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hadi Madwar Portfolio of Works Academy of Architecture in Mendrisio (MSc) McGill University School of Architecture (BSc)


CURRICULUM VITAE

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PROJECTS This is not about Theatre (but it could very well be) Professor Jan De Vylder MSc2 Diploma

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Chair Table Shelf Your(s) House(s) Professor Jan De Vylder **Completed with Chiara Malerba MSc1

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An Archive for Max Bill Professor Jonathan Sergison MSc2

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Tribute to Memory: Aleppo 2063 Professor Ipek Tureli **Completed with Julia Chang BSc3

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Center of Fine Arts at McGill University Professor Pierina Saia BSc2

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The Memory Organ Professors Martin Bressani, Aaron Sprecher **Completed with Jack Bian BSc3

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WORK EXPERIENCE Herzog and de Meuron Basel

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Education

Accademia di Architettura di Mendrisio - Universita della Svizzera Italiana | MSc Architecture | Mendrisio, Switzerland | 2017 McGill University | BSc Architecture | Montreal, Quebec | 2013 Marianopolis College | Pure and Applied Science | Montreal, Quebec, | 2009 Damascus Community School | Damascus, Syria | 1994-2009

Languages Spoken

Fluent in English | Fluent in Arabic | Proficient in Italian (B1-2) | basic command of French

Work Experience

Herzog and de Meuron Ltd. | Basel, Switzerland | March 2014 - August 2015 Michael Fischer, Senior Partner Hoffman-La Roche pRED Center, Bau 2; Helvetia Basel Campus | Trainee SURE Summer Undergraduate Research in Engineering (Architecture) | Montreal, Canada | May - August 2013 Professor Ipek Tureli Building Architectural Networks: American Missionary Schools in the Eastern Mediterranean | researcher McGill University School of Architecture, Research Assitantship | Montreal, Canada | September 2013 - February 2014 Professor Ipek Tureli “Architecture as Advertising: The Istanbul Reklam Building”, “Heritagisation of the ‘Ottoman|Turkish House’ in the 1970s: Istanbul-based Actors, Associations and their Networks” | Architectural illustrator Avi Friedman Consultants | Montreal, Canada | June - August 2012 Professor Abraham Friedman Convertible Housing for Sept-Iles | co-author of research preceeding housing proposal

Skills

Digital Modeling | Rhinoceros Drafting | Rhinoceros, AutoCAD Post-Processing| Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, Adobe InDesign Rendering | Vray for Rhinoceros Physical Modeling |

Contact Information

madwarh@gmail.com 1536 Avenue Summerhill H3H1B9 Montreal, Quebec , CANADA

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This is not about Theater (b u t i t c ou l d v e r y w e l l b e ) Diploma Project Professor Jan de Vylder Assisted by Luca Mostarda and Anna-Maria Prandi The project reacts to a perceived strangeness in the nondescript Glockengasse neighborhood in the Schalmoos district of Salzburg, Austria. Consequent to its situation to the north of the Kapuzinerberg, the neighborhood is arguably one of the city’s coldest and darkest. It is only loosely planned and hence - no architectural language dominates its physical expression. “This is not about Theater” proposes six projects to ameliorate the site condition: a Steampower Station, a Study Center, a Housing block, a Bathhouse, an open Pavillion, and a revised paving scheme. These projects take architectural reference mainly from a set of built and unbuilt works for Salzburg with the intention of accentuating the pre-existing strangeness of the neighborhood. Resultant is a sense of architectural projects through which each architectural intervention functions as a metaphorical stageset of daily life. Details, gestures, and ornaments reinforce the architectural connections amongst the projects. All drawings for this project were produced manually to emphasize the fictional quality of the proposal.

**I was kindly assisted by my colleagues Silvio Schubiger, Ewa Kaszuba, and Ana Sevo in the production of the final models. Without their help, this project would not have been possible. (T) A Staircase in a Bathhouse (in the mountain) Ink, acetone transfer, pencil coloring on 148 x 210; 297 x 420 mm card

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Bathhouse

Study Center

Pavillion

Steam Powerstation

Housing

(T) Site Model Constructed at 1:200

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(T) Site Photos

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(1)

(2)

(3)

(4)

(5)

(T) Process work; references (1) Markuskirche Salzburg, Fischer von Erlach (2) Proposal for Guggenheim Salzburg, Hans Hollein (3) Proposal for Salzburger Schauspielhaus, Hans Poelzig (4) Felsenreitschule, Fischer von Erlach (5) Hoyos-Stockl House (Vienna), Fischer von Erlach (6) Topcular Kislasi Girisi (Istanbul)

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(6)


(1)

(2)

(3)

(4)

(T) Process work; sketches (1) Steam Powerstation, (2) Study Center, (3) Housing, (4) Bathhouse, (5) Pavilion, (6) Pavement Ink, acetone transfer, pencil coloring on 148 x 210; 297 x 420 mm card

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(5)

(6)


(1)

(2)

(3)

(4)

(T) (T) Process work; sketches and corners (1) Steam Powerstation, (2) Study Center, (3) Housing, (4) Bathhouse, (5) Pavilion, (6)Pavement Ink, acetone transfer, pencil coloring on 148 x 210; 297 x 420 mm card

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(5)

(6)


(1)

(2)

(3)

(4)

(T) Process work; corners (1) Steam Powerstation, (2) Study Center, (3) Housing, (4) Bathhouse, (5) Pavilion Ink, acetone transfer, pencil coloring on 148 x 210; 297 x 420 mm card

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(5)


(1)

(2)

(3)

(4)

(T) (T) Process work; sketches, sections, and plans (1) Steam Powerstation, (2) Study Center, (3) Housing, (4) Bathhouse, (5) Pavilion, (6) Pavement Ink on 210 x 420 mm card Originally drawn at 1:200

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(5)

(6)


(T) Model Steam Powerstation Constructed at 1:200

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(T) Section Steam Powerstation Ink, acetone transfer, pencil coloring on 594 x 841 mm card Originally drawn at 1:100

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(T) Model Study Center Constructed at 1:200

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(T) Section Study Center Ink, acetone transfer, pencil coloring on 594 x 841 mm card Originally drawn at 1:100

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(T) Typical Floorplan Study Center Ink, acetone transfer, pencil coloring on 594 x 841 mm card Originally drawn at 1:100

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(T) Axonometry of a Corner Study Center Ink, acetone transfer, pencil coloring on 594 x 841 mm card Originally drawn at 1:20

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(T) Model Housing Constructed at 1:200

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(T) Typical Floorplan Housing Ink, acetone transfer, pencil coloring on 594 x 841 mm card Originally drawn at 1:50

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(T) Elevation Housing Ink, acetone transfer, pencil coloring on 594 x 841 mm card Originally drawn at 1:50

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(T) Longitudinal section Housing Ink, acetone transfer, pencil coloring on 594 x 841 mm card Originally drawn at 1:50

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(T) Section of a Private Livingroom Housing Ink, acetone transfer, acrylic paint, pencil coloring on 594 x 841 mm card Originally drawn at 1:20

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(T) Axonometry of a Private Livingroom Housing Ink, acetone transfer, acrylic paint, pencil coloring on 594 x 841 mm card Originally drawn at 1:20

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(T) Model of a Private Livingroom Housing Ink, acetone transfer, pencil coloring on 594 x 841 mm card Constructed at 1:20

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(T) Model Bathhouse Constructed at 1:200

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(T) Section Bathhouse Ink, acetone transfer, pencil coloring on 594 x 841 mm card Originally drawn at 1:100 27


(T) Plan Bathhouse Ink, acetone transfer, pencil coloring on 594 x 841 mm card Originally drawn at 1:100

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(T) Detail of a Staircase Bathhouse Ink, acetone transfer, pencil coloring on 594 x 841 mm card Originally drawn at 1:20

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(T) Model Pavilion Constructed at 1:200

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(T) Plan (0) Pavilion Ink, acetone transfer, pencil coloring on 594 x 841 mm card Originally drawn at 1:100

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(T) Floorplan (+1) Pavilion Ink, acetone transfer, pencil coloring on 594 x 841 mm card Originally drawn at 1:100

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(T) Section Pavilion Ink, acetone transfer, pencil coloring on 594 x 841 mm card Originally drawn at 1:100

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(T) Perspective Pavilion Ink, acetone transfer, pencil coloring on 594 x 841 mm card

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(T) Detail of Pavement Ink, acetone transfer, pencil coloring on 594 x 841 mm card Originally drawn at 1:20

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(T) Materiality studies Stool 60 by Alvar Aalto and Cocoon Lamp by Achille Castiglione Graphite on 105 x 210 mm card 36


Ch a i r Ta b l e S h e l f Yo u r (s ) Ho u s e( s ) Professor Jan de Vylder (MSc 1) Assisted by Luca Mostarda and Anna-Maria Prandi

The atelier was thematically divided into three movements, respectively entitled CHAIR TABLE SHELF, YOUR(S), and HOUSE(S). In the first movement, working alongside Chiara Malerba, I was tasked with the spatial analysis of two corners. The first, situated in Jos van Driessche’s home in Lokeren, Beligum, contained two of Achille Castiglione’s Cocoon Lamps. The second, situated in Edouard Neuenschwander’s home in Gokhausen, Switzerland, contained Alvar Aalto’s Stool 60. Our graphic representation of the two spaces was primarily concerned with materiality and structural relationships. In the second movement, as a continuation of the graphic studies completed with my partner, I was to derive two new pieces of furniture. Castiglione’s Cocoon Lamp was translated into a window seat set in a round window, whereas Aalto’s Stool 60 engendered a thinner stool characterized by a marble top. The two would be given a home in the final movement of the atelier. In the third movement, working individually, I was assigned to two Belgian locales. The first, located in the periphery of the coastal city of Ostend in a village named Oudenbourg, was to become site to a country house. The second, located in Brussels within a Garden City-inspired neighborhood (or “Logis Floreal”, was to become site to a winter house. Each project was preceeded by a painted study of the site.

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(T) Axonometry Stool 60 by Alvar Aalto Ink, acetone transfer on 700x1000 MM canvas 38


(T) Axonometry House in Gokhausen by Edoard Neuenschwander Ink, acetone transfer at 1:25 on 700x1000 mm canvas 39


(T) Axonometry Cocoon lamp by Achille Castiglione Ink detailing, acetone transfer at 1:2 on 700x1000 mm canvas 40


(T) Axonometry House in Lokeren by Jos van Driessche Ink detailing, acetone transfer at 1:25 on 700x1000 mm canvas 41


(T) 1:500 Site Map House in Logis Floreal, Brussels Ink detailing at 1:500 on 297x420 mm card 42


(T) Painting Site of a house in Logis Floreal, Brussels Ink, acetone transfer on 297x420 mm card 43


(T) Axonometry (concept) Stool for a house in the Logis Floreal Acetone transfer on 297x420 mm card 44


(T) Axonometry Stool for a house in the Logis Floreal Ink, acetone transfer at 1:5 on 297x420 mm card 45


(L) Plan, section (R) Material joint Stool for a house in the Logis Floreal Ink detailing, acetone transfer at 1:2, 1:1 on 210x297 mm card 46


(T) Axonometry Corner of a stool for a house in the Logis Floreal Ink detailing, acetone transfer at 1:25 on 210x297 mm card 47


(T) Axonometry A House in the Logis Floreal Ink detailing, acetone transfer at 1:50 on 297x420 mm card 48


(T) Section A house in the Logis Floreal Ink detailing, acetone transfer at 1:50 on 297x420 mm card 49


Before

After Points of architectural intervention

SXN

SXN

(T) Plans A house in the Logis Floreal Ink detailing, acetone transfer at 1:100 on 297x420 mm card 50


(T) Painting Site of a house in Oudenbourg, Oostende Ink detailing, acetone transfer on 297x420 mm card 51


(T) Painting Site of a house in Oudenbourg, Oostende Ink detailing, acetone transfer at 1:500 on 297x420 mm card 52


(T) Painting Concept for a window seat for a house in Oudenbourg, Oostende Ink detailing, acetone transfer on 297x420 mm card 53


(T) Axonometry Window seat for a house in Oudenbourg, Oostende Ink detailing, acetone transfer at 1:5 on 297x420 mm card 54


(T) Plan A house in Oudenbourg, Oostende Ink detailing, acetone transfer at 1:50 on 297x420 mm card 55


(T) Plan A house in Oudenbourg, Oostende Ink detailing, acetone transfer at 1:50 on 297x420 mm card 56


(T) Axonometry Corner in a house in Oudenbourg, Oostende Ink detailing, acetone transfer at 1:25 on 420x297 mm card 57


An Ar c h i v e fo r Ma x Bi l l Professor Jonathan Sergison (MSc 2) Assisted by Lea Prati and Taro Sakurai

The ongoing project is concerned with the creation of an archive for works of Max Bill. The archive will be located within proximity to his former home in Zumikon in the outskirts of Zurich. The project was preceeded by a model study of an existing art exhibition space. I was assigned to the Haus Konstruktiv in Zurich, within which I chose to study the spaces within which circulation and exhibition intersected. As an evolution of that exercise, my proposed facility in Zumikon would articulate upon that relationship between movement within the museum and the narrative of Max Bill’s production. An interior model shot has been included to express that particular architectural intention.

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(T) Model study Haus Konstrukttiv 1:10 59


Max Bill Archive (project)

Haus Bill (existing)

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(1) Entrance, Reception (2) Lecture room, Education Space (3) Access to storage, offices, and library (4) Cafe (5) Temporary art collection (6) Max Bill collection

(T) Groundfloor plan 1:200

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1

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(T) Cross Sections 1:200

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(1) Entrance, Reception (2) Lecture room, Education Space (3) Access to storage, offices, and library (4) Cafe (5) Temporary art collection (6) Max Bill collection


(T) Process Models 1:200

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(T) Final scheme model 1:200

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(T) Interior model 1:50

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(T) Interior model 1:50 67


(T) Exterior model 1:100

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restored house

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reconstructed house


Me m o r i a l o f a Ho u s e : Tr i b u te to Al e p p o 2 0 6 3 Professor Ipek Tureli Third-year undergraduate studio Completed with Julia Chang A series of architectural interventions is derived from the reconstructed narrative of the Kurdiyeh family of the Qadi-Askar neighborhood in Aleppo, Syria. The Kurdiyehs were forced into hiding in 2013 to escape the atrocities of civil warfare in their city. These interventions are set within the interpretive reconstruction of their destroyed apartment building - envisioned in 2063 to be the last remaining pre-war structure in their respective neighborhood. The physical reconstruction and chronicled deconstruction of their experience is approached through a series of material treatments that emphasize casting as a process of both preserving and narrating memory. In fifty years’ time, The Kurdiyeh’s home will become a defining landmark of a city undergoing physical and psychological rehabilitation and will stand monumental to a city it was originally stood insignificant to. Overall, the project was intended as an alternative approach to historical reconstruction in a region beset by internal conflict. As opposed to literally rebuilding the past, this project interprets it, attempting to submit the occupant to an architecture of narration as opposed to the the physical transplantation characteristic of contemporary reconstruction projects.

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The Kurdiyeh family lived in the second floor of a four storey tall apartment block. The building, initially overtaken by snipers, became a target for mortar fire. The building ultimately collapsed in halves, forcing the Kurdiyeh’s to seek refuge in a below-ground carpentry workshop

(T) BEFORE - c. November 29, 2012 72


(T) AFTER - c. Novermber 29, 2063 73


(T) AFTER - c. Novermber 29, 2063, from viewing deck 74


reconstructed house

restored house

+19.10 m 2 3

1

4

-3.75 m

(T) Section, 1:200 (1) glass brick reconstruction (2) perforated lightwell (3) viewing deck (4) suspended cast 75


(T) Physcial model, 1:200 76


BEFORE

AFTER

BEFORE

(T)1:50 mockup of of facade reconstruction

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(T) transfer mold 77


BEFORE

AFTER

BEFORE

(T)1:50 mockup of of cast concrete facade (for restored house)

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(T)1:50 mockup of of glass brick facade (for reconstructed house) 78


BEFORE

AFTER

BEFORE

(T)1:50 mockup of reconstructed lightwell simulating bullet holes

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(T)1:50 mockup of suspended latex cast 79


Ce n te r o f F i n e Ar ts a t Mc G i l l Un i v er s i t y Instructor Pierina Saia Second-year undergraduate studio Completed Independently The proposed project for a Center of Fine Arts at McGill University derives from the planar projection of building-street alignments onto the site located at the intersection of Peel Street and Sherbrooke Street. It is moreover an extension to the adjacent Bronfman Building belonging to the Desautels Faculty of Managment. The resultant pattern formed by projections - at times rationalized, at times not - comprises the basis of a logic of formalism and transparency which articulates a programmatic procession weaving through spaces dedicated to the storage, viewing, and production of fine art. This procession is topographical in nature, hence emphasizing itself as an encapsulated concentration of the urban landscape set in an envelope of concrete and translucent glass.

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(1) (2) (3) (4) (5)

(T) Process diagram rationalized grid site perspective transparent curtain wall transparency sequence perforated concrete envelope 81


(T) Concept model 82


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-6.10 m

(1) (2) (3) (4)

(T) Sectional perspective artists’ workspaces auditorium exhibition space archival space 83


(T) Interior perspective 84


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(T) Exterior Perspective 86


T h e Me m o r y O r g a n Professor Martin Bressani, Professor Aaron Sprecher Third-year undergraduate studio Completed with Jack Bian The Memory Organ is a data archive, programmatically dedicated to the recollection, storage, retrieval, reconstruction, and representation of public memory. Unlike the traditional bank and/or museum of a comparable program, its wealth is virtual. Unlike the conventional data server, it is not concealed from the public eye and is presented as a central urban feature in the city of Montreal. The project was based on a set of photographic and sculptural exercises drawn from a psycho-geographic analysis of the vicinity of the Mont Royal station of Montreal’s Orange Metro Line. Our photographic driftings, conducted both inside and outside of the Mont Royal station, revealed spatial contrasts. It led to the final production of two photographs depicting the main waiting platform and a street scene during an afternoon rainstorm – a juxtaposition of gestures of control and fluidity. This dichotomy formed the basis of our psychological understanding of the site and of our eventual sculptural exploration. Inspired by a muscular contraction, we created a long, striated strand expanding, twisting, and peeling open at its centre. Conceived as an “organ,” we emphasize it’s being a component part of a larger mechanism. Translating our sculpture into structure, and keeping in mind that our preliminary exercises would be insufficient to inform the design of the tower as a whole, we used the idea of a mechanism to guide a programmatic narrative weaving in an out of our sculpted organ. That process expresses itself in moments of rigidity, fluidity, isolation, and exposure sequenced in the vertical procession from the ground floor plaza through a set of platforms, spiral ramp, archives, and library. Memory simultaneously informs, animates, and sustains the tower, hence a Memory Organ.  

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(T) Site Photographs 88


(T) Three dimensional reconstruction of site atmospheres 89


+175.3 m

+100.5 m

+33.7 m

+33.7 m

+06.5 m

-10.5 m

(T) Section 90


(T) Exterior perspective

(T) Interior perspective

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(T) Exterior perspective


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(1) (2) (3) (4)

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10 m

(T) Plan +33.7 m Waiting area 3D scanners Memory capsules Entrance to exhibition ramp

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(T) Plan +100.5 m (1) (2)

Exhibition ramp Entrance to digital archives

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2

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(1) (2) (3)

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10 m

(T) Plan +175.3 m

Library Upper entrance to digital archives Exit ramp from The Organ


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(T) Detail section 93

(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12)

Metal grating Trapezoidal section ribbed metal sheeting I-Beam 100 mm deep 140 mm channel (forms drainage channel) 10 mm steel sheet bracket 2 x 50/7 steel flat ETFE membrane 50 mm dia. steel galvanized handrail Curved I-beam IPE 200 40 mm steel tension cable Diagonal steel bracing Vertical support arm connected to hidden metal gasket bolted to curved I-beam (13) Sound-absorbing element, part-perforated sheet aluminum filled with insulation

(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9)

10 mm aluminum extrusion 40 mm diameter tensile steel cable Bird netting fixing Continuous flat along the external side of the spiral ramp Bolted ETFE extrusion Double ETFE sheeting 80 mm steel cap to hide 50 mm opening for steel tension cables puncturing the spiral ramp Bolted connection for ETFE joint to the side surface of the spiral ramp


Wo r k E x p e r i e n c e **For a more detailed viewing of my work completed at Herzog and de Meuron in Basel, please contact me directly at the email provided.

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Hoffman - LaRoche Basel Campus expansion

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hadi Madwar | Portfolio of Works | Academy of Architecture in Mendrisio  

Works completed during Graduate (AAM Mendrisio) and Undergraduate (McGill SoA) studies in Architecture

hadi Madwar | Portfolio of Works | Academy of Architecture in Mendrisio  

Works completed during Graduate (AAM Mendrisio) and Undergraduate (McGill SoA) studies in Architecture

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