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Technology has changed everything And the future technology will change everything that exists today

people who created the technology but it is technology that helps people more.

WE NEED 4000 YEARS TO MOVE FROM THE USE OF IRON INTO THE INDUSTRY. WE ONLY NEED 40 YEARS TO MOVE TO THE STAGE OF THE COMPUTER. AND IN THE FUTURE WE ONLY NEED FOUR YEARS TO MAKE THIS WORLD DIFFERENT FROM BEFORE AND AT THE END OF EACH DAY WE WILL SEE A DIFFERENT TECHNOLOGY.


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Daftar isi

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Hololens

Li Fi

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Cover

3D pen

3D printer

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Project tango


HOLOLENS In 2016 Microsoft corporation create the first self-contained holographic computer enabling you to engage with your digital contentand interact with holograms in the world around you its MICROSOFT HOLOLENS

As a HoloLens wearer, you’ll still see the real world in front of you. You can walk around and talk to others without worrying about bumping into walls, The goggles will track your movements, watch your gaze and transform what you see by blasting light at your eyes (it doesn’t hurt).


SPESIFICATION OPTIC See-through holographic lenses (waveguides) 2 HD 16:9 light engines Automatic pupillary distance calibration Holographic Resolution: 2.3M total light points Holographic Density: >2.5k radiants (light points per radian)

PROCESSOR Intel 32 bit architecture with TPM 2.0 support Custom-built Microsoft Holographic Processing Unit (HPU 1.0)

SENSOR 1 IMU 4 environment understanding cameras 1 depth camera 1 2MP photo / HD video camera Mixed reality capture 4 microphones 1 ambient light sensor


LI-FI Light fidelity Light Fidelity (Li-Fi) is a bidirectional, high-speed and fully networked wireless communication technology similar to Wi-Fi. The term was coined by Harald Haas and is a form of visible light communication and a subset of optical wireless communications (OWC) and could be a complement to RF communication (Wi-Fi or cellular networks), or even a replacement in contexts of data broadcasting. It is wire and uv visible-light communication or infrared and near-ultraviolet instead of radio-frequency spectrum, part of optical wireless communications technology,.

Technology Details This OWC technology uses light from light-emitting diodes (LEDs) as a medium to deliver networked, mobile, highspeed communication in a similar manner to Wi-Fi. The Li-Fi market is projected to have a compound annual growth rate of 82% from 2013 to 2018 and to be worth over $6 billion per year by 2018. Visible light communications (VLC) works by switching the current to the LEDs off and on at a very high rate, too quick to be noticed by the human eye. Although Li-Fi LEDs would have to be kept on to transmit data, they could be dimmed to below human visibility while still emitting enough light to carry data.The light waves cannot penetrate walls which makes a much shorter range, though more secure from hacking, relative to Wi-Fi. Direct line of sight is not necessary for Li-Fi to transmit a signal; light reflected off the walls can achieve 70 Mbit/s.


HISTORY Harald Haas, coined the term “Li-Fi” at his TED Global Talk where he introduced the idea of “Wireless data from every light”. He is Chairman of Mobile Communications at the University of Edinburgh and co-founder of pureLiFi. The general term visible light communication (VLC), whose history dates back to the 1880s, includes any use of the visible light portion of the electromagnetic spectrum to transmit information. The D-Light project at Edinburgh’s Institute for Digital Communications was funded from January 2010 to January 2012. Haas promoted this technology in his 2011 TED Global talk and helped start a company to market it. PureLiFi, formerly pureVLC, is an original equipment manufacturer (OEM) firm set up to commercialize Li-Fi products for integration with existing LED-lighting systems.

In October 2011, companies and industry groups formed the Li-Fi Consortium, to promote highspeed optical wireless systems and to overcome the limited amount of radio-based wireless spectrum available by exploiting a completely dif-

ferent part of the electromagnetic spectrum. A number of companies offer uni-directional VLC products, which is not the same as Li-Fi - a term defined by the IEEE 802.15.7r1 standardization committee. VLC technology was exhibited in 2012 using Li-Fi. By August 2013, data rates of over 1.6 Gbit/s were demonstrated over a single color LED. In September 2013, a press release said that Li-Fi, or VLC systems in general, do not require line-of-sight conditions. In October 2013, it was reported Chinese manufacturers were working on Li-Fi development kits.

In April 2014, the Russian company Stins Coman announced the development of a Li-Fi wireless local network called BeamCaster. Their current module transfers data at 1.25 gigabytes per second but they foresee boosting speeds up to 5 GB/second in the near future. In 2014 a new record was established by Sisoft (a Mexican company) that was able to transfer data at speeds of up to 10 Gbit/s across a light spectrum emitted by LED lamps. Recent integrated CMOS optical receivers for Li-Fi systems are implemented with avalanche photodiodes (APDs) which has a low sensitivity. In July 2015, IEEE has operated the APD in Geiger-mode as a single photon avalanche diode (SPAD) to increase the efficiency of energy-usage and makes the receiver more sensitive. Also this operation could be performed as quantum-limited sensitivity that makes receivers detect weak signals from far distance


3D PEN and Peter Dilworth began a Kickstarter campaign in February of 2013 for the 3Doodler – the only 3D printing pen in existence. After the success of the campaign, 3Doodler went on to build their company and improve their product. And now, the 3Doodler 2.0 is available on the recently launched Mashable Shop. The shop, powered by Visa Checkout, includes a multitude of products for tech-lovers everywhere, along with some exclusive Mashable gear.

PENCEPTION

Back in 2012, Bogue, Cowen and Dilworth were having a hard time with a 3D print. Somewhere along the hours-long process they endured to make a toy prototype, the printer they were using missed a few layers. They lamented about how much easier the whole process would be if they could just take the nozzle off the printer and fill in the gaps. This was their eureka moment. They knew what they were making was something unique. “It’s a massive game-changer,” explains Cowen. “You could never just pick up a pen and create an object in 3D before. Now you can.” The ability to draw in thin air was definitely something new, so creating a machine small enough to fit in your hand to allow users to draw with ease was going to be a challenge. What they created works a lot

like a supercharged glue gun: You insert tubes of 3d printing plastic into the back of the pen, which are heated and released via a nozzle in the front, allowing you to draw in real time. Thought the plastic is hot initially, it swiftly cools and dries, making the creation process simple. Earlier this year, the team launched an improved version of the pen, the 2.0 version: It’s much slimmer and easier to use, and can be paired with a multitude of doodling materials. Creative Director Faraz Warsi explains that his personal goal is to allow users to doodle with “every single material possible.” On this dream, Cowen says, “I can’t tell you too much, but we’re gonna make the impossible happen.”


“Seeing people use the pen in ways that we could never imagine, and actually inspire others, has always been important to us.” FARAZ WARSI

3Doodler has already been put to use in unique and innovative ways. “I see new uses every day,” Cowen says. “We have people making fashion items with it that have been on catwalks.” Designer Amanda Sekulow created 10 garments using the 3Doodler and over 1000ft of ABS plastic. The pieces were shown in the Eloise Fashion Show in Tennessee on May 9, 2014.

Bogue expands on the many uses for 3Doodler, explaining that the pen can be used for education and adds that it also “allows you to create braille or tactile learning aids for the visually impaired, or the low-vision community.” These communities have been using the 3Doodler to create classroom aids, such as mathematic graphs.

“We go out and we support phenomenal teachers, artists, engineers who want to do cutting edge things with our pen. I’m very proud of that.” DANIEL COWEN

Now, this new world of creation will be expanded to the Mashable audience -- the 3Doodler 2.0 is featured in the Mashable Shop. “3Doodler and Mashable are the perfect partners,” Cowen explains. “For us, it’s really the bringing together of a cutting-edge publication and a great product. I can see how our users and their readers go hand-in-hand.”

tends that you have to try it for yourself. “Everyone has a better idea of 3D objects around them, so even if you can’t draw in 2D, you can draw in 3D because you have a better sense of 3D space and proportions.” Sounds like good news to us!

And for those a little worried that they aren’t enough of an artist to use the 3Doodler, Warsi con-

3d art works pen


3D PRINTER Before we get the core of discussion, let’s first get acquainted with the inventor of the 3D printer, chuchk hull. Chuck Hull (Charles W. Hull) is the co-founder, xecutive vice president and chief technology officer of 3D Systems. He is the inventor of the solid imaging process known as stereolithography (3D Printing), the first commercial rapid prototyping technology, and the STL file format. He is named on more than 60 U.S. patents as well as other patents around the world in the fields of ion optics and rapid prototyping. He was inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame in 2014. Chuck Hull was born on May 12, 1939 in Clifton, Colorado, the son of Lester and Esther Hull. His early life was spent in Clifton and Gateway, Colorado. He graduated from Central High School in Grand Junction, Colorado. Chuck received a BS in engineering physics from the University of Colorado in 1961.

What Is 3D Printing? Invented by a man named Chuck Hull back in 1986, 3D printing is a process of taking a digital 3D model and turning that digital file into a physical object. While Hull went on to launch one of the world’s la31rgest 3D printer manufacturers, 3D Systems, his invention concentrated solely on a fabrication process called Stereolithography (SLA). Since that time numerous other 3D printing technologies have been developed, such as Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM)/Fused Filament Fabrication (FFF), Selective Laser Sintering (SLS), PolyJetting and others, all of which rely on layer-by-layer fabrication and are based on a computer code fed to the printer.


While there are numerous technologies which can be used to 3D print an object, the majority of 3D printers one will find within a home or an office setting are based on the FDM/FFF or SLA processes, as these technologies are currently cheaper and easier to implement within a machine. ‘3D printing’ can also be referred to as ‘additive manufacturing,’ especially when referring to its use within a manufacturing setting, and many individuals will used both phrases interchangeably. 3D printer is unlike of the common printers. On a 3D printer the object is printed by three dimension. A 3D model is built up layer by layer. Therefore the whole process is called rapid prototyping, or 3D printing. A common process of rapid prototyping is to apply a fine powder (plaster, bioplastic, polyurethane, polyester, epoxy, metal, etc.) in such a 3D inkjet printers. Printer print out the layer of powder on a bed and form a fixed object. The design is defined by a CAD file. Fused deposition modeling (FDM) is another method in which molten polymer is sprayed on a support layer and the model is built layer by layer. Another way is to use liquids, such as photopolymer, by the same inkjet-type head which is also printed each layer by layer. Following, an ultraviolet light is used to activate the print head so that the liquid layer become a solid layer. This process is also well-known as stereolithography. The 3D printing process starts from a number of projects from MIT in 2000. This is an extension of the rapid prototyping process where the basic concern was in a short time a prototype model to make. The first practical application were in production from metallic material. The resolution of the current printers are among the 328 x 328 x 606 DPI (xyz) at 656 x 656 x 800 DPI (xyz) in ultra-HD resolution. The accuracy is 0.025 mm - 0.05 mm per inch. The model size is up to 737 mm x 1257 mm x 1504 mm. Nowadays, 3D printer is mainly used in business enterprises and concepts which demand time-saving. These include medicine, architecture but also the entertainment industry such as game and film industry. Even artists use a 3D printer for their creations in a

comparatively short time in a solid shape to print. Today there are more and more companies that specialise in the printing of 3D models and supply services for business and individuals. The biggest drawback for the individual home user is still the high cost of 3D printer. Another drawback is that it takes hours or even days to print a 3D model (depending on the complexity and resolution of the model). Besides above, the professional 3D software and 3D model design is also in a high cost range. Alternatively there are already simplified 3D printers for hobbyist which are much cheaper. And the materials it uses is also less expensive. These 3D printers for home use are not as accurate as commercial 3D printer.

“Manufacturing is rapidly changing, so when we’re talking about deployment, we’re not talking about some ancient assembly line. The people we talk with are already fully into digital manufacturing.” - Chuck Hull -


Project

Tango

Tango (formerly named Project Tango in-testing) is a technology platform developed and authored by Google that uses computer vision to enable mobile devices, such as smartphones and tablets, to detect their position relative to the world around them without using GPS or other external signals. Movidius specializes in computer vision and helped with Google’s Project Tango 3D mapping effort.

Google has been collaborating with universities, research labs, and industrial partners in nine countries, to concentrate the past 10 years of research in robotics and computer vision into a mobile phone. Creation of 3D maps in this way would make it easy to navigate through buildings such as offices and supermarkets. The current prototype is a 5-inch Android phone containing highly customized hardware and software designed to track the full 3D motion of the device as a user holds it, while simultaneously creating a map of the environment.

Google is using Movidius’ Myriad 1 vision processor platform for Project Tango. For the longest time, embedding these kinds of sensors into phones was not just prohibitively expensive, but because it tends to be computationally demanding, they would also drain a phone’s batteries rapidly. The latest generation of vision processors, however, uses significantly less power, which was likely a reason why Google was able to go ahead with this project.


Project

Tango

Once the device begins making 3D measurements, a 3D map of the environment being scanned begins to form. This is what you’re seeing above. Below you’re seeing how once you begin walking up a flight of stairs, the flight of stairs is mapped in 3D space. “It tracks your position as you go around the world, and it also makes a map of that…. This is going to allow people to interact with their environment in a fundamentally different way.” – Eitan Marder-Eppstein, President of hiDOF.

The concept is definitely intriguing: a tablet that creates 3D scans and tracking of the world in front of it. And the Google name behind it also lends some huge åcred to its reliability and marketability. Google has been downright tantalizing in how much info it has released openly about this product, which moved from the hush-hush experimental lab last fall to the Play Store where developers can now pony up a decent chunk of change to see what apps they can create for the new mobile with 3d camera. This project first came in news in February and Google is set to launch a prototype tablet based on this technology. This 7′ inch tablet is equipped with 2 rear cameras and in-depth sensors and two “computer vision processors” in order to generate a real-time 3D Mapping of the space around the phone. The company believes the combination of these sensors with advanced computer vision techniques will open up new avenuesfor indoor navigation and gaming, among many other things.


Technolgy Progres

As a technology, the book is like a hammer. That is to say, it is perfect: a tool ideally suited to its task. Hammers can be tweaked and varied but will never go obsolete. Even when builders pound nails by the thousand with pneumatic nail guns, every household needs a hammer. – James Gleick

Review

In 2016 Microsoft corporation create the first self-contained holographic computer enabling you to engage with your digital contentand interact with holograms in the world around you its MICROSOFT HOLOLENS. Light Fidelity (Li-Fi) is a bidirectional, high-speed and fully networked wireless communication technology similar toWi-Fi.The term was coined by Harald Haas and is a form of visible light communication and a subset of optical wireless communications (OWC) and could be a complement to RF communication (Wi-Fi or cellular networks), or even a replacement in contexts of data broadcasting. 3D PRINTER Chuck Hull (Charles W. Hull) is the co-founder, xecutive vice president and chief technology officer of 3D Systems. He is the inventor of the solid imaging process known as stereolithography (3D Printing), the first commercial rapid prototyping technology, and the STLfile format. 3D print Back in 2012, Bogue, Cowen and Dilworth were having a hard time with a 3D print. Somewhere along the hours-long process they endured to make a toy prototype, the printer they were using missed a few layers. Tango (formerly named Project Tango in-testing) is a technology platform developed and authored by Google that uses computer vision to enable mobile devices, such as smartphones and tablets, to detect their position relative to the world around them without using GPS or other external signals.


Evolution