Page 1

P H O E N I X A N C I E N T A RT


BEAKER DECORATED IN REPOUSSÉ Greek, first half of the 5th century B.C. Silver H: 15.3 cm - D: 9.5 cm (1:1) The beaker, a tall drinking cup, has simple and noble shape. The elongated cylindrical body is gradually widening toward the upper part where the thin rim is slightly turned down and has the oval shape. The composition of this object is well balanced and built in accordance with the architectonic principles: it has a wider foundation separated from the body by the narrow gold band consisting of the egg-and-dart ornament and the bead pattern; the middle of the body is accentuated with the gold figural frieze depicting the horse-riders; and the upper part under the rim is marked by the additional gold frieze showing the fighting animals. Contrast in color (originally the shining silver and bright gold) helps to appreciate these structural divisions. The gold bands have been made separately in the repoussé technique and attached to the body in silver. The horseriders are all and the same figure repeated ten times by the same die. As the space between the figures is not absolutely even, it seems that the figures are different. A naked warrior is depicted wearing a pointed helmet and holding a javelin in his raised right arm and the reins in the left hand: a military contest of a javelin throw on horseback as the shield (not included here) was set up as a target is thus presented in the composition. The rider can be compared with some types minted on ancient Greek coins. A parallel can be found in the galloping rider who wears weapons and same style helmet on the silver didrachm of c. 480 B.C. mint in Gela, Sicily. Rendering of the torso seen from the front versus the head and the legs in profile in our piece suggests similar date within the first half of the 5th century. Being the representation in miniature it shows the artist’s care for the details (eyes of the rider; ribs of the horse). One can notice a slight alteration of natural proportions, the horse’s body looks too long, but this is probably done to express the dynamics of the scene, a “storm-paced horse” - as the victorious horse of Heron, ruler of Siracuse, was described by Bacchylides. A very similar attitude of the galloping horse presents the sculpture from the temple in Contrada Marafioti near Locri of the end of the 5th century B.C. Same pair of a lion attacking a bull appears four times around the vessel’s lip. The lion is aggressively approaching the bull roaring from the wide-open mouth, his long tail is energetically curved and the forepaws with spread claws are ready to attack. The bull is getting to counter-attack bending the head with thick horns. The fighting animals were a wide-spread motif known to the Greeks from the Near-Eastern art. The figures on the beaker show the preference for elongated proportions and slim bodies, a similarity found in the representation of the lion with the bull on a terracotta altar of the second half of the 6th century B.C. from Centuripe, Sicily, whose artist was probably influenced by the earlier prototypes of Ionic origin. This beaker is definitely a unique piece finding no direct analogues in the shape or decoration. The stylistic features reveal its affiliation with the artistic tendencies of the Greek workshops of the Southern Italy and Sicily. The commission of the beaker might have been made to commemorate a victory in the horse races in panhellenic games or local festivals. CONDITION

The vessel is entirely preserved though bears several signs of weathering and damage. The silver surface is covered with a crust of dark oxides; there are vertical cracks that come through the body; the rim was broken and mended, there are traces of glue on the interior side; ruptures of metal at the bottom, middle and upper gold bands; losses of gold in the middle and upper bands. The upper band is covered with red-purple patina. The middle band shows its original seam. PROVENANCE

Formerly from the Nicolas Koutoulakis collection, Geneva-Paris, 1950-1960s. BIBLIOGRAPHY

BENNETT M. and PAUL A.J., Magna Graecia: Greek Art from South Italy and Sicily, New York-Manchester, 2002, pp. 240-241, no. 53. HEMINGWAY S., The Horse and Jockey from Artemision: A Bronze Equestrian Monument of the Hellenistic Period, Berkeley, 2004, p. 126. KRAAY C.M. and HIRMER M., Greek Coins, New York, 1966, p. 295, nos. 154,156, pl. 55. LANGLOTZ E. and HIRMER M., The Art of Magna Graecia, London, 1965, p. 261, no. 32; pp. 286-287, no. 124.

21985

2


1


FOUNTAIN SPOUT IN THE SHAPE OF A DOLPHIN Late Roman - Early Byzantine, ca. 400 - 500 A.D. Bronze H: 18 cm - L: 19.6 cm Sculptural representations of dolphins have a history of their own in ancient Greek and Roman art. One of the most curious pieces is reported by Pausanias (Description of Greece, 6, 20, 10-12): there was a bronze dolphin in the Olympia stadium marking the starting place for horse races of which Poseidon, the god of the sea, was the great patron. Representations of dolphins were often found as dedications in his the shrines. As a sign of the water kingdom of which Poseidon was the ruler, the dolphin appears on his forearm projected in a powerful gesture in the composition surviving in bronze statuettes (larger statues of the same type also certainly existed). It is also seen serving as a support for the figure of the deity. Pausanias describes the bronze statue of Poseidon in Corinth as a fountain: “under the feet of Poseidon is a dolphin spouting water” (Description of Greece, 2, 2, 8). Early Christian art preserved such iconography: a silver repoussé cup from the first half of the 6th century A.D. in the Louvre and another of the same kind in the Hermitage Museum each show the statue of Poseidon with the dolphin on its handle. Dolphins were similarly employed as supports in marble statues of the sea-born Aphrodite/Venus often shown with the figure of Eros/Amor riding the dolphin. Eros astride the dolphin became an iconographical pattern by itself; since Roman times, the sculptural group or the single figure of a dolphin was used in marble or bronze statuettes as part of the fountains in a garden setting. It is believed that the Greeks did not use images of dolphins for water spouts, probably because of their association with undrinkable salt water. Our piece shows the creature with its large snout and coiled tail both erect. The body is hollow-cast and includes the round hole in the mouth which served as a spout for a water jet. The back side under the tail has a wider round aperture designed as the conduit for the pipe bringing the pressurized water from the piping system to the fountain. This was probably not a figural spout on a stone pillar fountain for drinking water found on the streets and the squares of the ancient cities. Part of the bronze surface of the belly bears signs of a previous connection to a kind of support, while the surface of the dolphin’s tail above the large aperture is not flat but curved. All this shows that the piece was not designed for attachment to a rectangular pillar. Rather, we can assume that it was probably attached to a sculptural base representing a piece of rock or waves, a seascape similar, for example, to the fountain piece (a marble dolphin and Eros) discovered in Pompeii, whose base represents a seascape with darting fish. There might be an additional possibility of the origin of this piece. The attachment area continues on the coil of the tail where the back is flattened, suggesting an even longer surface for the vertical attachment; this could be a wider and thicker round pipe holding two or three dolphin spouts and supported by a common stone base (a bronze pipe with three attached dolphin spouts was found in Pompeii). The designer’s idea of projecting water into the basin below was certainly supported by the belief of the ancients that dolphins spouted water. In Late Roman-Early Byzantine art, the figures of dolphins similar in size and composition were employed in the shape of bronze lamps. The animated composition of our piece is combined with several apparent decorative features: the long tail is coiled as a serpentine coil, the added fan-like pectoral fins of a fish on the side of the sea mammal, behind the eyes, and the dorsal fin and flippers on the sides have linear treatment by incision. The pupils of the eyes and the teeth along the sides of the mouth are also indicated. CONDITION

Entirely preserved. Small losses of metal on the left side of the dolphin’s snout and scratches. Dark green patina over the red-brown metal surface. PROVENANCE

Ex-European private collection, acquired in 1993 in Munich, Germany. BIBLIOGRAPHY

STEBBINS. E.B., The Dolphin in the Literature and Art of Greece and Rome, Menasha (Wisconsin), 1929. On the dolphin in Early Christian art, s.: WEITZMANN K. (ed.), Age of Spirituality: Late Antique and Early Christian Art, Third to Seventh Century, New York, 1979, pp. 136-137, no.114. On the dolphin in fountain sculpture, s.: KAPOSSY B., Brunnenfiguren der hellenistischen und römischen Zeit, Zurich, 1969, p. 48. Rediscovering Pompeii, Rome, 1990, pp. 266-268, no.188. On the dolphin as an ex-voto, s.: ETIENNE R. and BRAUN J.-P., Ténos I: Le sanctuaire de Poséidon et d’Amphitrite, Paris, 1986, pp. 312-314, pl. 161-162. On the dolphin as part of a statue, s.: Lexicon Iconographicum Mythologiae Classicae (LIMC), Vol. VII, Zurich-Munich, 1994, s.v. Poseidon, p. 452, no. 25; s.v. Poseidon/Neptunus, pp. 485-486, nos. 1-25. Lexicon Iconographicum Mythologiae Classicae (LIMC), Vol. VIII, Zurich-Munich, 1997, s.v. Venus, pp. 200-203, 205, 210, nos. 46, 67, 88-90, 113, 121, 184.

1896

4


2


FEMALE HEAD FROM A MARBLE RELIEF

3

Greek, middle - third quarter of the 4th century B.C. Marble H: 26 cm This head was part of a grave relief, which was originally a large marble slab; it was sculpted nearly in the round and is under life size. Several entirely preserved Greek funerary gravestones, especially of Attic origin, have survived from Antiquity. They present various examples of relief compositions, of which two major types with female figures can be distinguished: the deceased is represented standing or seated on a chair; the deceased is alone or accompanied by a servant or relatives, or both. When alone, the figure may hold a mirror or, if young, a doll or a pet; sometimes a dog is represented at the deceased person’s feet. Often, the scene may depict a farewell; a deceased woman may receive a jewelry box from a servant girl or is shown shaking hands with a relative (handshaking is intended to show the continuing familial connection). In Greek funerary reliefs of the Classical and Late Classical periods, there is no indication of an interior or a landscape; space is conceived in a conventional way. A stele is usually designed as a piece of architecture; it is framed by two side pillars (antae) and a pediment, forming a naiskos, a small temple. From the mid-4th century B.C., Greek sculptors started to use deeper space inside the block, making it possible to include a group of figures sculpted almost three-dimensionally. While the architrave can bear an inscription that mentions the name of the deceased person and his or her relation to other members of the family, it is sometimes not clear who is the deceased among the figures represented. Judging by the typical composition of such groups and by the spatial relationship between the figures, the deceased person is rarely shown from the front; he or she is most often seen in profile or in a three-quarter view. Even more difficult is the task of identifying a fragment from a grave stele with a “family group”. Is this young female the deceased person, a relative or a slave girl? Taking into account the fact that the head is not seen from an angle, but almost entirely from the front (the broken area completely covers the back of the head and the nape of the neck), this implies that the female here was not herself the deceased person. Looking from the side, one observes that the transition of the head to the background, roughly modeled by the sculptor’s chisel, occupies almost a third of the entire volume. This means more space behind the figure of the girl (first plane) to include additional figures (second plane). She was doubtless one of a group of people surrounding the seated person. One also observes the slight turn of the head to the left, as seen in the line of the left part of the neck, the slight foreshortening of the shape of the left half of the face and the modeling of the eyes (her right eye has the eyeball positioned to the left). This young woman could well have been on one side gazing at a seated figure, or she could have been behind the seated figure with her gaze turned slightly away. Although there is a chip on her right cheek, it is not enough to indicate the original presence of a finger or palm applied to her face in a gesture of grief. The so-called Venus rings on the neck indicate that this is not a youngster or a teenager, but a young woman. The curls of the hairstyle are rendered in a very generic manner; there are no earrings and there is no veil. Consequently, this is likely to be a maid, rather than a daughter or a sister of the deceased person. The treatment of the stone yields a smooth surface and the features of the face are carefully modeled: slender cheeks narrowing towards the prominent dimpled chin, full lips on a small mouth drilled at the corners, almond-shaped eyes with heavy lids, bridge of the nose merging with sharp-ridged eyebrows. Viewed from side, an elegant and noble profile is revealed. This delicate face full of classical beauty is a telling example of fine workmanship in Attic sculpture. CONDITION

Excellent state of preservation. The head does not have any serious damage except for two small chips on the right eyebrow and cheek and a big chip on the right side of the neck. The marble is weathered. PROVENANCE

Ex-private collection, Vienna, said to have been collected in the late 19th-early 20th century; anonymous sale, Sotheby's London, 2 July 1996, lot 104; with Robin Symes, London, 2001. BIBLIOGRAPHY

On similar heads in frontal view, s.: CLAIRMONT C.W., Classical Attic Tombstones, Kilchberg, 1993, Vol. 3, nos. 3.453, 3.456, 3.459a; Vol. 4, no. 4.422. On Attic grave stelae, s.: GROSSMAN J., Greek Funerary Sculpture: Catalogue of the Collections at the Getty Villa, Los Angeles, 2001, pp. 8-71. LEADER R.E., In Death Not Divided: Gender, Family, and State on Classical Athenian Grave Stelae, in American Journal of Archaeology, 101 (4), October 1997, pp. 683-699. RIDGWAY B.S., Fourth-Century Styles in Greek Sculpture, Madison, 1997, pp. 157-170.

27381

7


A STAMNOS WITH LAYERED PAINTING, ASCRIBED TO THE WORKSHOP OF THE ANTIMENES PAINTER Greek (Attic), late 6th century B.C. Ceramic H : 24.2 cm This spectacular stamnos was modeled in the traditional, red-brick colored Attic clay and decorated in the “Six's technique”, named after the Dutch scholar who first, in the late 19th century, brought together a number of Attic containers which were painted in this style. The decoration, which comprises only three figures here, was made in an orangecolored paint applied over the black glaze covering the entire stamnos. Like in the black-figure method, details of the anatomy and clothing are completed by incisions. This technique - which was invented in Athens almost simultaneously with the red-figure process, against which it could not compete - remained a bit marginal and its use limited mostly on small-sized vessels: in the 5th century B.C., the Six's technique has had the most significant success outside the Greek mainland, since it was adopted by several Etruscan workshops in particular. Stamnos were rather rarely used by Greek potters and served, like craters, for mixing the wine with the water that was intended for the guests at symposia. This example, the size of which is smaller than the average, has a pear-shaped and well proportioned body supported by a circular base; the neck is low, the lip is rounded. From a morphological point of view, it has a particularity that makes this piece extraordinary: it is not provided with the two usual horizontal handles, a distinctive feature of this form of vessels. This absence has moreover determined the way the artist presented his subject, since he had an ample circular area uninterrupted by formal elements: the decoration is organized in an apparently simple, but very remarkable scheme, since the three figures are equidistant from each other on the black surface of the stamnos, so that only one entire figure at a time occupies the visual field, the two others being invisible due to the curve of the wall. The myth of Theseus, Ariadne and the Minotaur is one of the most famous and widely represented legends in Classical mythology: a son of the Athenian King Aegeus, the young Theseus went to Crete to kill the Minotaur (a human monster with the head of a bull, born from the coupling of Poseidon and Pasiphae, the wife of Minos, the Cretan king) and free Attic from the obligation to send seven boys and seven girls as a sacrifice to the monster; with the help of Ariadne, one of Minos daughters, who gave him a ball of string so he could find his way out of the Labyrinth where the Minotaur was trapped, the hero performed his feat by stabbing his opponent with a sword. On our example, this episode is treated in a surprising way for that period: in fact, the scheme with the three figures, which was often seen in the 7th century B.C., was virtually abandoned by the end of the Archaic period in favor of more narrative (some of the young victims most often attended to the fight) or more essential scenes, in which only the two fighters were painted. The interpretation of the image is guaranteed not only by the iconography, but also by the inscriptions that are painted near the figures and indicate their name; the text above the hand of the hero is the dedication to a young Athenian (ΑΡΛΕΑΔΕ[Σ ΚΑΛΟΣ). This vessel, which can be dated to the very late 6th century, around 510 B.C., has been attributed by C. Isler-Kerenyi to the workshop of the Antimenes Painter, who was certainly one of the most prominent artists among the contemporary ceramics painters. CONDITION

The vessel is complete but has been reassembled; the vase is in very good condition, with an attractive surface. PROVENANCE

Ars Antiqua A.G., Lucerne, Catalogue 13, 7 December, 1957, no. 14; Ex-Ferruccio Bolla collection (1911-1984), Lugano, Switzerland; Münzen und Medaillen A.G., Basel, Auktion 70, 14 November, 1986, no. 206; Christie’s New York, 14 November 2000, lot 441; English private collection, 2001-2009. EXHIBITED

Stamnoi, J. Paul Getty Museum, Malibu, 1980. PUBLISHED

Ars Antiqua A.G., Lucerne, Catalogue 13, 7 December, 1957, pl. 10-11, no. 14. ISLER-KERENYI C., Stamnoi, Lugano, 1976, pp. 29-35. ISLER-KERENYI C., Stamnoi, An Exhibition at the J. Paul Getty Museum, Malibu, 1980, no. 7. Münzen und Medaillen A.G., Basel, Auktion 70, 14 November, 1986, no. 206. BIBLIOGRAPHY

MARANGOU L.I., Ancient Greek Art from the Collection of Stavros S. Niarchos, Athens, 1995, pp. 106-109, pp. 134-139. PHILIPPAKI B., The Attic Stamnos, Oxford, 1967, pp. 25-28.

21492

8


4


4

11


SPOON DECORATED IN OPENWORK AND ADORNED WITH A DOLPHIN Roman, 1st century A.D. Rock crystal, bone, gold L: 22.7 cm The spoon is composed of two elements: the bowl, carved from a piece of rock crystal, and the handle, carved from a stem of bone. The connection between these elements is reinforced by the presence of a thick ring in hammered gold leaf. The long and thin handle, cylindrical in shape, is decorated with incised circles alternating with moldings and with spherical and oval patterns; it terminates in a trunconical knob. The very deep, long and narrow bowl is almond-shaped, with a pointed end. Near the handle, it turns into a particularly elaborate shaft, square in section, decorated with a pattern of four openwork volutes on the underside. On the upper part, with its snout resting on the edge of the bowl, is a small statuette of a swimming dolphin, its tail raised as if emerging from the water. Despite the miniature size, the crystal carver has rendered the animal with great detail and its attitude with great realism; the sinuous body of the dolphin suggests the idea of speed and of perfectly hydrodynamic movement (there is a tiny pierced openwork beneath the body of the dolphin), the snout is elongated, the eyes bulge and the fins are extended. Three other volutes, executed in very low relief, adorn the underside of the bowl; they follow the patterns of the stem and grow symmetrically, like the leaves of a tree, left and right of a pointed central branch. This is an outstanding, probably unique piece, which, on the one hand, uses particularly precious materials (gold, crystal) and, on the other hand, achieves a remarkable artistic and technical quality, comparable to the statuettes in semiprecious stone and to the masterpieces of contemporary glyptic art. At table, Romans essentially used a spoon and their fingers (the fork is a much more recent invention that gradually spread from the 15th century only, while the knife was used by the slaves, in the kitchen, to cut the meat before it was taken to the table). The main reason for such a use was related to the habit - of the wealthy social classes especially - of eating, while reclining on the left side, on a triclinium; this position would not enable the diners to use their hands for holding the tableware (knife and fork, in particular). Roman spoons were generally of two types: a more circular type (cochlear), which was used to eat shellfish and eggs, and a deeper, more ovoid type (ligula), used for sauces and broths. They were mostly made of metal (bronze or, more rarely, gold or silver) or, for humbler people, of wood or of bone. Glass examples are documented, though rarely, while the use of rock crystal is only attested for a cochlear with a silver handle dated to the 1st century A.D., now housed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, in New York. Our example, however, differs from the other spoons used at table or in the kitchen, mainly because of its shape and rich decoration, which do not seem suitable for such use. Two different interpretations may be suggested for this beautiful specimen, justified by the presence of the statuette of the dolphin (this mammal was traditionally associated with Aphrodite/Venus, the Greco-Roman goddess of love, often represented in the female world during the Imperial period): a) taking into account that spoons, in tombs, were usually related to other jewelry and typical female items, it could be a cosmetic spoon that would have belonged to the toiletry set of a wealthy Roman citizen: this spoon would have been used to prepare, measure or mix cosmetic powders or, possibly, medication; b) its cult use for the dosage of precious materials during specific rituals, probably connected with Aphrodite/Venus. CONDITION

Remarkably preserved: virtually intact, aside from minor chips (edge of the bowl and handle especially). Superficial deposits. PROVENANCE

Formerly with Sleiman Aboutaam; thence by descent, Noura Aboutaam collection, Geneva, Switzerland. BIBLIOGRAPHY

On spoons in the Roman world and on their use, s.: DAREMBERG C. and SAGLIO E., Dictionnaire des antiquités grecques et romaines, III.2, Paris, 1887, pp. 1253-1254. GUZZO P.G. (ed.), Argenti a Pompei, Milan, 2006, pp. 95-96, nos. 65-76. STRONG D.E., Greek and Roman Gold and Silver Plate, London, 1966, pp. 155-156. On the cochlear housed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, s.: PICON C.A. et al., Art of the Classical World in the Metropolitan Museum of Art: Greece, Cyprus, Etruria, Rome, New York, 2007, pp. 394 and 496, no. 462. On toiletry items for women, s.: CONTICELLO B. (ed.), Rediscovering Pompeii, Rome, 1990, pp. 156-159, nos. 28ff. DÖRIG J. (ed.), Art antique: Collections privées de Suisse romande, Geneva, 1975, no. 366.

26793

12


5


5

14


LIDDED RITUAL VESSEL BEARING THE NAME OF THUTMOSE III

6

Egyptian, 18th Dynasty, reign of Thutmose III (ca. 1473 - 1426 B.C.) Calcite (alabaster) H: 12.5 cm – D. of lid: 7.7 cm (1:1) Vessel of a very elegant shape, which was carved from a single block of calcite; worked with remarkable skill and finesse. The inscriptions on the lid and body of the vase were engraved and colored in blue by the addition of powdered frit. The body, slightly flared in the upper part, is supported by a small prominent foot; the circular lid (dimension, inscription, presence of the frit) shows, on the lower side, a circular projection which fits into the neck, preventing it from falling too easily. This form has a long tradition that dates back to the Old Kingdom, but still survived for centuries without major changes: such ritual vessels were intended to contain the cosmetics that were offered to the deity during ceremonies, especially for the needs of the daily divine worship; in this regard, one should highlight the fact that Thutmose III is also known to have himself designed ritual tableware. Aside from the usual formulas, the two inscriptions indicate the name of the pharaoh to whom the vessel belonged (Men-Kheper-Re, Thutmose III), while the name of the god who received the object as an offering (Amun-Re) is only read in the longest inscription incised on the body (three columns). The vessel would have belonged to the foundation deposit of a palace, which, according to the incised text, would have been dedicated to Amun-Re by this pharaoh of the 18th Dynasty (the name of the building should be read as Powerful Land of Egypt or Beloved Island). Furthermore, in the course of the New Empire, vases of the same shape would follow the deceased in his final resting place, as attested by similar vessels found in a box from the Tomb of Tutankhamun. In ancient Egypt, stone vases were regarded as significant luxury items. The art of carving stone vessels reached its climax at times as remote as the Thinite period and the Old Kingdom: for instance, the craftsmen working for the Pharaoh Djoser were able to meet the order of several tens of thousands of vessels, which were placed in the stores of the Step Pyramid at Saqqara (30-40,000 vessels were made, the majority of which were found broken). The manufacture of these objects is a frequent theme in the painted reliefs of the Old Kingdom, but very few ancient workshops were discovered. The iconography suggests that the carver would have started by carving and polishing the outside, before piercing the inside with a drill. The various operations were performed by placing the vessel in a hole in the ground or the work table. Stone vessels were mainly used to contain unguents and cosmetic oils and to store them thanks to the thickness and impermeability of their walls. All these substances had many uses in daily life (medicines), but they also played a leading role in the religious (offerings in temples, daily unctions of the statues and cult objects) and funeral sphere (preparation of the mummies, belief in the rejuvenating and regenerating effect of these substances). It is therefore not surprising that a very large number of stone vessels were regularly deposited in shrines and in funerary complexes. CONDITION

Complete and virtually intact vessel; minor chips at the edges. Smooth and polished surface, abundant remains of frit in the inscriptions. PROVENANCE

Ex-Israeli private collection, collected in the 1960s; accompanied by an Israeli Export License. BIBLIOGRAPHY

On related alabaster vessels from the New Empire, s.: PAGE-GASSER M. and WIESE A.B., Egypte, Moments d’Eternité, Mainz/Rhine, 1997, nos. 73-74. Thoutanhkhamon, L’or de l’au-delà, Trésors funéraires de la vallée des Rois, Basel, 2004, p. 343. VANDIER J., Catalogue des objets de toilette égyptiens, Paris, 1972, p. 129, no. 555.

27549

15


6

17


HANDLE IN THE SHAPE OF A LION Greek, late 6th century B.C. Bronze L: 18.2 cm (1:1) The ergonomic design of this statuette, whose body appears too slim compared to the muscled, powerful shapes of a lion or a panther, is in line with its ancient use as a patera handle or, but this is less probable, as a hydria or an oenochoe handle. Despite the formal stylization, the body of the wild cat, with its slender, elegant proportions, conveys a sense of great agility: the animal is about to leap, while the paws of its hind legs still appear to touch the ground. The neck and the head perfectly follow the axis of the body ; the forelegs do not touch the jaw. The cylindrical shape of the body narrows just above the rump, where two depressions mark the muscle tension and the joints of the lion’s hindquarters. The ribs are indicated by regular undulations on the surface. The expression of the muzzle is aggressive, with the snub nose, the chops turned outwards, the mouth partially open in a snarl. The bony, muscular structure of the skull is visible thanks to the sculpted forehead and cheeks ; the almondshaped eyes are prominent ; the small triangular ears are slightly tilted and placed on the crown of the mane. The very special mane is formed by a thick circle with incised flame-like locks. On the neck, the mane is in light relief compared to the rest of the back, from which it is separated by a deeply incised line. The other symmetrical locks are so carefully rendered that the surface looks almost like a fabric. The carving is very delicate and of a rather unique quality for this type of object. The statuette is solid cast, while the anatomy of the animal is rendered by incisions and by an accurate modeling. From the 8th century B.C. already, animals (lions, bulls) but also hybrid beings (griffins, sirens) adorned Greek bronze vessels. Throughout the 6th century B.C., lions represented in this posture are well documented, forming the handles of many a bronze phiale (or patera, a sort of low, wide cup) intended for the banquets of the wealthiest classes. The forelegs of the animal were generally cast with a large palm leaf attached to the lip and to the body of the vessel, while its head protruded over the rim of the vase ; another smaller palm leaf was located on the hind claws and served both as an ornament and as a supporting base for the back of the cup, thus providing better balance (in our example, the irregular, incomplete surface under the hind legs probably indicates the former presence of such a decoration). The loop formed by the tail would have allowed suspension of the vessel. Other similar figures of lions are attested, which are also regarded as patera handles, although only one example is still preserved with its cup. There are fewer than a dozen statuettes, five of which at least were found on the Acropolis of Athens ; others, uncovered in southern Italy, are generally considered as local imitations of Attic prototypes. The production of these cups ranges between the middle and the late 6th century B.C. for Athens, while the paterae of Magna Graecia seem a little more recent (some examples apparently date back to the early 5th century B.C.). Stylistically, the presence of some elements (the crown of the mane in particular), the smoother modeling and the richer, more precise anatomical details relate this handle to examples which were excavated in southern Italy ; the position of the forelegs (which, on our statuette, are clearly separated from the jaw of the cat) is the most significant difference compared to the Italiote examples. Chronologically, this piece appears to be slightly more recent than the Attic lions, whose style is clearly archaic. C. Tarditi suggests the existence of a workshop in Adriatic southern Italy (modern-day Apulia), which would have imitated and pursued the Attic tradition for several decades, and to which some handles with two lions’ bodies for podanipter basins could also be attributed. CONDITION

Excellent condition, tail reglued, ends of the forelegs now lost. Smooth, perfectly clear surface, covered with a beautiful and uniform light green patina. Slight firing defects in places (small superficial holes under the belly). PROVENANCE

With Nicolas Koutoulakis, Geneva-Paris; Private collection, acquired from him in 1995. BIBLIOGRAPHY

On patera handles, s.: GAUER W., Ein spätarchaischer Beckengriff mit Tierkampfgruppe, in Olympiabericht, 10, Berlin, 1981, pp. 111-165 (see especially pp. 146-148). JANTZEN U., Griechische Griffphialen, in Winkelmannsprogramm Berlin, 114, 1958, pp. 5-29. TARDITI C., Vasi di bronzo in area Apula, Lecce, 1996, pp. 112, 132-136 and 179-180. On the examples found in the Acropolis, s.: DE RIDDER A., Catalogue des bronzes trouvés sur l’Acropole d’Athènes, Paris, 1896, pp. 77-79, nos. 231-235. On other lion statuettes used as vessel handles or ornaments, s.: GAUER W., Die Bronzegefässe von Olympia: I, Olympische Forschungen XX, Berlin, 1991, pp. 254-256, nos. M23, M32-M33, pl. 77-78 (cauldron supports). ROLLEY C., Les bronzes grecs, Fribourg, 1983, pp. 137-139 (Vix and Paestum).

3820

18


7


CONICAL BOWL WITH A FLOWER-SHAPED GOLD ORNAMENT

8

Hellenistic Greek (Syria-Palestine), 2nd - 1st century B.C. Glass and gold H: 7.5 cm - D: 14.5 cm (1:1) This bowl (or cup) is outstanding not only for its state of preservation, but also for the thick gold leaf ornament attached to its bottom; this special element makes the piece a unique and probably major bowl in this group of Hellenistic vessels. It is made of thick transparent glass, olive green in color; the wall is thicker at the upper edge than at the bottom. The shape is as simple as it is elegant; the profile is even and conical, with a rounded bottom, covered with a gold ornament decorated with a flower in relief. The flower is composed of two rings of petals with pointed tips and of a circular central part, which gives the vessel a certain balance (there are no handles). It is worth noting that the bottom of the bowl was specifically sized to receive the ornament; rather than simply rounded, as is the norm for this type of bowl, it shows a projection in the outer profile, as if it had been carved or pressed for a better adhesion of the ornament to the glass (other related bowls occasionally feature more elaborate decorative patterns than a few incised lines, as is the case, for example, with a piece in the University of Missouri-Columbia Collection, whose bottom is fashioned to provide a good balance). On the inside, the decoration is limited to three horizontal parallel lines, deeply incised and no doubt made with a potter’s wheel. The rim is simple, without a lip and slightly rounded. On the outside, about halfway up the wall, a small disk in low relief is probably evidence of ancient repairs, due perhaps to a fusion defect in the glass or to damage. This piece belongs to a well attested group of glass vases, certainly used as drinking vessels during symposia (drinking parties). Produced by workshops based on the Syro-Palestinian coast, approximately between the middle of the 2nd and the late 1st century B.C., these bowls (known as Syro-Palestinian grooved cups, because of the inner and/or outer circular engravings) were soon acknowledged in a large part of the Mediterranean world, since they were later uncovered in Greece (Athens, Delos), in Italy (Etruria, Magna Graecia, Sicily), in Spain and in Egypt. Diverse in size and proportions, they were made of transparent, generally colorless amber or, as is the case here, of yellowish green glass. These glass bowls, which were certainly already regarded as luxury items in ancient times, can be considered as imitations of the many Hellenistic drinking cups made of precious metals (mostly silver), as evidenced not only by the formal affinities, but also by the presence of the rosette on the bottom, a widespread pattern in the decoration of metal tableware. The manufacturing technique is unique, based on the principle of the mold, but without the pressing operation. After preparing a glass disk of the desired dimensions, the craftsman places it on a plaster or terracotta cone-shaped mold, pointed upwards, and partially fuses it. Under the action of heat and gravity, the glass “melts” over the mold, taking its shape and concentrating especially towards the lip of the vessel, which thus becomes thicker (unlike blown glass vessels, in which the bottom of the vase is thicker). This process (known as sagging) is faster and less expensive than the one based on molding in male and female molds; moreover, since only one side of the vessel is in contact with the form, the polishing of the glass can be limited to the inner part only. CONDITION

Virtually intact bowl, aside from the partially chipped edge. Iridescent patina in places and remains of encrustations partly covering the inner bowl. Regular traces of polishing on the inside. PROVENANCE

Formerly with Sleiman Aboutaam; thence by descent, Noura Aboutaam collection, Geneva, Switzerland. BIBLIOGRAPHY

On related bowls, s.: GROSE D.F., The Syro-Palestinian Glass Industry in the Later Hellenistic Period, in Muse, 13, 1979, pp. 31-33 (technique); pp. 54-67 (p. 58, no. 1 for the bowl with the worked bottom). GROSE D.F., The Toledo Museum of Art: Early Ancient Glass, New York, 1989, pp. 245ff. STERN E.M. and SCHLICK-NOLTE B., Early Glass of the Ancient World, 1600 B.C.-50 A.D.: Ernesto Wolf Collection, Ostfildern, 1994, pp. 68-71, no. 77 (technique); pp. 284-285, no. 79. On metal parallels, s.: OLIVER A. and LUCKNER K.T., Silver for the Gods: 800 Years of Greek and Roman Silver, Toledo, 1977, pp. 84-85, no. 47. STRONG D.E., Greek and Roman Gold and Silver Plate, London, 1966, pp. 108-109ff.

26727

21


8

23


STATUETTE OF A WORSHIPPER Nuragic (Sardinia), 8th - 7th century B.C. Bronze H: 13.3 cm (1:1) This statuette represents a woman standing in a strictly frontal position (seen in profile, the piece is almost flat). The skinny body is straight and shows no details, except for the small circular breasts in very low relief. The arms are spread and directed towards the viewer: the right arm is bent upwards, while the hand is open with four outstretched fingers and the thumb at an angle. The left arm is slightly lowered, while the hand holds an offering plate filled with four objects (two “croissants” and two “bread rolls”, whose exact nature remains enigmatic). Long regular lines incised on the hands and feet indicate the fingers and the toes.Slightly tilted back, the neck and the head of the woman accentuate the vertical and head-on appearance of the statuette, especially in the front view. The face is an elongated oval with a hieratic, frozen expression; although all major elements are represented (prominent eyes, triangular pointed nose, eyebrows, mouth), no other detail is modeled; even the hair has no volume and is simply indicated by horizontally incised locks parted in the middle. Soldered under the feet, a tenon with three points allowed the attachment of the statuette to its original base. The woman wears three different garments: a tunic, a mantle and a cloak. The tunic, very tight, is visible on the neck (horizontal line) and above the feet, where the border is fringed; the cap that covers the head of the figure belongs to this tunic. The mantle has a slanting upper border covering the left shoulder (where it was probably fastened by an invisible fibula) and passes under the right armpit; the vertical line in relief inside the cloak is the border of this mantle. The thick woolen cloak covers the arms and rigidly falls to the ground; the semi-circular outline of this garment is the only element that gives the statuette a sense of depth; on the outer surface, at knee height, a fringe, similar to that of the tunic, adorns the cloak. This piece is among the finest examples of Nuragic bronze sculpture and brings together all the main characteristics of this class of objects. The style is neat and precise, almost geometric, not only in the pure and essential shapes, but also in the structure, which emphasizes either the frontal or the vertical and horizontal axes. No concessions have been made to plasticity, modeling or decorations. The term nuragic characterizes the local civilization that developed in Sardinia between about 1600 and 500 B.C. It is derived from the Sardinian nuraghe, no doubt of very ancient origin. It refers to the type of stone towers sometimes surrounded by a more complex system of fortifications, built on countless hills of the island at that time. There are different types of Nuragic statuettes representing human figures: “tribal leaders”, shepherds, warriors, archers, worshippers, groups (woman and child, wrestlers), etc. Among the male and female worshippers, there is a series of standing figurines, like our example, that each hold a plate with offerings and that each raise his or her right hand in prayer, or more likely in a greeting to a deity. The closest parallel for this piece is probably a statuette housed in the George Ortiz Collection; stylistically and typologically very similar, both may have been produced by the same workshop. It is thought that Nuragic bronzes represented the worshippers and their offerings rather than a deity; they are most often ex-votos dedicated in a temple or a shrine and sometimes placed in tombs. The constant presence of the tenon under the feet indicates that the figurines were placed upright in a place specifically designed for them. Although our knowledge in this field is still very limited (mostly because of the lack of written sources), it is generally admitted that these hieratic and stylized figurines represented the highest classes of society, which held military, religious and political responsibilities; the rise of this new aristocracy might have resulted in the creation of bronze and stone sculptures. Some scholars suggest that the garments and/or the complex weapons characterize them as priests (or priestesses) or chiefs. Chronologically, these statuettes can be dated either by the presence of Nuragic material in Etruria or, conversely, by the Etruscan, Greek and Phoenician objects which were discovered in Sardinia; the dating can therefore be estimated between the late 9th and the 6th century B.C. “Classic” figurines like our example would more likely be dated to the 8th or the 7th century B.C. CONDITION

Complete statuette in excellent condition. Superficial wear (especially on the border of the mantle, on the edge of the plate and on the fingers). Left wrist accidentally bent downwards. Surface of a golden bronze color, with a beautiful green patina in places (plate). Traces of polishing inside the mantle. PROVENANCE

Ex-Professor A. Goumaz collection, Switzerland, 1950s. BIBLIOGRAPHY

On Nuragic sculpture and on this piece, s.: La civiltà nuragica, Milan, 1990, pp. 211ff. L’art des peuples italiques: 3000 à 300 avant J.-C., Geneva, 1993, pp. 52 ff., and p. 391, fig. 264 (George Ortiz Collection). LILLIU G., Sculture della Sardegna nuragica, Cagliari, 1966 (see especially pp. 137-156 for the female statuettes in a similar position). THIMME J. (ed.), Kunst und Kultur Sardiniens vom Neolithikum bis zum Ende der Nuraghenzeit, Karlsruhe, 1980, pp. 391-392, figs. 136-138. On Nuragic culture, s.: La civiltà nuragica, Milan, 1990. THIMME J. (ed.), Kunst und Kultur Sardiniens vom Neolithikum bis zum Ende der Nuraghenzeit, Karlsruhe, 1980. 9504

24


9


9

27


RING WITH A FEMALE PORTRAIT (JULIA TITI) Roman, late 1st century A.D. Solid gold, carnelian H: 2.4 cm - D (cabochon): 2.6 cm (Enlarged) This solid gold ring, round in shape, has a semi-circular section; the upper part, with a flat shoulder, is elliptical and supports a carnelian cabochon of a beautiful dark red color, which is secured in the ring by a closed setting. A female bust, certainly an individual portrait, is carved in hollow relief on the cabochon. The woman, adult though still young in appearance, is seen in left profile. This is a figure of the highest social rank, belonging perhaps to the Imperial family. The artist - given the quality and finesse of the work, he truly was a great master - has represented a richly adorned figure, with a very elaborate hairstyle and dressed in a finely draped cloak covering the neckline and a large part of the neck. Her face, with its stern expression and firm gaze, is that of a woman accustomed to giving orders and to being obeyed. Despite the idealization of the face and the lack of wrinkles, all individual features are clearly indicated. The neck is thick and well modeled, the head has a linear outline with a strong jaw, the nose is prominent, the eye is watchful, the lips are full and the chin is rounded though jutting. The ear, uncovered by the hair, is adorned with a composite earring. The adornment is completed by a large diadem, whose triangular shape is visible on top of the head. The extremely sophisticated hairstyle confirms the dating of the ring to the last decades of the 1st century A.D., when the Flavian dynasty ran the Empire. In front, the hair is arranged in finely incised, rounded curls descending to the temples and down to the ears. Behind the diadem, however, the hair is twisted and curled into braids, which form a wide circular bun. Tiny regular incisions indicate the details of the locks. The comparison with monetary and glyptic effigies and life-size stone portraits of Julia Titi, the daughter of Emperor Titus, leads to a feasible identification of the figure represented on this ring. The National Library in Paris owns some intaglio portraits of this woman that are closely related to our ring; the structure of the head, the profile of the face and the type of hairstyle repeat the same iconographic patterns and belong, in all likelihood, to the same figure. The dating of this ring also corresponds to that of the gems of the National Library (between 80 and 90 A.D., during the last years of the woman’s life). The most evident differences with the known effigies of Julia Titi concern the presence of the diadem (which is a constant in glyptic art, but rarer on coins and on stone portraits) and the amount of hair over the forehead (which is highly elaborate in a number portraits); here (as with other intaglios), it seems to be limited to a thick web of curls. Julia Titi (Flavia Julia Sabina Titi, born in 64 or 65 A.D., died in 91 A.D.) was the daughter of Emperor Titus and his wife Marcia Furnilla. Her parents divorced for reasons related to Roman politics while Julia was still a child. She was raised by Titus in Rome and was only six years old when her father undertook a military expedition to the Near East and conquered Jerusalem. Historians know very few things (often hypothetical) about Julia’s existence. Titus offered her in marriage to his brother Domitian, who refused because of his commitment to Domitia Longina. Julia then married Titus Flavius Sabinus, a consul. On the death of her father and of her husband, Julia lived with Domitian, who had meanwhile fallen in love with her, “like a woman with her husband” in the words of Cassius Dio (Roman History, 67.3). Pregnant by Domitian, Julia died, according to unconfirmed rumor, of a forced abortion wanted by the emperor. After her death, Julia was quickly deified; her ashes were later mixed with those of Domitian after he died (cf. Suetonius, The Twelve Caesars: Domitian, 17.3). CONDITION

Complete ring in excellent condition; slightly marked. PROVENANCE

Formerly with Sleiman Aboutaam; thence by descent, Noura Aboutaam collection, Geneva, Switzerland. BIBLIOGRAPHY

On portraits of Julia Titi, s.: DALTROP G. et al., Das römische Herrscherbild: Vol. 2, Die Flavier, Berlin, 1966, pp. 49-59 and 115-119, pl. 42-50. On the intaglios in Paris, s.: VOLLENWEIDER M.-L. and AVISSEAU-BROUSTET M., Camées et intailles: Tome II, Les portraits romains du Cabinet des Médailles, Paris, 2003, pp. 128-131, nos. 146-150.

26795

28


10


BUST OF A YOUNG LADY CONTEMPORY OF HADRIAN Roman, ca. 120 - 140 A.D. Marble H: 43.2 cm As seen from the back, this hollow bust is supported by a straight pillar; at the front, it features a small capital; the cylindrical base is in the shape of a drum with a concave profile and molded edges. This is a funerary bust which represents the life-size portrait of an adult woman still with a youthful appearance. The work is characterized by the remarkable elegance of the proportions (her neck is slim and long), by the regular and delicate features, by the great finesse in the execution of details in the face and by the elaborate hairstyle and drapery folds. The woman turns her head towards her left shoulder; this position is accentuated by a slight differentiation in the neck musculature. She wears a V-necked tunic with folds in high relief. The soft fabric, especially on the shoulders and the breast, reveals its fineness and transparency. The woman’s delicate and slightly long face with almost idealized features has a pointed but not too prominent chin. The sculptor’s skill is evident from the rendering; he probably worked in the capital of the Empire. The forms are modeled in an assured and precise way with very subtle sculptural nuances which animate the broad surfaces of the cheekbones, neck and forehead. The eyes are almond-shaped without indication of the irises, the small straight mouth has full lips and marked dimples and the nose has a prominent bridge. Despite her age, the expression of the woman’s face is solemn and concentrated, although the gaze seems to be a little lost in space. This lady, who certainly belonged to the high society of the Imperial period, was already a matrona assuming her role as the mistress of the house. The virtues associated with such women are expressed in the portrait: she is serious, authoritative, sober and steadfast. The hairstyle, which is particularly elaborate, frames the forehead in a clear and linear way, forming a triangle looking like a small gable. The hair is parted in two tresses above the forehead and the ears; above, it is shaped in a kind of a crown consisting of small flame patterns (with a central motif in the shape of a heart). The braids which appear on the top of the head form a thick turban on three levels, in reality a hairpiece. The surface of the hair is covered with zigzag incisions. In front of the ears, the small curls are sculpted in low relief. As with many female portraits, the hairstyle is the most important feature to classify this head. Roman ladies started to wear such hairstyles at the beginning of the 2nd century A.D. Many variants exist: with or without the wavy fringe above the forehead, with or without the chignon on the back or on the top of the head, one or several tresses, and so on. Sabina, wife of Emperor Hadrian, was the first to introduce this fashion, which was then often adopted by many ladies of the Imperial court, as attested by this portrait. Roman portraits of such quality are not frequent. The physiognomy indeed recalls certain portraits of Sabina (86-136 A.D.), wife of Emperor Hadrian, from which it differs by the younger age and the shape of the face which is smaller and less detailed, especially in the lower part. This gives us a precise reference for the chronology of this bust which should be dated about 120-140 A.D., confirmed by the type of hairstyle. This bust, complete with its base, reminds us that this way of reducing the human figure to the upper part of the torso (called a bust) was an invention of the Romans. According to them, the head, the seat of thought, was sufficient to represent a personality. As the present portrait shows, Roman ladies took great care with their hairstyle, a sign of their social rank. They often employed wigs, which were called galeri. These hairpieces were imported mostly from Germany where, contrary to Italy, the color blond was current. The desired blondness could also be obtained by using an infusion of walnut, a mixture of vinegar and mastic tree oil or even a kind of soap based on beech ash and goat fat. There were slaves specialized in taking care of the hair of their mistresses. The ciniflones practiced the coloring, the cinerarii heated the curling tongs (calamistrae), the calamistri curled the hair and, finally, the psecades perfumed the hair with aromatic oils. CONDITION

Excellent state of preservation. Most of the piece is intact, except for a fragment of the base, the tip of the nose and the chips on the lower lip, right eyebrow, the ears and the drapery. The surface is still covered with concretions in some areas and with cream-colored patina (on the face). Carved from a single block of marble. PROVENANCE

Ex-Michele Baranowsky collection, Asta Numismatica, Milan, ca. 1925 ; ex-Y. Forrer collection, Geneva, Switzerland. BIBLIOGRAPHY

FITTSCHEN K. and ZANKER P., Katalog der römischen Porträts in den Capitolinischen Museen und den anderen kommunalen Sammlungen der Stadt Rom, Vol. III, Mainz/Rhine, 1983, pp. 61-63, no. 83. DE KERSAUSON K., Catalogue des portraits romains (Musée du Louvre): Tome II, De l’année de la guerre civile (68-69 apr. J.-C.) à la fin de l’Empire, Paris, 1996, nos. 78-79.

28279

30


11


11


RELIEF WITH AN OFFERING SCENE

12

Egyptian, Old Kingdom - First Intermediate Period (ca. 2575 - 1994 B.C.) Painted limestone Dim: 31 x 134 cm Frieze engraved on a rectangular, oblong limestone slab, a few inches thick, with the figures worked in very low relief, while the inscriptions are rendered in hollow relief. Large traces of red paint remain from the polychromy, especially on the bodies of the men. The scene is composed of three different parts. On the right, the deceased and owner of the tomb is seated on a seat with finely carved legs ending in animal limbs. He holds a scepter in his left hand and a rod in the other. He is dressed in a loincloth fastened by a belt. His hair is simply combed back in long parallel, slightly wavy locks. His importance is highlighted by his size, since he is the largest figure in the picture, despite being seated. In the middle of the frieze, three servants walk towards the deceased to offer him goods from his farms. The first servant carries the haunch of an ox in his arms. Behind him, a herdsman leads a bull tied to a leash; the animal, with lyre-shaped horns, belongs to a race common in ancient Egypt, frequently represented in the iconography of the Old Kingdom. The procession ends with a duck keeper holding two birds by the wings and raising them to show them better to his master. Each of these three small-sized figures has his hair styled and is dressed in the same manner: short hair rendered as a simple cap, a short loincloth with a belt and a bow in relief. On the left of the frieze, positioned symmetrically to the deceased and owner of the tomb, three upright women form a procession moving to the right. The first woman, slightly larger, is the wife of the deceased person (she holds a flowering umbel in her left hand); she is followed by her two daughters. Carved in a somewhat frozen position, with their arms falling along their bodies, they each wear a long dress, which was certainly decorated with painted details and partially incised. Stylistically, even taking into account the fact that the scene was embellished with many painted details now lost, the representation is characterized by rather simple shapes that repeat the same schemes (attitudes, faces, garments, headgear, etc.). Despite the formal naivety, the slender, willowy proportions of the figures and the clear composition give this relief a certain charm that the modern esthetic taste can appreciate and understand. The inscription, which reads from right to left, is engraved on a line above the servants, as well as between them and the three women (two lines and two columns). It begins with the usual offering formula given by the god Anubis, which includes an invocation, bread and beer, and then indicates the names of the deceased person (Khy), of his wife (TaImat?) and of his daughters. The text arranged in columns is more enigmatic; the word written above the bull appears to be related to the term indicating a team of animals. Scenes of animal herds on parade, as well as of their presentation to the deceased and owner of the tomb, constitute a leitmotif in funerary iconography. Such scenes appear in various forms, from the shorter types, as is the case here, in which a single animal can represent the whole herd, to the more complex types, which are articulated in numerous registers and feature several animal and bird species. Chronologically, our example probably dates to the Old Kingdom or to the First Intermediate period, the boundaries of which vary according to archeologists (ca. 26th-20th century B.C.). CONDITION

Preserved rectangular fragment including a complete and clearly legible scene, but the right lower part is reattached; chips. Remains of redbrownish paint. PROVENANCE

Ex-European private collection, acquired in 1992. BIBLIOGRAPHY

On animal parades in contemporary tombs, s.: VANDIER J., Manuel d’archéologie égyptienne: Tome V, Bas-reliefs et peintures: Scènes de la vie quotidienne, Paris, 1969, pp. 13ff. On other contemporary funeral scenes, s.: ZIEGLER C., Catalogue des stèles, peintures et reliefs égyptiens de l’Ancien Empire et de la Première Période Intermédiaire, vers 2686-2040 av. J.-C., Paris, 1990.

16129

33


12

35


BOTTLE DECORATED WITH FOUR FEMALE FIGURES Sassanid, 6th - 7th century A.D. Gilded silver H: 17.2 cm (1:1) Bottle entirely made in the cold hammering technique; neck and bottom probably made separately and soldered to the body. Decorative patterns obtained either by repoussé from the inside (figures, flowers, edges of the cells, etc.) or by an elaborate combination of incisions and chiseling (anatomical details, details of the attributes, fabrics, etc.). The shape of the vessel is very simple: a small circular foot supports the ovoid body surmounted by a cylindrical neck. The rim is vertical and the lip is angular and simple: its shape allows the attachment of a disk-shaped lid (attested on at least one other example). The decoration, which is rigidly structured, occupies the whole body. The frieze, the background of which is entirely gilded, is divided vertically into four oval cells, each containing a standing figure; the ground is not indicated. Each niche is separated from the other by a non-gilded architecture, which no doubt imitates real contemporary constructions: each double column, whose base and capital are carved in the shape of a sphere, supports an almost semicircular arch, barely higher than the figures. Each element of the architecture is adorned with dotted or incised motifs (rosettes, zigzags, ivy and vine branches, etc.). A plant wreath in high relief completes the decorated area on the body. The four female figures represented on this piece have similar attitudes. They stand upright and simply wear long scarves wrapped around their arms, passing in front of their bodies, partially covering their legs and falling to their ankles. Their somewhat stiff movements recall a dance step: they are characterized by a small step forward, on tiptoe, and by the elegant position of the raised or lowered arms. These young women, whose sensuality is particularly highlighted (rounded shapes, well modeled breasts, pubic area indicated by a Y-shaped incision), are almost certainly dancers. Despite the typological similarities, they differ in many minor ways, mainly in the attributes they hold (weapons, tools, vessels, bird, etc.) and in the direction of their movements (three of them are turned to the right, one in the other direction). The adornments and the hairstyles, the accuracy and richness of which are remarkable, are the same for each of the figures: each wears a large chain necklace around the neck and a thinner one, simply dotted, that falls to the belly, bracelets on the wrists and two other bracelets with large beads on the ankles. Their hairstyling is very elaborate: the crown is covered with smooth locks held by a diadem with a medallion; on the sides, the hair descends in a thick mass that hides the ears and turns into long wavy braids, visible on the shoulders. Behind the head of each dancer, an embossed or incised aura is represented; above each head is a sphere. The faces, which show only minor variations, are finely rendered but look slightly frozen and stylized. The large quantity of richly decorated gold and silver tableware in the Sassanid court was proverbial: among the most widespread forms are the plates, the jugs and the bottles, like our piece which constitutes a beautiful example of the Iranian silversmith’s trade in that period. Stylistically and typologically, the dancers belong to a large group of figures represented on metal vessels in the late Sassanid period (5th-7th century A.D.): their attitudes are similar, but their attributes show important differences. Some are musicians (playing pan flute, double horns or castanets), while others, like these, hold various objects, animals or plants; the background of the scene may be smooth and simple or divided into several cells by ridges or by real architectural elements. It is still unknown whether the iconographic variants imply that the dancers represent different figures. Scholars have tried to identify these images, whose iconography sometimes evokes the Dionysian sphere, as priestesses of Anahita (Zoroastrian deity of water and fertility, partly identified with Dionysus) or as personifications of the four seasons, inspired by Roman art. It is nowadays common to attribute to them a secular rather than a religious meaning, especially in connection with the banquets that took place in the Sassanid court, when precious metal tableware was used for the service; such representations were perhaps above all proof of wealth and abundance. The Sassanids ruled Iran from 224 A.D (end of the domination of the Parthian kings) until the Arab invasion of 651 A.D. This period was a golden age in the history of Iran: the Sassanid Empire extended throughout the Near East, as it is still considered today (Iran, Iraq, Armenia, southern Caucasus, southern Central Asia, western Afghanistan, part of Pakistan, eastern regions of Turkey, Syrian territories, part of the Arabian Peninsula). In many respects, this period represents the highest achievement of the ancient Persian civilization, just before the Muslim conquest and the subsequent adoption of the doctrine of Muhammad. The cultural influence of the Sassanids spread far beyond the Near East, reaching Western Europe, Africa, the Middle East and the Far East, and played a role both in the emerging Islamic civilization and culture and in Byzantine, Asian and European art of the Middle Ages.

36


13


13 CONDITION

Complete and virtually intact. Lower body partially pierced by tiny holes. Perfectly preserved decoration. PROVENANCE

With Y. Molayern, London, 1960s; ex-private collection, Geneva, Switzerland, acquired in London in 1968; ex-Mr. J. L. collection, 1980; ex-Swiss private collection acquired from Mr. J. L. in 1993. BIBLIOGRAPHY

On Sassanid silverware and related bottles, s.: GUNTER A.C. and JETT P., Ancient Iranian Metalwork in the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery and the Freer Gallery of Art, Washington, 1992, pp. 185-201, nos. 32-36. In Pursuit of the Absolute: Art of the Ancient World from the George Ortiz Collection, London, 1994, no. 244. Les Perses sassanides: Fastes d’un empire oublié (224-642), Paris, 2006, pp. 70-137. VON BOTHMER D. (ed.), Glories of the Past: Ancient Art from the Shelby White and Leon Levy Collection, New York, 1990, pp. 60-62, nos. 44-45.

28662

39


STATUETTE REPRESENTING A WARRIOR DRESSED IN A LONG LOINCLOTH Canaanite, first half of the 2nd millennium B.C. Bronze H: 27.5 cm Cast in solid bronze, this statuette is devoid of a real base, but a small rectangular surface is placed under each foot, slightly offset between left and right because of the position of the legs. The figure portrayed is a warrior, certainly a man, with rather slender and willowy proportions (the accentuated chest, attested in other related figures, probably served to represent these warriors as athletic figures). He is dressed simply in a long, knee-length loincloth and his waist is encircled by a very wide belt fastened in the front; the vertical edge of the loincloth is richly decorated with a geometric pattern in light relief. He wears a large three-strand necklace. His head is covered with a high conical and pointed helmet. The warrior stands upright, in the strictly frontal and rigid posture typical of these statuettes, accentuated here by the thinness and the linear geometric shapes of the figure. His left leg is placed a little forward. His arms are bent towards the viewer, hands clenched into fists: his attributes, most likely a scepter and a weapon, or two weapons (ax, spear, shield, club?), have left no trace. A dagger with a crescentic handle is attached to the belt and worn diagonally on the chest. The head is round, with a full face conveying a slightly naive expression, in which the metalsmith has especially highlighted the sense organs: vertical and elongated ears, large circular eyes, a pointed prominent nose, a thin though broad mouth. There is a small vertical line on the chin. The figure appears to be barefoot, but no details of the toes are visible. Stylistically, it is worth noting the contrast between the rounded, well sculpted shapes of the legs and of the head, on the one hand, and the flat chest and loincloth, whose details are mostly rendered in relief, on the other. Typologically, our statuette is a beautiful example of group IV of the Orontes Figurines, as classified by H. Seeden, which includes male and female figures, warriors generally, each wearing a loincloth and high, often conical and pointed headgear. A large number of bronze statuettes like our example were produced by Levantine metalsmiths and most often dedicated in the sanctuaries of the Syro-Palestinian world and north-eastern Anatolia, especially in the course of the 2nd millennium B.C. They were manifestly widespread, since such figurines have also been uncovered in Mesopotamia and in many Mediterranean coastal sites, even in Spain. They are very diverse in quality (depending on the economic situation of the dedicator), in their dimensions and in technique. Generally made of solid bronze, some were covered with a foil of hammered precious metal (gold or silver) or were inlaid or composite, with some parts made of different materials (ivory, precious metal, stone, etc.). Most of them represented male warrior deities carrying a shield, a sword, a dagger or an ax, with bent or raised arms. The interpretation of these Levantine bronze statuettes is still under discussion, but they are thought to have represented divine figures (Baal especially) or former rulers and kings who had become objects of worship in local sanctuaries; they were generally votive statuettes. CONDITION

Complete and in very good condition, except for the weapons, now lost, and the eyes that were probably inlaid. Slightly embossed surface still retaining traces of green patina and concretions. PROVENANCE

Ex-English private collection, 1980s. BIBLIOGRAPHY

MATTHIAE P., La storia dell’arte dell’Oriente Antico: Gli stati territoriali, 2100-1600 a.C., Milan, 2000, pp. 202ff. NEGBI O., Canaanite Gods in Metal, Tel Aviv, 1976. SEEDEN H., The Standing Armed Figurines in the Levant, PBF I, Munich, 1980, pp. 23-35 (see especially pl. 23-27).

22537

40


14


STATUETTE OF PAN WITH A HUNTING STICK AND A BAG Greco - Roman, ca. 1st century B.C. - 1st century A.D. Bronze H: 11.3 cm (Enlarged) Half man and half goat, a spritely horned Pan holds one of his usual attributes in his upraised right hand, a throwing stick or lagobolon used for hunting rabbits, one of the god’s favorite animals. In his left hand he carries a small bag, perhaps to secure the quarry. Pan is known for his prowess in hunting smaller rather than larger game, the pursuit of which was presided over by Artemis as ultimate goddess of the hunt. Because of Pan’s close relationship with the god Hermes, as his son, the bag may also refer to representations of that god, who is often represented carrying a money pouch. Small in size but powerful, with its highly animated pose and statuesque quality, the statuette may have formed part of a multi-figured sculptural group or functioned as a votive in a sanctuary of Pan. The bronze is very finely detailed for its size. Pan’s expressive face with pointed ears, scraggly beard, furry upper legs, tail, hooves, as well as his muscular torso, are all clearly defined. The god’s original Greek name, Paoni, is derived from a word meaning “guardian of the flocks”, which accurately describes his function in the pastoral world. As a pastoral god he is a protector of shepherds who sacrifice kids, goats, or sheep in his honor and may dedicate statuettes of herdsmen to him. The son of Hermes and the nymph Dryops, Pan’s original home was in the mountainous and isolated lands of Arcadia. There he became a national god of the region, even being depicted on the reverse side of the coins of Zeus Lycaeus issued by the Arcadian League. Known as a god who inhabited vast and secluded mountain landscapes while watching over his flocks, sanctuaries and eventually temples were constructed to honor him. At the beginning of the 5th century B.C. the knowledge and veneration of Pan spread to Boeotia and Attica, and subsequently to the rest of the Greek world. For the 5th century Greeks, he became famous for his role as their ally in the battle of Marathon, during which he helped bring victory to the Greeks by instilling fear, or panic, into retreating Persian forces (see Herodotus, Histories, VI, 105-106). Despite Pan’s popularity as a divinity, bronze statuettes of the god are rare. Their typology, often flamboyant and lively, as well as their style, a bit crude and realistic, are certainly in line with the characteristics of the god himself: commonly, he is depicted as a hybrid beast, half man, half animal; the expression on his bearded face, with its deep creases and pointed chin is somewhat animalistic. On his forehead are two horns, his ears are pointed, his body is hairy; instead of human legs, he has the hind limbs of a goat, instead of feet, cloven hooves. He is fast and agile. The god has an active sexual drive, lusting with equal passion after nymphs and young men. His attributes are the syrinx (Pan flute), the shepherd’s staff (lagobolon) and the pine torch In the Homeric Hymn to Pan, the Greeks associated the god with the word pan, meaning “all,” from which he was identified in the Roman period as the universal god of all. In the hymn Pan is fondly remembered by the story of his introduction by Hermes to the gods of Olympus, after the goat-god’s fantastic appearance frightened his mother and she fled: “But Hermes, the helper, was overjoyed in his mind… and he hid the boy in the thick skin of a mountain rabbit and went immediately to the home of the immortal gods. He set him down next to Zeus and the other immortal gods, and he showed them his boy. All the immortal gods were delighted in their hearts, and more than anyone else, even Dionysos. And they decided to call him Pan because he had delighted the minds of all.” CONDITION

Complete statuette in perfect condition; superficial wear. Dark brown surface largely covered with a beautiful green patina. PROVENANCE

Ex-European private collection, 1980s; ex-Japanese private collection, acquired in 1993. BIBLIOGRAPHY

Some parallels: COMSTOCK M. and VERMEULE C., Greek, Etruscan and Roman Bronzes in the Fine Arts Museum, Boston, Boston, 1971, p. 73, no. 75. KENT HILL D., Catalogue of Classical Bronze Sculpture in the Walters Art Gallery, Baltimore, 1949, pp. 39-40, pl. 19, nos. 77-79. KOZLOFF M. and MITTEN G., The Gods Delight, The Human Figure in Classical Time, Cleveland, 1988, pp. 142-147, no. 23. On Pan in general, s.: Lexicon iconographicum Mythologiae Classicae (LIMC), vol VIII, Zurich-Munich 1997, s.v. Pan, pp. 923-941.

21740

42


15


STATUETTE REPRESENTING A DEIFIED KING OR A GOD Syro-Anatolian, 9th - 7th century B.C. Bronze H: 6 cm (Enlarged) This statuette is remarkable for the precision and the number of incised details that characterize the head, face and garments, given its miniature size especially. It is full cast and was probably part of a group including other images and perhaps animals. The man stands upright, feet together, in a somewhat frozen position, since (except for the forearms) he is almost entirely enclosed in a long thin sheath. Despite the presence of many details and also the shapes modeled in the back, the image was carved to be seen frontally. The arms are bent at right angles and directed towards the viewer, but the attributes that the man held can no longer be identified: the attribute on the right is completely lost, while only a fragment of twisted bronze wire is preserved from the object that the figure held tightly in his left hand. The clothing, composed of two pieces, is of a well documented type in the early centuries of the 1st millennium B.C. both in the Assyrian and in the Anatolian world, commonly seen in many royal representations. The man wears a long narrow robe, with sleeves, ending in a fringe just above his feet. A shawl furrowed by vertical lines covers his left shoulder and part of his chest (where it is held by a belt) and then passes under the opposite armpit. The flat-topped headgear is adorned with a knob in the center of the crown and covers the neck; a pair of horns decorate the front, just above the bangs. The man’s hair is long, but only a part of it is visible, behind, the rest being hidden by the headgear. The beard is long, but neat and perfectly arranged: in the upper part, it leaves the cheeks and mouth uncovered, but then descends to the chin and draws a wide rectangle with vertically and horizontally incised locks. The meaning of this statuette remains enigmatic. The presence of the horned tiara (a type of headgear widespread throughout the Near East since at least the 3rd millennium B.C., which could take many forms, conical, spherical or cylindrical, and be provided with different pairs of horns according to the importance of its owner) immediately classifies the figure represented in the superhuman sphere: he is certainly a god or perhaps a deified king. Unfortunately, no other element enables us to be more precise. If the preserved bronze wire belonged to the reins of a team of horses, one may imagine that the man was driving a chariot, probably in a parade, given his static attitude. The position of the legs and feet joined together supports this hypothesis and, at the same time, leads us to exclude the notion that the figure was standing upright on an animal, as did many a contemporary divine figure who, to keep balance on the back of the animal, had to place one foot a little in front of the other. Among other ideas, one might imagine that the wire represents a fragment of a plant or a part of a bow. Stylistically, the statuette has close parallels in the iconography of the Syro-Anatolian world in the early 1st millennium B.C. (proportions, attitude, clothing, etc.), among which may be included in particular the British Museum statuettes (BM 91147 and 1951,0606.2) and those housed in the Louvre, found in Mosul, which represent unknown gods. CONDITION

Virtually complete, but the right hand is now lost and the wire is fragmentary. Surface covered with a beautiful and uniform green patina. PROVENANCE

Ex-English private collection, acquired in London in 1994. BIBLIOGRAPHY

On the two bronzes in the British Museum and in the Louvre, s.: KYRIELEIS H., Orientalische Bronzen aus Samos, in Archäologischer Anzeiger, 1969, pp. 166-171 (British Museum, 1951,0606.2). SPYCKET A., La statuaire du Proche-Orient ancien, Leiden-Cologne, 1981, p. 382, pl. 244 (Louvre, from Mosul); pl. 245 (British Museum, BM 91147). On Urartian bronze pieces, s.: MERHAV. R. (ed.), Urartu: A Metalworking Center in the first Millennium B.C., Jerusalem, 1991. WARTKE R.-B., Urartu: Das Reich am Ararat, Mainz/Rhine, 1993.

23348

44


16


PORTRAIT OF A CONTEMPORARY OF EMPEROR GALLIENUS Roman, ca. 250 - 270 A.D. Marble H: 30 cm Head of a middle-aged man, carved in life size from a block of fine-grained marble. Its original translucence is still suggested by a modern, small break in the neck. The piece is currently covered with virtually uniform wear due to prolonged outdoor exposure, which gives it a unique charm and makes it so remarkable, a testament to the many ages traversed by such ancient artworks. The face is an elongated oval, with slightly chubby cheeks. The mouth has regular and finely modeled lips, but the upper lip is marked in the middle by a pronounced philtrum that accentuates the curvy shape of the pursed mouth. The almond-shaped eyes, surmounted by thin lids, are wide open. The irises and the pupils are neatly carved and clearly delineated ; an engraved outline indicates the former, while a concentric hollow marks the latter. The gaze is directed upwards to the right. The arches are prominent above the hollows of the eyes. The brows, partially preserved, would have been thick and finely incised. The philtrum, which connects the nose to the lips, echoes a small cleft marking the upper chin, whose rounded modeling is thus even more emphasized. A short bushy beard covers the lower face in the form of small shell-shaped curls. The ears are perfectly modeled and detailed both inside and out. The hair is thick and wavy. Arranged in locks on the forehead, it forms curls at the back of the head. Both the overall treatment and the distinctive features of the sculpture enable us to date this head to the reign of Emperor Gallienus. Many typological similarities support this hypothesis : the type of hair, the beard, the mouth, the eyes and the direction of the gaze. These various elements actually allow us to relate this portrait to documented official sculptures of Emperor Gallienus. This work differs, however, by a rather oval shape, instead of the square or massive shape typical of the emperor. It differs also by the somewhat vague expression of the eyes and the rather ordinary pout of the mouth, unlike the official portraits marked by individual facial features, a frank gaze and a determined expression. All these differences lead us to the conclusion that this is the portrait of an influential man, who wished to be represented in the style of the ruling emperor, namely Publius Licinius Egnatius Gallienus, son of Emperor Valerian, whose reign lasted from 253 to 268 A.D. CONDITION

Complete carved head, irregularly broken at the neck. Sculpture in good condition, except for general wear due to prolonged outdoor exposure. Minor chips and damage on the left eyebrow, on the tip of the nose, on the chin, behind the right ear and on the back of the head. PROVENANCE

Ex-Michele Baranowsky collection, Asta Numismatica, Milan, ca. 1925 ; ex-Y. Forrer collection, Geneva, Switzerland. BIBLIOGRAPHY

BERGMANN M., Studien zum römischen Porträt des 3. Jahrhunderts n. Chr., Bonn, 1977. DE KERSAUSON K., Catalogue des portraits romains (Musée du Louvre) : Tome II, De l’année de la guerre civile (68-69 apr. J.-C.) à la fin de l’Empire, Paris, 1996, (see Gallienus nos. 227, 228 and 229, and more especially see nos. 230 et 231, «Inconnu autrefois dit Gallien», pp. 482-491). FITTSCHEN K. and ZANKER P., Katalog der römischen Porträts in den Capitolinischen Museen und den anderen kommunalen Sammlungen der Stadt Rom : Band I, Kaiser- und Prinzenbildnisse, Mainz/Rhine, 1994, pp. 134-139 nos. 112-115, pl. 139-142. JOHANSEN F., Roman Portraits III : Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek, Copenhagen, 1995, pp. 124-125 and 128-129, nos. 51 and 53.

24421

46


17


ALABASTRON WITH A SPINNING SCENE Greek (Attic), second quarter of the 5th century B.C. Ceramic H: 18.9 cm Slender vessel with an elongated body, a slightly narrow neck and a flared, flat mouth; the base is rounded. Two small tenons acting as miniature handles, now lost, were placed towards the top of the body. This type of flask is known as an alabastron and was used to store perfumed oil. The decoration is painted in the so-called red-figure technique, invented in Athens in the late 6th century B.C. The illustrated scene is indeed “reserved”, in that the red color of the clay appears between the outlines of the figures drawn in black glaze. In accordance with the structure of the vessel, the mouth is undecorated, but the inside edge and the outside edge of the lip are black-glazed. The neck and the base of the alabastron are also painted. Two figural scenes occupy the elongated body of the alabastron. Each scene is framed, above and below, by an ornamental band with a frieze of meanders (double at the top and single at the bottom). Similarly, on the sides, two bands adorned with lozenges separate the scenes, which are nevertheless thematically linked. On the obverse side of the vessel, a fabric is suspended above a woman seated on a klismos (high-backed chair). Dressed in a chiton (tunic), she also has a cloak draped over her left shoulder. Her hair is tied in a chignon wrapped in a cloth and a crown or diadem encircles her head. Her forearms are bare, as well as her feet. The reverse side also features a young woman dressed identically, but without the fabric covering her hair; she looks younger. She stands upright and holds a pyxis (box with a lid) in her arms, which she appears to bring to the other figure. At her feet is a tall basket, commonly called kalathos (tall basket). Crucially, on the obverse side, a last overpainted detail, almost erased, can still be seen. It enables us to clearly identify the two represented scenes, which combine several distinctive features: the vessel features the lady of the house and her servant, or most probably her daughter given her similar adornment and garment, wool-spinning. The vase could thus have been designed in honor of the girl. The yarn is suspended from the left hand of the main figure, the mother, falling in the direction of her foot, while her right hand spins the wool on top of her thigh. Despite the worn surface of the decoration, one may suppose that her thigh is covered by a semi-cylindrical object closed at one end, called epinetron (επινητρον in ancient Greek). Blocked at the knee, this painted ceramic protection would prevent grease from the wool from spoiling the clothes of the woman, as well as making the spinning easier. Epinetra are attested by many archeological discoveries and on many representations of similar scenes. As for the reverse side, it can be inferred that the offered box contains finished woven products, while the kalathos is there to collect the balls of wool, as often detailed in similar representations. The quality of the workmanship and the careful rendering of both scenes, as well as other documented parallels, enable us to date the production of this Attic vase to the second quarter of the 5th century B.C. CONDITION

Complete vessel, but the two miniature tenons are now lost. In good condition. Minor concretions. Chips on the mouth. On the obverse side, a small part of the decoration is damaged, but the representation can still be identified thanks to the incisions of the preparatory drawing. PROVENANCE

Ex-Swiss private collection, collected in the 1960s-1970s. BIBLIOGRAPHY

On the theme of wool-spinning and on the use of the epinetron, s.: PEKRIDOU-GORECKI A., Come vestivano i Greci, Milan, 1993, pp. 16-17 and 141, figs. 3-6. On examples of black-figure and red-figure terracotta epinetra, s.: See also the web sites of the British Museum (inv. 1886,0310.11 and 1906,0314.4), of the Metropolitan Museum of Art (inv. 06.1021.52 and 10.210.13) and the specimen housed in the National Archaeological Museum of Athens (inv. 1629). Furthermore, an example in the Musée du Louvre links the tool to the imagery, since one side of the epinetron (inv. MNC 624) features a domestic scene of wool-spinning by several young women.

27050

48


18


STATUETTE REPRESENTING THE GODDESS NEITH Egyptian, Late or Ptolemaic Period (ca. 7th - 1st century B.C.) Bronze, gilding for the eyes H: 23 cm Solid cast statuette, probably made in a single piece with the pedestal. Rectangular hollow pedestal provided with two vertical tenons, which would have been inserted in the original base, or perhaps on top of a pole to expose the figure during processions. An incomplete inscription is engraved on the edge of the base and indicates the name of the goddess Neith; it starts near the end of the left side and then covers the entire front surface. It can be translated as: “May Neith give life to Apis, who is the son of...” The goddess is represented according to her iconography: upright on the base, she walks by stepping forward with her left foot. Her right arm falls along her body, while the left is slightly bent and directed towards the spectator: in her pierced clenched fists, she would have held her emblems, the ankh symbol of life or, less probably, two crossed arrows and a bow (right hand) and the was scepter, or maybe the wadji scepter; on the base, the attachment point of the long vertical shaft is still visible. Dressed in a long ankle-length, very tight dress that reveals the sensual and well modeled shapes of her young body, Neith wears her usual headgear, the deshret red crown of Lower Egypt, cylindrical in shape and adorned with a spiral element. No jewelry or ornaments decorate the body or garment of Neith. Her eyes, however, are remarkably rendered by a layer of gilding (still visible), which replaces the silver normally used for some contemporary statuettes. This representation is of the highest artistic quality, with the beautifully modeled and rounded shapes of the breasts, belly, thighs and back. The face is characterized by almond-shaped eyes, the small nose with a rounded tip and the slightly smiling lips, typical on Egyptian figures of this period. The style, which already reflects an influence of the Greek traditions and forms, indicates that the piece was manufactured in Egypt during the Late or the Ptolemaic period. This figure would have likely served (like many contemporary bronze representations of deities) as a votive offering in an official sanctuary (in particular at Sais, for Neith) or as an object of private worship, placed on a home altar. The existence of many contemporary images of this goddess bears witness to the increasing importance of Neith in the 1st millennium B.C., mostly from the 26th Dynasty, whose rulers came from Sais. Her cult is nevertheless very old, already documented in the Thinite period. She was a major deity regarded as a female demiurge; according to tradition, she created the Earth, Egypt, the Sun and light by pronouncing seven words or by using seven arrows. In addition to Sais (a city located in the western part of the Nile delta), seat of her original sanctuary, she was also worshiped at Esna (in Upper Egypt, south of Luxor). Her fields of influence were many and varied. Associated with Isis, Nephthys and Serket, she was one of the four mourners represented near the sarcophagus in funeral scenes (see the Pyramid Texts). In the popular cults and traditions, she assumed the role of a weaving patroness. As a protector of the Sun and of the dead, she sometimes appeared in the form of the cow Hesat, bearing the solar disk between her horns. CONDITION

Complete and very well preserved. Attributes and spiraling vertical element of the crown now lost. Superficial wear on the surface, covered with a green patina partially turning blue. Possible small repairs. Remains of gilding in the eyes. PROVENANCE

Ex-Israeli private collection, collected in the 1960s; accompanied by an Israeli Export License. BIBLIOGRAPHY

On this goddess, s.: EL-SAYED R., La déesse Neith de Saïs, Cairo, 1982. On some parallels, s.: HILL M. (ed.), Offrandes aux dieux d’Egypte, Martigny, 2008, pp. 108-109, no. 37. JORGENSEN M., Catalogue Egypt V, Egyptian Bronzes, Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek, Copenhagen, 2009, pp. 136-140, nos. 45.1-3. PAGE-GASSER M. and WIESE A.B., Egypte, Moments d’éternité: Art égyptien dans les collections privées, Suisse, Mainz/Rhine, 1997, pp. 267ff, no. 179. SCHOSKE S. and WILDUNG D., Gott und Götter im Alten Aegypten, Mainz/Rhine, 1992, pp. 149-150, no. 103.

27634

50


19


19


RHYTON WITH THE PROTOME OF AN IBEX (OR A GOAT)

20

Anatolian (Phrygia), 6th - 4th century B.C. or Hellenistic Period Painted ceramic H: 20 cm - L: 22 cm Rhyton (drinking vessel) composed of two distinct elements: the posterior part, shaped like a tall narrow horn, is bent at a right angle and turns into an animal protome (head, neck, front half of body) modeled in the form of an ibex (or a goat?) positioned with both its forelegs folded under its body. Given the visible traces inside the vessel, the posterior element was no doubt turned, while the protome was certainly hand-completed. Modeled separately, the head and horns of the ibex were soldered before the firing process. Except for the head, the vessel is entirely hollow; made of a pinkish beige hard terracotta (mixed clay). Protome and upper horn covered with a cream slip; central part of the horn painted in reddish brown; blackish brown and reddish brown decorations on the white surface. The vessel has two openings: the larger, on the upper horn, was used for the filling and would have been circular; the hole for the pouring of the liquid is a simple small hole drilled in the neck, between the legs of the animal, which could be easily covered with a finger. This system would allow the pouring of the liquid in a precise and limited quantity. Despite being highly stylized (the neck and the body of the animal are simple cylinders, without any indication of anatomical details or muscle modeling), the shape of the protome enables us to identify the species represented as a caprid: it is certainly a goat or an ibex, as evidenced by the pointed muzzle and the long arched horns. The caprid extends its neck and raises its head in a watchful attitude. The forelegs are long thin stems terminating in hooves; they are folded so as to provide a support for the vessel, which could therefore stand on its own. Only the head shows sculpted details, such as the small pointed ears, the eyebrows, the nostrils and the protruding outline of the jaws. The tips of the horns are connected to the central body of the rhyton, probably to make it less fragile. The summarily painted patterns include elements highlighting the anatomy of the caprid (area of the eyes, folds of the skin on the muzzle, ears), but they are mostly imaginative and have a purely decorative purpose. Zigzags, strokes of various sizes, undulating lines and vegetal patterns that are completely unrelated to the features of a caprid are used only to fill and embellish the decorative space. This rhyton belongs to a small group of vessels known for many decades, whose classification is still a matter of debate among archeologists: although they are unanimously accepted as coming from central Asia Minor (and usually thought to have been produced in Phrygian workshops), their chronology varies from the 6th-5th century B.C. (see K. Tuchelt and O.W. Muscarella) to the Hellenistic period (see C. Dunant, H. Jucker and W. Hornbostel, for whom the white background and the decorative vegetal patterns are typical of some Hellenistic pottery, such as the vessels of the lagynos type). Among the closest parallels, one should mention some rhyta very similar in size, shape and decoration: examples representing the same protome of a caprid found in Amisos, the ancient Samsun, in modern-day Turkey (now in the Archaeological Museum of Istanbul), the rhyton of a horse with a rider (Musée d’Art et d’Histoire, Geneva) and the one in the shape of a deer (Walter Kropatscheck Collection, Hamburg). Technically, these vessels are similar in many respects (quality of the ceramics, same polychromy, same decorative repertory) to other Anatolian rhyta. They are vessels either entirely modeled in the shape of animals (goats or ducks, for example, found in Amisos) or representing only the head of an animal, most often a bovid (see, for instance, Walter Kropatscheck Collection and Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe, Hamburg; Badisches Landesmuseum, Karlsruhe; former Ernest Brummer Collection; Louvre, Paris, inv. CA 1884). It is also worth noting the connection between these terracotta examples and the precious metal rhyta (gold, silver, but also bronze), mostly representing animals, that were first created in the Achaemenid world and were then rapidly copied in different areas of the ancient world and in other materials. Rhyta are well attested vessels in the framework of various ancient cultures. The first documented rhyta are those of Tell Halaf (Syria, 6th-5th millennium B.C.), but the form quickly spread to Mesopotamia, to Egypt, to the Aegean cultures of the Bronze Age (Crete, Mycenae) and then, in the Historical period, to Anatolia and to the eastern Greek colonies of Greek and Roman Classical civilization. The name, of Greek origin (ρυτον = “drinking vessel”), designates a vessel intended to contain liquids and that was most often used for libations or as tableware during banquets. It is often provided with two openings, one in the back for filling the container and the other, smaller, in the front part: this orifice is generally a simple small circular hole, which can be easily covered so as to precisely measure the liquid poured.

53


CONDITION

Good overall condition, but reassembled and fragmentary (the upper neck, left horn, right leg and some fragments are lost). Well preserved painting, though partially chipped, faded or erased. PROVENANCE

Ex-Maurice Boss collection, Geneva, Switzerland; ex Dr. L. collection, Switzerland, acquired in 1964. BIBLIOGRAPHY

On this topic in general, s.: TUCHELT K., Tiergefässe in Kopf- und Protomengestalt: Untersuchungen zur Formgeschichte tierförmiger Giessgefässe, Berlin, 1962, pp. 64-68 and 90-94. On other parallels, s.: DUNANT C., Rhyton d’Asie mineure à protomé de cavalier, in Genava 25, 1977, pp. 213-220. HORNBOSTEL W. (ed.), Aus Gräber und Heiligtümer: Die Antikensammlung Walter Kropatscheck, Mainz/Rhine, 1980, pp. 14-18. HORNBOSTEL W. (ed.), Kunst der Antike: Schätze aus Norddeutschem Privatbesitz, Mainz/Rhine, 1977, pp. 208-211. JUCKER H., Ein Becher der weissgrundigen Lagynosgattung, in Mansel’e Armagan (Mélanges Mansel), Vol. 1, Ankara, 1974, pp. 475ff (see especially p. 476, note 6). MUSCARELLA O.W., Ancient Art: The Norbert Schimmel Collection, Mainz/Rhine, 1974, no. 135. MUSCARELLA O.W., Ladders to Heaven: Art Treasures from Lands of the Bible, Toronto, 1981, pp. 169-170. The Ernest Brummer Collection: Vol. II, Ancient Art, Zurich, 1979, pp. 356-357.

14989

54


20


BUST OF EMPRESS SABINA Roman, ca. 130 A.D. Marble H: 58 cm This marble bust represents Empress Sabina as a Roman matrona in traditional dress. She wears a tunic of thin fabric which gathers around her neck in many folds. Her shoulders are wrapped in a stola, a mantle of thicker fabric, shown with broad folds that cover the breast. The idea of modesty and purity is thus clearly expressed. The gaze is not direct and avoids the viewer as the head is turned to the side. The expression is calm and full of dignity, although one may decipher a feeling of melancholy and probably sadness. Sabina is represented as a woman of youthful appearance. The skin of her face is smooth, while the delicate treatment of the marble reveals especially attractive dimples at the corners of her thin lips and soft, almost invisible transitions between the cheeks and the eyelids. The wide-open eyes and the flat forehead contrast with the elaborate hairstyle. It is believed that Sabina herself introduced the fashion of long braids arranged in a kind of turban on top of the head. The braids are carefully incised; the hairstyle has a distinctive decorative quality because of the symmetrical arrangement of four separate locks seen dressed from the nape and vertical rows of crescent-shaped curls in front of each ear. Vibia Sabina was a very young girl when, after the death of her father, Lucius Vibius Sabinus, she was taken to live in the household of Emperor Trajan, the uncle of her mother, Salonina Matidia. At the request of Trajan’s wife, Pompeia Plotina, Sabina married Hadrian in 100 A.D. Hadrian was then the adopted son of Trajan and succeeded him in 117 A.D. The rumors were that Plotina was in love with Hadrian and was helpful later in securing his access to power. The family life of Hadrian and Sabina was not at all happy and even less exemplary as regards Roman standards. They did not have any children. Hadrian was away from home for several years visiting the provinces of the Empire. He dismissed two court officials (one was the famous biographer Suetonius) for being too close to Sabina; the word even spread that he had tried to poison her. Despite obvious drama in her personal life, Sabina appeared according to her high social rank in several official images of Roman propaganda throughout the vast Empire. These images, which survive on coins, honorific statues and busts, were intended to demonstrate the virtues of the Roman matrona. The person of the empress was associated with the powers of the goddesses supporting and protecting the family. Sabina is shown in the guise of Venus Genetrix, Ceres, Juno, Vesta, Pudicitia, Pietas, Concordia and Indulgentia, accompanied by the title Augusta (Divine). Sabina was deified after her death in 136 A.D. No symbol or attribute of divinity appears on the bust. Sabina is represented here as herself, with much emphasis on her mood. As the irises and the pupils were originally indicated by incisions, this particularity puts the date of the bust still within Sabina’s lifetime (however, it is difficult to say whether the pupils were carved, or re-carved, later). Scholarly study recognizes three major types, which are based on the coin images and the hairstyles, among more than eighty surviving portraits of Sabina in marble. Our bust belongs to the first type which was probably created in a Greek workshop around 130 A.D. on the occasion of her visit to Greece in 128-129 A.D. It was influenced by the Classical style which is reflected in the depiction of her face. The individual features of her physiognomy are smooth; in particular, the representation of the eyebrows is without any detailing, as was typical for Greek sculpture of the Classical period.

56


21


21 CONDITION

Very good state of preservation. Originally carved from a single block of marble. The head and the neck were broken from the bust and have been repaired. The neck consists of four reassembled fragments. The nose and the tip of the chin have been restored. The once carved pupils (seen on old photographs) have been filled with plaster. The lost left ear has been replaced in plaster. There are a few chips on the face (eyebrows, lower left eyelid, right cheekbone) and some losses from the edges of the drapery folds partially restored in marble. An original piece of the hairstyle has been reattached behind. The bust no longer has its cylindrical base, but the transitional plaque has survived. PROVENANCE

Ex-Pietro Stettiner, Rome, prior to 1912; ex-François Olive, Saint-Lys, France, acquired in the 1950s-1960s; ex-Drouot, Paris. Blanchet et Associés, Paris, December 21, 2005, Lot 190. PUBLISHED

CHEVALIER L., Buste de l’impératrice Vibia Sabina, in Galerie Tarantino, Paris, 2011, pp. 60-66, no. 20. MATHESON S.B., A Woman of Consequence, in Yale University Art Gallery Bulletin, 1992, pp. 89-90, figs. 4-5. STETTINER P., Roma nei suoi monumenti: Illustrazione storico-cronologica con 580 figure, Rome, 1911. BIBLIOGRAPHY

On early photographs of the bust, s.: Arachne Database, Deutsches Archäologisches Institut, Rome, nos. 3064-3065, accessioned in 1912 (http://arachne.uni-koeln.de/item/marbilderbestand/850805). On art collector Pietro Stettiner, s.: POLLAK L., Römische Memorien: Künstler, Kunstliebhaber und Gelehrte, 1893-1943, Rome, 1994, p. 152. On portraits of Sabina, s.: ADEMBRI B. and NICOLAI R.M. (eds.), Vibia Sabina: Da Augusta a Diva, Milan, 2007. CARANDINI A., Vibia Sabina, Florence, 1969, pp. 151-153. DE KERSAUSON K., Catalogue des portraits romains (Musée du Louvre): Tome II, De l’année de la guerre civile (68-69 apr. J.-C.) à la fin de l’Empire, Paris, 1996, pp. 138-139, no. 56. FITTSCHEN K., Courtly Portraits of Woman in the Era of the Adoptive Emperors (AD 98-180) and their Reception in Roman Society, in KLEINER D.E.E. and MATHESON S.B. (eds.), I, Claudia: Woman in Ancient Rome, New Haven, 1996, p.48, note 71. FITTSCHEN K. and ZANKER P., Katalog der römischen Porträts in den Capitolinischen Museen und den anderen kommunalen Sammlungen der Stadt Rom, Vol. III, Mainz/Rhine, 1983, p. 62. OPPER T., Sabina, in Hadrian: Empire and Conflict, London, 2008, pp. 188-205. WEGNER M. and UNGER R., Verzeichnis der Bildnisse von Hadrian und Sabina, in Boreas, 7, 1984, pp. 146-156.

27389

59


UNGUENTARIUM IN THE SHAPE OF A FISH Roman, 3rd century A.D., if not 4th century A.D. Glass L: 9.5 cm (Enlarged) Unguentarium (small perfume bottle) in the shape of a fish. Made of thick transparent, white-colored glass, the vessel was certainly mold-blown and some elements were added later, like the fins. This slender fish is provided with many realistic anatomical details, such as semi-protruding eyes, a thin strip that separates the head from the body and which partially constitutes the gills, a long dorsal fin, a small anal fin (today allowing the installation of the piece on a pedestal) and a double vertical caudal fin which corresponds to the tail. The fish, arching and raising its tail, appears to have its mouth wide open. The bottle is indeed completely open at this specific anatomical location. Two hypotheses may therefore be advanced: either an elongated mouth was placed here and is now broken, or the end of the vessel was cut here on purpose to allow the extraction of its contents. On the upper dorsal fin, it is worth noting the presence of two elements, the tips of which are broken. Given the rounded shape, a suspension lug was probably placed here. Many major glass centers developed throughout a wide geographic area, reaching England and France, Germany and Italy, Greece and Egypt, not to mention the Syro-Palestinian coast. Fish-shaped vessels were particularly appreciated by glass craftsmen. As a fish is devoid of limbs, its fins and gills were easy to shape using liquid glass ribbons. Several fish-shaped bottles are attested. Some have a rounded belly, while others have a spiny backbone. The opening is often placed at the tail, but also at the mouth. They can be dated mainly to the first half of the 3rd century A.D. Ancient Rome saw fermented fish used as an ingredient in the preparation of a famous sauce, garum. This condiment was utilized in a wide variety of dishes, enhancing their flavor with its salty taste. The very first fish-shaped glass vessels would therefore have been manufactured to store this popular sauce. In such cases, they were tableware accessories and existed in larger sizes (up to about thirty centimeters long). But, for the Romans, the fish was also a symbol of reproduction and fecundity, which would have inspired craftsmen to favor this shape for a variety of vessels, like our small perfume bottle. Furthermore, it is worth noting that the fish was later connected with the symbol of Christ. In conclusion, considering also the other attested parallels, their provenance and their dating, the overall workmanship of our unguentarium leads us to regard it as a Roman production of the eastern Mediterranean coast (probably SyroPalestinian) in the 3rd, if not the 4th century A.D. CONDITION

Virtually complete bottle, except for the opening of the mouth that has been cut, the lost suspension lug (on the dorsal fin), part of the tail and the corner of the right eye. The surface of the vessel is entirely covered with a whitish patina, due to the passage of time. PROVENANCE

Formerly from the Franziska Gassner collection (1907-2005), Germany. BIBLIOGRAPHY

EISEN G.A. and KOUCHAKJI F., Glass: Its Origin, History, Chronology, Technic and Classification to the Sixteenth Century, New York, 1927, pp. 531 and 611, pl. 130 and 149. FREMERSDORF F., Römisches geformtes Glas in Köln, in Die Denkmäler des römischen Köln, Band VI, Cologne, 1961, pl. 3-6. Glass from the Ancient World: The Ray Winfield Smith Collection, New York, 1957, nos. 334-336. MENNINGER M., Untersuchungen zu den Gläsern und Gipsabgüssen aus dem Fund von Begram (Afghanistan), Würzburg, 1996, pp. 73-75, Tafeln 24-25. OLIVER A., Ancient Glass in the Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Pittsburgh, 1980, nos. 149-150. STERN E.M., Roman, Byzantine and Early Medieval Glass, 10 B.C.E.-700 C.E.: Ernesto Wolf Collection, Ostfildern-Ruit (Germany), 2001, no. 67. VON SALDERN A. et al., Gläser der Antike: Sammlung Erwin Oppenländer, Mainz/Rhine, 1974, no. 697. See also the web sites of the British Museum (inv. 1875,0608.2 and 1901,0413.3174), of the Metropolitan Museum of Art (inv. 15.43.168, 17.194.135 and 17.194.137) and of the Musée du Louvre (inv. MNE 165).

18648

60


22


RHYTON IN THE SHAPE OF A SEATED BULL Anatolian (Phrygia?), ca. 7th - 5th century B.C. Ceramic L: 28 cm This hand-modeled rhyton represents a bovid seated with its legs folded under its body, which may be identified as a bull or a calf. The terracotta is now of a yellow ocher color, highlighted with reddish brown and black paint for the details of the coat (patches on the shoulders, haunches and head), for the tail and for the lines that probably indicated garlands (around the chest, shoulders, collar, head and hindquarters). A tall cylindrical opening, provided with a rounded lip and certainly used to fill the vessel, is placed on the back of the animal, while a small circular opening, pierced at the bottom of the chest, between the front legs, allowed limited pouring of the liquid by the simple covering of a finger. The body of the animal is squat, with powerful proportions and well rounded, though poorly detailed and hardly realistic volumes. The lower legs, however, are represented only by thin stems in low relief, which terminate in hooves and constitute the support points of the vessel. The head, which enables us to confidently identify the animal as a bovid, has a strong and massive structure that reveals the triangular shape of the skull. Unlike the body, its modeling is more realistic, both in the overall shape and through the presence of many accurate anatomical details (eyes, brows, incised nostrils, horizontal mouth, jaw in relief, etc.) highlighted by red and black paint. The ornamental motifs covering the body and the head (triangles on the forehead and “pendants” between the horns) characterize this animal as sacred, perhaps sacrificial: like many other related rhyta, this vessel was no doubt used for libations during religious ceremonies, the precise nature of which still remains enigmatic. It can even be imagined that by depicting the exact pattern of an animal intended for sacrifice, the vessel would somewhat replace the real animal, like a sort of permanent offering. While belonging to the rich and large series of animal-shaped rhyta originating in Anatolia and in the Near East from the late 2nd millennium B.C., this example does not currently have any specific parallels, which prevents us from suggesting a precise chronology: it should nevertheless be dated between the late 8th and the 5th century B.C. Among the best comparisons, one should mention the rhyta in the shape of a seated horse (from Maku, Western Azerbaijan Province, Iran) and in the shape of a standing horse (from Susa, Khuzestan Province, Iran), also adorned with richly painted patterns (8th-7th century B.C.), as well as the terracotta example from Ardabil, slightly coarser and darker (late first half of the 1st millennium B.C.). In central and eastern Anatolia, the ornaments in the shape of bulls’ heads adorning the cauldrons from Gordium (Tumulus MM, late 8th century B.C.) are typologically similar, like the protome of a rhyton in the shape of a horn found in Armavir (Armenia, 6th-5th century B.C.). Technical and stylistic similarities also exist with a type of ceramic (yellow ocher background, linear decoration painted in red and black) from the eastern regions of Anatolia and that archeologists date to the 7th century B.C. Rhyta were widespread in the ancient world: the first documented examples are those of Tell Halaf (Syria, 6th-5th millennium B.C.), but their shape quickly became the norm in Mesopotamia, in Egypt, in the Aegean cultures of the Bronze Age and, later, in Greek and Roman Classical civilization. Although rhyta may vary in their typology, they are almost always linked to the world of animals and fantastic beings: they may be modeled in the shape of an animal (like our example) or in the shape of a horn with the protome of an animal or a monster; or, in the classical world especially, they may be composed of a wide mouth with a handle and of a head depicting various animals, women, blacks, satyrs, small groups with two figures, etc. These vessels were used primarily to make libations by pouring the offered liquid to the deity (their Greek name, ρυτοσ, means “drinking, pouring vessel”). CONDITION

Virtually complete and remarkably preserved. A fragment is missing just above the left shoulder. The left horn and ear are lost. Chips and wear on the left side of the body and on the head especially. Abundant remains of paint. PROVENANCE

Ex-Maurice Boss collection, Geneva, Switzerland; ex-Dr. L. collection, Switzerland, acquired in 1964. BIBLIOGRAPHY

On rhyta in the Caucasus and in the Caspian Sea region, s.: BLOME P. (ed.), Paradeisos: Frühe Tierbilder aus Persien, Basel, 1992, pp. 56ff. On similar examples, s.: AMIET P., Elam, Auvers-sur-Oise, 1966, p. 568, no. 433 (from Susa, Khuzestan Province, Iran). Au pied du Mont Ararat: Splendeurs de l’Arménie antique, Arles, 2007, p.163, no. 110 (protome in the shape of a bull’s head). SEIPEL W. (ed.), 7000 Jahre persische Kunst: Meisterwerke aus dem Iranischen Nationalmuseum in Teheran, Milan-Vienna, 2000, pp. 175ff, no. 101 (from Maku, Western Azerbaijan Province, Iran). Trésors de l’ancien Iran, Geneva, 1966, p. 108, pl. 40, no. 554. YOUNG R.S., Three Great Early Tumuli, Vol. I, Philadelphia, 1981, pp. 102ff and 219ff., pl. 50. On the type of ceramic, s.: MERHAV R. (ed.), Treasures of the Bible Lands from the Elie Borowski Collection, Tel Aviv, 1987, no. 77. 22305

62


23


BLACK AND WHITE MOSAIC DEPICTING A STAG Roman, Antonine Period (ca. 170 A.D.) Stone H: 58.5 cm A lively image of a rearing stag composed of black and white mosaic tesserae decorates this panel of an ancient floor. In stark silhouette and with details indicated by unconnected, internal white lines, the sophisticated design of the animal is remarkably similar to that of a mosaic stag in the Foro delle Corporazioni at Ostia, the ancient port of Rome. The draftsmanship of both stags is a primary example of the so-called optical style. This technique maximizes the visual effect of silhouette and white interior contour lines, of which some tesserae are tapered to form lines effectively delineating the animal’s musculature. The decorating of buildings with black and white mosaics flourished in the 2nd century A.D., a period of innovative building technology that developed between the reign of Emperor Nero and that of Emperor Hadrian and which is referred to as the “Roman architectural revolution”. Black and white mosaics of high quality, like the decorative pavements of Hadrian’s Villa at Tivoli, the figural mosaics of the Baths of Neptune at Ostia and of the Baths of Caracalla in Rome, demonstrate that both private and public buildings commissioned by the emperors were decorated in this technique as part of a refined and sophisticated language of floor design. Black and white mosaic decoration became important for the embellishment of large architectural spaces that resulted from the expansive construction of vaulted areas and the large floor areas that they covered. By the end of the 1st century A.D., these voluminous vaulted spaces required decoration on a much larger scale than the relatively small floor areas of older buildings at Pompeii and Herculaneum, structures that did not require decoration with large and ambitious compositions. The widespread use of figural mosaics is well documented at Ostia, where an area near the small shops of the Foro delle Corporazioni afforded relatively intimate spaces for the depiction of singular animals (stag, boar, elephant) flanking an innovative representation of the Nile River. The Roman writer Varro lists cervi (deer) among the animals that obeyed the summons of Orpheus; hence, they play an important role in Roman art and myth. In Antiquity, deer were plentiful in Italy and were not only hunted for sport and food, but also appreciated for their natural beauty and kept at the countryside estates of the wealthy classes in late Republican Rome. The popularity of stags in Pompeiian wall paintings (and on some mosaics) suggests that they were sometimes kept as pets. Virgil’s writings tell of a pet stag beloved by Silvia, the daughter of Latinus’ chief shepherd. Remarkable for its beauty and for the size of its antlers, the deer’s head was decorated with garlands, while its mistress groomed and bathed the animal. It fed at the table and roamed freely by day, never failing to return to its home by nightfall. The hunting and capture of deer for taming as pets or for shows is most vividly illustrated among the animal scenes of the “Little Hunt” mosaic at Piazza Armerina in Sicily. Among the many renderings of deer in Roman art, one of the most realistic representations is that of the hind which suckles the infant Telephus in the famous fresco from Herculaneum depicting Heracles finding his son Telephus. In Roman sculpture, stags, hinds and their young offspring are also often found attending to their protectress and goddess of the hunt, Diana. CONDITION

Complete mosaic square panel, currently applied to its original ancient pavement. Minor breaks and possible small restorations. PROVENANCE

Formerly from a private collection 1960-1970s; with Gawain McKinley, London-New York; Ex-Sylvan Schefler collection, New York, acquired in the early 1980s. BIBLIOGRAPHY

BECATTI G., Scavi di Ostia: IV, Mosaici e pavimenti marmorei, Rome, 1961. BLAKE M., Roman Mosaics of the Second Century in Italy, in Memoirs of the American Academy in Rome, 13, 1936, pp. 67-214. CLARKE J.R., Roman Black-and-White Figural Mosaics, New York, 1979, pp. 31-39 and 81-85 (see especially fig. 40: mosaic of a stag, boar and elephant at Ostia, Foro delle Corporazioni, st. 26, 27, 28, dated to ca. 170 A.D.). TOYNBEE J.M.C., Animals in Roman Life and Art, Baltimore, 1996, pp. 143-145 (see especially fig. 66: fresco from Herculaneum depicting Heracles finding his son Telephus).

22403

64


24


TRANSLUCENT LIGHT GREEN RIBBED BOWL Roman, 1st century A.D. Translucent glass H: 5.5 cm - D: 12.5 cm (1:1) This thick-walled bowl is remarkable both for its excellent state of preservation and for its perfect shape. It was molded and pressed in transparent glass embellished with bluish reflections, while the finish was obtained by polishing and/or by grinding. The vessel, somewhat squat in proportions (the body is semi-spherical and the diameter rather small), is decorated with twenty-four thick ribs arranged vertically or slightly diagonally along the outer wall; their presence recalls the metallic origin of the shape, inspired by the gadroon vases made of precious metal. Spaced along the rim, the ribs join and converge towards the flat base that provides the bowl with good balance. The rim is tall, vertical and simply rounded, without a real lip; two parallel lines, incised using a grinding wheel, decorate the inner lower part of the vessel. Ribbed cups and bowls exist in many chromatic and typological variations and were manufactured with different techniques: by pressing the required quantity of heated glass between a male mold and a female mold; by printing a flat glass disk that was then rounded over a curved form; by lathe-turning, then modeled and decorated with a short stick. The first examples of ribbed bowls date back to the second quarter of the 1st century B.C.; from the middle of that century, the shape suffered a minor variation, with the adoption of a flatter or slightly convex bottom, which made the vessel more stable. Their production increased considerably from the late Hellenistic period on and continued during the 1st century of the Empire with a very elaborate typology and various dimensions. The most common colors were first orange-brown, cobalt blue and aubergine; these were gradually replaced by a simple transparent glass with light blue, dark or pale green reflections around the mid-1st century A.D., when the taste for bright colors became old-fashioned. These bowls were largely used as tableware across the Mediterranean world, from Italy to the more western and northern colonies of the Empire, from the Aegean to the Levant. This wide distribution suggests that they were produced in many places, but especially by Italian and Near Eastern workshops (Syria and Levantine coasts). CONDITION

Complete and virtually intact. Minor chips and superficial wear. An aubergine-colored shadow partially marks the rim. Traces of polishing (turning wheel) clearly visible. PROVENANCE

Formerly from the Franziska Gassner collection (1907-2005), Germany. BIBLIOGRAPHY

On the production of these cups and on related vessels, s.: ARVEILLER-DULONG V. and NENNA M.-D., Les verres antiques: I, Contenants à parfum en verre moulé sur noyau et vaisselle moulée, VIIe siècle av. J.-C.Ier siècle apr. J.-C., Paris, 2000, pp. 187-193. GOLDSTEIN S.M., Pre-Roman and Early Roman Glass in the Corning Museum of Glass, New York, 1979, pp. 153-156. GROSE D.F., The Toledo Museum of Art: Early Ancient Glass, New York, 1989, pp. 244ff. MATHESON S.B., Ancient Glass in the Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, 1980, pp. 14-16.

18633

66


25


TRANSLUCENT AMBER RIBBED BOWL Roman, 1st century A.D. Translucent amber glass H: 4.5 cm - D: 15 cm (1:1) This thick-walled bowl is outstanding both for its excellent state of preservation and for its perfect shape. It was molded and pressed in amber brown glass, while the finish was obtained by polishing and/or by grinding. This rounded and shallow vessel is decorated with twenty-nine ribs arranged vertically or slightly diagonally along the outer wall; their presence recalls the metallic origin of the shape, inspired by the gadroon vases made of precious metal. Spaced along the rim, the ribs join and converge towards the flat base that provides the bowl with good balance. A groove, engraved using a grinding wheel, runs around the tall, smooth and simply rounded inner part of the rim; on the inside, the decoration is completed by two other lines incised at mid-height. Ribbed cups and bowls exist in many chromatic and typological variations and were manufactured with different techniques: by pressing the required quantity of heated glass between a male mold and a female mold; by printing a flat glass disk that was then rounded over a curved form; by lathe-turning, then modeled and decorated with a short stick. The first examples of ribbed bowls date back to the second quarter of the 1st century B.C.; from the middle of that century, the shape suffered a minor variation, with the adoption of a flatter or slightly convex bottom, which made the vessel more stable. Their production increased considerably from the late Hellenistic period on and continued during the 1st century of the Empire with a very elaborate typology and various dimensions. The most common colors were first orange-brown, cobalt blue and aubergine; these were gradually replaced by light blue, dark and light green around the mid-1st century A.D., when the taste for bright colors became old-fashioned. These bowls were largely used as tableware across the Mediterranean world, from Italy to the more western and northern colonies of the Empire, from the Aegean to the Levant. This wide distribution suggests that they were produced in many places, but especially by Italian and Near Eastern workshops (Syria and Levantine coasts). CONDITION

Complete and virtually intact. Chipped and partially cracked along the circular engraving on the body. Inner surface slightly worn. PROVENANCE

Formerly from the Franziska Gassner collection (1907-2005), Germany. BIBLIOGRAPHY

On the production of these cups and on related vessels, s.: ARVEILLER-DULONG V. and NENNA M.-D., Les verres antiques: I, Contenants à parfum en verre moulé sur noyau et vaisselle moulée, VIIe siècle av. J.-C. - Ier siècle apr. J.-C., Paris, 2000, pp. 187-193. GOLDSTEIN S.M., Pre-Roman and Early Roman Glass in the Corning Museum of Glass, New York, 1979, pp. 153-156. GROSE D.F., The Toledo Museum of Art: Early Ancient Glass, New York, 1989, pp. 244ff. MATHESON S.B., Ancient Glass in the Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, 1980, pp. 14-16.

18632

68


26


SCULPTOR’S MODEL REPRESENTING AN OFFERING PHARAOH Egyptian, 30th Dynasty - Ptolemaic Period (ca. 4th - middle 3rd century B.C.) Limestone Dim: 14.4 x 12.7 cm (1:1) Virtually square plaque decorated with a male figure in very low relief; no trace of paint is visible. The figure of a man, of youthful appearance, is depicted squatting, but his right knee touches the ground. His slightly bent arms are raised forward to show better to the viewer (a deity here) the two vessels that he holds in his hands. The khepresh crown, a symbol of victory mostly used in military representations of the Pharaoh (it was blue or black, decorated with yellow circular patterns), and the presence of the uraeus (rearing cobra) clearly indicate that the sculpted figure is a Pharaoh. The sovereign is shown offering to an unknown deity the liquid contained in the spherical vases, called nw jars; originally, these small vessels were intended to store the wine offered as a gift to the gods during various cult services. This position of the figure, which is among the most classic Egyptian royal statuary (the king may hold different types of vases in his hands), reflects the devotion of the king and his humble attitude towards the gods. Despite its remarkable esthetic and artistic qualities (delicate face, precision of the crown with the uraeus, elegant rendering of the arms), this small relief is not an official image and certainly does not represent one pharaoh in particular. It is a piece of documentary evidence that sheds light on the first working methods of Egyptian craftsmen, since it is a model that was probably used by an apprentice sculptor to exercise his talents. Moreover, the work remains unfinished, as seen in various details, such as the simple and smooth shape of the necklace, the drawing of the right leg which has no internal profile or any indication of a loincloth, the sharp-angled right knee which has not yet received its final rounded outline, and so on. Although their existence is documented as of the Old Kingdom, there are only a few examples of sculptors’ models that have survived up to modern times. The only preserved group concerns the workshop of Thutmose in Amarna (where, among others, the famous bust of Nefertiti originated, probably a simple sculptor’s model). But most models date to the Late and Ptolemaic periods: the very diversified subjects range from three-dimensional portraits of pharaohs to reliefs representing gods or kings; there are also studies for the carving of hieroglyphics on parts of the human body and on architectural elements. Many specimens still retain traces of grid patterns; others, like our example, are incomplete and thus reveal the creative process of Egyptian artists; still others bear inscriptions showing that they were devoted to a divinity, like ex-votos. Their frequency of use, at that time, is generally explained by the arrival in Egypt (in the Ptolemaic period mostly) of many sculptors of Greek tradition, who had to learn the Egyptian artistic standards. Models like our example would therefore result from the transmission of the millennial knowledge of Egyptian sculptors to the newcomers, so as to teach them the conventions, proportions and styles which governed Egyptian art. CONDITION

Reassembled; restored parts (lower corners, upper edge especially). Surface partially damaged and worn. Currently mounted in a square wooden frame. PROVENANCE

Formerly from Mrs. Louise Crane collection; anonymous sale, Christie's New York, 4 June 1999; Ex-American private collection, New York. BIBLIOGRAPHY

On sculptors’ models in general, s.: STEINDORFF G., Catalogue of the Egyptian Sculpture in the Walters Art Gallery, Baltimore, 1946, pp. 7-9; p. 95, nos. 326 and 331, pl. LXI-LXII. VARGA E., Les modèles de sculpture de Basse époque dans la collection égyptienne, in Bulletin du Musée National Hongrois des Beaux-Arts, 18, 1961, pp. 3-19. On the issues raised by ex-voto models, s.: Cleopatra’s Egypt: Age of Ptolemies, New York, 1988, pp. 242-243, no. 131.

18668

70


27


COLUMN KRATER WITH A HORSE RACE Greek (Attic), middle of the 5th century B.C. Ceramic H: 42.5 cm Large column krater with a heart-shaped body, a straight neck, a foot molded at two levels and the cylindrical vertical handles which give this type of krater its name. It is one of the most important and typical vessels of Attic pottery in the 5th century B.C. Column kraters were the centerpieces of the area dedicated to the Greek banquet, in Attica especially; they contained a mixture of wine and water that was consumed by the guests at the symposium. This krater has a beautiful shape with harmoniously perfect contours. The decoration, on the main side especially, is rich and finely detailed. The frieze on the neck is composed of a dense pattern of lotus buds linked to each other by stems that were certainly drawn with a compass, given their remarkable regularity. The lip, left in the red color of the clay, is decorated with several stylized representations of running animals (four on each side, wild boar?). The animals were drawn freehand, without any elaborate details. On the body, each figural scene is painted in a metope delineated by a reserved edge adorned with a frieze of languettes at the top and by a double row of successive dots and triangles at the sides. On the obverse side, two nude horsemen compete, riding their horses bareback. The reins are finely drawn in black (or overpainted), but partially faded. Although many anatomical details of the horses are now lost, a number of features represented by the painter are still clearly apparent, especially their heads, their manes, their back muscles and their hooves. The two horsemen each wear a thin headband. The one in front on the right looks younger and shorter; he appears to gallop. His elder companion behind him seems to rein in his horse, which rears up a little. The latter rider, while holding the reins, carries a sort of stick extended by a long, thin cord: could this be a starting or a finish line that he has just activated? One may imagine that the older man is involved in training the younger in preparation for a race planned during a festival, like the Olympics or the Panathenaic Games. Races featuring nude horsemen riding bareback actually took place on these special occasions, both in the Olympian hippodrome and in the Athenian agora. On the reverse side, three young men, each draped in a himation (long cloak), are depicted talking quietly. The side figures are turned towards the young man at the center of the image, who holds a long stick and leans on it. All three men each wear a thin headband. Such a secondary scene is totally conventional. Although the figural decoration is simpler and rendered in a more basic manner, it is part of the iconography that traditionally appears on the reverse sides of kraters. This type of conversation scene unfolds in a more peaceful setting, as a counterpart to the main scene that already represents a piece of lively action or an event related to a famous heroic episode. In our example, it is tempting to connect the two illustrated sides of the vessel. The talking figures could therefore be spectators at a horse race, like the one depicted on the obverse side. They could be simple punters, trainers of other competitors or even judges. This krater has not yet been attributed, but it could be the work of a Classical painter who was active in Athens at the time of the building of the Parthenon and who belonged to the entourage of the Polygnotos group or, more likely, to the group of column krater painters as classified by J.D. Beazley. CONDITION

Intact and in good condition, except for a small hole in the body, two large chips on one of the handles and small chips at the mouth. Other minor chips on the rest of the vessel. One of the animal motifs on the lip is partially faded and appears to surmount an area which might have been damaged during the firing process. Some areas also indicate that the black glaze was not always sufficiently and evenly applied, which is why the red color of the clay appears here and there between the brush strokes of black paint. Some concretions, corresponding to residual soil. PROVENANCE

Ex-M.C. private collection, Switzerland; Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva, 1989; Gily AG, Riehen, Switzerland, 1993; ex-Japanese private collection, 1993. BIBLIOGRAPHY

BEAZLEY J.D., Attic Red-Figure Vase-Painters, Oxford, 1968, ch. 52-54. BOARDMAN J., Athenian Red-Figure Vases: The Classical Period, London, 1989, pp. 60ff. On a very similar vessel, but with a scene featuring horsemen who can be identified as the Dioscuri, s.: MARANGOU L.I., Ancient Greek Art from the Collection of Stavros S. Niarchos, Athens, 1995, pp. 168-172.

21681

72


28


"MOSAIC GLASS" BOWL Roman, 1st century B.C. - 1st century A.D. Blue and white glass H: 3.8 cm - D: 16 cm (1:1) This bowl presents an extraordinary decoration and is a very rare, completely preserved example of Roman mosaic glass. The glass-making technique in antiquity originated in Egypt and Mesopotamia in the 2nd millennium B.C. and progressed from core-molding to mold-pressing/casting and then to free-blowing and mold-blowing. Mosaic glass belongs to the category of mold-casting and required great skill of the glass-worker and several graduated steps in the execution. The first step was to produce several canes (or rods) of polychrome glass, which were then sliced into small discoid sections: their chromatic composition determined the coloristic effect of the final result. Next, the sliced glass disks were placed side by side and fused, before the colored hot bundle was slumped in a stone (or ceramic) mold to give it its definitive shape. Finally, this was followed by tooling the ribs and flutings (they are fifteen on our bowl) on the exterior surface and by polishing the interior of the vessel, guarantying a uniformly fine surface. While this type of mosaic ribbed glass bowl was known in Italy and in the western Roman provinces (“western” bowls are attributed to the Roman-Italian industry of the Augustan and Tiberian periods), their distribution extended to Egypt and to other areas of the eastern Mediterranean and even to the Black Sea. Mosaic glass pieces remained in fashion for a relatively short historic period, from the 1st century B.C. until the mid-1st century A.D.; they were highly desirable but very expensive items of tableware which only the wealthiest buyers could afford. With the spread of the glass-blowing technique, more affordable products came to replace the vessels made of mosaic glass; however, the technique itself was never forgotten and indeed survived in the production of mosaic glass beads. The color palette of this bowl is only cobalt and white, although the combination of more subtle or intense shades of cobalt with intricate patterns in the white creates a striking decorative effect. The white volutes form spiral designs that are arranged in circles all around the surface, from the rim to the bottom of the bowl. Handling an item of mosaic glass, along with direct observation, is important to appreciate all its decorative qualities, and there is even more to discover in the present bowl: some areas become translucent when light shines through the vessel’s walls. CONDITION

Excellent state of preservation. Completely intact. Few areas of white color are affected by iridescence. PROVENANCE

Ex-Professor A. Goumaz collection, Switzerland, 1950s. BIBLIOGRAPHY

On the technique of mosaic glass, s.: ANTONARAS A., Fire and Sand: Ancient Glass in the Princeton University Art Museum, New Haven-London, 2012, pp. 19-21. EISEN G.A., Glass, New York, 1927, Vol. I, pp. 174-199. OLIVER A., Millefiori Glass in Classical Antiquity, in Journal of Glass Studies, 10, 1968, pp. 48-70. On other examples of mosaic glass bowls, s.: BERETTA M. and DI PASQUALE G., Vitrum: Il vetro fra arte e scienza nel mondo romano, Florence, 2004, p. 207, no. 1.22. GOLDSTEIN S.M., Pre-Roman and Early Roman Glass in the Corning Museum of Glass, New York, 1979, pp. 188-191, nos. 501-512. GROSE D.F., Early Ancient Glass, New York, 1989, pp. 241-250. KUNINA N., Ancient Glass in the Hermitage Collection, St. Petersburg, 1997, p. 268, no. 93.

28145

74


29


29


SATYR HOLDING GRAPES AND A HUNTING STICK (LAGOBOLON)

30

Roman, 1st century A.D. Bronze H: 15 cm (1:1) Only the pointed ears and the slightly snub nose betray the identity of the nude youth as a satyr. He stands holding a cluster of grapes in his lowered right hand and a hunting stick, a lagobolon, held upright and supported by his left arm. Although half human and half animal, the primordial wildness for which satyrs are known is absent. Instead, the youthful figure projects a certain calm and serenity with his sensuous pose. The broad, muscular chest and abdomen, straightened right leg juxtaposed with the slightly bent left leg, and with hip raised on the right and lowered on the left, all contribute a pleasing rhythm to the figure’s contrapposto stance. An impressive bronze of the Augustan period, this statuette clearly shows the influence of Greek Classical and Hellenistic art upon the artistic taste of the early Roman Empire. Ultimately the bronze statuette’s pose and anatomy hearken back to the canon of proportions established by the Greek Classical sculptor Polykleitos in the 5th century B.C. However, combined with his charming smile, the overall effect of the satyr’s pose is one of sensual delight associated with the god of wine, Dionysus, and his retinue of satyrs and maenads as depicted in the Hellenistic period. The elongation of the satyr’s body is another characteristic of Classical and Hellenistic art that had its beginnings particularly with the sculptures of Praxiteles and, later of Lysippos. The hybrid of Classical and Hellenistic styles embodied in this bronze statuette, which unifies Polykleitan discipline of form and the sensuous approach to sculpture established by Praxiteles, has produced an esthetically pleasing figure. Among major sculptures, one of the closest parallels to this bronze satyr is the large-scale satyr of red marble from the Emperor Hadrian’s villa at Tivoli. Now in the Capitoline Museum, the famous Fauno Rosso holds a cluster of grapes raised up in his right hand and a hunting stick upright in his left hand. In keeping with the Hellenistic style for the representation of young satyrs, and like this bronze satyr, the body of the marble satyr is tall and slender, and the hair of the figure is thick and sprouting, almost cap-like as it frames a round and playfully grinning face. Also from Hadrian’s villa, and now in the Vatican Museum, is an additional sculpture of a red marble satyr holding grapes and a hunting stick similar to the Fauno Rosso. A third parallel of a satyr with grapes and hunting stick is in the collection of the Villa Albani in Rome. During the Roman period, such sculptures likely adorned fountains or gardens where they would have contributed to the Dionysiac fantasy of an ideal pastoral setting. Dionysus was a particularly favored deity, especially during the Hellenistic period, and Dionysian statues naturally represent the aspects of this god that are associated with the joys, delights and happiness of life. Statues of satyrs were additionally set up as offerings in sanctuaries of Dionysus, patron god of the theater, in thanks for the success of a winning theatrical composition or performance. Writing in the second century A.D., the Greek traveler Pausanias mentions the statue of a satyr made by Praxiteles. The sculpture was offered as a votive in thanks for an individual’s success at the festival held in the Athenian theater of Dionysus. The popular belief in the existence of actual satyrs in the wild was a long-standing one, and persisted throughout antiquity, as did the practice of imitating them during urban festivals, a custom that was finally banned in Constantinople in 692 A.D. CONDITION

The statuette is complete except for the feet, now lost. Minor superficial wear and chips (hair, left forearm, end of the lagobolon). Surface covered with a beautiful bluish green patina. PROVENANCE

Ex-German private collection. BIBLIOGRAPHY

For satyrs: BROMMER F., Satyroi, Würzburg, 1937. CARPENTER T., Dionysian Imagery in Archaic Greek Art, Oxford, 1984. LISSARAGUE F., On the Wildness of Satyrs in CARPENTER T. and FARAONE C., Masks of Dionysos, Ithaca, 1993, pp. 207-220. LISSARAGUE F., in WINKLER J. and ZEITLIN F. (eds.), Nothing to do with Dionysos, Princeton, 1990, p.228. PADGETT M., The Centaur’s Smile: The Human Animal in Early Greek Art, New Haven, 2003, pp. 27-36. For Fauno Rosso: BIEBER M., Sculpture of the Hellenistic Age, New York, 1961, figs. 268 and 573 (for the satyrs in the Villa Albani and in the Vatican Museum, inv. 801). HASKELL F. and PENNY N., Taste and the Antique, New Haven, 1981, pp. 213-15, no. 39. MAC DONALD W. and PINTO J., Hadrian’s Villa and Its Legacy, New Haven, 1995, pp. 141-143, fig. 173. SMITH R.R.R., Hellenistic Sculpture, New York, 1991, p. 129, fig. 152. SPINOLA G., Il Museo Pio Clementino 2, Vatican City, 1999, p. 158, no. 23, fig. 25 (for the Vatican Museum satyr, inv. 801).

22530

77


30

79


GOBELET EN ARGENT REPOUSSE

1

Art grec, première moitié du Ve s. av. J.-C. Argent H : 15.3 cm - D : 9.5 cm Ce gobelet, un vase à boire, a une forme simple et élégante. Le corps cylindrique allongé s’élargit progressivement vers la partie supérieure où le bord mince est légèrement tourné vers le bas et a une forme ovale. La composition de cet objet est bien équilibrée et construite en conformité avec les principes architecturaux: une base plus large séparée du corps par la bande dorée étroite composée d’oves et d’un motif perlé ; le milieu du corps est mis en valeur par la frise dorée figurative représentant des cavaliers ; la partie supérieure, sous le rebord, est soulignée par une autre frise dorée avec des combats d’animaux. Le contraste des couleurs (à l’origine l’argent brillant et le doré éclatant) permettait d’apprécier pleinement ces divisions structurelles. Les bandes dorées ont été réalisées séparément au repoussé et fixées au corps en argent. Les cavaliers sont tous identiques, le motif ayant été répété dix fois à l’aide du même moule. L’espace entre les personnages n’est pas tout à fait régulier et donne l’impression que les figures diffèrent. Un guerrier nu est représenté portant un casque à pointe ; il tient un javelot dans sa main droite levée et des rênes dans la main gauche: la scène représente sans doute un concours militaire de lancer du javelot à cheval (le bouclier n’apparaît pas ici), d’où la présence d’une cible dans la composition. Le cavalier rappelle certains personnages frappés sur les anciennes monnaies grecques. Un parallèle peut également être établi avec le cavalier lancé au galop, qui est armé et coiffé du même type de casque, sur le didrachme en argent de 480 av. J.-C. environ, frappé à Géla en Sicile. Le rendu du torse, vu de face par rapport à la tête et aux jambes vues de profil sur notre pièce, suggère une datation similaire de la première moitié du Ve siècle av. J.-C. Malgré les dimensions réduites, l’artiste a porté un grand soin aux détails (yeux du cavalier, côtes du cheval). On peut remarquer une légère modification des proportions naturelles – le corps du cheval paraît trop long –, mais cela permet sans doute de mieux exprimer la dynamique de la scène et d’établir un parallèle entre ce cheval de course et Pherenikos, la monture de Hiéron, maître de Syracuse, décrit par Bacchylides. Cette représentation peut également être comparée au cheval galopant sur la sculpture du temple de Contrada Marafioti, près de Locri, datée de la fin du Ve siècle av. J.-C. Le même couple de lions attaquant un taureau apparaît quatre fois autour de la lèvre du gobelet. Le lion s’approche de façon agressive du taureau, qui rugit, la gueule grande ouverte, sa longue queue énergiquement recourbée et ses pattes de devant aux griffes déployées, prêt à attaquer. Le taureau est en train de contre-attaquer, fléchissant sa tête aux cornes puissantes. Le motif du combat entre animaux était très répandu chez les Grecs, qui l’ont repris de l'art proche-oriental. Sur ce récipient, la préférence a été donnée aux proportions allongées et aux corps minces, un schéma qui rappelle la représentation du lion et du taureau illustrés sur un autel en terre cuite de la seconde moitié du VIe siècle av. J.-C., à Centuripe, en Sicile, et dont l’artiste avait probablement été influencé par les premiers prototypes d’origine ionique. Ce gobelet est une pièce unique qui n’a aucun parallèle direct en termes de forme ou de décoration. Les caractéristiques stylistiques révèlent son affiliation aux tendances artistiques des ateliers grecs du sud de l’Italie et de la Sicile. Ce gobelet a pu être commandé pour commémorer une victoire de courses de chevaux aux jeux panhelléniques ou dans des festivals locaux. CONSERVATION

Le récipient est entièrement conservé, mais montre des traces d’usure et des dommages. La surface en argent est recouverte d’une croûte d’oxydation sombre ; des ébréchures verticales zèbrent le corps ; le bord a été cassé et réparé, des traces de colle sont visibles sur le côté intérieur ; éclats dans le métal des bandes dorées du bas, du milieu et du haut ; parties dorées effacées sur les frises du milieu et du haut. La bande supérieure est recouverte d’une patine violet rougeâtre. La bande du milieu laisse apparaître la jointure originale. PROVENANCE

Ancienne collection Nicolas Koutoulakis, Genève-Paris, 1950-1960. BIBLIOGRAPHIE

BENNETT M. – PAUL A., Magna Graecia : Greek Art from South Italy and Sicily, New York, Manchester, 2002, pp. 240-241, no. 53. HEMINGWAY S.A., The horse and jockey from Artemision : a bronze equestrian of the Hellenistic period, Berkeley, 2004, p. 126. KRAAY C.M. and HIRMER M., Greek Coins, New York, 1966, p. 295, nos. 154,156, pl. 55. LANGLOTZ E. – HIRMER M., The Art of Magna Graecia, London, 1965, pp. 261, no. 32 ; pp. 286-287, no. 124.

21985

80


BEC DE FONTAINE EN FORME DE DAUPHIN

2

Fin de l’Epoque Romaine - début de l’Epoque Byzantine, environ 400 - 500 apr. J.-C. Bronze H : 18 cm - L : 19.6 cm Les représentations sculptées de dauphins ont une histoire qui leur est propre dans l’art antique grec et romain. L’une des pièces les plus curieuses a été décrite par Pausanias (Description de la Grèce, 6, 20, 10-12) : il s’agit d’un dauphin en bronze qui était fixé sur un poteau de la ligne de départ des courses de chevaux à Olympie, dont Poséidon, dieu des mers et des océans, était le patron. De nombreuses représentations de dauphins ont en effet été découvertes dans les sanctuaires du dieu marin. En tant qu’emblème du royaume aquatique dont Poséidon était le souverain, le dauphin apparaît souvent sur l’avant-bras du dieu, dans les compositions de statuettes en bronze encore conservées (il existait certainement aussi des statues plus grandes du même type). Le dauphin peut également servir de support à la figure de la divinité. Pausanias précise, à propos de la statue de Poséidon sur la fontaine de Corinthe, que «sous les pieds de Poséidon, de l’eau jaillit d’un dauphin» (Description de la Grèce, 2, 2, 8). L’art paléochrétien a conservé cette iconographie : une coupe en argent repoussé de la première moitié du VIe siècle (musée du Louvre) et un autre récipient du même genre (musée de l’Ermitage) présentent sur leur poignée une statue de Poséidon accompagné d’un dauphin. Les dauphins étaient également utilisés comme supports dans les statues en marbre d’Aphrodite/Vénus surgie des eaux, et accompagnée d’Eros/Amor chevauchant un dauphin. Eros chevauchant le dauphin est d’ailleurs devenu un motif iconographique à part entière ; à partir de l’époque romaine, les dauphins, inclus dans un groupe sculptural ou en figure unique, apparaissent sous la forme de statuettes en marbre ou en bronze dans le cadre de fontaines décoratives de jardin. Il semblerait que les Grecs n’aient pas utilisé de dauphins pour les jets d’eau, probablement en raison de leur association avec l’eau salée, non potable. Dans la pièce en examen, l’animal est représenté avec un grand rostre et une queue enroulée, tous deux dirigés vers le haut. Le corps est creux, la bouche est un trou rond qui sert de bec au jet d’eau. A l’arrière, sous la queue, une ouverture plus grande a été conçue pour permettre le passage du tuyau qui amenait l’eau sous pression jusqu’à la fontaine. Il ne s’agit probablement pas ici du bec d’une fontaine en pierre délivrant de l’eau potable, comme celles qui étaient placées dans les rues et sur les places des villes anciennes. Une partie de la surface de bronze sur le ventre du mammifère porte la trace d’une jointure à un ancien support, tandis que la surface de la queue du dauphin au-dessus de la grande ouverture n’est pas plate mais incurvée. Cela démontre que la pièce n’a pas été conçue pour être fixée à un pilier rectangulaire. Au contraire, nous pouvons supposer qu’elle était probablement fixée à une base sculpturale représentant un morceau de rocher ou de vagues, un paysage marin par exemple, à l’image de la fontaine représentant Eros et un dauphin en marbre découverte à Pompéi. Il existe toutefois une autre hypothèse quant à l’origine de cette pièce. La zone de fixation continue sur la spirale de la queue aplatie suggère que la surface pour la soudure verticale était plus longue, peut-être un tuyau rond large et plus épais qui contenait deux ou trois becs de fontaine en forme de dauphin, soutenu par un socle de pierre commun (un tuyau en bronze avec trois becs de dauphins a été retrouvé à Pompéi). L’idée du concepteur de projeter de l’eau dans le bassin du dessous s’inscrivait parfaitement dans la croyance des anciens, selon laquelle les dauphins recrachaient de l’eau. Dans l’art romain tardif et au début de l’art byzantin, des figures de dauphins similaires furent utilisées pour les lampes en bronze. La composition animée de la pièce en examen est associée à plusieurs éléments décoratifs apparents : la longue queue enroulée comme un serpentin, la nageoire pectorale en forme d’éventail sur le côté de l’animal, juste derrière l’œil, ainsi que la nageoire dorsale et les ailerons sur les côtés, incisés dans un traitement linéaire. Les pupilles et les dents du mammifère sont également indiquées. CONSERVATION

Intact, excepté quelques petits éclats de métal sur le côté gauche du museau du dauphin et quelques rayures. Surface brun-rouge recouverte d’une patine vert foncé. PROVENANCE

Ancienne collection particulière européenne, acquis en 1993 à Munich, Allemagne. BIBLIOGRAPHIE

STEBBINS. E.B., The Dolphin in the Literature and Art of Greece and Rome, Menasha, Wisconsin, 1929. Sur le dauphin dans l’art paléochrétien, v. : WEITZMANN K. (ed.), Age of Spirituality. Late Antique and Early Christian Art, Third to Seventh Century, New York, 1979, pp. 136-137, no. 114. Sur le dauphin dans les sculptures de fontaines, v. : KAPOSSY B., Brunnenfiguren der hellenistischen und römischen Zeit, Zürich, 1969, p. 48. Rediscovering Pompeii, Rome, 1990, pp. 266-268, no. 188. Sur le dauphin comme ex-voto, v. : ETIENNE R. – BRAUN J.-P., Ténos I. Le sanctuaire de Poséidon et d’Amphitrite, Paris, 1986, pp. 312-314, pl. 161-162. Sur le dauphin comme partie d’une statue, v. : Lexicon Iconographicum Mythologiae Classicae (LIMC), vol. VII, Zurich-Munich, 1994, s.v. Poseidon, p. 452, no. 25 ; s.v. Poseidon/Neptunus, pp. 485-486, nos. 1-25. Lexicon Iconographicum Mythologiae Classicae (LIMC), vol.VIII, Zurich-Munich, 1997, s.v. Venus, pp. 200-203, 205, 210, nos. 46, 67, 88-90, 113, 121, 184. 1896

81


TETE DE FEMME PROVENANT D’UN RELIEF FUNERAIRE

3

Art grec, moitié - troisième quart du IVe s. av. J.-C. Marbre H : 26 cm Cette pièce appartenait au relief d’une tombe, à l’origine une grande dalle de marbre, vu que la tête est quasiment sculptée en ronde-bosse. Plusieurs pierres tombales grecques, en particulier celles qui venaient d’Attique, sont encore conservées. Elles présentent différentes sortes de compositions, parmi lesquelles on peut distinguer deux principaux types mettant en scène des personnages féminins : la défunte est représentée debout ou assise sur une chaise ; seule ou accompagnée d’un serviteur, de parents ou des deux. Lorsqu’elle est seule, elle tient parfois un miroir ou, si elle est plus jeune, une poupée ou un animal de compagnie, quelquefois un chien est représenté à ses pieds. Il arrive souvent que la scène représente un adieu, la défunte reçoit la boîte à bijoux d’une servante ou échange une poignée de main avec un parent (un geste qui montre la continuité du lien familial). Dans les reliefs funéraires grecs de l’époque classique et classique tardive, il n’y a aucune indication d’un quelconque intérieur ou d’un paysage, l’espace étant conçu de manière conventionnelle. Une stèle est généralement conçue comme une architecture ; elle est encadrée par deux piliers latéraux (antae) et par un fronton façonné en naiskos, un petit temple. A partir du milieu du IVe siècle av. J.-C., les sculpteurs grecs ont commencé à créer un espace plus profond à l’intérieur du bloc, permettant d’inclure un groupe de personnages sculptés en trois dimensions. Bien que l’architrave puisse porter une inscription qui mentionne le nom du défunt ou de la défunte et sa relation avec les autres membres de la famille, dans plusieurs cas le défunt n’est pas clairement indiqué parmi les personnages représentés. A en juger par les compositions standards de tels groupes et par la relation spatiale entre les personnages, la personne décédée est rarement représentée de face, mais plutôt de profil ou de trois quarts. Il est particulièrement difficile de se prononcer à partir d’un fragment de stèle funéraire qui représentait un «groupe familial» : cette jeune fille était-elle la défunte, une parente ou une jeune esclave ? Le fait que cette tête soit presque entièrement représentée de face (la partie cassée couvrant complètement l’arrière de la tête et la nuque qui étaient attachés à l’arrière-plan est visible), renforce l’hypothèse selon laquelle la jeune fille n’est pas la défunte. Quant au côté de la tête, on observe que la transition de la tête à l’arrière-plan, grossièrement ciselée par le sculpteur, occupe presque un tiers de l’ensemble du volume. Cela signifie qu’un espace important était aménagé derrière la jeune fille (premier plan) pour y inclure des personnages supplémentaires (second plan). Une seule personne du groupe entoure le personnage assis. On peut également observer la position de la tête tournée vers le côté gauche, comme le montre la ligne de la moitié gauche du cou, le léger raccourcissement de la forme de la moitié gauche du visage, ainsi que le modelé des globes oculaires (le globe de son œil droit est positionné vers la gauche). Cette jeune femme pouvait se trouver sur la gauche de la composition, regardant une personne assise, ou elle était placée derrière elle, le regard détourné. L’ébréchure sur sa joue droite ne suffit pas pour en déduire le geste de la paume vers le visage, synonyme de deuil. Cette tête est plus petite que nature, les anneaux dits «de Vénus» sur le cou du personnage indiquent qu’il ne s’agit pas d’une adolescente, mais d’une jeune fille ou d’une jeune femme. Les boucles de la chevelure sont rendues de façon banale, elle ne porte pas de boucles d’oreilles, ni de voile ; elle incarne peut-être une servante, plutôt qu’une fille ou sœur du (de la) défunt(e). Le traitement de la pierre crée une surface lisse et façonne avec soin les traits individuels du visage : les joues maigres se rétrécissant vers le menton volontaire creusé d’une fossette, les lèvres pleines de la petite bouche percée dans les coins, les yeux en amande aux paupières lourdes, l’arête du nez rejoignant les sourcils clairement visibles. La vue de profil révèle une silhouette précise et racée. Ce délicat visage à la beauté classique est un magnifique exemplaire de sculpture attique. CONSERVATION

Excellent état de conservation, la tête n’a pas subi de graves dommages, à l’exception des deux ébréchures peu profondes sur le sourcil droit et la joue, et d’un gros éclat sur le côté droit du cou. Usure superficielle sur la surface du marbre. PROVENANCE

Ancienne collection particulière, Vienne, aurait été collectionnée à la fin du XIXe ou au début du XXe siècle ; Sotheby's Londres, 2 juillet 1996, lot 104; Robin Symes, Londres, 2001. BIBLIOGRAPHIE

Sur des têtes similaires représentées frontalement, v. : CLAIRMONT C.W., Classical Attic Tombstones, Kilchberg, 1993, vol. 3, no. 3.453, 3.456, 3.459a ; vol. 4, no. 4.422. Sur les stèles funéraires attiques, v. : GROSSMAN J., Greek Funerary Sculpture : Catalogue of the Collections at the Getty Villa, Los Angeles, 2001, pp. 8-71. LEADER R.E., In Death Not Divided : Gender, Family, and State on Classical Athenian Grave Stelae in American Journal of Archaeology, 101 (4), Oct. 1997, pp. 683-699. RIDGWAY B.S., Fourth-Century Styles in Greek Sculpture, Madison, 1997, pp. 157-170. 27381

82


STAMNOS A PEINTURE SUPERPOSEE, ATTRIBUE A L’ATELIER DU PEINTRE D’ANTIMENES

4

Art grec (Attique), fin du VIe s. av. J.-C. Céramique H : 24.2 cm Ce spectaculaire stamnos a été modelé dans la traditionnelle argile attique de couleur rouge-brique et décoré selon la «technique de Six», du nom du savant néerlandais qui, le premier, à la fin du XIXe siècle, regroupa un ensemble de récipients attiques peints de cette façon. Le décor, qui compte ici uniquement trois figures, est exécuté à la peinture orangée posée par-dessus le vernis noir recouvrant tout le stamnos. Comme dans les figures noires, les détails anatomiques et vestimentaires sont complétés par des incisions. Cette technique – inventée à Athènes presque en même temps que la figure rouge de laquelle elle n’a pas su supporter la concurrence – est restée un peu marginale et son utilisation limitée surtout à des récipients de petites dimensions : au Ve siècle av. J.-C., c’est en dehors du continent grec que la «technique de Six» a connu son succès le plus considérable, puisqu’elle a été adoptée notamment par plusieurs ateliers étrusques. Le stamnos est une forme relativement peu utilisée par les potiers grecs et qui servait, comme le cratère, à préparer le mélange de vin avec de l’eau qui était destiné aux convives lors des symposia. Cet exemplaire, dont les dimensions sont plus petites que la moyenne, a un corps piriforme et bien proportionné, soutenu par une base circulaire ; le col est bas, la lèvre arrondie. Morphologiquement il présente une particularité qui en fait une pièce hors du commun : il est en effet dépourvu des deux anses horizontales, qui sont une des caractéristiques habituelles de cette forme de vase. Leur absence a d’ailleurs conditionné la manière dont le peintre a présenté son sujet, puisqu’il dispose ainsi d’une ample surface circulaire qu’aucun élément de la forme n’interrompt : la décoration est structurée selon un schéma apparemment simple mais très remarquable, puisque les trois figures se trouvent à égale distance l’une de l’autre sur la surface noire du stamnos, de telle façon que seul un personnage entier à la fois occupe le champ visuel, les deux autres étant invisibles en raison de la courbure de la paroi. Le mythe de Thésée, Ariane et le Minotaure est une des légendes les plus importantes et les plus représentées de la mythologie classique: fils du roi athénien Egée, le jeune Thésée s’est rendu en Crète pour tuer le Minotaure (monstre humain à tête de taureau, né des amours entre Poséidon et Pasiphaé, la femme de Minos, le roi crétois), afin de délivrer l’Attique de l’obligation d’envoyer sept jeunes gens et sept jeunes filles en sacrifice pour le monstre : avec l’aide d’Ariane, l’une des filles de Minos, qui lui a fourni une pelote pour retrouver la sortie du labyrinthe dans lequel est enfermé le Minotaure, le héros accomplit son exploit en tuant son adversaire d’un coup d’épée. L’épisode est traité ici de façon plutôt surprenante pour cette période : en effet, le schéma à trois figures fréquent au VIIe siècle av. J.-C. est pratiquement abandonné à la fin de l’époque archaïque au profit de scènes plus narratives (quelques-unes des jeunes victimes assistent le plus souvent au combat) ou plus essentielles, où seuls les deux combattants sont peints. L’interprétation de l’image est assurée non seulement par l’iconographie, mais aussi par les inscriptions peintes à côté des personnages et qui indiquent leur nom; le texte au-dessus de la main du héros est la dédicace à un jeune athénien (ΑΡΛΕΑΔΕ[Σ ΚΑΛΟΣ). Ce vase, dont la chronologie est à fixer tout à la fin du VIe siècle, vers 510 av. J.-C., a été attribué par C. Isler-Kerenyi à l’atelier du peintre d’Antiménès, qui était certainement l’un des artistes les plus en vue parmi les peintres sur céramique contemporains. CONSERVATION

Le vase est complet mais recollé, et il est très bien conservé, avec une belle surface. PROVENANCE

Ars Antiqua A.G., Lucerne, Catalogue no. 13, 7 décembre 1957, no. 14 ; anciennement collection Ferruccio Bolla (1911-1984), Lugano, Suisse ; Münzen und Medaillen A.G., Basel, Auktion 70, 14 novembre 1986, no. 206 ; Christie’s New York, 14 novembre 2000, no. 441 ; collection particulière anglaise, 2001-2009. EXPOSÉ

Stamnoi, J. Paul Getty Museum, Malibu. 1980. PUBLIÉ

Ars Antiqua A.G., Lucerne, Catalogue 13, 7 décembre 1957, pl. 10-11, no. 14. ISLER-KERENYI C., Stamnoi, Lugano, 1976, pp. 29-35. ISLER-KERENYI C., Stamnoi, An Exhibition at the J. Paul Getty Museum, Malibu, 1980, no. 7. Münzen und Medaillen A.G., Basel, Auktion 70, 14 novembre 1986, no. 206. BIBLIOGRAPHIE

MARANGOU L.I., Ancient Greek Art from the Collection of Stavros S. Niarchos, Athènes, 1995, pp. 106-109, pp. 134-139. PHILIPPAKI B., The Attic Stamnos, Oxford, 1967, pp. 25-28.

21492

83


CUILLERE AJOUREE ET ORNEE D’UN DAUPHIN

5

Art romain, Ier s. apr. J.-C. Cristal de roche, os, or L : 22.7 cm L’objet se compose de deux éléments, le cuilleron, taillé dans un fragment de cristal de roche, et le manche sculpté dans une tige d’os. Le raccord entre les parties est renforcé par la présence d’une épaisse bague en feuille d’or martelé. Le manche, long et mince, de forme cylindrique, est orné de séries de cercles incisés et alternés à des moulures ou à des motifs sphériques ou ovales ; il se termine par un bouton tronconique. Le cuilleron, très profond, long et étroit, est taillé en forme d’amande, avec l’extrémité pointue. Vers le manche, il se transforme en une tige particulièrement élaborée, à section carrée, qui comporte un motif de quatre volutes ajourées dans la partie inférieure. Sur la partie supérieure, avec le museau posé sur le bord du cuilleron, se trouve une petite statuette de dauphin en train de nager, la queue soulevée et probablement hors de l’eau ; malgré la taille miniaturisée, le tailleur du cristal a su rendre l’animal avec grande minutie et son attitude avec réalisme : son corps sinueux rend l’idée de la vitesse et des mouvements parfaitement hydrodynamiques (un minuscule ajour est percé même sous le corps du dauphin), le museau est allongé, l’œil globulaire, les nageoires tendues. Trois autres volutes, réalisées en très bas relief, décorent la face inférieure du cuilleron : elles continuent les motifs de la tige et se développent symétriquement, comme les feuilles d’un arbre, à gauche et à droite d’une branche centrale pointue. Il s’agit d’une pièce remarquable, probablement unique en son genre, qui d’une part utilise des matériaux particulièrement précieux (or, cristal) et de l’autre atteint une qualité artistique et technique hors du commun, comparable aux statuettes en pierre semi-précieuses et aux chefs-d’œuvre de la glyptique contemporaine. A table, pour manger, les Romains utilisaient essentiellement la cuillère et les doigts (la fourchette est une invention beaucoup plus récente qui s’est imposée progressivement seulement à partir du XVe siècle, tandis que le couteau était utilisé par les esclaves à la cuisine et servait à découper la viande avant qu’elle ne soit emmenée à table) : la raison principale de cela est à chercher dans l’habitude, propre surtout aux classes privilégiées de la société, de manger allongés sur un triclinium en s’appuyant sur un coude : cette position empêchait de se servir des deux mains pour tenir les services (couteau et fourchette en particulier). Les cuillères romaines étaient généralement de deux types, l’un plus circulaire (le cochlear) pour contenir les œufs et les coquillages, et l’autre plus ovoïde et profond (la ligula) utilisé pour les sauces ou les bouillons. Elles étaient généralement fabriquées en métal (bronze ou plus rarement en argent ou or) ou, pour les citoyens plus modestes, en bois ou en os. Les exemplaires en verre sont connus mais rares, tandis que l’utilisation du cristal de roche n’est attestée que pour un cochlear avec le manche en argent acquis par le Metropolitan Museum de New York et daté du Ier siècle apr. J.-C. Mais l’objet en examen se différencie des autres cuillères utilisées à table ou à la cuisine surtout à cause de sa forme et de sa riche décoration qui ne semblent pas aptes pour un tel emploi. On peut suggérer deux différentes interprétations pour ce magnifique exemplaire, que la présence de la figurine de dauphin rend parfaitement plausibles (ce mammifère était traditionnellement lié à Aphrodite/Vénus, la déesse de l’Amour, très présente dans l’univers féminin de l’époque impériale) : a) en tenant compte du fait que dans les sépultures les cuillères sont fréquemment associées avec des bijoux et d’autres outils typiquement féminins, on peut imaginer que la pièce en examen était une cuillère à fard, ayant peut-être appartenu à l’ensemble d’objets de toilette d’une riche citoyenne romaine : elle pouvait être utilisée dans la préparation, le dosage ou le mélange de poudres cosmétiques ou éventuellement de médicaments ; b) son utilisation cultuelle pour le dosage de matières précieuses lors de rites particuliers, probablement en relation avec Aphrodite/Vénus. CONSERVATION

Conservation remarquable : pratiquement intacte à l’exception de quelques ébréchures (surtout bord du cuilleron et manche). Dépôts superficiels. PROVENANCE

Collection particulière de M. Sleiman Aboutaam; puis par descendance Noura Aboutaam, Genève, Suisse. BIBLIOGRAPHIE

Sur les cuillères dans le monde romain et leur utilisation, v. : DAREMBERG C. - SAGLIO E., Dictionnaire des Antiquités grecques et romaines, vol. III, 2, Paris, 1898, pp. 1253-1254. GUZZO P.G. (ed.), Argenti a Pompei, Milan, 2006, pp. 95-96, nos. 65-76. STRONG D.E., Greek and Roman Gold and Silver Plate, London, 1966, pp. 155-156. Sur la cuillère en cristal du Metropolitan Museum : PICON C.A. et al., Art of the Classical World in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Greece, Cyprus, Etruria, Rome, New York, 2007, no. 462, p. 394 et p. 496. Quelques objets de toilette féminine : CONTICELLO B. (ed.), Rediscovering Pompeii, Rome, 1990, pp. 156-159, no. 28ff. DÖRIG J. (ed.), Art antique, Collection privée de Suisse romande, Geneva, 1975, no. 366.

26793

84


VASE RITUEL AVEC COUVERCLE AU NOM DE THOUTMOSIS III

6

Art égyptien, XVIIIe dynastie, règne de Thoutmosis III (env. 1473 - 1426 av. J.-C.) Calcite (albâtre) H : 12.5 cm – Diam. du couvercle : 7.7 cm Vase de forme très élégante, taillé dans un seul bloc de calcite ; travaillé avec une adresse et une finesse hors du commun. Les inscriptions sur le couvercle et sur le corps du vase ont été gravées et colorées en bleu par l’adjonction de fritte en poudre. Le fût, discrètement évasé vers la partie supérieure, est soutenu par un petit pied en bourrelet ; le couvercle circulaire, certainement d’origine (dimension, inscription, présence de la fritte), présente dans la face inférieure un décrochement circulaire qui s’emboîte dans le goulot, l’empêchant de tomber trop facilement. La forme a une longue tradition qui remonte à l’Ancien Empire, mais perdure sans grandes variations pendant des siècles : il s’agit d’un vase rituel apte à contenir des fards que l’on offrait à la divinité lors de certaines cérémonies, en particulier pour les besoins du culte divin journalier : à ce propos il ne faut oublier que Thoutmosis III est connu aussi pour avoir dessiné lui-même la vaisselle rituelle. Mis à part les formules habituelles, les deux inscriptions indiquent le nom du pharaon auquel le vase a appartenu (MenKheper-Ré, Thoutmosis III) tandis que le nom du dieu ayant reçu l’objet en offrande (Amon-Ré) se lit uniquement sur l’inscription la plus longue, incisée sur le fût (trois colonnes). Le vase appartenait probablement au dépôt de fondation d’un palais qui, selon le texte incisé, aurait été dédié à AmonRé par ce pharaon de la XVIIIe dynastie (le nom de l’édifice est à lire «Puissante terre d’Egypte» ou «Ile-Aimée»). Par ailleurs, au courant du Nouvel Empire des vases de forme identique suivaient le défunt dans sa dernière demeure, comme le prouvent les récipients similaires trouvés dans un coffret de la tombe de Toutankhamon. Dans l’Egypte ancienne, les vases en pierre étaient considérés comme des objets de luxe de tout premier ordre. L’art de sculpter la vaisselle dans la pierre a atteint son apogée déjà à des époques aussi reculées que l’époque thinite et l’Ancien Empire : par exemple, les artisans travaillant pour le pharaon Djéser ont su répondre à la commande de plusieurs dizaines de milliers de récipients, qui ont été placés dans les magasins de la pyramide à degrés de Saqqara (on parle de 30 000 à 40 000 vases dont la grande majorité a été retrouvée brisée). La fabrication de ces objets est un sujet fréquent dans les reliefs peints de l’Ancien Empire, mais très peu d’ateliers antiques ont été découverts. L’iconographie semble indiquer que le tailleur commençait par sculpter et polir l’extérieur, avant de percer l’intérieur à l’aide d’un foret. Les différentes opérations étaient accomplies en plaçant le vase dans une cavité du sol ou de la table de travail. La principale fonction des récipients en pierre était de contenir des onguents et des huiles cosmétiques et de les conserver grâce à l’épaisseur et l’imperméabilité de leur paroi. Si ces substances avaient d’innombrables usages au quotidien (médicaments), elles jouaient un rôle de premier plan aussi dans la vie religieuse (offrandes dans les temples, onctions quotidiennes des statues et des objets de culte) et funéraire (préparation des momies, croyance en l’effet rajeunissant et régénérateur de ces substances). Il n’est donc pas étonnant qu’une quantité très importante de récipients en pierre était régulièrement déposée dans les sanctuaires et dans les complexes funéraires. CONSERVATION

Vase complet et pratiquement intact ; légères ébréchures sur les bords. Surface lisse et polie, abondantes restes de fritte dans les inscriptions. PROVENANCE

Ancienne collection particulière israélienne, constituée dans les années 1960 ; pourvu d’une licence d'exportation israélienne. BIBLIOGRAPHIE

Quelques vases en albâtre du Nouvel Empire : PAGE-GASSER M. – WIESE A.B., Egypte, Moments d’Eternité, Mainz/Rhine, 1997, nos. 73-74. Toutankhamon, L’or de l’au-delà, Trésors funéraires de la vallée des Rois, Basel, 2004, p. 343. VANDIER J., Catalogue des objets de toilette égyptiens, Paris, 1972, p. 129, no. 555.

27549

85


ANSE EN FORME DE STATUETTE DE LION

7

Art grec, fin du VIe s. av. J.-C. Bronze L : 18. 2 cm Le dessin ergonomique de la statuette, au corps trop effilé par rapport aux formes musclées et puissantes d’un lion ou d’une panthère, s’adapte à son utilisation antique comme anse de patère ou, plus difficilement, d’hydrie ou d’œnochoé. Malgré la stylisation formelle, le corps du fauve, aux proportions élancées et élégantes, dégage une impression de grande souplesse : l’animal est représenté juste dans l’acte de bondir alors que l’extrémité des pattes postérieures semble encore toucher le sol. Le cou et la tête sont parfaitement dans l’axe du corps, les pattes antérieures ne touchent pas la mâchoire. La forme cylindrique du corps se rétrécit avant la croupe, où deux dépressions marquent la tension musculaire et les articulations de l’arrière-train du lion. Les côtes sont indiquées plastiquement par des ondulations régulières de la surface. L’expression du museau est agressive, avec le nez retroussé, les babines tournées vers l’extérieur, la gueule entrouverte. La structure osseuse et musculaire du crâne est visible grâce à la plasticité du front et des joues ; les yeux sont proéminents et en forme d’amande ; les petites oreilles triangulaires sont un peu inclinées et situées sur la couronne de la crinière. Celle-ci, très particulière, est formée d’un cercle épais, avec des flammèches incisées. Sur le cou, la crinière est en léger relief par rapport au reste du dos, duquel elle est séparée par une raie profondément incisée. D’autres flammèches, symétriques, sont rendues avec un tel soin que cette surface fait presque penser à un tissu. Le travail du sculpteur est très soigné et d’une qualité rarement égalée pour ce genre d’objets : la statuette est en fonte pleine, l’anatomie de l’animal est rendue par des incisions et par un travail de modelage précis. Depuis le VIIIe siècle av. J.-C. déjà, des animaux (lions, taureaux) mais aussi des êtres hybrides (griffons, sirènes) ornent les vases grecs en bronze. Pendant tout le VIe siècle av. J.-C., on connaît des exemplaires de lions représentés dans cette attitude, qui constituaient l’anse de nombreuses phialés (ou patères, une forme de coupe basse et large) en bronze destinées aux banquets des classes les plus aisées. Les pattes antérieures du fauve étaient généralement fondues avec une ample palmette fixée à la lèvre et au corps du vase tandis que sa tête dépassait le bord du récipient ; une autre palmette, plus petite, se positionnait sur les griffes postérieures et servait non seulement comme ornement mais également comme base d’appui pour l’arrière de la coupe qui s’en trouvait donc mieux équilibrée (ici la surface irrégulière et inachevée sous les pattes postérieure indique probablement la présence d’une telle décoration). La boucle formée par la queue permettait de suspendre le récipient. On connaît quelques autres figures de lions typologiquement très semblables à celle-ci et qui sont également considérées comme des anses de patère, même si un seul exemplaire est conservé avec sa coupe. On dénombre moins d’une dizaine de statuettes, dont au moins cinq ont été retrouvées sur l’acropole d’Athènes ; d’autres, mises au jour en Italie méridionale, sont généralement considérées comme des imitations locales des prototypes attiques. La production de ces coupes est comprise entre le milieu et la fin du VIe siècle pour Athènes, alors que les patères de Grande-Grèce semblent être un peu plus récentes (certains exemplaires pourraient descendre jusqu’au début du Ve siècle av. J.-C.). Stylistiquement, la présence de certains éléments (en particulier la couronne de la crinière), le modelé plus souple et les détails anatomiques plus riches et précis, rapprochent le manche en examen des exemplaires mis au jour en Italie méridionale ; la position des pattes antérieures (qui sur la statuette en examen sont bien séparées de la mâchoire du fauve) est la différence la plus importante par rapport aux exemplaires italiotes. Chronologiquement cette pièce est certainement un peu plus récente que les lions attiques, au style encore clairement archaïque. C. Tarditi a postulé l’existence d’un atelier en Italie méridionale adriatique (actuellement dans les Pouilles) qui aurait repris et continué pendant quelques décennies la tradition attique et auquel on peut également attribuer quelques manches à double corps de lion appartenant à des bassins de type dit podanipter. CONSERVATION

Excellente conservation, queue recollée, extrémité des pattes antérieures perdue ; surface lisse, parfaitement lisible, recouverte d’une magnifique patine vert clair, uniforme. Par endroits légers défauts de cuisson (petits trous superficiels sous le ventre). PROVENANCE

Ancienne collection Nicolas Koutoulakis, Genève-Paris; collection particulière, acquis auprès de Nicolas Koutoulakis en 1995. BIBLIOGRAPHIE

Sur les anses de patères, v. : GAUER W., Ein spätarchaischer Beckengriff mit Tierkampfgruppe in Olympiabericht 10, Berlin, 1981, pp. 111-165 (v. surtout pp. 146-148). JANTZEN U., Griechische Griffphialen, in Winkelmannsprogramm Berlin 114, 1958, pp. 5-29. TARDITI C., Vasi di bronzo in area apula, Lecce, 1996, pp. 112, 132-136 et 179-180. Pour les pièces de l’Acropole, v. : DE RIDDER A., Catalogue des bronzes trouvés sur l’acropole d’Athènes, Paris, 1896, pp. 77-79, nos. 231-235. Pour d’autres statuettes de lion utilisées comme manche ou ornement de récipients, v. : GAUER W., Die Bronzegefässe von Olympia, I, Olympische Forschungen XX, Berlin, 1991, pp. 254-256, M23, M32-M33, pl. 77-78 (supports de chaudron). ROLLEY C., Les bronzes grecs, Fribourg, 1983, pp. 137-139 (Vix et Paestum). 3820

86


BOL CONIQUE AVEC APPLIQUE EN FORME DE FLEUR

8

Art hellénistique (Syrie-Palestine), IIe - Ier s. av. J.-C. Verre et or H : 7.5 cm - D : 14.5 cm Cette coupe est remarquable non seulement pour ses conditions de conservation mais aussi à cause de l’applique en épaisse feuille d’or fixée sur le fond du récipient : sa présence fait de cette pièce un objet probablement unique et un des bols les plus importants de cette classe de récipients hellénistiques. Il est en verre transparent épais et solide, de couleur vert olive ; l’épaisseur de la paroi est plus importante à la hauteur du bord que vers le fond. Sa forme est tout aussi simple qu’élégante : le profil est conique et régulier avec le fond arrondi, recouvert d’un bouton en or qui porte, comme décoration, une fleur en relief : elle se compose de deux couronnes de pétales à l’extrémité pointue et d’une partie centrale circulaire qui confère au récipient un certain équilibre (le bol est dépourvu d’anses). Il faut noter que le fond du récipient a été préparé exprès pour recevoir l’applique : plutôt que simplement arrondi, comme c’est la règle pour ce type de bol, il présente un décrochement dans le profil externe, comme s’il avait été taillé ou pressé pour permettre une meilleure adhérence de l’applique au verre (rarement, d’autres bols de ce type présentent sur le fond des motifs de décorations plus importants que quelques lignes incisées : c’est le cas par exemple d’une pièce de la collection de l’Université de Missouri-Columbia, dont le fond se termine par une sorte de bouton qui lui garantit probablement une bonne stabilité). A l’intérieur, la décoration se limite à trois lignes horizontales et parallèles, profondément incisées et certainement exécutées sur le tour. Le bord est simple, sans lèvre mais légèrement arrondi. A l’extérieur, environ à mi-hauteur de la paroi, un petit disque en léger relief est probablement le témoignage d’une réparation antique, causée peut-être par un défaut de fusion dans le verre ou par un coup. La pièce en examen appartient à un groupe bien connu de vases en verre, certainement utilisés comme vaisselle à boire pendant le symposium : produites par des ateliers basés sur la côte syro-palestinienne à une date comprise environ entre le milieu du IIe et la fin du Ier siècle av. J.-C., ces coupes (appelées en anglais syro-palestinian grooved cup à cause des gravures circulaires internes et/ou externes) se sont rapidement imposées dans un grande partie du monde méditerranéen puisqu’elles ont été mises au jour en Grèce (Athènes, Délos par exemple), en Italie (Etrurie, Grande-Grèce, Sicile, etc.), en Espagne, en Egypte, etc. De taille et de proportions variables, elles sont en verre transparent généralement incolore, ambre ou, comme ici, vert/jaune. Ces bols en verre, qui étaient certainement considérés comme des produits de luxe déjà dans l’Antiquité, sont à comprendre comme des imitations de nombreuses coupes à boire hellénistiques fabriquées en métal précieux (argent surtout), comme le confirment non seulement les affinités formelles mais aussi la présence de la rosette sur le fond, un motif largement répandu dans la décoration de la vaisselle métallique. La technique de fabrication est particulière, basée sur le principe du moule mais sans l’opération du pressage : après avoir préparé un disque de verre, l’artisan le pose sur une forme conique (en plâtre ou en terre cuite) tournée à l’envers et le soumet à une fusion partielle. Sous l’action de la chaleur et de la gravité, le verre «coule» sur le moule en prenant sa forme et en se concentrant surtout vers la lèvre du récipient, qui en résulte donc plus épaisse (contrairement aux récipients en verre soufflé, où le fond du vase est plus épais). Ce procédé (dit du flan de verre, sagging en anglais) est plus rapide et moins onéreux que celui basé sur le moulage dans des moules mâle et femelle ; en plus, puisque seule une face du récipient est en contact avec la forme, le polissage du verre peut se limiter uniquement à la partie interne. CONSERVATION

Pratiquement intact, sauf bord partiellement ébréché ; patine par endroits iridescente et restes d’incrustations recouvrant partiellement l’intérieur du bol. Traces régulières de polissage à l’intérieur. PROVENANCE

Collection particulière de M. Sleiman Aboutaam; puis par descendance Noura Aboutaam, Genève, Suisse. BIBLIOGRAPHIE

Sur les bols de ce type, v. : GROSE D.F., The Syro-Palestinian Glass Industry in the Later Hellenistic Period, in Muse 13, 1979, pp. 31-33 (technique), pp. 54-67 (voir p. 58, no. 1, pour le bol avec le fond travaillé). GROSE D.F., The Toledo Museum of Art, Early Ancient Glass, New York, 1989, pp. 245ff. STERN E.M. - SCHLICK-NOLTE B., Early Glass of the Ancient World, 1000 B.C. A.D. 50, Ernesto Wolf Collection, Ostfildern, 1994, pp. 68-71, no. 77 (technique) ; pp. 284-285, no. 79. Pour les comparaisons en métal : OLIVER A. and LUCKNER K.T., Silver for the Gods: 800 Years of Greek and Roman Silver, Toledo, 1977, pp. 84-85, no. 47. STRONG D.E., Greek and Roman Gold and Silver Plate, London 1966, pp. 108-109ff.

26727

87


STATUETTE D’OFFRANTE Art nuragique (Sardaigne), VIIIe - VIIe s. av. J.-C. Bronze H : 13.3 cm La figurine représente une femme debout, en position strictement frontale (vue de profil elle n’a pratiquement pas d’épaisseur). Le corps est droit, filiforme, sans détails à l’exception des petits seins circulaires à peine en relief. Les bras sont écartés du corps et dirigés vers le spectateur : le droit est plié vers le haut, la main est ouverte avec quatre doigts tendus, tandis que le pouce est ouvert en «V». Le bras gauche est légèrement baissé, la main présente un plat à offrandes rempli avec quatre objets (deux «croissants» et deux «petits pains», dont la nature exacte n’est pas compréhensible). De longs traits réguliers, incisés sur les mains et sur les pieds, indiquent les doigts et les orteils. Légèrement penchés vers l’arrière, le cou et la tête de la femme accentuent, surtout vus de face, la verticalité et la frontalité de l’image. Le visage est ovale, très allongé, avec une expression hiératique et figée ; si les éléments les plus importants sont représentés (yeux proéminents, nez triangulaire et pointu, sourcils, bouche), aucun autre détail n’est modelé plastiquement ; même les cheveux n’ont aucun volume et ne sont indiqués que par une raie centrale avec des mèches incisées horizontalement. Soudé sous les pieds, un tenon à trois pointes permettait de fixer la statuette à sa base d’origine. La femme porte trois vêtements différents : une tunique, un manteau et une cape. a) tunique : très adhérente, visible sur le cou (bord horizontal) et au-dessus des pieds, où son bord a une frange ; le capuchon qui couvre la tête de la figure appartient à cette tunique. b) manteau au bord supérieur incliné ; il couvre l’épaule gauche (où il était probablement fixé par une fibule non visible) et passe sous l’aisselle droite. La ligne verticale en relief qui se trouve à l’intérieur de la cape, est le bord ce manteau. c) la cape en laine épaisse couvre les bras et tombe raide vers le sol ; le contour semi-circulaire de ce tissu est le seule élément de toute la statuette qui lui donne un certain sens de la profondeur. A l’extérieur, à la hauteur des genoux, une frange, semblable à celle de la tunique, orne la cape. Il s’agit d’un très bel exemplaire de sculpture nuragique en bronze, qui réunit toutes les caractéristiques principales de cette catégorie d’objets. Le style est net et précis, presque géométrique, non seulement dans les formes pures et essentielles mais aussi dans la structure, qui accentue soit la frontalité soit les axes verticaux et horizontaux. Aucune concession n’est faite ni à la plasticité ou au modelage, ni aux décorations. Le terme «nuragique» caractérise la civilisation locale qui s’est développée en Sardaigne environ entre 1600 et 500 av. J.-C. : il est tiré du mot sarde «nuraghe», d’origine probablement très ancienne et indique les tours, parfois entourées d’un système plus complexes de fortifications, construites sur d’innombrables collines de l’île à cette époque. Il existe différents types de statuettes nuragiques à figure humaine : les «chefs de tribu», les bergers, les guerriers, les archers, les offrant(e)s, des groupes (la femme et l’enfant, les lutteurs), etc. Parmi les «offrant(e)s», hommes ou femmes, il y a une série de figurines debout qui, comme celle-ci, tiennent un plat avec les offrandes et lèvent la main droite en signe de prière ou plus probablement de salut à une divinité. Très proche stylistiquement et typologiquement, une statuette de la collection G. Ortiz est le meilleur parallèle pour cette pièce : il est possible que les deux images soient des produits du même atelier. On croit que les bronzes nuragiques représentent les offrants et leurs offrandes plutôt qu’une divinité ; il s’agit le plus souvent d’ex-voto dédiés dans un temple ou dans un sanctuaire, voire parfois déposés dans des tombes. La présence constante du tenon sous les pieds indique que les figurines étaient installées debout, dans un endroit prévu expressément pour elles. Bien que nos connaissances dans ce domaine ne soient pas très étendues (à cause surtout du manque de sources écrites), on admet généralement que les figurines hiératiques et stylisées représentent les classes les plus hautes de la société, auxquelles incombaient les responsabilités militaires, religieuses et politiques ; il est possible que l’apparition de cette nouvelle aristocratie soit à l’origine de la naissance de la sculpture en bronze et en pierre. Certains savants pensent que l’habillement ou l’armement complexe caractérisent en particulier des prêtres (prêtresses) ou des chefs. Chronologiquement, ces statuettes sont datées soit par la présence de matériel nuragique en Etrurie, soit, à l’inverse, par les objets étrusques, grecs ou phéniciens découverts en Sardaigne ; on arrive ainsi, pour ce style de sculptures, à une datation comprise entre la fin du IXe et le VIe siècle av. J.-C. Les figurines «classiques», comme celle-ci, sont plus probablement à dater du VIIIe ou du VIIe siècle av. J.-C.

88


9 CONSERVATION

Statuette complète, excellente conservation ; usures superficielles (surtout sur les bords du manteau, du plat et sur les doigts). Poignet gauche accidentellement tordu vers le bas. Surface couleur bronze doré, par endroits (plat) belle patine verte. Traces de polissage à l’intérieur du manteau. PROVENANCE

Ancienne collection du Professeur A. Goumaz, Suisse, années 1950. BIBLIOGRAPHIE

Sur la sculpture nuragique et sur cette pièce, v. : La civiltà nuragica, Milan, 1990, pp. 211ff. L’art des peuples italiques, Geneva, 1993, pp. 52ff. et p. 391, fig. 264 (collection G. Ortiz). LILLIU G., Sculture della Sardegna nuragica, Cagliari, 1966 (v. surtout pp. 137-156 pour les statuettes féminines dans la même attitude). THIMME J. (ed.), Kunst und Kultur Sardiniens, Karlsruhe, 1990, pp. 391-392, figs. 136-138. Sur la culture nuragique, v. : La civiltà nuragica, Milan, 1990. THIMME J. (ed.), Kunst und Kultur Sardiniens vom Neolithikum bis zum Ende der Nuraghenzeit, Karlsruhe, 1980.

9504

89


BAGUE AVEC PORTRAIT FEMININ (JULIA TITI)

10

Art romain, fin du Ier s. apr. J.-C. Or massif, cornaline H : 2.4 cm – Diam. cabochon : 2.6 cm La bague, en or massif et de forme arrondie, présente une section semi-circulaire ; la partie supérieure, à l’épaule plate, est elliptique et supporte un cabochon en cornaline, d’un très beau rouge foncé, qui est fixé selon la technique du sertissage clos. Un buste féminin, certainement un portrait individuel, est sculpté en relief dans le creux sur le cabochon. La femme, adulte mais à l’apparence encore jeune, est vue de profil gauche : il s’agit d’un personnage de très haut rang, appartenant peut-être à la famille impériale. Le sculpteur – vue la qualité et la finesse du travail il s’agissait certainement d’un grand maître - a exécuté une figure richement parée, portant une coiffure très élaborée et habillée d’un manteau finement drapé, couvrant le décolleté et montant assez haut sur la nuque. Son visage, à l’expression sévère et au regard ferme, fait penser à une femme habituée à donner des ordres et qui exige de l’obéissance. Malgré une certaine idéalisation et l’absence de rides, les caractères individuels sont bien typés : le cou est massif et bien modelé, la tête a un contour linéaire avec la mâchoire forte, le nez bien dégagé, l’œil attentif, les lèvres charnues et le menton arrondi mais proéminent. L’oreille ornée d’une boucle composite est dégagée de la chevelure ; la parure est complétée par un grand diadème à la silhouette triangulaire visible sur le sommet de la tête. La chevelure, extrêmement élaborée, confirme la datation de la bague, qui est placer dans les dernières décennies du Ier siècle apr. J.-C., lorsque la dynastie flavienne dirigeait l’Empire. Dans la partie antérieure de la tête, les cheveux sont rangés en boucles arrondies et finement incisées qui descendent vers les tempes jusqu’à la hauteur des oreilles ; après le diadème central, ils sont en revanche coiffés en tresses torsadées et enroulées, qui forment un ample chignon circulaire. De minuscules incisions régulières indiquent les détails des mèches. La comparaison avec les effigies monétaires ou glyptiques et les portraits grandeur nature taillées en pierre de Julia Titi, la fille de l’empereur Titus, fournit une probable solution pour l’identification du personnage représenté sur cette bague. De cette femme la Bibliothèque Nationale de Paris possède quelques portraits sur intailles qui sont particulièrement proches de la bague en examen : la structure de la tête, le profil du visage et le type de coiffure répètent les mêmes schémas iconographiques et appartiennent selon toute vraisemblance aux mêmes personnages. La datation de cette bague correspond également à celle fixée pour les gemmes de la Bibliothèque Nationale (environ entre 80 et 90 apr. J.-C., pendant les dernières années de vie de la jeune femme). Les différences les plus notables avec les effigies connues de Julia Titi concernent la présence du diadème (qui est une constante dans la glyptique mais plus rare sur les monnaies ou sur les portraits en pierre) et la taille du toupet au-dessus du front, qui dans certains portraits atteint un important degré d’élaboration : comme sur d’autres intailles, ici, il semble se limiter à un épais tapis de boucles plutôt qu’à un grand toupet. Julia Titi (Flavia Julia Sabina Titi, née probablement en 64 ou 65 et décédée en 91 apr. J.-C.) était la fille de l'empereur Titus et de son épouse Marcia Furnilla. Ses parents divorcèrent pour des raisons liées à la politique romaine alors que Julia était encore enfant. Elle fut élevée par Titus à Rome et n’avait que six ans lorsque son père entreprit une expédition militaire au Proche-Orient et conquit Jérusalem. Sur son existence les historiens savent très peu de choses, souvent hypothétiques. Titus l'offrit en mariage à son frère Domitien, mais celui-ci refusa à cause de son engagement envers Domitia Longina. Elle se maria alors avec le consul Titus Flavius Sabinus. À la mort de son père et de son mari, elle vécut avec Domitien, qui s’était entretemps épris d’elle, « comme une femme avec son mari » selon les paroles de Dion Cassisus (Histoire romaine, 67.3). Enceinte de Domitien, Julia mourut, selon une rumeur non confirmée, d’un avortement forcé, voulu par l’empereur. Après sa mort, elle fut très vite divinisée et ses cendres furent ensuite mélangées à celles Domitien après le décès de celui-ci (Suétone, Vie des Douze Césars, Domitien, 17.3). CONSERVATION

Bague complète, excellent état de conservation ; légères marques superficielles de coups. PROVENANCE

Collection particulière de M. Sleiman Aboutaam; puis par descendance Noura Aboutaam, Genève, Suisse. BIBLIOGRAPHIE

Sur les portraits de Julia Titi, v. : DALTROP G. et al., Das römische Herrscherbild, vol. 2, Die Flavier, Berlin, 1966, pp. 49-59, 115-119, pl. 42-50. Sur les intailles de Paris, v. : VOLLENWEIDER M.-L. et al., Camée et intailles, vol. II, Les Portraits romains du Cabinet des Médailles, Catalogue raisonné, Paris, 2003, pp. 128131, nos. 146-150.

26795

90


BUSTE DE JEUNE FEMME CONTEMPORAINE D’HADRIEN

11

Art romain, vers 120 - 140 apr. J.-C. Marbre H : 43.2 cm Buste creux, soutenu à l’arrière par un pilier droit et se terminant, vers l’avant, par un petit chapiteau ; base cylindrique en forme de tambour à profil concave et aux bords moulurés. Il s’agit d’un buste funéraire reproduisant le portrait grandeur nature d’une femme adulte mais d’aspect encore juvénile : il est caractérisé par la remarquable élégance des proportions (le cou est haut et mince, le visage fin et régulier) ainsi que par la grande finesse d’exécution des détails du visage et par l’élaboration de la coiffure et des plis du tissu. La femme tourne la tête vers son épaule gauche ; cette position est soulignée par une légère différenciation au niveau de la musculature du cou. Elle est habillée uniquement d’une tunique qui présente des plis en fort relief sur le décolleté et qui forme un triangle avec la pointe dirigée vers le bas. Sur les épaules et la poitrine, le tissu, davantage tendu, a un aspect plus fin et transparent. Son visage, mince et allongé, aux traits presque idéalisés, a un menton pointu mais peu proéminent. Son rendu met en évidence la grande maîtrise du sculpteur, un maître qui travaillait probablement dans la capitale impériale : les formes sont exprimées par un modelage sûr et précis avec de très légères nuances plastiques qui animent les amples surfaces des joues, du cou et du front. Les yeux sont en amande, sans indication de l’iris, la bouche petite et horizontale a des lèvres charnues aux commissures à peine creusées, le nez présentait probablement une légère bosse. Malgré son âge, l’expression de ce visage est sévère et concentrée, même si le regard semble un peu perdu dans le vide : cette femme, qui appartenait certainement à la haute noblesse de l’époque impériale, était peut-être déjà une matrona, qui devait assumer son rôle de maîtresse de la maisonnée. Les vertus que l’on prêtait à ces femmes sont exprimées dans ce portrait : sérieux, autorité, sobriété, constance. La chevelure, qui est particulièrement élaborée, encadre le front de façon nette et linéaire en formant un triangle, comme un petit fronton. Coiffés en deux tresses au-dessus du front et jusqu’aux oreilles, les cheveux sont ensuite rangés en une sorte de «couronne» de flammèches (avec motif central en forme de cœur). Les tresses réapparaissent sur le sommet de la tête, où elles forment un épais turban à trois niveaux, qui dans la réalité était constitué d’un postiche. La surface des cheveux est parcourue d’incisions en zigzag, qui indiquent clairement les mèches se croisant et se superposant. Devant les oreilles, de petites boucles en léger relief sont sculptées librement. De même que pour beaucoup d’autres portraits féminins, la chevelure est le trait le plus important pour le classement de cette tête. C’est au début du IIe siècle de notre ère que les femmes romaines ont commencé à porter de telles coiffures, dont il existe d’ailleurs plusieurs variantes : avec ou sans frange ondulée au-dessus du front, avec ou sans chignon fixé sur l’occiput ou sur le sommet de la tête, une ou plusieurs tresses, etc. Sabina, femme de l’empereur Hadrien, a été la première à inaugurer cette mode, que de nombreuses femmes de la cour impériale ont par la suite fréquemment adoptée, comme le prouve le portrait en question. Les portraits romains d’une telle qualité artistique ne sont pas fréquents : par sa physionomie, cette tête rappelle certains portraits de Sabine (86-136 apr. J.-C.), la femme de l’empereur Hadrien, dont elle se différencie surtout par son plus jeune âge et par la forme plus mince, fine et moins marquée du visage, surtout dans sa partie inférieure. Cela nous donne un repère précis pour la chronologie de ce buste qui est à dater environ des années entre 120 et 140 av. J.-C., ce que confirme le type de coiffure porté par cette jeune femme. Ce buste, pour une fois complet, c’est-à-dire qui a conservé son pied, offre l’occasion de rappeler que cette manière de réduire la figure humaine à la partie supérieure de son tronc (qu’on appelle un buste) est une invention des Romains. Selon eux, la tête, siège de la pensée, suffit pour représenter la personnalité. Comme le montre le portrait en examen, les femmes romaines accordaient beaucoup de soin à leur chevelure, signe de leur rang social. Elles recouraient souvent à des coiffures préparées à part, des perruques, qu’on appelait galeri. Les cheveux postiches provenaient surtout de la Germanie, où la couleur blonde était courante, contrairement à l’Italie. Cette blondeur si recherchée pouvait aussi s’obtenir par la teinture, une infusion de brou de noix, un mélange de vinaigre et d’huile de lentisque ou encore un savon à base de cendre de hêtre et de suie de chèvre. Des esclaves spécialisés s’occupaient des cheveux de leur maîtresse. Les ciniflones pratiquaient la teinture ; les cinerarii laissaient chauffer les aiguilles à friser, appelés calamistrae ; les calamistri disposaient les cheveux en boucles, en les enroulant sur les aiguilles ; enfin les psecades parfumaient la chevelure à l’aide d’une huile de senteur. CONSERVATION

Excellent état : pratiquement intact sauf fragment base, pointe du nez, ébréchures sur oreilles. Surface par endroits encore recouverte de concrétions, par endroits avec patine crème (visage). Taillé dans un seul bloc de marbre. PROVENANCE

Ancienne collection particulière Michele Baranowsky, Asta Numismatica, Milan, vers 1925 ; ancienne collection particulière Y. Forrer, Genève. BIBLIOGRAPHIE

FITTSCHEN K. − ZANKER P., Katalog der römischen Porträts in den kapitolinischen Museen und den anderen kommunalen Sammlungen der Stadt Rom, vol. III, Mainz/Rhine, 1983, pp. 61-63, no. 83. DE KERSAUSON K., Catalogue des portraits romains (Musée du Louvre), Tome II, De l’année de la guerre civile (68-69 apr. J.-C.) à la fin de l’Empire, Paris, 1996, nos. 78-79. 28279

91


RELIEF FUNERAIRE AVEC SCENE D’OFFRANDE

12

Art égyptien, Ancien Empire – Première Période Intermédiaire (env. 2575 - 1994 av. J.-C.) Pierre calcaire peinte Dim : 31 x 134 cm Frise gravée sur une plaque rectangulaire et oblongue, d’une épaisseur d’une dizaine de centimètres, avec les figures travaillées en très bas relief tandis que les inscriptions sont rendues en relief dans le creux. De la polychromie il reste d’amples traces de peinture rouge en particulier sur le corps des hommes. La scène comprend trois parties différentes : à droite, le défunt est assis sur un siège à bas dossier avec les pieds finement taillés et se terminant par des pattes d’animal. Il tient dans ses mains un sceptre (gauche) et une canne et est habillé d’un pagne retenu par une ceinture ; ses cheveux sont simplement coiffés vers l’arrière en longues mèches parallèles, légèrement ondulées. Son importance est soulignée par sa taille, puisqu’il est le personnage le plus grand de l’image malgré sa position assise. Devant lui, trois de ses serviteurs, se dirigeant vers la droite, lui présentent des biens provenant de ses élevages : le premier tient dans ses bras le cuissot d’un bœuf. Il est suivi par un bouvier qui conduit un taureau attaché à une laisse : l’animal, aux cornes en forme de lyre, appartient à une race largement répandue dans l’Egypte ancienne et fréquemment reproduite dans l’iconographie de l’Ancien Empire. La procession est fermée par un gardien des canards qui tient deux oiseaux par les ailes et les soulève pour mieux les montrer à son maître. Les trois personnages, de petite taille, sont habillés et coiffés de la même manière : cheveux courts rendus comme une simple calotte, pagne court avec ceinture et nœud en relief. A gauche de la frise, symétriquement au propriétaire de la tombe, se trouvent trois femmes représentées debout en procession vers la droite. La première, un peu plus grande, est la femme du défunt (elle tient une ombelle fleurie dans la main gauche), suivie de ses deux filles. Sculptées dans une position un peu figée, avec les bras descendant le long du corps, elles portent une robe longue, qui était certainement ornée de détails peints et partiellement incisés. Stylistiquement, même en tenant compte du fait que la scène était enrichie de nombreux détails peints actuellement perdus, la représentation est caractérisée par des formes plutôt simples qui répètent les mêmes schémas (attitudes, visages, habillement, coiffures, etc.). Malgré cette naïveté formelle, les proportions fines et élancées des figures et la clarté de la composition confèrent au relief un charme certain, que le goût esthétique moderne sait apprécier et comprendre. L’inscription, qui se lit de droite à gauche, est gravée sur une ligne au-dessus des serviteurs et entre ceux-ci et les trois femmes (deux lignes et deux colonnes). Elle commence par la formule d’offrande habituelle accordée par le dieu Anubis qui comprend une invocation, du pain et de la bière et indique ensuite le nom du défunt (Khy), de sa femme (TaImat ?) et de ses filles. La partie en colonne est moins claire ; le mot écrit au-dessus du taureau serait en relation avec le terme indiquant un attelage. La scène du défilé des troupeaux et de leur présentation au défunt et propriétaire de la sépulture est un des leitmotivs de l’iconographie funéraire. Elle apparaît sous différentes formes, des plus brèves, comme ici, où un seul animal représente l’ensemble du bétail, aux plus complexes, qui s’articulent sur plusieurs registres et mettent en scènes plusieurs espèces d’animaux et d’oiseaux. Chronologiquement, l’image en examen est à dater de l’Ancien Empire ou de la Première Période Intermédiaire, dont les limites varient selon les archéologues (env. XXVIe au XXe siècles av. J.-C.). CONSERVATION

Fragment conservé rectangulaire comprenant une scène complète et clairement lisible mais partie inférieure droite réassemblée ; ébréchures. Restes de peinture brun-rouge. PROVENANCE

Ancienne collection particulière européenne, acquis en 1992. BIBLIOGRAPHIE

Sur les défilés d’animaux dans les tombes contemporaines : VANDIER J., Manuel d’archéologie égyptienne, Tome V, Bas-reliefs et peintures, scènes de la vie quotidienne, Paris, 1969, pp. 13ff. Pour d’autres scènes funéraires contemporaines : ZIEGLER C., Catalogue des stèles, peintures et reliefs égyptiens de l’Ancien Empire et de la Première Période Intermédiaire, vers 2686-2040 av. J.-C., Paris, 1990.

16129

92


BOUTEILLE AVEC QUATRE FIGURES FEMININES

13

Art sassanide, VIe - VIIe s. apr. J.-C. Argent doré H : 17.2 cm Entièrement fabriqué selon la technique du martelage à froid ; col et fond probablement faits à part et soudés au corps. Motifs décoratifs obtenus soit au repoussé depuis l’intérieur (figures, fleurs, arêtes des alvéoles, etc.) soit par un savant travail d’incisions et de ciselage (détails anatomiques, détails des attributs, étoffes, etc.). La forme du récipient est très simple : un petit pied circulaire soutient le corps ovoïde qui est surmonté d’un col cylindrique. Le bord est vertical et la lèvre angulaire est simple : sa forme est apte à recevoir un couvercle discoïde (attesté sur au moins un autre exemplaire). La décoration, qui est rigidement structurée, occupe tout le corps : la frise, dont le fond est entièrement doré, est divisée verticalement en quatre alvéoles de forme ovale qui contiennent chacune une figure debout ; le sol n’est pas indiqué. Chacune des niches est séparée de l’autre par une architecture non dorée, qui reproduit certainement des constructions contemporaines réelles : doubles colonnes dont la base et le chapiteau sont taillés en forme de sphère, surmontées par des arcs presque semi-circulaires, à peine plus hauts que les personnages. Chaque élément de l’architecture est orné de motifs pointillés ou incisés (rosettes, zigzags, branches de vigne ou lierre, etc.). Une guirlande végétale en haut-relief clôt la zone décorée sur le corps. Les quatre figures féminines représentées sur cette pièce ont une attitude similaire. Elles sont debout et ne portent qu’une longue écharpe enroulée autour de leurs bras, qui passe devant leur corps en couvrant partiellement les jambes et descend jusqu’à leurs chevilles. Leurs mouvements, un peu figés, rappellent un pas de danse : ils sont caractérisés par un léger pas vers l’avant, exécuté sur la pointe des pieds, et par la position élégante des bras pliés ou baissés. Ces jeunes femmes, dont la sensualité est particulièrement mise en évidence (formes arrondies, seins bien rendus, pubis indiqué par une incision en Y), pourraient être des danseuses. Malgré les similitudes typologiques, elles présentent de nombreuses petites différences, principalement dans les attributs qu’elles transportent (armes, instruments, récipients, oiseau, etc.) et dans la direction de leur mouvement (trois parmi elles sont tournées vers la droite, une seule dans l’autre direction). La parure et la coiffure, dont la précision et la richesse sont remarquables, sont les mêmes pour chacune des figures : elles portent un gros collier en chaîne autour du cou et un plus fin, simplement pointillé, qui descend sur le ventre, des bracelets aux poignets et deux autres en grosses perles sur les chevilles. Leur coiffure est très élaborée : le crâne est couvert de mèches lisses retenues par un diadème avec médaillon tandis que sur les côtés les cheveux descendent en une masse épaisse qui cache les oreilles et qui se transforme en longues tresses ondulées, visibles sur les épaules. Derrière la tête de chaque danseuse une aura est représentée en relief ou incisée ; sur leur crâne il y a une sphère. Les visages, qui présentent peu de variations, sont bien rendus mais paraissent un peu figés et stylisés. La richesse en vaisselle d’or et d’argent de la cour sassanide était proverbiale : parmi les formes les plus répandues il y a les plats, les cruches, ainsi que les bouteilles comme la pièce en examen qui constitue un magnifique exemplaire de l’orfèvrerie iranienne de cette période. Stylistiquement et typologiquement, les danseuses appartiennent à un important groupe de figures représentées sur les vases en métal de la fin de l’époque sassanide (Ve-VIIe s. apr. J.-C.) : leurs attitudes sont semblables mais les attributs dont elles sont pourvues présentent d’importantes différences. Certaines sont des musiciennes (flûte de Pan, doubles cornes, castagnettes) tandis que d’autres, comme celles-ci, tiennent différents objets, des animaux ou des végétaux ; le fond de la scène est parfois lisse et simple, dans d’autres cas il est divisé en plusieurs alvéoles par des arêtes ou de véritables éléments architecturaux. On ignore si les variantes iconographiques impliquent que les danseuses représentent différents personnages. Les savants ont parfois essayé d’expliquer ces images, dont l’iconographie évoque parfois le monde dionysiaque, comme des prêtresses d’Anahita (divinité zoroastrienne de l’eau et de la fertilité, partiellement assimilée à Dionysos), ou comme des personnifications des quatre saisons, inspirées de l’art romain. Aujourd’hui on a tendance à leur attribuer une signification séculaire plutôt que religieuse, en relation surtout avec les banquets qui se déroulaient à la cour sassanide, lors desquels la vaisselle en métal précieux était utilisée pour le service de table : peut-être ces représentations faisaient-elles surtout référence à la richesse et à l’abondance.

93


13 Les Sassanides régnèrent sur l’Iran de 224 (fin de la domination des rois parthes) jusqu’à l’invasion arabe de 651. Cette période constitue un âge d’or pour l’histoire de l’Iran : l’Empire sassanide s’étendait sur tout le Proche-Orient tel qu’on l’entend encore actuellement (Iran, Irak, Arménie, Caucase méridional, Asie centrale méridionale, Afghanistan occidental, partie du Pakistan, régions orientales de la Turquie, territoires de la Syrie, partie de la péninsule Arabique). Sous de nombreux aspects, cette période représente l’accomplissement au plus haut degré de la civilisation de la Perse antique juste avant la conquête musulmane et la conséquente adoption de la doctrine de Mahomet. L’influence culturelle des Sassanides s’étendit bien au-delà du Proche-Orient pour atteindre l’Europe de l’ouest, l’Afrique, le Moyen et l’ExtrêmeOrient et joua un rôle dans la formation non seulement de la culture et la civilisation islamique naissante, mais aussi de l’art byzantin, asiatique et de l’Europe du haut Moyen Age. CONSERVATION

Entier et pratiquement intact ; par endroits parois percés par de minuscules petits trous (partie inférieure). Décoration parfaitement conservée. PROVENANCE

Anciennement propriété de Y. Molayern, Londres, années 1960 ; ancienne collection particulière, Genève, Suisse, acquis à Londres en 1968 ; ancienne collection M. J. L., 1980 ; ancienne collection particulière suisse, acquis auprès de M. J. L. en 1993. BIBLIOGRAPHIE

Sur l’argenterie sassanide et les bouteilles de ce type : GUNTER A.C. – JETT P., Ancient Iranian Metalwork in the A. M. Sackler Gallery and the Freer Gallery of Art, Washington, 1992, pp. 185-201, nos. 32-36. In pursuit of the Absolute, Art of the Ancient World, The G. Ortiz Collection, London, 1994, no. 244. Les Perses sassanides : Fastes d’un empire oublié (224-642), Paris, 2006, pp. 70-137. VON BOTHMER D. (ed.), Glories of the Past, Ancient Art from the S. White and L. Lévy Collection, New York, 1990, pp. 60-62, nos. 44-45.

28662

94


STATUETTE REPRESENTANT UN GUERRIER PORTANT UN LONG PAGNE

14

Art cananéen, première moitié du IIe mill. av. J.-C. Bronze H : 27.5 cm Coulée en bronze massif, la statuette est dépourvue de véritable base mais présente sous chaque pied une petite surface rectangulaire, légèrement décalée entre gauche et droite à cause de la position des jambes. Le personnage représenté est un guerrier, certainement masculin, aux proportions plutôt élancées et sveltes (l’accentuation de la poitrine, bien attestée sur d’autres figures comparables, sert probablement à décrire ces guerriers comme figures athlétiques). Il est vêtu uniquement d’un long pagne, qui lui arrive jusqu’aux genoux, et d’une ceinture très haute avec fermeture antérieure, qui serre sa taille; le bord vertical du pagne est richement orné d’un motif géométrique en léger relief. Sa parure se limite à un grand collier à trois rangées. Sur la tête l’homme porte un haut casque conique et pointu. Le guerrier se tient debout, dans l’attitude frontale et un peu raide typique de ces statuettes, encore accentuée par sa minceur et par ses formes linéaires et géométriques. Il avance légèrement la jambe gauche et plie ses bras vers le spectateur, les mains serrées en poing: ses attributs, très probablement un sceptre et une arme ou deux armes (une hache, une lance, un bouclier, une massue), n’ont pas laissé de traces. Un poignard à manche en demi-lune est fixé à la ceinture et porté en diagonale sur la poitrine. La tête est arrondie, avec un visage plein, à l’expression un peu naïve où le bronzier a mis en évidence surtout les organes exprimant les sens: oreilles verticales et allongées, grands yeux circulaires, nez pointu et proéminent, bouche fine mais large; un petit trait vertical orne le menton. Les pieds paraissent nus mais aucun détail des orteils n’est visible. Du point de vue stylistique on notera le contraste entre les formes plus arrondies et plastiques des jambes et de la tête tandis que torse et pagne sont plats avec les détails exprimés surtout en relief. Typologiquement la statuette en examen est un très bel exemple des figurines du groupe IV (Orontes Figurines) du classement proposé par H. Seeden, qui comprend des images masculines et féminines généralement de guerriers, habillées d’un pagne et portant un haut couvre-chef, souvent conique et pointu. Un grand nombre de statuettes en bronze comme celle en examen ont été produites par les bronziers levantins et le plus souvent dédiées dans les sanctuaires du monde syro-palestinien et de l’Anatolie nord-orientale, surtout au courant de tout le IIe millénaire avant notre ère. Leur distribution géographique est également très large, puisque de telles figurines ont été mises au jour aussi en Mésopotamie et sur de nombreux sites côtiers méditerranéens, jusqu’en Espagne. Elles présentent une grande variété qualitative – qui dépendait des conditions économiques du dédiant – de dimensions et de techniques: généralement en bronze massif, certaines étaient recouvertes d’une plaque de métal précieux martelé (or, argent), d’autres étaient incrustées ou composites, avec des parties faites en différents matériaux (ivoire, métal précieux, pierre, etc.). La plupart parmi elles reproduisent des divinités guerrières, le plus souvent de sexe masculins, portant un bouclier, une épée, un poignard, une hache, etc., et avec les bras pliés, comme ici, ou soulevés, etc. L’interprétation des statuettes levantines en bronze n’est pas assurée, mais les archéologues pensent qu’il pouvait s’agir de figures de divinités (Baal en particulier) ou d’anciens souverains et rois divinisés et devenus objets de culte dans des sanctuaires souvent locaux; ces statuettes étaient généralement votives. CONSERVATION

Complet et en très bon état, à l’exception des armes qui sont perdues et des yeux qui étaient probablement rapportés. Surface un peu bosselée, conservant quelques traces de patine verte et des concrétions. PROVENANCE

Ancienne collection particulière anglaise, années 1980. BIBLIOGRAPHIE

MATTHIAE P., La storia dell’arte dell’Oriente Antico: gli stati territoriali, 2100-1600 a.C., Milan, 2000, pp. 202ff. NEGBI O., Canaanite Gods in Metal, Tel-Aviv, 1976. SEEDEN H., The Standing Armed Figurines in the Levant (PBF I, 1), Munich, 1980, pp. 23-35 (v. surtout pl. 23-27).

22537

95


STATUETTE DE PAN PORTANT UN BATON DE CHASSE ET UN SAC

15

Art gréco-romain, environ 1er s. av. J.-C. - 1er s. apr. J.-C. Bronze H : 11.3 cm Mi-homme mi-bouc, Pan apparaît ici coiffé de cornes et tenant dans sa main droite levée son attribut habituel, un bâton de jet, ou lagobolon, utilisé pour chasser le lapin, l’un de ses animaux favoris. Dans sa main gauche il porte un petit sac, peut-être pour y ranger sa proie. Pan était connu pour ses prouesses à chasser le petit plutôt que le gros gibier, généralement réservé à Artémis, déesse de la chasse. En raison des liens étroits entre Pan et le dieu Hermès, son père, le sac peut également faire référence aux images de ce dernier, souvent représenté avec un sac d’argent. Cette statuette, de petite taille mais imposante, représente Pan dans une attitude très animée; elle faisait peut-être partie d’un groupe sculptural ou servait d’ex-voto dans un sanctuaire dédié au dieu. Cette œuvre est très finement détaillée malgré ses dimensions réduites. Le visage expressif de Pan, ses oreilles pointues, sa barbe en bataille, ses cuisses, sa queue et ses sabots velus, ainsi que son torse musclé, sont clairement décrits. D’origine grecque, le nom Pan dérive de Paoni, un mot signifiant «gardien des troupeaux», un terme décrivant précisément la fonction de ce dieu dans le monde pastoral. En tant que tel, il protège les bergers qui sacrifient des enfants, des boucs ou des moutons en son honneur, et lui consacrent des statuettes de bergers. Fils d’Hermès et de la nymphe Dryops, il habitait dans les terres montagneuses et isolées d’Arcadie. Là, il devint un dieu national de la région, et fut même représenté sur le revers des pièces de Zeus Lycaeus émises par la Ligue arcadienne. Il était connu pour vivre dans de vastes régions montagneuses et isolées, où il veillait sur ses troupeaux; des sanctuaires et des temples furent construits pour lui rendre hommage. Au début du Ve siècle av. J.-C., la renommée et la vénération de Pan se propagèrent jusqu’en Béotie et en Attique, pour gagner ensuite le reste du monde grec. Au Ve siècle, il se rendit célèbre aux yeux des Grecs en s’alliant à eux pendant la bataille de Marathon, au cours de laquelle il contribua à leur victoire en instillant la peur, ou la panique dans l’armée perse, contrainte à reculer et à la défaite (voir Hérodote, Histoires, VI, 105 -106). Malgré l’importance de Pan dans la piété populaire, les statuettes en bronze le représentant sont peu nombreuses. Leur typologie, le plus souvent pittoresque et joyeuse, et leur style, un peu cru et réaliste, s’inscrivent parfaitement dans les caractéristiques du personnage: il est habituellement représenté comme un démon, mi-homme mi-animal; son visage barbu au menton saillant a une expression de ruse bestiale. Son front est orné de deux cornes, ses oreilles sont pointues, son corps est velu; des pattes de bouc remplacent les jambes humaines et des sabots fendus les pieds. Il est doué d’une grande agilité et d’une grande rapidité ainsi que d’une activité sexuelle considérable, puisqu’il poursuit avec une égale passion les nymphes et les jeunes garçons. Ses attributs sont la syrinx, le bâton de jet (le lagobolon) et un rameau de pin. Dans l’Hymne homérique à Pan, les Grecs associaient ce dieu avec le mot pan, qui signifie «tout», d’où il a été identifié à l’époque romaine comme le dieu universel de tous. L’Hymne de Pan relate plus particulièrement l’histoire de sa présentation par Hermès aux dieux de l’Olympe, après que sa propre mère se fut enfuie, effrayée par son apparence monstrueuse: «Mais, aussitôt, le très bienveillant Hermès, se réjouissait beaucoup dans son âme (...) et il se rendit promptement aux demeures des Immortels, ayant enveloppé l’enfant dans la fourrure épaisse d’un lièvre montagnard. Il s’assit auprès de Zeus et des autres Immortels, et il leur montra son fils. Tous les Immortels se réjouirent dans leur cœur, et Dionysos surtout fut charmé. Et ils le nommèrent Pan, parce qu’il les avait tous charmés.» CONSERVATION

Statuette complète et en excellente condition ; usures superficielles. Surface brun foncé en grande partie recouverte d’une belle patine verte. PROVENANCE

Ancienne collection particulière européenne, années 1980 ; ancienne collection particulière japonaise, acquis en 1993. BIBLIOGRAPHIE

Quelques parallèles : COMSTOCK M. – VERMEULE C., Greek, Etruscan and Roman Bronzes in the Fine Arts Museum, Boston, Boston, 1971, p. 73, no. 75. KENT HILL D., Catalogue of Classical Bronze Sculpture in the Walters Art Gallery, Baltimore, 1949, pp. 39-40, pl. 19, nos. 77-79. KOZLOFF M. – MITTEN G., The Gods Delight, The Human Figure in Classical Time, Cleveland, 1988, pp. 142-147, no. 23. Sur Pan en général, v.: Lexicon iconographicum Mythologiae Classicae (LIMC), vol. VIII, Zurich-Munich, 1997, s.v. Pan, pp. 923-941.

21740

96


STATUETTE MASCULINE REPRESENTANT UN ROI DIVINISE OU UN DIEU

16

Art syro-anatolien, IXe − VIIe s. av. J.-C. Bronze H : 6 cm La figurine est remarquable par la précision et le nombre de détails incisés, qui caractérisent sa tête, son visage et son habillement, surtout en tenant compte de sa taille miniature. Elle est en fonte pleine et faisait probablement partie d’un groupe comprenant d’autres images et peut-être des animaux. L’homme est représenté debout, les pieds joints, dans une position un peu figée, puisque (les avant-bras mis à part) la statuette est presque entièrement inscrite dans un cylindre mince et long: malgré la présence de nombreux détails et de formes modelées aussi dans le dos, l’image a été sculptée pour être vue de face. Ses bras sont pliés à angle droit et dirigés vers le spectateur, mais les attributs que l’homme tenait ne sont plus identifiables : celui de droite est entièrement perdu, tandis qu’il ne reste qu’un fragment de fil de bronze tordu de l’objet que la figurine serrait dans sa main gauche. L’habillement, composé de deux pièces, correspond à une mode bien attestée dans les premiers siècles du Ier millénaire av. J.-C. dans le monde assyrien et anatolien, qui est fréquente aussi pour de nombreuses images royales. L’homme porte une robe à manches, longue et étroite se terminant par une frange juste au-dessus des pieds. Un châle sillonné de lignes verticales couvre son épaule gauche et une partie du torse (où il est retenu par une ceinture) et passe ensuite sous l’aisselle opposée. Le couvre-chef, de forme cylindrique et plate, orné d’un bouton au centre de la tête, descend bas sur la nuque; une paire de cornes décorent la partie antérieure, juste au-dessus de la frange. L’homme portait les cheveux longs, mais de la chevelure on ne voit qu’une couronne en haut du dos, le reste étant caché par le couvre-chef. La barbe est longue mais parfaitement soignée et coiffée : dans la partie supérieure, elle laisse dégagées les joues et la bouche mais descend ensuite sur le menton et dessine un ample rectangle aux mèches incisées verticalement et horizontalement. La signification de cette statuette demeure énigmatique : la présence de la tiare à corne (un couvre-chef répandu dans tout le Proche-Orient depuis au moins le IIIe millénaire av. J.-C., qui pouvait prendre plusieurs formes, conique, sphérique ou cylindrique et être pourvue de différentes paires de cornes suivant l’importance de son propriétaire) inscrit d’emblée la figure représentée dans le cadre du surhumain : il s’agit certainement d’un dieu ou peut-être d’un roi divinisé. Mais malheureusement, aucun autre élément ne permet d’en savoir davantage avec précision: si le fil de bronze conservé appartenait aux rênes d’un attelage, on pourrait imaginer que l’homme est en train de conduire un char, probablement de parade, vu son attitude statique. La position jointe des jambes et des pieds est favorable à cette hypothèse et tend en même temps à exclure que le personnage se tenait debout sur un animal, comme le font de nombreuses figures divines contemporaines, qui, pour garder leur équilibre sur le dos d’un animal, sont obligées d’avancer un pied. Parmi d’autres suggestions on peut éventuellement imaginer que le fil représentait un fragment d’une branche végétale ou une partie déformée d’un arc. Stylistiquement la statuette possède de bons parallèles dans l’iconographie du monde syro-anatolien du début du Ier millénaire av. J.-C. (proportions, attitude, habillement, etc.), parmi lesquels on peut indiquer en particulier les statuettes de Londres BM 91147 et 1951,0606.2 et celle du Louvre trouvée à Mossul, qui représentent des dieux inconnus. CONSERVATION

Complet mais main droite perdue, fils lacunaires. Surface recouverte d’une belle patine verte uniforme. PROVENANCE

Ancienne collection particulière anglaise ; acquis à Londres en 1994. BIBLIOGRAPHIE

Les deux bronzes du British Museum et du Louvre : KYRIELEIS H., Orientalische Bronzen aus Samos in Archäologischer Anzeiger, 1969, pp. 166-171 (London, British Mus. 1951,0606.2). SPICKET A., La statuaire du Proche-Orient ancient, Leiden-Cologne, 1981, p. 382, pl. 244 (Louvre de Mossul) ; pl. 245 (British Mus., BM 91147). Sur les bronze ourartéens : MERHAV. R. (ed.), Urartu, A metalworking Center in the first Millennium B.C., Jerusalem, 1991. WARTKE R.-B., Urartu, Das Reich am Ararat, Mainz/Rhine, 1993.

23348

97


PORTRAIT D’UN CONTEMPORAIN DE L’EMPEREUR GALLIEN

17

Art romain, environ 250 - 270 apr. J.-C. Marbre H : 30 cm Tête d’un homme d’âge mûr, taillée grandeur nature dans du marbre à grain fin. Au travers notamment d’une petite cassure moderne au niveau du cou, on imagine volontiers à quel point il devait être beau d’apprécier sa quasi translucidité à l’époque. Aujourd’hui couverte d’une usure quasi uniforme due à son exposition prolongée à l’extérieur, on contemple avec admiration ces marques du temps qui confèrent à la sculpture ce charme si particulier car témoignant des périodes qu’ont su traverser les œuvres de l’Antiquité. Le visage est de forme ovale et allongée, et présente des pommettes légèrement rebondies. La bouche offre des lèvres régulières et finement modelées, mais la lèvre supérieure est marquée en son milieu par un creux prononcé qui accentue la forme arquée de la bouche pointant vers l’avant. Les yeux sont grands ouverts, en forme d’amande, surmontés par une fine paupière. La pupille ainsi que l’iris sont clairement sculptés et définis ; un contour gravé indique l’un, alors qu’un creux concentrique marque l’autre. Le regard est clairement dirigé vers le haut et la droite. Les arcades sourcilières sont prononcées et surplombent le creux des yeux. Les sourcils, pour ce qu’il en reste de perceptible, devaient être denses et finement incisés. A la fossette reliant le nez aux lèvres fait écho un creux marquant le haut du menton dont le modelé arrondi ressort d’autant plus. Une barbe courte mais ondoyante couvre le bas du visage sous la forme de petites coquillettes denses et recroquevillées. Les oreilles sont parfaitement modelées et détaillées de l’intérieur vers l’extérieur. Les cheveux sont denses et ondulants. Organisés en mèches sur le devant, ils forment des boucles sur l’arrière de la tête. Le traitement général de cette sculpture ainsi que ses caractéristiques nous permettent de situer cette tête sculptée comme une production sous le règne de l’empereur Gallien. En effet, de nombreuses similitudes typologiques corroborent cette datation: le type de chevelure, celui de la barbe, la formation générale et la direction adoptée par les yeux ou encore la forme de la bouche. Ces différents éléments nous permettent effectivement de relier ce portrait aux modèles connus de sculptures officielles faites de l’empereur Gallien. Ce qui l’en distinguent en revanche, ce sont la forme générale plutôt ovale de notre sculpture et non carrée ou massive, caractéristique de l’empereur ; ou encore l’expression du regard assez vide ainsi qu’une moue plutôt quelconque de la bouche en ce qui concerne l’exemplaire en examen, au contraire des portraits officiels marqués par des traits physionomiques, un regard et une moue véritablement déterminés. A la vue de ces divergences, on peut en conclure que nous sommes ici en présence du portrait d’un notable qui souhaitait être représenté «à la manière» de l’empereur alors en place, à savoir Publius Licinius Egnatius Gallienus, fils de l’empereur Valérien, dont le règne dura de 253 à 268 apr. J.-C. CONSERVATION

Tête sculptée complète, coupée irrégulièrement au niveau du cou. Sculpture en bon état de conservation, hormis son usure générale due à son exposition à l’extérieur. Quelques ébréchures ou coups sont à signaler, au niveau de l’arcade sourcilière gauche, l’extrémité du nez, le menton, l’arrière de l’oreille droite et l’arrière de la tête. PROVENANCE

Ancienne collection particulière Michele Baranowsky, Asta Numismatica, Milan, vers 1925 ; ancienne collection particulière Y. Forrer, Genève. BIBLIOGRAPHIE

BERGMANN M., Studien zum Römischen Porträts des 3. Jahrhunderts n. Chr., Bonn, 1977. DE KERSAUSON K., Catalogue des portraits romains (Musée du Louvre), Tome II, De l’année de la guerre civile (68-69 apr. J.-C.) à la fin de l’Empire, Paris, 1996 (v. Gallien nos. 227, 228 et 229, et plus particulièrement v. nos. 230 et 231, «Inconnu autrefois dit Gallien», pp. 482-491). FITTSCHEN K. – ZANKER P., Katalog des römischen Porträts in den Capitolinischen Museen und den anderen kommunalen Sammlungen der Stadt Rom, Band I : Kaiser- und Prinzenbildnisse, Mainz/Rhine, 1994, nos. 112-115, pp. 134-139 et pl. 139-142. JOHANSEN F., Roman Portraits III, Catalogue, Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek, Copenhagen, 1995, nos. 51 et 53, pp. 124-125 et 128-129.

24421

98


ALABASTRE ILLUSTRANT UNE SCENE DE FILAGE

18

Art grec (Attique), deuxième quart du Ve s. av. J.-C. Céramique H : 18.9 cm Récipient de forme élancée, au corps étiré, goulot légèrement rétréci et embouchure évasée et plate ; la base est arrondie. Deux petits tenons, sortes d’anses miniatures aujourd’hui disparues, se trouvaient au départ de la panse sur le haut du vase. Ce type de flacon est appelé «alabastre» et servait à contenir de l’huile parfumée. Son décor est peint selon la technique dite de la figure rouge, inventée à Athènes à la fin du VIe siècle av. J.-C. La scène illustrée est en effet en «réservé», c’est-à-dire que la couleur de l’argile elle-même, rouge, apparaît entre les contours tracés en vernis noir des personnages figurés. En accord avec la structure du vase, l’embouchure est dépourvue de décor, mais l’intérieur ainsi que le pourtour extérieur de la lèvre sont vernissés noir. Le col ainsi que la base de l’alabastre sont également peints. Deux scènes figurées occupent ainsi la partie étirée de la panse de l’alabastre, d’un côté et de l’autre. Chaque scène se trouve entourée en dessus et en dessous par une bande ornementale présentant une frise de méandres (double en haut, et simple en bas). De même, sur les côtés, deux bandes ornées de losanges séparent les scènes qui pourtant sont liées thématiquement. Sur la face A, un tissu est suspendu au-dessus d’une jeune femme assise sur une chaise à haut dossier (klismos). Vêtue d’un chiton, elle porte également un manteau qui passe sur son épaule gauche pour retomber vers le bas. Sa coiffure est nouée en un chignon enveloppé d’un tissu, et une couronne ou diadème ceint sa tête. Ses avant-bras sont dénudés ainsi que ses pieds. La face B présente également une jeune femme vêtue de manière identique et couronnée, mais sans le tissu recouvrant son chignon; elle a l’air plus jeune. Elle se tient debout et porte une boîte (pyxis) dans ses bras, qu’elle semble apporter à l’autre personnage. A ses pieds se trouve un haut panier communément appelé un kalathos. Sur la face A, un dernier détail primordial, en surpeint, est assez effacé, mais on parvient néanmoins à en suivre le tracé. Grâce à cela, il nous est possible d’identifier clairement les deux scènes illustrées qui ensemble réunissent plusieurs éléments caractéristiques : il s’agit d’une maîtresse de maison ainsi que de sa servante ou plus probablement de sa fille au vu de sa parure et des vêtements identiques, en train de s’adonner au filage de la laine. Le vase pourrait dès lors avoir été conçu en l’honneur de la jeune fille. Le fil est suspendu depuis la main gauche du personnage principal, la mère, en direction de son pied, alors que de sa main droite elle file la laine sur le dessus de sa cuisse. Malgré l’effacement d’une partie de ce décor, on peut supposer que sa cuisse est certainement couverte par une tuile demi-cylindrique fermée à une extrémité, appelée epinetron (επινητρον en grec ancien). Bloquée au genou, cette protection en céramique peinte servait non seulement à protéger la cuisse de la jeune femme de toute salissure, mais aussi la surface rugueuse facilitait le filage. De nombreuses découvertes archéologiques l’attestent, de même que plusieurs représentations de scènes similaires. Quant à la face B, on peut en déduire que la boîte apportée est destinée à conserver les productions tissées, alors que le kalathos est prêt à recueillir les pelotes de laine – comme cela est souvent détaillé sur d’autres représentations similaires. Au vu de la qualité d’exécution et du soin apporté à l’ensemble de ces deux scènes et grâce à d’autres parallèles connus, il nous est possible de situer la production de ce vase en Attique, dans le deuxième quart du Ve siècle av. J.-C. CONSERVATION

Vase entier, si ce n’est la perte des deux petits tenons latéraux. Bon état de conservation ; quelques petites concrétions ; ébréchures au niveau de l’embouchure. Effacement d’une petite partie du décor de la face A, mais la lisibilité est néanmoins possible grâce aux incisions du dessin préparatoire. PROVENANCE

Ancienne collection suisse constituée dans les années 1960-1970. BIBLIOGRAPHIE

Sur la thématique du filage de la laine et de l’utilisation de l’epinetron, v. : PEKRIDOU-GORECKI A., Come vestivano i Greci, Milano, 1993, pp. 16-17 et 141, figs. 3-6. Pour des exemplaires d’epinetron en terre cuite, à figures noires ou encore à figures rouges : Voir les sites du British Museum (inv. 1886,0310.11 et 1906,0314.4), du Metropolitan Museum of Art (inv. 06.1021.52 et 10.210.13) ou encore l’exemplaire du National Archaeological Museum of Athens (inv. 1629). L’exemplaire du Musée du Louvre lie l’outil à l’imagerie puisqu’un des côtés de l’epinetron (inv. MNC 624) présente une scène domestique du travail de la laine par plusieurs jeunes femmes.

27050

99


STATUETTE REPRESENTANT LA DEESSE NEITH

19

Art égyptien, Basse Epoque ou Période Ptolémaïque (env. VIIe – Ier s. av. J.-C.) Bronze, dorure pour les yeux H : 23 cm Statuette en fonte pleine, probablement faite d’un seul tenant avec le socle. Socle rectangulaire et creux, pourvu de deux tenons verticaux qui s’inséraient dans la base d’origine ou peut-être au sommet d’une crosse pour exposer la figure lors de processions. L’inscription, incomplète, est gravée sur le bord du socle et mentionne le nom de la déesse : elle commence près de l’extrémité du côté gauche et occupe ensuite toute la face antérieure. Elle peut être traduite ainsi : «Que Neith accorde la vie à Apis, qui est le fils de…» La déesse est représentée selon une de ses iconographies habituelles : debout sur le socle, elle marche en avançant le pied gauche. Son bras droit descend le long du corps tandis que le gauche est légèrement plié et dirigé vers le spectateur : dans les poings serrés mais percés par une cavité, elle tenait vraisemblablement ses emblèmes, le symbole de vie ankh ou, plus difficilement, deux flèches croisées et un arc (main droite) et le sceptre ouas (éventuellement le sceptre ouadji) ; sur le socle on voit encore l’attache de la longue tige verticale. Revêtue d’une robe longue jusqu’aux chevilles et très moulante, qui laisse deviner les formes sensuelles et bien modelées de son corps de jeune femme, Neith porte son couvre-chef habituel : la couronne rouge decheret, de la Basse Egypte, de forme cylindrique, ornée par une tige à spirale. Ni bijoux ni parures n’ornent le corps ou le vêtement de Neith : en revanche ses yeux sont exceptionnellement rendus par une couche de dorure (qui est encore bien visible) qui remplace l’argent normalement utilisé pour certaines statuettes contemporaines. Artistiquement cette image est d’un très bon niveau, avec des formes bien modelées et arrondies que l’on peut admirer sur la poitrine, sur le ventre, sur les cuisses et dans le dos. Le visage est caractérisé par des yeux en forme d’amande, le petit nez à la pointe arrondie et les lèvres qui amorcent un léger sourire, fréquent sur les figures égyptiennes de cette période. Ce style, qui laisse déjà transparaître une certaine influence de la tradition et des formes grecques, indique que la pièce a été faite à la Basse Epoque ou pendant la Période ptolémaïque. Il est probable que (comme beaucoup de représentations contemporaines de divinités en bronze) cette figurine ait servi d’offrande votive dans un sanctuaire officiel (en particulier à Saïs pour Neith) ou comme objet de culte privé, placé sur un autel domestique. L’existence de nombreuses images contemporaines de cette déesse prouve que l’importance de Neith s’est considérablement accrue au Ier millénaire, surtout à partir de la XXVIe dynastie, dont les souverains étaient originaires de Saïs. Son culte est néanmoins très ancien puisque attesté déjà à l’époque thinite : elle était une divinité primordiale considérée comme un démiurge féminin, qui selon la tradition, aurait créé la Terre, l’Egypte, l’astre solaire et la lumière en prononçant sept paroles ou au moyen de sept flèches. Outre à Saïs (ville située dans la partie occidentale du delta du Nil), siège de son sanctuaire d’origine, elle fut adorée aussi à Esna (en Haute-Egypte, au sud de Luxor). Ses domaines d’influence sont multiples et variés : associée à Isis, Nephthys et Selqet elle fait partie des quatre pleureuses représentées près du sarcophage dans les scènes funéraires (cf. aussi les Textes des Pyramides) ; dans les cultes et les traditions populaires elle assume également le rôle de patronne du tissage ; comme protectrice du Soleil et des défunts, elle apparaît parfois sous l’aspect de la vache Hésat portant le disque solaire entre ses cornes, etc. CONSERVATION

Complète et en très bon état. Attributs et tige verticale spiralée de la couronne perdus. Surface légèrement usée, recouverte de patine verte par endroits virant au bleu. Possibles petits rebouchages. Restes de dorure dans les yeux. PROVENANCE

Ancienne collection particulière israélienne, constituée dans les années 1960 ; pourvu d’une licence d'exportation israélienne. BIBLIOGRAPHIE

Sur cette déesse, v. : EL-SAYED R., La Déesse Neith de Saïs, Cairo, 1982. Quelques parallèles, v. : HILL M. (ed.), Offrande aux dieux d’Egypte, Martigny, 2008, pp. 108-109, no. 37. JORGENSEN M., Catalogue Egypt V, Egyptian Bronzes, Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek, Copenhagen, 2009, pp. 136-140, nos. 45.1-3. PAGE-GASSER M. – WIESE A.B., Egypte, Moments d’éternité, Art égyptien dans les collections privées, Suisse, Mainz/Rhine, 1997, pp. 267ff., no. 179. SCHOSKE S. – WILDUNG D., Gott und Götter im alten Ägypten, Mainz/Rhine, 1992, pp. 149-150, no. 103.

27634

100


RHYTON AVEC PROTOME DE BOUQUETIN

20

Art anatolien (Phrygie), VIe - IVe s. av. J.-C. ou Epoque Hellénistique Céramique peinte H : 20 cm - Long : 22 cm Récipient constitué de deux éléments distincts : la partie postérieure en forme de corne haute et étroite est pliée à angle droit et se transforme en protomé d’animal (avant-train, cou et tête) modelé en forme de bouquetin (ou bouc ?) assis, aux pattes repliées sous le corps. D’après les traces visibles à l’intérieur du vase, l’élément postérieur semble fait au tour, tandis que le protomé a certainement été achevé à la main ; modelées à part, la tête et les cornes du bouquetin ont été soudées avant la cuisson. A l’exception de la tête, le reste du vase est entièrement creux. Terre cuite beige rosé, dure, pas très épurée ; peinture blanche sur le protomé et le haut de la corne ; la partie centrale de la corne est peinte en brun-rouge. Décorations brun-noir et brun-rouge superposées au blanc. Le vase présente deux ouvertures : la plus grande, en haut de la corne, servait au remplissage et était certainement circulaire ; le trou pour l’écoulement du contenu est un simple petit trou visible sur l’encolure, entre les pattes de l’animal, que l’on pouvait boucher avec un doigt. Ce dispositif permettait de contrôler très facilement la quantité de liquide à verser du récipient. Malgré une stylisation importante (cou et corps de l’animal sont de simples cylindres, sans indications de détails anatomiques ou modelage de la musculature), la forme du protomé permet de reconnaître un capriné dans l’animal représenté : il s’agit certainement d’un bouc ou d’un bouquetin, comme le prouvent surtout le museau pointu et les longues cornes arquées. Le capriné redresse son cou et garde sa tête droite, l’air attentif. Les pattes antérieures sont de longues et minces tiges se terminant par un sabot : elles sont repliées de façon à servir comme point d’appui pour le vase, qui pouvait ainsi garder un équilibre précaire. Seule la tête présente des détails plastiques, comme les petites oreilles pointues, les arcades sourcilières, les narines et le contour saillant des mâchoires. La pointe des cornes est collée au centre du corps du rhyton, sans doute dans le but de les rendre un peu moins fragiles. Les motifs, peints plutôt sommairement, comprennent quelques éléments soulignant l’anatomie du capriné (zone des yeux, plis de la peau au niveau du museau, oreilles) mais ont un caractère surtout fantaisiste et un but décoratif évident. Zigzags, traits de différente épaisseur, lignes ondulées, motifs tirés du domaine végétal sont complètement étrangers au pelage de l’animal et ne servent qu’à remplir et embellir l’espace à décorer. Ce rhyton appartient à un petit groupe de récipients connus depuis plusieurs décennies dont le classement est encore sujet à discussion parmi les spécialistes : si leur provenance du centre de l’Asie Mineure (on parle d’ateliers situés génériquement en Phrygie) semble acquise, la chronologie qui leur est attribuée oscille selon les archéologues entre le VIe et le Vesiècle (v. K. Tuchelt et O.W. Muscarella) et l’époque hellénistique (v. C. Dunant, H. Jucker et W. Hornbostel : le fond blanc ainsi que certains motifs de la décoration empruntés au domaine végétal sont typiques de différentes céramiques hellénistiques, comme les vases de type lagynos par exemple). Parmi les meilleurs parallèles il faut mentionner les rhyta de taille, forme et décoration très similaires, découverts à Amisos du Pont (l’antique Samsoun, dans l’actuelle Turquie, Musée archéologique d’Istanbul ; exemplaires reproduisant le même protomé de capriné), le rhyton représentant un cheval avec cavalier (Genève, Musée d’art et d’histoire) et celui en forme de cervidé (Hambourg, coll. W. Kropatscheck). Techniquement, ce groupe de récipients présente de nombreuses analogies (qualité de la céramique, même polychromie, répertoire décoratif similaire) avec d’autres rhyta anatoliens : il s’agit soit de vases entièrement modelés en forme d’animal (boucs, canards, trouvés à Amisos) soit de récipients reproduisant seulement la tête d’un animal, le plus souvent un bovidé (v. par exemple Hambourg, coll. W. Kropatscheck et Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe ; Karlsruhe, Badisches Landesmuseum ; ancienne collection E. Brummer ; Louvre, inv. CA 1884). Il faut également souligner la parenté entre ces exemplaires en terre cuite et les rhyta en métal précieux (or, argent mais aussi bronze) à sujet le plus souvent animalier, produits d’abord dans le monde achéménide et ensuite rapidement imités dans différentes régions du monde antique et en d’autres matériaux. Le rhyton est un récipient bien attesté dans le panorama de différentes cultures antiques. Les premiers rhyta connus sont ceux de Tell Halaf (Syrie, VIe - Ve millénaire av. J.-C.), mais la forme s’est vite répandue en Mésopotamie, en Egypte, dans les cultures égéennes de l’âge du Bronze (Crète, Mycènes) et ensuite à l’époque historique, en passant de nouveau par l’Anatolie et les colonies de Grèce orientale, dans la civilisation classique grecque et romaine. Le nom, qui est d’origine grecque (ρυτον = «vase à boire»), désigne un vase apte à contenir des liquides, qui était le plus souvent utilisé pour faire des libations ou comme vaisselle de table pour les banquets. Il est souvent pourvu de deux ouvertures, une, situé vers l’arrière, pour remplir le récipient, et l’autre plus petite, percée dans la partie antérieure, servant à verser le liquide avec précision.

101


20 CONSERVATION

Bonne conservation générale mais recollé et fragmentaire (manquent: partie supérieure du goulot, corne gauche, patte droite, fragments). Peinture en bon état, par endroits écaillée, déteinte ou effacée. PROVENANCE

Ancienne collection Maurice Boss, Genève, Suisse ; ancienne collection du Dr. L., Suisse, acquis en 1964. BIBLIOGRAPHIE

En général sur le sujet, v. : TUCHELT K., Tiergefässe in Kopf- und Protomengestalt, Untersuchungen zur Formgeschichte tierförmiger Giessgefässe, Berlin, 1962, pp. 64-68 et 90-94. D’autres parallèles : DUNANT C., Rhyton d’Asie mineure à protomé de cavalier, in Genava 25, 1977, pp. 213-220. HORNBOSTEL W. (ed.), Aus Gräber und Heiligtümer, Die Antikensammlung Walter Kropatscheck, Mainz/Rhine, 1980, pp. 14-18. HORNBOSTEL W. (ed.), Kunst der Antike, Schätze aus Norddeutschem Privatbesitz, Mainz/Rhine, 1977, pp. 208-211. JUCKER H., Ein Becher der weissgrundigen Lagynosgattung, in Mansel’e Armagan (Mélanges Mansel), vol. 1, Ankara, 1974, pp. 475ff (v. surtout p. 476, note 6). MUSCARELLA O.W., Ancient Art, The Norbert Schimmel Collection, Mainz/Rhin, 1974, no. 135. MUSCARELLA O.W., Ladders to Heaven, Art Treasures from Lands of the Bible, Jerusalem, 1981, pp. 169-170. The Ernest Brummer Collection, vol. II : Ancient Art, Zurich, 1979, pp. 356-357.

14989

102


BUSTE DE L’IMPERATRICE SABINE

21

Art romain, environ 130 apr. J.-C. Marbre H : 58 cm Ce buste en marbre représente Sabine comme une matrone romaine, en robe traditionnelle : elle est vêtue d’une tunique en tissu fin qui se rassemble autour de son cou en de nombreux plis ; ses épaules sont enveloppées dans une stola, un manteau en tissu plus épais, comme l’indiquent les larges plis couvrant la poitrine. C’est l’idée de la modestie et de la pureté qui est exprimée ici. Le regard n’est pas direct et évite le spectateur, la tête étant tournée sur le côté. L’expression est calme et pleine de dignité, même si on ne peut manquer de remarquer le sentiment de mélancolie et de tristesse qui s’en échappe. L’impératrice est représentée comme une femme d’apparence juvénile. La peau de son visage est lisse, le traitement délicat du marbre révèle des fossettes particulièrement attrayantes dans les coins de ses lèvres minces et souples, et des transitions presque invisibles entre les joues et les paupières. Les yeux sont grands ouverts, le front est souple et crée un contraste évident avec la coiffure élaborée. Sabine semble avoir été elle-même l’inventrice de cette coiffure, consistant en de longues tresses disposées en une sorte de nid (ou en turban) sur le dessus de la tête. Toutes les parties des tresses sont soigneusement gravées dans la pierre, et la chevelure se distingue par sa qualité décorative grâce à la disposition symétrique des quatre mèches séparées à l’arrière de son cou et aux rangées verticales de boucles en forme de croissant de lune devant chaque oreille. Vibia Sabina était une toute petite fille lorsque, à la mort de son père, Lucius Vibius Sabinus, elle partit vivre dans la maison de l’empereur Trajan, un oncle de sa mère, Salonina Matilda. A la demande de l’épouse de Trajan, Pompeia Plotina, Sabine épousa Hadrien en 100 apr. J.-C. Hadrien avait alors été adopté par Trajan, à qui il succéda en 117. Des rumeurs prétendaient que Plotine était amoureuse d’Hadrien et qu’elle lui fut plus tard utile dans la garantie de son accès au pouvoir. La vie de couple d’Hadrien et de Sabine n’était pas heureuse et encore moins exemplaire aux yeux de la norme en vogue à cette époque, puisqu’ils n’avaient pas d’enfants ; Hadrien s’absenta de la maison pendant plusieurs années pour visiter les provinces de l’Empire et ne s’investit que peu dans sa vie privée ; il renvoya toutefois deux fonctionnaires de la cour (l’un était le célèbre biographe Suétone) qui auraient été trop proches de Sabine ; il aurait même tenté d’empoisonner son épouse. Malgré le drame évident que fut sa vie personnelle, Sabine apparaît toujours comme l’exigeait son rang social dans les images officielles que la propagande romaine déploya à travers l’Empire. Ces représentations, conservées aujourd’hui sur des pièces de monnaie, des statues honorifiques ou des bustes, reflétaient principalement les vertus de la matrone romaine. L’impératrice y est ainsi associée aux pouvoirs des déesses qui soutenaient et protégeaient la famille, apparaissant sous les traits de Vénus Genitrix, Cérès, Junon, Vesta, Pudicitia, Pietas, Concordia, Endulgentia, accompagnée du titre d’Augusta (divine). Sabine fut divinisée après sa mort en 136. Aucun symbole ou attribut divin n’apparaît dans ce buste ; Sabine est ici elle-même, avec une attention particulière accordée à l’expression de son humeur. Comme à l’origine l’iris et les pupilles étaient gravés et incisés, il était possible de dater ce buste du vivant de Sabine (cependant, à ce stade de conservation, il est difficile de déterminer si les pupilles étaient gravées ou si elles le furent à nouveau plus tard). La critique archéologique établit trois types principaux basés sur les images des pièces de monnaie et sur les coiffures, parmi les quatre-vingts portraits en marbre (voire plus) de Sabine encore conservés. Le buste en examen appartient au premier type qui fut probablement créé dans un atelier grec vers 130 apr. J.-C. à l’occasion de sa visite en Grèce, en 128-129. On y décèle l’influence du style classique dans la représentation du visage : les traits individuels de la physionomie lissés et, en particulier, la représentation des sourcils sans aucun détail, comme cela était typique dans la sculpture grecque de la période classique. CONSERVATION

Très bon état de conservation. A l’origine sculpté dans un seul bloc de marbre. La tête et le cou ont été cassés et détachés du buste, puis réparés ; le cou se compose de quatre fragments réassemblés ; le nez et la pointe du menton ont été restaurés. Les pupilles qui furent jadis gravées (voir photographies anciennes) ont été remplies avec du plâtre. L’oreille gauche perdue a été remplacée par une pièce en plâtre. Quelques éclats sur le visage (sourcils, paupière inférieure gauche et os de la joue droite) et quelques pertes sur les bords des plis de la draperie partiellement restaurée en marbre. Un morceau original de la coiffure a également été remis en place à l’arrière de la pièce. La base cylindrique du buste est perdue, seule la plaque de transition est conservée.

103


21 PROVENANCE

Ancienne collection Pietro Stettiner, Rome, avant 1912 ; ancienne collection François Olive, Saint-Lys, France, acquis dans les années 19501960 ; marché de l’art français, Drouot, Paris, Blanchet & Associés, commissaires-priseurs, Paris, 21 décembre 2005, no. 190. PUBLIÉ

CHEVALIER L., Buste de l’impératrice Vibia Sabina in Galerie Tarantino, Paris, Cabinets d’antiques, Paris, 2011, no. 20, pp. 60-66. MATHESON S.B., A Woman of Consequence, in Yale University Art Gallery Bulletin, 1992, pp. 89-90, figs. 4-5. STETTINER P., Roma nei suoi monumenti: Illustrazione storico-cronologica con 580 figure, Rome, 1911. BIBLIOGRAPHIE

Anciennes photographies du buste : Arachne Database, Deutsches Archäologisches Institut, Rome, neg. nos. 3064-3065, enregistré en 1912 (http://arachne.uni-koeln.de/item/marbilderbestand/850805). A propos du collectionneur d’art Pietro Stettiner, v. : POLLAK L., Römische Memorien : Künstler, Kunstliebhaber und Gelehrte. 1893-1943, Rome, 1994, p. 152. Pour les portraits de Sabine, v. : ADEMBRI B. – NICOLAI R.M. (eds.), Vibia Sabina : da Augusta a Diva, Milano, 2007. CARANDINI A., Vibia Sabina, Florence, 1969, pp. 151-153. DE KERSAUSON K., Catalogue des portraits romains (Musée du Louvre), Tome II, De l’année de la guerre civile (68-69 apr. J.-C.) à la fin de l’Empire, Paris, 1996, pp. 138-139 no. 56. FITTSCHEN K., Courtly Portraits of Woman in the Era of the Adoptive Emperors (AD 98 – 180) and their Reception in Roman Society in KLEINER D.E.E. – MATHESON S.B. (eds.), I, Claudia : Woman in Ancient Rome, New Haven, 1996, p. 48 and note 71. FITTSCHEN K. − ZANKER P., Katalog der römischen Porträts in den kapitolinischen Museen und den anderen kommunalen Sammlungen der Stadt Rom, vol. III, Mainz/Rhine, 1983, pp. 62, d. OPPER T., Sabina in Hadrian : empire and conflict, London, 2008, pp. 188-205. WEGNER M. – UNGER R., Verzeichnis die Bildnisse von Hadrian und Sabina in Boreas 7, 1984, pp. 146-156.

27389

104


FLACON EN FORME DE POISSON

22

Art romain, courant du IIIe s. apr. J.-C., voire IVe s. apr. J.-C. Verre L : 9.5 cm Petit flacon à parfum (unguentarium) qui reprend la forme d’un poisson. Réalisé en une épaisse couche de verre transparent à teinte blanche, le vase a certainement été façonné selon la technique du soufflage, puis certains éléments lui ont été rajoutés, comme les nageoires. De forme élancée, le poisson est doté de nombreux détails anatomiques réalistes, tels que des yeux semi-globulaires, un fin bourrelet qui sépare la tête du reste du corps et qui constitue en partie les branchies, une longue nageoire dorsale, une petite anale (qui permet de socler la pièce aujourd’hui) et enfin une double nageoire caudale verticale qui correspond à la queue de l’animal marin. Le poisson qui se cambre et relève la queue semble ainsi «ouvrir grand la bouche». Le flacon est effectivement pleinement ouvert à cet endroit anatomique de l’animal. Deux hypothèses se présentent alors : soit une embouchure allongée prenait place ici et s’est cassée ; soit l’extrémité du vase a été volontairement sectionnée à cet endroit afin de permettre l’extraction de son contenu. Sur le dessus de la nageoire dorsale, il faut noter la présence de deux éléments dont l’extrémité a cassé. Vu l’arrondissement présenté, il est à considérer qu’une anse de suspension se trouvait sans doute à cet emplacement précis. De nombreux grands centres de verriers se sont développés sur une vaste étendue géographique, qui touche aussi bien l’Angleterre que la France, l’Allemagne et l’Italie, la Grèce et l’Egypte, sans oublier la côte syro-palestinienne. Or, la forme de poisson était particulièrement appréciée des artisans verriers. En effet, comme cet animal marin ne comprenait pas de membres, ils pouvaient facilement, à l’aide de rubans de verre liquide, en façonner les nageoires et les branchies. Plusieurs flacons en forme de poisson sont connus. Certains ont un ventre arrondi, d’autres présentent une épine dorsale épineuse. L’ouverture se retrouve souvent au niveau de la queue, mais aussi au niveau de la bouche. Leur datation se rattache principalement au IIIe siècle apr. J.-C., dans sa première moitié. Dans l’Antiquité romaine, le poisson entrait dans la composition d’une fameuse sauce à base de poisson, le garum. Ce condiment était présent dans de nombreux plats, notamment en raison de son fort goût salé. Il est ainsi fort possible que les tout premiers récipients en verre qui reprenaient la forme du poisson aient été fabriqués pour contenir cette fameuse sauce. Dans ces cas-là, il s’agit bien de vaisselle de table et les contenants offrent de plus grandes dimensions (pouvant aller jusqu’à une trentaine de centimètres). Mais pour les Romains, le poisson symbolisait également la reproduction et la fécondité. Il a donc pu donner lieu à la créativité des artisans verriers qui en ont fait un sujet privilégié pour différents flacons, dont le petit flacon à parfum étudié ici. Enfin, mentionnons également que par la suite, le poisson deviendra aussi le symbole chrétien du Christ. En conclusion, si l’on considère les parallèles connus, leur provenance et leur datation, la facture générale de l’unguentarium en examen nous permet d’envisager une production romaine sur la côte méditerranéenne orientale (probablement syro-palestinienne), au IIIe, voire au IVe siècle de notre ère. CONSERVATION

Flacon pratiquement complet, à l’exception de l’embouchure qui a été sectionnée (ouverture de la bouche), de la perte d’une anse de suspension (au niveau de la nageoire dorsale), d’une partie de la queue du poisson ainsi que de l’extrémité pointue de l’œil droit. Le vase présente une couche de patine blanchâtre sur l’ensemble de sa surface, due au passage du temps. PROVENANCE

Ancienne collection particulière Franziska Gassner (1907-2005), Allemagne. BIBLIOGRAPHIE

EISEN G.A. - KOUCHAKJI F., Glass, its Origin, History, Chronology, Technic and Classification to the Sixteenth Century, New York, 1927, pp. 531 and 611, pl. 130 and 149. FREMERSDORF F., Römisches Geformtes Glas in Köln, in Die Denkmäler des römischen Köln Band VI, Cologne, 1961, pl. 3-6. Glass from the Ancient World, The Ray Winfield Smith Collection, New York, 1957, nos. 334-336. MENNINGER M., Untersuchungen zu den Gläsern und Gipsabgüssen aus dem Fund von Begram/Afghanistan, Würzburg, 1996, pp. 73-75, Taf. 24-25. OLIVER A., Ancient Glass in the Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, 1980, nos. 149-150. STERN E.M., Roman, Byzantine and Early Medieval Glass, 10 B.C.E.-700 C.E.: Ernesto Wolf Collection, Ostfildern-Ruit (Germany), 2001, no. 67. VON SALDERN A. et al., Gläser der Antike, Sammlung Erwin Oppenländer, Mainz am Rhein, 1974, no. 697. Voir aussi les sites internet du British Museum (inv. 1875,0608.2 et 1901,0413.3174), du Metropolitan Museum of Art (inv. 15.43.168, 17.194.135 et 17.194.137) ainsi que du Musée du Louvre (inv. MNE 165, flacon compte-gouttes en forme de poisson).

18648

105


RHYTON EN FORME DE TAUREAU ASSIS Art anatolien (Phrygie ?), env. VIIe – Ve s. av. J.-C. Céramique L : 28 cm Modelé à la main, le récipient représente un bovidé assis avec les pattes repliées sous le corps, par lequel on peut reconnaître un taureau ou un veau. La terre cuite est actuellement de couleur jaune-ocre, rehaussée de peinture brunrouge et noir pour les détails du pelage (taches sur les épaules et les cuisses, tête), pour la queue et pour dessiner des lignes, qui indiquaient probablement des guirlandes (collier autour du poitrail, épaules, croupe, «collier», tête). Un goulot cylindrique et haut, pourvu d’une lèvre arrondie et utilisé certainement pour remplir le vase, est placé sur le dos de l’animal, tandis qu’une petite ouverture circulaire, percée au fond du poitrail, entre les genoux antérieurs, permettait l’écoulement contrôlé du liquide, simplement à l’aide d’un doigt. Le corps de l’animal est trapu, ses proportions puissantes avec des formes aux volumes bien arrondis mais peu détaillés et peu réalistes. Les pattes en revanche ne sont représentées que par des tiges minces, en léger relief, qui se terminent par des sabots et constituent les points d’appui au sol du récipient. La tête, qui permet aisément d’interpréter l’animal comme un bovidé, présente une structure forte et massive où l’on sent la forme triangulaire du crâne. Contrairement au corps, son modelage est plus réaliste non seulement en ce qui concerne la forme générale, mais aussi pour la présence de nombreux détails anatomiques précis (yeux avec arcades sourcilières, narines incisées, gueule horizontale, mâchoire en relief, etc.), soulignés par de la peinture rouge et noire. Les motifs ornementaux dessinés sur le corps, ainsi que sur la tête (triangles sur le front et «pendentifs» entre les cornes) caractérisent cet animal comme sacré, destiné peut-être au sacrifice : comme de nombreux autres rhyta de ce type, ce récipient était certainement utilisé pour faire des libations dans le cadre de cérémonies cultuelles dont nous ne connaissons pas la nature exacte. On peut même imaginer qu’en reproduisant le schéma exact d’un animal destiné au sacrifice, le récipient remplaçait d’une certaine manière l’animal réel, comme un sorte d’offrande ininterrompue. Tout en appartenant à l’importante et riche série de rhyta en forme d’animal d’origine anatolienne ou proche-orientale attestée dès la fin du IIe millénaire, cet exemplaire ne possède actuellement pas de parallèles précis, ce qui empêche de proposer une chronologie précise : celle-ci devrait néanmoins être comprise entre la fin du VIIIe et le Ve siècle av. J.-C. Parmi les meilleures comparaisons on peut mentionner les rhyta en forme de cheval assis de Maku (Azerbaïdjan) et debout de Suse, également ornés de riches motifs peints (VIIIe - VIIe siècle av. J.-C.) ainsi que l’exemplaire d’Ardébil (Azerbaïdjan) en terre cuite plus grossière et de couleur foncée (fin de la première moitié du Ier millénaire). En Anatolie centrale et orientale, les appliques en forme de têtes de taureaux ornant les chaudrons de Gordion (Tumulus MM, fin du VIIIe siècle av. J.-C.) sont typologiquement semblables, de même que le protomé d’un rhyton en forme de corne trouvé à Armavir, en Arménie (VIe - Ve siècle av. J.-C.). Des analogies techniques et stylistiques existent aussi avec un type de céramique (fond jaune-ocre, décoration linéaire peinte en rouge et noir) qui apparaît dans les régions orientales de l’Anatolie et que les archéologues datent du VIIe siècle av. J.-C. Les rhyta étaient communs à tout le monde antique : les premiers exemplaires connus sont ceux de Tell Halaf (Syrie, VIe - Ve millénaire av. J.-C.), mais leur forme s’est vite imposée en Mésopotamie, en Egypte, dans les cultures égéennes de l’âge du Bronze et, plus tard, dans la civilisation classique grecque et romaine. Les types de rhyta sont très variables, mais ils sont presque toujours en relation avec le monde des animaux ou des êtres fantastiques: tantôt ils sont modelés en forme d’animal – comme la pièce en examen – tantôt ils ont une forme de corne avec un protomé d’animal ou de monstre, tantôt, surtout dans le monde classique, ils sont composés d’un large goulot avec anse et d’une tête reproduisant différentes formes (animaux, femmes, noirs, satyres, petits groupes à deux personnages, etc.). Ces récipients étaient utilisés surtout pour faire des libations en versant le liquide offert à la divinité (leur nom grec, ρυτοσ, signifie «vase à boire, à verser»).

106


23 CONSERVATION

Pratiquement complet et admirablement conservé. Un fragment manque dans la paroi un peu au-dessus de l’épaule gauche, corne et oreille gauche perdues ; ébréchures et usures surtout sur la partie gauche du corps et sur la tête. Abondants restes de peinture. PROVENANCE

Ancienne collection Maurice Boss, Genève, Suisse ; ancienne collection du Dr. L., Suisse, acquis en 1964. BIBLIOGRAPHIE

Sur les rhyta dans les régions du Caucase et de la mer Caspienne : BLOME P. (ed.), Paradeisos, Frühe Tierbilder aus Persien, Basel, 1992, pp. 56ff. Quelques exemplaires similaires : AMIET P., Elam, Auvers-sur-Oise, 1966, p. 568, no. 433 (de Suse, Khuzistan). Au pied du Mont Ararat, Splendeur de l’Arménie antique, Arles, 2007. p.163, no. 110 (avec protomé en forme de tête de taureau). SEIPEL W., 7000 Jahre persische Kunst, Meisterwerke aus dem iranischen Nationalmuseum in Teheran, Milan-Vienna, 2000, pp. 175ff, no. 101 (de Maku, Azerbaïdjan). Trésors de l’ancien Iran, Genève, 1966, p. 108, pl. 40, no. 554. YOUNG R.S., Three Great early Tumuli, vol. I, Philadelphia, 1981, pp. 102ff, 219ff, pl. 50. Pour le type céramique : MERHAV R. (ed.), Treasures of the Bible Land, The E. Borowski Collection, Tel Aviv, 1987, no. 77.

22305

107


MOSAÏQUE NOIRE ET BLANCHE REPRESENTANT UN CERF

24

Art romain, Période Antonine (170 apr. J.-C. environ) Pierre H : 58.5 cm Composée de tesselles noires et blanches, la mosaïque présente une scène animée représentant un cerf se cabrant. Ce panneau décorait un pavement de sol antique. La silhouette est brute, en noir, et les détails sont indiqués par des lignes internes blanches individuelles. La conception sophistiquée de l’animal est remarquablement similaire au cerf illustré dans la mosaïque du Foro delle Corporazioni à Ostie, le port antique de Rome. Ces deux mosaïques sont de parfaits exemples de ce que l’on appelle l’«optical style». La technique utilisée maximise l’effet visuel de la silhouette et des lignes de contour internes blanches, dont un certain nombre de tesselles sont alignées pour former des lignes retraçant efficacement la musculature de l’animal. La décoration de bâtiments avec des mosaïques noires et blanches a connu un large essor au courant du IIe siècle de notre ère, une période novatrice pour la technologie de construction des édifices qui s’est développée entre le règne des empereurs Néron et Hadrien et qui fait référence à la «révolution architecturale romaine». Les mosaïques noires et blanches de grande qualité, comme les pavements décoratifs de la Villa d’Hadrien à Tivoli, les mosaïques figurées des Bains de Neptune à Ostie et celles des Bains de Caracalla à Rome, démontrent que les édifices tant privés que publics commandités par les empereurs étaient décorés avec cette technique selon un langage raffiné et sophistiqué de motifs décorant les sols. La décoration avec des mosaïques noires et blanches est devenue importante pour l’embellissement de grands espaces architecturaux qui résultent de la construction expansive d’espaces voûtés et des larges pavements qui vont de pair. Vers la fin du Ier siècle de notre ère, ces larges espaces voûtés exigent une décoration à beaucoup plus grande échelle que les relativement petits pavements au sol des bâtiments plus anciens de Pompéi ou Herculanum, des structures qui n’ont pas exigé de décoration avec de grandes et ambitieuses compositions. L’utilisation répandue de mosaïques figurées est bien documentée à Ostie, là où une zone, près des petits magasins du Foro delle Corporazioni, a permis de créer des espaces relativement petits pour y représenter des animaux singuliers (cerf, sanglier et éléphant), dans le cadre d’une représentation innovatrice du Nil. L’auteur romain Varron inscrit les cerfs (cervi) parmi les animaux qui obéissaient à l’appel d’Orphée ; depuis ils jouent un rôle important dans l’art et la mythologie romaine. Dans l’Antiquité le cerf était très présent en Italie et n’était pas seulement chassé pour le sport et la nourriture mais était aussi apprécié pour sa beauté naturelle, et il était maintenu près des propriétés de campagne de la classe riche à Rome, vers la fin de la République. La popularité des cerfs dans les peintures murales pompéiennes et sur quelques mosaïques suggère qu’ils étaient parfois gardés comme des animaux de compagnie. Les textes de Virgile parlent d’un cerf domestiqué, bien-aimé de Silvia, la fille du berger en chef de Latinus. Remarquable pour sa beauté et pour la taille de ses bois, la tête du cerf était décorée de guirlandes et sa maîtresse préparait et baignait l’animal. Il était nourri à table et errait librement toute la journée, ne manquant jamais de retourner à la maison à la tombée de la nuit. La chasse et la capture de cerfs pour les apprivoiser comme animal de compagnie ou pour les exhiber sont illustrés de la manière la plus vivante dans les scènes d’animaux de la mosaïque «La petite chasse», à la Piazza Armerina en Sicile. Parmi les nombreuses représentations de cerf dans l’art romain, une des plus réalistes est celle de la biche qui allaite le jeune enfant Télèphe, dans la célèbre peinture dépeignant «La découverte de Télèphe», d’Herculanum. Dans la sculpture romaine, les cerfs, les biches et leur jeune progéniture sont aussi souvent trouvés accompagnant leur protectrice et la déesse de la chasse, Diane. CONSERVATION

Panneau de mosaïque carré complet, reposant sur son fond en pierre original ; quelques rares lacunes ; petites restaurations possibles. PROVENANCE

Ancienne collection particulière 1960-1970; Gawain McKinley, Londres-New York; ancienne collection M. Sylvan Schefler, New York, acquis au début des années 1980. BIBLIOGRAPHIE

BECATTI G., Scavi di Ostia IV : Mosaici e pavimenti marmorei, Rome, 1961. BLAKE M., Roman Mosaics of the Second Century in Italy, in Memoirs of the American Academy in Rome 13, 1936, pp. 67-214. CLARKE J.R., Roman Black and White Figural Mosaics, New York, 1979, pp. 31-39, pp. 81-85, fig. 40 (pour la mosaïque au cerf, sanglier et éléphant à Ostie, Foro delle Corporazioni, stationes 26, 27, 28, datant de 170 apr. J.-C. environ). TOYNBEE J.M.C., Animals in Roman Life and Art, Baltimore, 1996, pp. 143-145 (et fig. 66, La découverte de Télèphe, de Herculanum).

22403

108


COUPE COTELEE BLEUTEE

25

Art romain, Ier s. apr. J.-C. Verre transparent H : 5.5 cm – D : 12.5 cm Cette coupe à paroi épaisse est remarquable aussi bien pour ses conditions de conservation que pour sa forme parfaitement réussie. Elle est en verre moulé et pressé transparent mais aux reflets bleutés. Les finitions ont été obtenues par polissage et/ou par meulage. De proportions plutôt trapues (le corps est semi-sphérique et le diamètre plutôt étroit), le récipient est orné de vingtquatre cannelures épaisses, disposées verticalement ou légèrement en diagonale le long de la paroi externe du vase ; leur présence trahit l’origine métallique de cette forme, inspirée des vases à godrons en métal précieux. Espacées vers le bord, les cannelures se rapprochent et convergent vers la base plate qui assure un bon équilibre à la coupe. Le bord est haut, vertical et simplement arrondi, sans véritable lèvre ; la décoration incisée se limite à deux lignes parallèles, gravées à la meule à l’intérieur dans la partie inférieure du récipient. Les coupes et les bols côtelés, dont il existe un grand nombre de variantes typologiques et chromatiques, étaient fabriqués selon différentes techniques : en pressant la quantité nécessaire de verre réchauffé entre un moule mâle et un moule femelle ; par impression à plat d’un disque de verre qui était par la suite arrondi sur une forme galbée ; par tournage sur un tour de potier et travaillés et décorés avec un bâtonnet. Les premiers exemples de bols côtelés remontent au deuxième quart du Ier siècle avant notre ère ; dès le milieu de ce siècle la forme subit une légère variation, avec l’adoption d’un fond plus plat ou légèrement convexe, qui rendait le récipient plus stable. Leur production augmente considérablement dès la fin de l’époque hellénistique et se poursuit pendant tout le Ier siècle de l’Empire avec une typologie très riche et des proportions très variables. Les couleurs les plus utilisées ont été d’abord le brun orangé, le bleu cobalt et l’aubergine, qui ont progressivement été remplacés par du simple verre transparent aux reflets bleu clair ou vert foncé ou clair, lorsque vers le milieu du Ier siècle de notre ère le goût pour les teintes vives passe de mode. Ces bols ont été largement utilisés comme vaisselle de table dans tout le monde méditerranéen, de l’Italie aux colonies plus occidentales et septentrionales de l’Empire, de l’Egée en Anatolie et jusqu’au Levant. Cette large diffusion fait penser qu’ils étaient produits en divers lieux mais en particulier par des ateliers italiens et proche-orientaux (Syrie et côtes du Levant). CONSERVATION

Complet et pratiquement intact. Légères ébréchures et usures superficielles. Une ombre de couleur aubergine traverse une partie du bord. Traces de polissage sur le tour bien visibles. PROVENANCE

Ancienne collection particulière Franziska Gassner (1907-2005), Allemagne. BIBLIOGRAPHIE

Sur la production de ces coupes et pour quelques parallèles : ARVEILLER-DULONG V. – NENNA M.D., Les verres antiques, I, Contenant à parfum en verre moulé sur noyau et vaisselle moulée, VIIe siècle av. J.-C. – Ier siècle apr. J.-C., Paris, pp. 187-193. GOLDSTEIN S.M., Pre-Roman and Early Roman Glass in the Corning Museum of Glass, New York, 1979, pp. 153-156. GROSE D.F., The Toledo Museum of Art, Early Ancient Glass, New York, 1989, pp. 244ff. MATHESON S.B., Ancient Glass in the Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, 1980, pp. 14-16.

18633

109


COUPE COTELEE AMBREE

26

Art romain, Ier s. apr. J.-C. Verre couleur ambre H : 4.5 cm – D : 15 cm Cette coupe à paroi épaisse est remarquable aussi bien pour ses conditions de conservation que pour sa forme parfaitement réussie. Elle est en verre moulé et pressé de couleur brun ambré ; les finitions ont été obtenues par polissage et/ou par meulage. De forme arrondie et peu profonde, le récipient est orné de vingt-neuf cannelures disposées verticalement ou légèrement en diagonale le long de la paroi externe du vase ; leur présence trahit l’origine métallique de cette forme, inspirée des vases à godrons en métal précieux. Espacées vers le bord, les cannelures se rapprochent et convergent vers la base plate qui assure un bon équilibre à la coupe. Le bord, haut, lisse et simplement arrondi, est parcouru à l’intérieur par une épaisse rainure gravée à la meule ; à l’intérieur, la décoration est complétée par deux autres lignes incisées à la mihauteur. Les coupes et les bols côtelés, dont il existe un grand nombre de variantes typologiques et chromatiques, étaient fabriqués selon différentes techniques : en pressant la quantité nécessaire de verre réchauffé entre un moule mâle et un moule femelle ; par impression à plat d’un disque de verre qui était par la suite arrondi sur une forme galbée ; par tournage sur un tour de potier et travaillés et décorés avec un bâtonnet. Les premiers exemples de bols côtelés remontent au deuxième quart du Ier siècle avant notre ère ; dès le milieu de ce siècle la forme subit une légère variation, avec l’adoption d’un fond plus plat ou légèrement convexe, qui rendait le récipient plus stable. Leur production augmente considérablement dès la fin de l’époque hellénistique et se poursuit pendant tout le Ier siècle de l’Empire avec une typologie très riche et des proportions très variables. Les couleurs les plus utilisées ont été d’abord le brun orangé, le bleu cobalt et l’aubergine, qui ont progressivement été remplacées par le bleu clair, le verdâtre et le vert clair lorsque, vers le milieu du Ier siècle apr. J.-C., le goût pour les teintes vives passe de mode. Ces bols ont été largement utilisés comme vaisselle de table dans tout le monde méditerranéen, de l’Italie aux colonies plus occidentales et septentrionales de l’Empire, de l’Egée en Anatolie et jusqu’au Levant. Cette large diffusion fait penser qu’ils étaient produits en divers lieux mais en particulier par des ateliers italiens et proche-orientaux (Syrie et côtes levantines). CONSERVATION

Complet et pratiquement intact. Ebréchures ; partiellement fissuré le long de la gravure circulaire sur le corps, surface interne un peu usée. PROVENANCE

Ancienne collection particulière Franziska Gassner (1907-2005), Allemagne. BIBLIOGRAPHIE

Sur la production de ces coupes et pour quelques parallèles : ARVEILLER-DULONG V. – NENNA M.D., Les verres antiques, I, Contenant à parfum en verre moulé sur noyau et vaisselle moulée, VIIe siècle av. J.-C. – Ier siècle apr. J.-C., Paris, pp. 187-193. GOLDSTEIN S.M., Pre-Roman and Early Roman Glass in the Corning Museum of Glass, New York, 1979, pp. 153-156. GROSE D.F., The Toledo Museum of Art, Early Ancient Glass, New York, 1989, pp. 244ff. MATHESON S.B., Ancient Glass in the Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, 1980, pp. 14-16.

18632

110


MODELE DE SCULPTEUR REPRESENTANT UN PHARAON OFFRANT

27

Art égyptien, XXXe dynastie – Période Ptolémaïque (env. IVe - milieu du IIIe s. av. J.-C.) Pierre calcaire Dim : 14.4 x 12.7 cm Plaquette pratiquement carrée, décorée d’une figure masculine en très bas relief ; aucune trace de peinture n’est visible. L’homme, d’aspect juvénile, est accroupi mais son genou droit touche le sol. Ses bras, légèrement pliés, sont soulevés vers l’avant pour mieux montrer au spectateur (dans ce cas particulier une divinité) les deux récipients qu’il tient dans ses mains. Le couvre-chef (il s’agit de la couronne appelée khépresh, un symbole de victoire utilisé surtout dans les représentations militaires du pharaon : elle était de couleur bleue ou noire, ornée de motifs circulaires jaunes) ainsi que la présence de l’uraeus indiquent clairement que le personnage sculpté n’est autre qu’un pharaon. Le souverain est en train d’offrir à une divinité inconnue le liquide que contenaient les deux vases sphériques, appelés jarre-nou : à l’origine ces petits récipients étaient destinés à contenir le vin présenté comme cadeau aux dieux lors de différents cultes. Cette position, qui est parmi les plus classiques de la statuaire royale égyptienne (le roi peut tenir dans ses mains différents types de vases), traduit la dévotion du roi et son attitude empreinte d’humilité vis-à-vis des dieux. Malgré ses remarquables qualités esthétiques et artistiques (finesse du visage, précision de la couronne avec l’uraeus, plasticité et élégance du rendu des bras, etc.), ce petit relief n’est pas une image officielle et ne représente certainement pas un pharaon particulier. Il s’agit d’un type de document très intéressant qui nous éclaire en premier lieu sur les méthodes de travail des artisans égyptiens puisque c’est un modèle, ayant probablement servi à un apprenti sculpteur à exercer ses talents : l’œuvre est d’ailleurs restée inachevée, comme le montrent différents détails tels la forme simple et lisse du collier, le dessin de la jambe droite qui n’a pas de profil interne, ni d’indication du pagne, le genou droit pointu, qui n’a pas encore reçu son profil définitif arrondi, etc. Bien que leur existence soit attestée depuis l’Ancien Empire, rares sont les exemples de modèles de sculpteurs parvenus jusqu’à nous : le seul ensemble conservé concerne l’atelier de Thoutmosis (Tell el-Amarna, d’où proviendrait entre autres le célèbre buste de Néfertiti, qui était probablement lui aussi un simple modèle de sculpteur) mais la plupart des modèles datent de la Basse Epoque et de l’époque ptolémaïque : les sujets, très variés, vont des portraits de pharaons en trois dimensions, aux reliefs reproduisant des dieux ou le roi ; des études pour sculpter les signes hiéroglyphiques à des parties du corps humain et aux éléments architecturaux. De nombreux spécimens conservent encore les traces de quadrillage ; d’autres, comme celui-ci, ne sont pas terminés, et nous dévoilent ainsi la manière de procéder des artistes égyptiens ; d’autres encore portent des inscriptions montrant qu’ils étaient consacrés à une divinité, comme un ex-voto. Leur fréquence à cette période est généralement expliquée par l’arrivée en Egypte (surtout à l’époque ptolémaïque) de nombreux sculpteurs de tradition grecque, qui ont dû apprendre les canons artistiques égyptiens : les modèles comme celui en examen seraient donc le résultat de la transmission du savoir millénaire des sculpteurs égyptiens aux nouveaux venus afin de leur enseigner les règles, les proportions et les styles qui régissaient l’art égyptien. CONSERVATION

Recollé ; parties restaurées (angles inférieurs, bord supérieur en particulier) ; surface par endroits abîmée et usée. Actuellement monté dans un cadre en bois de forme carrée. PROVENANCE

Ancienne collection de Mme Louise Crane; Christie's New York, 4 juin 1999; ancienne collection particulière américaine, New York. BIBLIOGRAPHIE

Sur les modèles de sculpteurs en général, v. : STEINDORFF G., Catalogue of the Egyptian Sculpture in the Walters Art Gallery, Baltimore, 1946, pp. 7-9, p. 95, nos. 326 et 331, pl. LXI-LXII. VARGA E., Les modèles de sculpture de Basse Epoque dans la collection égyptienne in Bulletin du Musée National Hongrois des Beaux-Arts, 18, 1961, pp. 3-19. Sur la problématique des modèles-ex-voto, v. : Cleopatra’s Egypt, Age of Ptolemies, New York, 1988, pp. 242-243, no. 131.

18668

111


CRATERE A COLONNETTES AVEC SCENE DE COURSE

28

Art grec (Attique), milieu du Ve s. av. J.-C. Céramique H : 42.5 cm La pièce en examen est un grand cratère à colonnettes avec le corps en forme de cœur, le col aux parois droites, le pied moulé à deux niveaux et les anses cylindriques et verticales qui donnent le nom à ce type de vase. Il s’agit d’une des formes les plus importantes et caractéristiques de la céramique attique du Ve siècle av. J.-C. Tout le monde du banquet grec, et attique en particulier, tourne autour du cratère qui était posé au centre de l’espace dédié au symposion et qui contenait le mélange de vin coupé avec de l’eau que les participants au banquet consommaient pendant la fête. Ce vase présente réellement une forme magnifique aux contours lisses et parfaits. L’ornementation, sur la face principale surtout, offre également une richesse et une très grande précision. La frise présente sur le col est effectivement composée d’une suite très dense et serrée de boutons de fleurs de lotus, reliés entre eux grâce à des tracés réalisés très certainement au compas, vu leur remarquable régularité. La lèvre laissée couleur de l’argile, rouge, offre plusieurs représentations stylisées de quadrupèdes courant (quatre sur chaque face, sangliers ?). Ceux-ci ont été réalisés en quelques traits, à main levée, sans apport de détails supplémentaires. Sur la panse, la scène figurée est peinte dans une métope que délimite un bord réservé orné d’une frise de languettes sur le dessus, et sur les côtés, d’une double rangée de points ou triangles successifs. Sur la face A, nous trouvons deux cavaliers en course, représentés nus, chevauchant à cru leur monture. Les rênes sont bien détaillées en noir ou en surpeint, mais sont par endroits effacées. De même, la plupart des détails apportés aux chevaux ont en partie disparu. Le peintre a en effet pris la peine d’apporter plusieurs précisions anatomiques aux animaux, notamment au niveau de leur tête, de leur crinière, de la musculature de leur dos ou encore de leurs pattes. La tête des jeunes gens est ceinte d’un bandeau fin, le jeune homme devant sur la droite étant plus jeune d’apparence et de taille. Ce dernier a l’air de partir au galop, alors que son aîné, derrière lui sur la gauche, semble retenir son cheval qui se cabre légèrement. Celui-ci tient, en plus des rênes, une sorte de bâton prolongé par une longue et fine corde : pourrait-il s’agir d’une ligne d’arrivée ou de départ qu’il vient d’actionner ? Nous pourrions dès lors en conclure que le jeune homme plus âgé est donc en train d’entraîner son cadet, en vue d’une prochaine course prévue lors d’une fête particulière, comme les Jeux Olympiques ou les Panathénées. Des courses de cavaliers, nus et montant à cru, avaient effectivement lieu à ces différentes occasions, dans un hippodrome à Olympie et sur l’Agora à Athènes. Sur la face B, trois jeunes gens drapés dans de larges himations sont paisiblement en train de discuter. Les personnages latéraux sont tournés vers le jeune homme au centre de l’image, qui tient un long bâton et s’appuie dessus. Tous trois portent un fin bandeau sur leur tête. Ce type de scène secondaire est tout à fait conventionnel. Le décor figuré est certes moins riche et rendu de manière plus sommaire, mais il fait partie de l’iconographie qui illustre traditionnellement les revers de cratères. Ce genre de scène de discussion offre effectivement un cadre plus paisible, en contrepartie de la scène principale qui est déjà illustrée par une action vive ou relative à un épisode héroïque bien connu. Or, dans le cas présent, il serait tentant de créer un lien entre les deux faces illustrées de ce vase. Nous pourrions ainsi penser que les personnages ici présents participent en tant que spectateurs à des Jeux. Ils viendraient donc d’assister à un type de course de chevaux telle que celle représentée sur la face A. Ces personnages seraient de simples spectateurs, des entraîneurs de concurrents ou même des juges. Le vase n’a pas encore été attribué, mais il est certainement l’œuvre d’un peintre classique ayant travaillé à Athènes environ à l’époque de l’érection du Parthénon et qui est à chercher parmi les proches du groupe de Polygnote ou plus probablement parmi les peintres des «cratères à colonnettes», selon la classification de J.D. Beazley. CONSERVATION

Le cratère est intact et en bon état de conservation. Il faut juste signaler un petit orifice au niveau de la panse, et deux éclats principaux sur l’une des anses, en dehors de quelques-uns au niveau de l’embouchure. D’autres éclats sont mineurs pour le reste du vase. Un des motifs de quadrupède présent sur la lèvre est partiellement effacé et semble surplomber une zone ayant peut-être subi des perturbations durant la cuisson du cratère (?). Certaines zones indiquent aussi que le vernis noir n’a pas toujours été appliqué en couche suffisante et régulière. C’est pourquoi la couleur rouge de l’argile ressort par endroits entre des coups de pinceaux de peinture noire. Quelques concrétions sont présentes, correspondant à des résidus de terre. PROVENANCE

Ancienne collection privée M. C., Suisse ; Phoenix Ancient Art, Genève, 1989 ; Gily AG, Riehen, Suisse, 1993 ; ancienne collection privée, Japon, 1993. BIBLIOGRAPHIE

BEAZLEY J.D., Attic Red-Figure Vase-Painters, Oxford, 1968, ch. 52-54. BOARDMAN J., Athenian Red-Figure Vases, The Classical Period, London, 1989, pp. 60ff. Pour un vase très similaire, mais avec une scène de cavaliers identifiables comme les Dioscures : MARANGOU L. I., Ancient Greek Art from the collection of Sravros S. Niarchos, Athens, 1995, pp. 168-172. 21681

112


BOL EN VERRE MOSAÏQUE

29

Art romain, Ier s. av. J.-C. - Ier s. apr. J.-C. Verre bleu et blanc H : 3.8 cm – D : 16 cm Cette pièce à la décoration extraordinaire est un exemple très rare et remarquablement conservé de verre mosaïque romain. Les premiers témoignages de la fabrication du verre sont à situer au IIe millénaire av. J.-C. en Egypte et en Mésopotamie. La technique est graduellement passée du moulage sur un noyau d’argile au modelage ou coulage par pression, jusqu’à atteindre la finesse du soufflage à l’air libre ou dans des moules. Le verre mosaïque en examen a été façonné selon la technique du moulage/pressage, qui requiert une grande habileté de la part du verrier et le respect de plusieurs étapes précises dans sa réalisation. La première étape consistait à fabriquer plusieurs cannes (ou tiges) de verre polychrome, qui seront ensuite coupées en petits disques : leur composition chromatique déterminera l'agencement des couleurs du récipient. Les disques en verre découpés sont alors placés côte à côte et réchauffés jusqu’à leur fusion ; ensuite, la masse colorée encore chaude est posée sur un moule en pierre (ou en céramique) afin de lui donner la forme définitive d’un bol. La dernière phase comprenait la réalisation à l’aide d’outils, des nervures et des cannelures (15 sur la pièce en examen) sur toute la surface extérieure et le polissage de l’intérieur du récipient, qui lui garantissait une belle surface à l’aspect uniforme. Bien que ce type de bol cannelé en verre mosaïque fût connu en Italie et dans les provinces romaines occidentales (les bols «occidentaux» sont attribués à l'industrie Italo-Romaine des périodes augustéennes et tibériennes), leur distribution s’étendit jusqu’en Egypte et à d’autres régions de l’est de la Méditerranée, et même jusqu’à la mer Noire. Les récipients en verre mosaïque sont restés à la mode durant une période relativement courte de l’histoire – du Ier siècle av. J.-C. au milieu du Ier siècle de notre ère, ils faisaient partie des objets de vaisselle très convoités, mais très coûteux que seuls les plus riches pouvaient se permettre d’acquérir. Avec la propagation de la technique du verre soufflé, des produits plus abordables apparurent et remplacèrent les récipients en verre mosaïque; toutefois, la technique ellemême n’a jamais été oubliée et s’est perpétuée dans la production de perles en verre mosaïque. La palette de couleurs du bol en examen est limitée au cobalt et au blanc, bien que la combinaison de nuances plus subtiles ou intenses de cobalt avec des motifs complexes dans le blanc crée un effet décoratif saisissant. Les volutes blanches forment des motifs en spirale qui sont disposés en cercles tout autour de la surface, depuis le bord jusqu’au fond du récipient. Manipuler un objet en verre mosaïque, parallèlement à une observation directe, est important pour révéler toutes les qualités décoratives, et il y avait plus encore à découvrir dans ce bol : par exemple, certaines zones deviennent translucides lorsque la lumière traverse les parois du récipient. CONSERVATION

Récipient intact et en excellent état de conservation. Peu de zones de couleur blanche sont touchées par l’irisation. PROVENANCE

Ancienne collection du Professeur A. Goumaz, Suisse, années 1950. BIBLIOGRAPHIE

Sur la technique du verre mosaïque, v. : ANTONARAS A., Fire and Sand : Ancient Glass in the Princeton University Art Museum, New Haven-London, 2012, pp. 19-21. EISEN G.A., Glass, New York, 1927, vol. I, pp. 174-199. OLIVIER A., Millefiori Glass in Antiquity in Journal of Glass Studies 10, 1968, pp. 48-70. D’autres exemples de bols en mosaïque de verre : BERETTA M. – DI PASQUALE G., Vitrum : Il vetro fra arte e scienza nel mondo romano, Florence, 2004, p. 207, no. 1.22. GOLDSTEIN S.M., Pre-roman and Early Roman Glass in the Corning Museum of Glass, New York, 1979, pp. 188-191, nos. 501-512. GROSE D.F., Early Ancient Glass, New York, 1989, pp. 241-250. KUNINA N., Ancient Glass in the Hermitage Collection, St. Petersburg, 1997, p. 268, no. 93.

28145

113


SATYRE TENANT UNE GRAPPE DE RAISIN ET UN BATON DE CHASSE (LAGOBOLON)

30

Art romain, 1er s. apr. J.-C. Bronze H : 15 cm Seuls les oreilles pointues et le nez légèrement retroussé permettent d’identifier ce jeune homme nu comme un satyre. Il se tient debout, une grappe de raisin dans sa main droite abaissée, et brandit un bâton de chasse, un lagobolon, dans sa main gauche. Bien que mi-animal mi-humain, l’air sauvage qui définit généralement les satyres est ici absent. A la place, le jeune personnage, représenté dans une pose sensuelle, évoque le calme et la sérénité. La poitrine et le ventre, larges et musclés, la jambe droite tendue juxtaposée à la gauche légèrement pliée, la hanche relevée à droite et abaissée sur le côté gauche, tous ces éléments rythment agréablement la position en contrapposto du personnage. Cette impressionnante statuette en bronze de l’époque augustéenne reflète clairement l’influence de l’art grec classique et hellénistique sur le goût artistique du début de l’Empire romain. L’attitude du personnage et son anatomie surtout renvoient au canon des proportions établies par le sculpteur grec Polyclète, au Ve siècle av. J.-C. En outre, combinée au sourire charmeur, la pose du satyre évoque la volupté associée au dieu du vin, Dionysos, et à son cortège de satyres et de ménades, tels qu’ils étaient représentés pendant l’époque hellénistique. L’aspect allongé du corps du satyre est également une caractéristique de la fin de l’époque classique et de l’époque hellénistique, qui s’est développé en particulier à travers les sculptures de Praxitèle et un peu plus tard de Lysippe. Le mélange des styles classique et hellénistique contenus dans cette statuette en bronze, qui réunit la discipline formelle de Polyclète et l’approche sensible de la sculpture créée par Praxitèle, résulte ici en un personnage beau et attirant. Parmi les sculptures d’égale importance on peut établir un parallèle entre ce satyre en bronze et le grand satyre en marbre rouge de la villa de l’empereur Hadrien, à Tivoli. Actuellement conservé au musée du Capitole, le célèbre Fauno Rosso soulève une grappe de raisin de sa main droite et tient un bâton de chasse dans sa main gauche. Dans le respect du style hellénistique pour la représentation des jeunes satyres, et comme l’exemplaire en examen, le corps du satyre en marbre est grand et mince, et ses cheveux sont épais et touffus, presque comme une calotte qui encadre le visage rond et souriant. Provenant également de la villa d’Hadrien, une autre sculpture en marbre rouge, aujourd’hui conservée au musée du Vatican, représente un satyre tenant des raisins et un bâton de chasse similaires à ceux du Fauno Rosso. Enfin, on peut tracer un troisième parallèle avec le satyre au raisin et au bâton de chasse qui se trouve dans la collection de la villa Albani, à Rome. Pendant l’époque romaine, les statues de ce type ornaient probablement les fontaines et les jardins, contribuant à l’image dionysiaque du cadre champêtre idéal. Dionysos était une divinité particulièrement populaire, surtout à l’époque hellénistique, et les statues à l’image de ce dieu reflétaient naturellement des caractéristiques associées aux joies, aux plaisirs et aux bonheurs de la vie. Les statues de satyres étaient parfois placées comme offrandes dans les sanctuaires de Dionysos, dieu tutélaire du théâtre, en remerciement après une composition ou une performance théâtrale réussies. Au IIe siècle apr. J.-C., l’écrivain voyageur grec Pausanias mentionne la statue d’un satyre exécutée par Praxitèle. La sculpture fut offerte comme ex-voto en remerciement de sa contribution au succès d’une pièce jouée au festival de théâtre de Dionysos, à Athènes. Quant à la croyance populaire en l’existence de satyres réels dans la nature, elle est ancienne et a persisté tout au long de l’Antiquité, de même que la pratique consistant à imiter les satyres au cours de festivals urbains, une coutume qui fut finalement interdite à Constantinople en 692 apr. J.-C. CONSERVATION

Statuette complète, mis à part les pieds qui sont perdus. Quelques traces d’usure et ébréchures superficielles (chevelure, avant-bras gauche, extrémité du lagobolon). Surface recouverte d’une très belle patine vert bleuté. PROVENANCE

Ancienne collection particulière allemande. BIBLIOGRAPHIE

A propos des satyres : BROMMER F., Satyroi, Würzburg, 1937. CARPENTER T., Dionysian Imagery in Archaic Greek Art, Oxford, 1984. LISSARAGUE F., On the Wildness of Satyrs in CARPENTER T. – FARAONE C., Masks of Dionysos, Ithaca, 1993, pp. 207-220. LISSARAGUE F., in WINKLER J. – ZEITLIN F. (eds.), Nothing to do with Dionysos, Princeton, 1990, p.228. PADGETT M., The Centaur’s Smile : The Human Animal in Early Greek Art, New Haven, 2003, pp. 27-36. A propos du Fauno Rosso: BIEBER M., Sculpture of the Hellenistic Age, New York, 1961, figs. 268 et 573 (pour le satyre de la villa Albani et du musée du Vatican, inv. 801). HASKELL F. – PENNY N., Taste and the Antique, New Haven, 1981, pp. 213-15, no. 39. MAC DONALD W. – PINTO J., Hadrian’s Villa and Its Legacy, New Haven, 1995, pp. 141-143, fig. 173. SMITH R.R.R., Hellenistic Sculpture, New York, 1991, p. 129, fig. 152. SPINOLA G., Il Museo Pio Clementino 2, Vatican City, 1999, p. 158, no. 23, fig. 25 (à propos du satyre du musée du Vatican, inv. 801).

22530

114


115


CREDITS & CONTACTS

Selection of objects

Ali Aboutaam and Hicham Aboutaam

Project manager

Hélène Yubero, Geneva

Introduction

Phoenix Ancient Art

Research

Virginie Sélitrenny, Geneva Brenno Bottini, Geneva Alexander V. Kruglov, Ph.D, New York

Graphic concept

mostra-design.com, Geneva

Photography

Atsuyuki Shimada, Japan Stephan Hagen, New York

Printing

CA Design, Wanchai, Hong Kong

In Geneva

Ali Aboutaam C. Michael Hedqvist Phoenix Ancient Art S.A. 6, rue Verdaine - P.O. Box 3516 1211 Geneva 3 - Switzerland T +41 22 318 80 10 F +41 22 310 03 88 E paa@phoenixancientart.com www.phoenixancientart.com

In New York

Hicham Aboutaam Alex Gherardi Electrum, Exclusive Agent for Phoenix Ancient Art S.A. 47 East 66th Street New York, NY 10065 - USA T +1 212 288 7518 F +1 212 288 7121 E info@phoenixancientart.com www.phoenixancientart.com

© 2014 Phoenix Ancient Art SA 117


119


PHOENIX ANCIENT ART SA Geneva 6, rue Verdaine - 1204 Geneva - Switzerland T +41 22 318 80 10 - F +41 22 310 03 88 New York Electrum, Exclusive Agent 47 East 66th Street - New York, NY 10065 - USA T +1 212 288 7518 - F +1 212 288 7121 www.phoenixancientart.com

Phoenix AncientArt 2014 N°1  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you