, and when she went into the room, she had such a strange feeling that she said to herself: ‘Oh dear! how uneasy I feel today, and at other times I like being with grandmother so much.’ She called out: ‘Good morning,’ but received no answer; so she went to the bed and drew back the curtains. There lay her grandmother with her cap pulled far over her face, and looking very strange. ‘Oh! grandmother,’ she said, ‘what big ears you have!’ ‘All the better to hear you with, my child,’ was the reply. ‘But, grandmother, what big eyes you have!’ she said. ‘All the better to see you with, my dear.’ ‘But, grandmother, what large hands you have!’ ‘All the better to hug you with.’ ‘Oh! but, grandmother, what a terrible big mouth you have!’ ‘All the better to eat you with!’ And scarcely had the wolf said this, than with one bound he was out of bed and swallowed up Red Riding Hood. When the wolf had appeased his appetite, he lay down again in the bed, fell asleep and began to snore very loud. The huntsman was just passing the house, and thought to himself: ‘How the old woman is snoring! I must just see if she wants anything.’ So he went into the room, and when he came to the bed, he saw that the wolf was lying in it. ‘Do I find you here, you old sinner!’ said he. ‘I have long sought you!’ But just as he was going to fire at him, it occurred to him that the wolf might have devoured the grandmother, and that she might still be saved, so he did not fire, but took a pair of scissors, and began to cut open the stomach of the sleeping wolf.

The wolf thought to himself: ‘What a tender young creature! what a nice plump mouthful - she will be better to eat than the old woman. I must act craftily, so as to catch both.’ So he walked for a short time by the side of Little Red Riding Hood, and then he said: ‘See, Little Red Riding Hood, how pretty the flowers are about here - why do you not look round? I believe, too, that you do not hear how sweetly the little birds are singing; you walk gravely along as if you were going to school, while everything else out here in the wood is merry.’ Little Red Riding Hood raised her eyes, and when she saw the sunbeams dancing here and there through the trees, and pretty flowers growing everywhere, she thought: ‘Suppose I take grandmother a fresh nosegay; that would please her too. It is so early in the day that I shall still get there in good time.’ So she ran from the path into the wood to look for flowers. And whenever she had picked one, she fancied that she saw a still prettier one farther on, and ran after it, and so got deeper and deeper into the wood. Meanwhile the wolf ran straight to the grandmother’s house and knocked at the door. ‘Who is there?’ ‘Little Red Riding Hood,’ replied the wolf. ‘She is bringing cake and wine; open the door.’ ‘Lift the latch,’ called out the grandmother, ‘I am too weak, and cannot get up.’ The wolf lifted the latch, the door sprang open, and without saying a word he went straight to the grandmother’s bed, and devoured her. Then he put on her clothes, dressed himself in her cap, laid himself in bed and drew the curtains. Little Red Riding Hood, however, had been running about picking flowers, and when she had gathered so many that she could carry no more, she remembered her grandmother, and set out on the way to her.

It is also related that once, when Red Riding Hood was again taking cakes to the old grandmother, another wolf spoke to her, and tried to entice her from the path. Red Riding Hood, however, was on her guard, and went straight forward on her way, and told her grandmother that she had met the wolf, and that he had said ‘good morning’ to her, but with such a wicked look in his eyes, that if they had not been on the public road she was certain he would have eaten her up. ‘Well,’ said the grandmother, ‘we will shut the door, so that he can not come in.’ Soon afterwards the wolf knocked, and cried: ‘Open the door, grandmother, I am Little Red Riding Hood, and am bringing you some cakes.’ But they did not speak, or open the door, so the grey-beard stole twice or thrice round the house, and at last jumped on the roof, intending to wait until Red Riding Hood went home in the evening, and then to steal after her and devour her in the darkness. But the grandmother saw what was in his thoughts.

When he had made two snips, he saw the little red riding hood shining, and then he made two snips more, and the little girl sprang out, crying: ‘Ah, how frightened I have been! How dark it was inside the wolf.’ After that the aged grandmother came out alive also, but scarcely able to breathe. Red Riding Hood, however, quickly fetched great stones with which they filled the wolf ’s belly, and when he awoke, he wanted to run away, but the stones were so heavy that he collapsed at once, and fell dead. Then all three were delighted. The huntsman drew off the wolf ’s skin and went home with it; the grandmother ate the cake and drank the wine which Red Riding Hood had brought, and revived. But Red Riding Hood thought to herself: ‘As long as I live, I will never leave the path by myself to run into the wood, when my mother has forbidden me to do so.’

In front of the house was a great stone trough, so she said to the child: ‘Take the pail, Red Riding Hood; I made some sausages yesterday, so carry the water in which I boiled them to the trough.’ Red Riding Hood carried until the great trough was quite full. Then the smell of the sausages reached the wolf, and he sniffed and peeped down, and at last stretched out his neck so far that he could no longer keep his footing and began to slip, and slipped down from the roof straight into the great trough, and was drowned. But Red Riding Hood went joyously home, and no one ever did anything to harm her again. l from the Brothers Grimm

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The following interview with Walt Disney was conducted by NBC in 1966. On the surface, in his highly informal, friendly way, Walt’s business philosophy seems relatively simplistic. Translated, however, it provides an understanding as to why he was so highly rated by the business world.

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NBC: Walt, why did you pick Anaheim as the site for Disneyland? WALT: The Disneyland concept kept growing and growing and it finally ended up where I felt I needed two-three hundred acres. So, I wanted it in the Southern California area, there were certain things that I felt that I needed, such as flat land, because I wanted to make my own hills. I didn’t want it near the ocean, I wanted it sort of inland, so I had a survey group go out and hunt for areas that might be useful. And they finally came back with several different areas and we settled on Anaheim because the price of the acreage was right. But there was more to it than that. And that is that Anaheim was sort of a growing area. The freeway projection was such that we could see that the freeway would set Anaheim as sort of a hub. Well, that’s how we selected Anaheim. NBC: Do you feel Anaheim has lived up to expectations? WALT: In every way, the city fathers have been wonderful. They’ve given us wonderful cooperation right from the start and they are still cooperating. NBC: What has been your biggest problem? WALT: Well, I’d say it’s been my biggest problem all my life - it’s money. It takes a lot of money to make these dreams come true. From the very start it was a problem of getting the money to open Disneyland. About 17 million dollars it took. We had everything mortgaged, including my family. We were able to get it open and for ten or eleven years now we’ve been pouring more money back in. In other words, like the old farmer, you’ve got to pour it back into the ground if you want to get it out. That’s been my brother’s philosophy and mine too. NBC: What plans for the future do you have at Disneyland? WALT: There’s a little plaque out there that says, “As long as there is imagination left in the world, Disneyland will never be complete.” We have big plans. This year, we finished over $20 million in new things. Next June, I hope, we’ll have a new Tomorrowland; and starting from the ground up, building a whole new Tomorrowland. And it’s going to run about $20 million bucks. NBC: What steps have you taken to see that Disneyland will always be good, family entertainment? WALT: Well, by this time, my staff, my young group of executives are convinced that Walt is right, that quality will win out, and so I think they will stay with this policy because it’s proven it’s a good business policy. Give the public everything you can give them, keep the place as clean as you can keep it, keep it friendly - I think they’re convinced and I think they’ll hang on after - as you say, “after Disney.” l from an archival article originally published in the mid-1970s

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1. Walt Disney and Mickey Mouse at Disneyland on Opening Day, June 17, 1955. Image provided by the Walt Disney Quotes website. 2, A young Walt reviews slides for Fantasia with composer Igor Stravinsky. Image courtesy of the Walt Disney Family Foundation. 3. “The way to get started is to quit talking and begin doing,� - Disney. Above is a headshot of Disney provided by the Dr. Macro High Quality Movie Scans site. 4. Disney is shown carrying each of the four Academy Awards he won in the 1954 award show. Disney holds the record for the most nominations for a total of 59. Image and info provided by the Hollywood Golden Guy site.

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BLACK & WHITE RIVALS MICKEY AND MORTIMER MOUSE

inspired the pin-up, polka dot, and punk photoshoot featuring the grafitti tunnels of San Clemente. The urban backdrop sets up a beautiful contrast to the ladies of the 40s dressed in black and white. Mickey and Mortimer’s quarrel over Minnie will be left in the dust after they lay their eyes on these smooth, heaven-sent ladies.

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MICE STYLE

Models Hannah and Lizzie were styled fron ears to toe by Hailey Nowak who felt Mickey & Mortimer inspired a 40s polka dot invasion. Hannah is shown wearing polka dot capris from Urban Outfitters for $29.99 paired with a white blouse and vintage heels from a local thift shop. Lizzie is styled in a sweater from American Vintage for $20 with shorts and heels from Forever 21.

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BACK STREETS OF LOS MOLINOS

set the stage for the models of the 40s. Hidden alleyways and tunnels contrast the textures of the American Vintage clothing worn by both Hannah and Lizzie.

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THE

DOLL LIED THAT

PHOTOGRAPHY BY IRENE LEE The story of Pinocchio once again comes to life, this time through model Danielle Price. Inspired and shot in the woods of Griffith Park, Danielle appears in Disneybound apparel. Disneybound originated as a Tumblr site that assembles wearable outfits that resemble the costumes of our favorite Disney characters. Danielle may not be mischievous by nature but, once in costume, mystery consumed her in this Pinocchio-inpsired shoot.

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LOOK AHEAD NEXT ISSUE

1. An Alice inspired shoot photographed and modeled by The Little Fools, Danielle Price and Irene Lee will fill the pages of the winter Alice Issue. 2. Another Alice inspired shoot will accompany the classic Alice in Wonderland fairytale. 3. Miss Price once again graces the pages of AEI in The Little Fools Alice shoot. Maybe there will even be a Queen of Hearts photoshoot featured. 4. The VM Attraction spread will feature an article from Yesterland about the original Mad Tea Party.

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AEI - Fall Issue