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ISSUE NUMBER FOUR

FALL 2016

PUBLISHED BY HACIN + ASSOCIATES

THE

GATHERING EDITION

DESIGN FEATURES EDITORIALS PHOTO ESSAYS

DESIGN CULTURE

H+


www.hacin.com


2016 Boston Society of Architects Honor Award for Design Excellence 2016 IIDA of New England Design Award Best Private Residential Design

Hacin + Associates [architecture + design]


FOLLOW H+A ON INSTAGRAM!

@HacinAssociates


BEGIN YOUR KITCHEN DESIGN JOURNEY HERE

Take a Test Drive and reset your expectation for what is possible at Clarke’s new Sub-Zero & Wolf Showroom and Test Kitchen at 7 Tide.

7 Tide Street • Boston Seaport • 800-845-8247 • clarkeliving.com


17 WOLCOTT CT, BOSTON, MA 02136 | 617.333.6800 | info@fbnconstruction.com | www.fbnconstruction.com Team: FBN Construction, Hacin + Associates, Jama Samek Interiors, Bulthaup Kitchens, Metalwork www.bartekkonieczny.com


TABLE OF CONTENTS

11

Letter from the Editor

14

The Making of a Restaurant

34

Contemporary Kitchen Living

42

Anatomy of a Kitchen

46

Culture +

A message from David Hacin on the places where we gather and connect, and the renovation of his own personal gathering space

From blank canvas to open day, the story of creating Glass House Restaurant & Bar in Cambridge's Kendall Square

Eduardo Serrate and David Hacin join our clients and collaborators in a sketchbook style reflection on what makes these spaces work

A diagrammatic look at how we fit a chef's kitchen, a place for relaxing, and plenty of storage all into a compact space

A list of things we love, including what we’re listening to, reading, watching, eating, buying, and discovering lately

5


TABLE OF CONTENTS [continued]

The Four Seasons

54

Objet d'art

68

FOCUS

76

List of 10+

91

Our own story about the closing of the Four Seasons, its status as an icon of great design, and taking a piece of it with us

A look at the objects we hold onto over the years - beautiful, curious, and odd - and the meaningful reasons why

A photographic essay of food plated in architectural styles with acompanying sketches from Brutalist to Bauhaus

Ten (plus) classic New England Desserts, and where to find them, from Tim Grafft's highly coveted 'list'

6


There's a new Flour in town.

Opening December 2016 | 40 Erie Street, Cambridge, MA | An H+A and BioMed Realty collaboration

www.flourbakery.com


DESIGN CULTURE

PUBLISHER Hacin + Associates EDITOR-IN-CHIEF David Hacin CREATIVE DIRECTORS David Hacin Emily Neumann PHOTOGRAPHY Matthew Arnold Trent Bell Bruce Martin Emily Neumann Michael Stavaridis COVER IMAGES Emily Neumann PHOTO STYLISTS Jennifer Clapp David Hacin Matthew Woodward Yaoyao Kelly ADVERTISING media@hacin.com Printed in China

CONTRIBUTORS Scott Thomson David Tabenken Matthew Manke Jeremy Robertson Jennifer Clapp Eduardo Serrate Hillary Faccio Matthew Arnold Jeffrey Brown Rob Clocker Elizabeth Dame Aimee Epstein Norton Darien Fortier Russell Higgins Michelangelo Latona Joshua Lentz Christine Rankin Manke David Monti Rebecca Rivers Matthew Woodward Srishti Goyal Yaoyao Kelly Tim Grafft Paul Reidt SPECIAL THANKS FBN Construction Holland Companies Kochman, Reidt, & Haigh Showroom Poggenpohl Clarke SubZero Wolf The Briar Group BioMed Realty John Moriarty & Associates

H+

H+ MAGAZINE IS CREATED, DESIGNED, AND PUBLISHED BY ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN FIRM, HACIN + ASSOCIATES 1 1 2 SHAWMUT AVENUE, STUDIO 5A, BOSTON, MA 021 1 8 www.hacin.com | media@hacin.com | 617.426.0077 /HacinAssociates

8

@HacinAssociates

@HacinAssociates

H+


Innovative cuisine for innovative people.

DISTRICT HALL, 75 Northern Avenue, Boston, MA | www.gatherboston.com


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

Here’s the situation: I can’t wait for our kitchen to get finished. My husband Tim is over it completely and, in this photograph, is in hiding. Walter, our 1 year old miniature schnauzer puppy[named for the German Bauhaus architect Walter Gropius], reluctantly posed with me under the condition that he be allowed to bark at the parade of contractors coming into our home without being locked in the bedroom. The project keeps expanding in scope and cost. I have 25 people coming for an early Thanksgiving dinner… Sound familiar? As we head into the holiday season, designers and architects, as well as their contractors and sub-contractors, suppliers and craftspeople, are often faced with seemingly impossible deadlines to get it done in time for a ‘big event’, be it a Thanksgiving dinner, a fundraiser, a restaurant opening, an office move, or simply the time of year when we traditionally gather and celebrate. I decided to experience this myself, knowing that a week after it’s all done, I will have no memory of washing dishes in the bathroom sink and will only be excited to prepare for our annual ‘Thanksmas’ family get together in a beautiful[and functional] new space. Having seen this scenario play out so many times before, I know that in the end, it’s always worth it. Gatherings and celebrations are central to our lives and, as such, central to our goal of designing beautiful, comfortable places and spaces in all of our projects with these moments in mind. Of course, the focus of these places to meet, share, and connect are often centered around food and drink; as architects and interior and graphic designers, kitchens, bars, and places to dine are among the most inspiring - and most personal - challenges we encounter. It takes a lot of expertise and thought to make a special place where both great memories and recipes can be made and shared. In this fourth issue of H+, we explore the making of places to gather, drink, dine, and celebrate. In addition to our regular ongoing feature on what H+Aers are reading, watching and listening to, as well as where we are traveling and eating, we have turned our attention to what makes us really tick - collaborating, sharing stories, breaking bread and, as our cover illustrates, takeout from the Buttery and Myers and Chang! For our main feature, the ‘Making of a Restaurant’, we created a scrapbook of sorts to illustrate all of the people, choices, details, decisions, and efforts that have gone into making our latest restaurant in Kendall Square, Glass House. We were thrilled to work with The Briar Group and BioMed on this venture and to be able to showcase our interdisciplinary approach to design, from laying out the space to selecting the furnishings and developing the restaurant’s identity. Glass House will open as you get this magazine and we hope to see you there! On a more domestic scale, we, along with our clients and collaborators, deconstruct three of our most memorable kitchens from the past few years, highlighting the details that made a difference. In ‘Anatomy of a Kitchen’, we take that one step further by diagramming one of our most recent kitchen projects for noted restaurateur Pat Lyons. We also riff on the closing of New York’s legendary Four Seasons restaurant and why it was important to us to bring a piece of that history into our new office…In fact, as we plan for our January move back to SoWa in the South End, no project in our studio has elicited more debate than the design of our new H+A kitchen Let’s get 25 designer types to talk about the ‘right’ way to make coffee… In perhaps my favorite feature, H+A designers explore the artistry of plating food in a uniquely design focused way. I was blown away by the results! Hungry yet? As a ‘sweet’ end note, our guest foodie Tim Grafft shares 10 worth-the-trip places to get a classic dessert in New England culled from his highly coveted ‘list’. Finally, I want to offer a special thank you to Poggenpohl kitchens, Clarke Sub Zero Wolf and Monaco Johnson general contracting for making my own kitchen project so rewarding. Along with all of the other participants and advertisers in this issue, we are proud to work with the best! We hope you enjoy it and all of us at H+A wish you happy gatherings this holiday season! David[and Walter]

David Hacin FAIA President and Editor dhacin@hacin.com 11


LIVE.

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WORK.

Loft Offices, Retail, and Residences at 46 Wareham Street Coming Soon visit www.thehollandcompanies.com | 617.556.2900

THE FACTORY PROPERTIES DEVELOPED BY THE HOLLAND COMPANIES DESIGNED IN PARTNERSHIP WITH HACIN + ASSOCIATES

the

HOLLAND COMPANIES


The Making of a Restaurant FROM A BLANK CANVAS, TO OPENING DAY.

Glass House Restaurant & Bar opened in Cambridge's Kendall Square neighborhood in November 2016. This Briar Group establishment was a joint collaboration with BioMed Realty who developed and operates the building at 450 Kendall Street where the eatery is located. H+A partnered with them to develop a vision for the space and then to make it a reality with John Moriarty & Associates. This empty, unfinished shell, waiting for the right team to come along and give it an identity, is where it all started. Team noted: Austin O'Connor, Tom Shea, Todd Bennett, Hannah Huke, Ben Hennemuth, Jessica O'Neal, Salvatore Zinno, David Hacin, Matthew Arnold, Christine Rankin Manke, Rebecca Rivers, Emily Neumann, Mike Frias, Brian Cooper

14


15


1

NAMES EXPLORED

SQUARE FEET

TRIP TO CANADA We started the project with a trip to Toronto, Ontario in Canada to gather inspiration from the city's bourgeoning hospitality scene.

27

5,207 The restaurant includes over 5,200 square feet of dining, prep, cooking, storage, and utility space.

The team brainstormed 27 different possible names for the restaurant before deciding on 'Glass House'.

100+

PEOPLE INVOLVED IN THE MAKING OF THE RESTAURANT. HERE ARE A FEW OF THEM...

SAL

AUSTIN

director, development president BioMed Realty The Briar Group

DAVID

design director H+A

MATTHEW

project designer H+A

220 16

TOM

TODD

chief operating officer general manager The Briar Group The Briar Group

CHRISTINE

project designer H+A

REBECCA

interior designer H+A

HANNAH

marketing director The Briar Group

EMILY

branding & graphics H+A

37+

SEATS

GREEN VINYL FABRICS

The restaurant can host up to 220 people at once, including 130 seats inside and another 90 at the patio.

More than 37 swatches for green vinyl were reviewed before finding just the right one.

BEN

JESSICA

MIKE

BRIAN

executive chef marketing coordinator The Briar Group The Briar Group

project manager project superintendent JMA JMA

15

TYPES OF LIGHTING We curated 15 different lighting fixtures to meet the various needs of this multi-use space.


MAKING A RESTAURANT: BY THE NUMBERS a quantitative look

10

COUNTRIES Products from craftsmen and artisans from 10 different countries - as close as Canada and as far as Denmark were sourced for the space.

3

BABIES BORN During the course of creating this restaurant, three babies were born to this team, one marriage occured, & one team member got engaged!

60 BEER TAPS

There are 22 brands of beer and 2 wines on tap at both the drinking bar and the raw bar, with an additional 12 taps outside.

85 + CHAIRS

We vetted over 85 chairs, even having five delivered to the design studio to choose the three that worked best for the restaurant.

52

LOGO OPTIONS We worked through 52 different logo sketches, options, and variations before landing on the final identity design and mark.

4

OPENING PARTIES! Four parties were held to celebrate the opening of the space for friends, team members, vendors, and everyone who helped with the project.

7

MONTHS OF CONSTRUCTION JMA began construction in March 2016 and ended in October 2016.

720 PIECES OF GLASS

We worked with a local artisan to create custom glass panels which used over 700 individually cut pieces of glass!

532 DAYS

We held our first team meeting for the project in May 2015, and the restaurant opened its doors in November 2016. 17


Starting with a Concept. When the Briar Group decided to open a restaurant at BioMed Realty's 450 Kendall Street building in Cambridge, it created another opportunity to work with H+A. Sal Zinno of BioMed worked with the team to establish the parameters of what was wanted for the space: an everyday establishment, serving the public, with a dual purpose of providing a dedicated space for meetings, events, and social activities for the Kendall Square community. H+A and the Briar Group previously collaborated on Gather Restaurant at District Hall - another multifunctional space in an innovation hub - so the idea was familiar. The concept, design, and operation had to focus on more than just a restaurant or a bar. The aesthetic needed to appeal to a specific, yet broad clientele, and it needed a theme and a name. So when you start with a blank canvas like this, where, exactly, do you start? For us, it was Toronto.

Toronto trip was intended to encourage everyone to " The think creatively. I wanted a restaurant as unique as the building and unlike the other restaurants in the area. I think that Glass House is definitely going to be distinctive compared to any other restaurant in Cambridge. I also think that we’ve accomplished the same with the building. The neuron is like nothing else in the area and the Soso lobby installation and associated lighting system is also pretty unique. - Sal

"

team trip to Toronto was perfectly timed. " The After initial concept ideation and some basic floorplan layouts of the Cambridge space, the trip was a real life exploration of applications of hospitality concepts in modern ground level glass spaces. It helped validate many of the groups’ ideas and fostered a great collaborative creative process. - Tom

"

are always looking to New York or other " People cities we're more familiar with for design precedents, but Toronto and Montreal are some of the most cosmopolitan cities in the world, and yet they're sometimes off our radar. There was a lot to learn about what's going on up there, especially their diverse and multi-ethnic food scene. - David

"

18


we knew from the beginning that " Since we would be operating a dedicated event space within the restaurant, we needed to come up with creative and interesting ways to activate the rest of the space during those events. That was one of the earliest concepts the team used to build upon for the rest of the design. - Todd

"

wanted to start this project with a fresh perspective, " We and traveling to Toronto allowed us to do that. After speed-dating our way through restaurants ranging from super sleek and modern to overly eclectic, we had a better language for what we wanted the restaurant to be and what we absolutely did not want it to be. The most valuable part was spending a day together as a group - It was a rare opportunity and I wish we could start off every project that way. - Christine

"

of the first things Sal said to me was that he " One wanted a space that was different from all the others. He said, 'I want you to smell the coffee beans to clear your palate,' (so I actually brought coffee beans to the first meeting with Sal!)... That’s one of the reasons we went to Toronto, to find inspiration. - Matthew

"

19


I wanted the design and aesthetic of the space to be similar to the building... quality finishes, not overdone, with clean lines, but also not cold or uninviting. I think that the abundance of natural materials helped to offset the abundance of glass and aluminum at the storefront. It’s a nice balance. - Sal

Designing the space. One parameter established early in the design process was the need for a private dining space used for a range of events throughout the day and evening but which also allows the restaurant to continue to operate for the public. We developed the idea of a “room within a room” which evolved into the “conservatory”, a glass space with a large window and door system. The room operates autonomously but also feels integrated when functioning as a traditional dining room. As the formal dining atmosphere winds down for the evening, the dining room can be closed off, concentrating the activity around the two bars. With the restaurant located off the main street, placing the main bar in a visible corner was intentional to appear busy throughout the day.

design process was a " The blast! We took advantage

of the full spectrum of our in house design talent - from architecture to interiors, graphic design to custom fabrication - and the clients were full partners in the vision. A rare and wonderful collaborative experience! - David

"

MID-PROCESS RENDERING KITCHEN

RAW BAR

ENTRY

BAR CASUAL DINING

DINING ROOM WC

OUTDOOR LOUNGE 20

PATIO

In total, we explored 17 options for the plan of the space.


EARLY WIREFRAME SKETCH MID-PROCESS RENDERING

WALL SCONCE

COPPER WIRE + BLACK METAL MATERIALS USED IN THE FRAMEWORK FOR THE BAR'S OVERHEAD STORAGE

designed the service " We furniture like the host's

RAW BAR PENDANT

stand and server stations using the same concepts we applied for the overall space. Light and dark materials were combined for high contrast, with GREEN SCHEME copper detailing as an accent. - Matthew

"

Today’s hospitality spaces need to create energy centers of social interaction such as bar and lounge areas that allow a fluid movement of guests, balanced with more traditional dining format seating. - Tom

AN EARLY CONCEPT THAT REMAINED IN THE SCOPE WAS THE LIGHT VS. DARK MARBLE SURFACES USED TO SEPARATE THE BEVERAGE + RAW BARS

HOST STAND DESIGN

WALL SCONCE

21


Main Bar: Appx Qty 37

Chairs near Main Bar: Appx Qty 6

DINING ROOM LIGHTS

"

RAW BAR PENDANT LIGHTS

Main Dining Stackable: Appx Qty 72

Starting any project from a blank canvas is challenging, T AP & T A B L E but one thing we did have T AP T AP & T A B L E was a new modern building T AP & T A B L E Main Bar with a mint green glass Main Bar Raw / Breakfast Bar: Appx Qty 9 ADA Counter: Appx QtyQty 6 37 Main Bar: Appx facade. This was really Main Bar Classic TBistro P & T A the B L E jumping off point for A P + Modern & T ATwist B L Final E Proposed Pieces T AP & T AP & T A B L E the material palette and the glass concept for the Main Bar Main Bar T AP & T A B L E Main Bar A P & T restaurant. A B L E - Christine Bar: Appx Qty 37 Main Bar: Appx Main Qty 37

Main Bar: Appx Qty 37

"

Main Bar Chairs near Main Bar: Appx Qty 6

T A B L E

Main Dining Main Dining Stackable: AppxStackable: Qty 72 Appx Qty 72

Main Dining Main Dining

T A B L E

near Main Chairs near MainChairs Bar: Appx Qty 6Bar: Appx Qty 6

Chairs near Main Bar: Appx Qty 6

Main Dining Stackable: Appx Qty 72

&

Main Bar Main Bar: Appx Qty 37

Main Dining Stackable: Appx Qty 72

Main Bar

Chairs

Main Dining

Main Bar

Main Dining T AP

Raw / Breakfast Bar: Appx Qty 9

&

T A B L E

ADA Counter: Appx Qty 6

T AP

&

T A B L E

/ Breakfast Raw / Breakfast Raw Bar: Appx Qty 9Bar: Appx Qty 9 Main Bar: Appx Qty 37 Bar RawDining / Raw Breakfast Bar + Banquette ChairsMain / Breakfast Bar + Banquette Chairs Main

Modern Vintage

ADA Qty Counter: Appx Qty 6 ADA Counter: Appx 6

Retro Classic + Industrial Twist

Dining Main Bar Main Main Dining

Main Dining

Main Dining Stackable: Appx Qty 72 Proposed PiecesAppx Qty 6 ADA Counter: Pieces

Bistro +Twist Modern Final Raw / Breakfast Bar: Appx Qty 9 Classic + Modern FinalTwist Proposed Chairs near Main Bar: Appx Qty Bistro 6 Classic

Raw / Breakfast Bar + Banquette C

Main Dining

Vintage Nostaligia

Raw / Breakfast Bar + Banquette Chairs T AP

&

T A B L E

Vintage Nostaligia + Modern Twist Main Dining Stackable: Appx Qty 72

Main Dining

Raw / Breakfast Bar: Appx Qty 9

ADA C

Raw / Breakfast Bar + Banquette C Main BarTHAT MADE THE CUT FOR THE FINAL ROUND SOME SEATING OF SELECTIONS... Main Dining

Raw / Breakfast Bar + Banquette Chairs

Classic Bistro + Modern Twist

Raw /Raw Breakfast Bar + Banquette Chairs Chairs / Breakfast Bar + Banquette Main Dining

Raw / Breakfast Bar + Banquette Chairs Modern Vintage

Moder

Retro Classic + Industrial The floor tile is meant to be installed Twist Classic Bistro + Modern Twist Classic Bistro + Modern Twist randomly, but we quickly figured out Raw / Breakfast Bar: Appx Qty 9 ADA Counter: Appx Qty 6 that without some guidelines, the randomness could easily not look the Classic Bistro + Modern Twist Final Proposed Pieces Raw / Breakfast + Banquette Chairs way we wanted. We went through Main Bar Dining several Bar iterations of meticulously Raw / Breakfast + Banquette Chairs Classic Bistro + Modern Twist forming rules for Breakfast Bar + Banquette Chairs Retro Classic + Modern Twist the tile installers to layout the floor tile, making Vintage Nostaligia + Modern Twist the pattern feel Raw / Breakfast Bar + Banquette Chairs 'random'. - Matthew Vintage Nostaligia + Modern Twist

We reviewed over 85 chairs before finding 3 that met all code requirements, durability Raw / tests, client preferences, and matched the design aesthetic. 22


Creating interior style.

FABRIC SWATCHES FOR DRAPERY AND UPHOLSTERY

Although we had established an aesthetic direction for the space, we still needed to develop an interior style for the restaurant. The clients had a vision of the space as a modern day ‘meeting house' - a comfortable, everyday establishment in which to gather. To bring this vision to life, every interior element was carefully considered to make sure it fit this design story. Beyond aesthetics, the furniture and lighting required vetting to ensure it would be flexible and functional for this multipurpose space serving the surrounding community from morning to night. The seating needed to be comfortable for a long dinner but casual enough for an informal lunch; stackable and light enough to be stored away for events, but heavy and durable enough for daily use; with upholstery designed to last. The lighting had to be both warm and inviting for evening bar crowds but also bright and cheery for corporate meetings.

Our commitment to become a meeting space in addition to a hospitality venue required the space to be more flexible in design and selections of furniture. Certainly, in the role of operator, it was important that the excitement for design be compatible with operational function. - Tom

WALL SCONCE

BARTOP LIGHT

aimed to mix the familiar " We and unexpected, using classic

BANQUETTE SEATING DESIGN

forms reinterpreted in modern materials. We used a minimal color palette, accented by “throwback” shades of green, reminiscent of what your grandmother might have had in her kitchen. - Rebecca

www.seeddesignusa.com

"

ENTRY PENDANT LIGHT

RESTROOM FIXTURES

VOLA Exclusive Colour Series.

DOME PENDANTS AT HALLWAY 23


TODD BENNETT GENERAL MANAGER 4 5 04 5K0E NK DE AL N DLALSLT S T C AMB C AMB R IDRGIDE ,G MA E , MA 0 2 14 0 2214 2 TBENNETT@THEBRIARGROUP.COM TBENNETT@THEBRIARGROUP.COM GLASSHOUSECAMBRIDGE.COM GLASSHOUSECAMBRIDGE.COM @Glasshouse450 @Glasshouse450| 617.945.9450 | 617.945.9450

BRIAR EV EN TS AN THEM kitchen + bar brew cafe at district hall CITY BAR at the len ox city bar w aterfron t CITY TABLE at the len ox GATHER at district hall THE GREEN BRIAR THE HARP K2 CAFE M. J. O’CON N OR’S park plaz a m. j. o’con n or’s w aterfron t N ED DEV IN E’S PARRIS SOLAS at the len ox

BUSINESS + GIFT CARDS

SMOKED BLUEFISH PLATE

G

charred octopus

Chili-lime aioli, beer braised spinach, chorizo & oaxaca cheese 12

Chef’s daily selections

Description

chips & dip

Spicy dipping sauce

G

Chimichurri, chili aioli, bruleed lemon 12

12

oysters rockafeller

cheese & charcuterie 12

tom’s shishito peppers

12

Olive oil, sea salt, lemon

RAW BAR

OYSTERS, 3 TYPES LITTLENECKS

12

DAILY CRUDO

12

LOBSTER TAIL

G

12

12

12

JUMBO SHRIMP COCKTAIL

12

NORTH ATLANTIC RED CRAB LEGS glass house tower

12

12

Jumbo shrimp, lobster tail, crab legs, oysters

S O U P S & S A L A D S

APPETIZERS

BURRATA

G

Petite herbs, marinated baby heirlooms, aged balsamic 12

KALE CAESAR

G

Greek yogurt dressing, smoked bacon, boquerones, fried capers, skillet brioche croutons 12

FALL BOWL

Quinoa, farro, roasted sweet potato, pickled baby carrots, black kale, pumpkin seeds, toasted almonds, scrumpy cider vinaigrette 12

thai beef salad

Green papaya, smashed cucumbers, toasted macadamia nuts, vermicelli, thai chillies, lime, cilantro, basil & fish sauce 12

CHOPPED

G

Romaine, feta, olives, grilled corn, bacon, grape tomatoes, Dijon vinaigrette 12

LOBSTER COBB

G

Baby iceberg, chopped bacon, hard cooked egg, gorgonzola, cherry tomato, avocado, green goddess dressing 12

beet salad

G

Arugula, beets, goat cheese, toasted hazlenuts, yuzu vinaigrette 12

ramen

Roast chashu pork, shitake-miso broth, soft cooked soy egg, bean sprouts 12

chowder

Oyster crackers

12

ADD TO ANY SALAD Chicken

sandw iches

Shrimp 7

|

Salmon 8

|

6 | Steak Lobster 16

8

full sandwich with french fries or half sandwich with soup or side salad

entrees

Rosemary mushrooms, bechamel, crispy noodle sheets 12

surf & turf tacos

G

House pickles, Russian dressing, melted swiss, marble rye

salmon

12

mussels & fries

Sancerre, shallots, creme fraiche & thyme 12

G

Toasted naan, beet tzatziki, marinated cucumbers & tomatoes, feta, sesame dressed greens 12

LOBSTER ROLL

Lobster salad, spicy slaw, brioche bun

steak frites

G

Grilled skirt steak, bistro fries, housemade steak sauce 12

12

ben’s kickass flatbread Some kickass ingredients

G

Turkey, spinach, cucumbers, tomatoes, dressing

LUNCH

G

Crispy quinoa cake, wasabi-edamame emulsion, pea shoots, papaya 12

PASTRAMI BOMB

Boston brisket, grain mustard BBQ sauce, pan-fried hot cherry peppers & onions, pepper jack cheese 12

HEALTHY WRAP

Glass House is a restaurant, bar, and modern day ‘meeting house’ inspired by the history and present day visionary identity of Kendall Square. Once the center of the nation’s glass-making industry, East Cambridge attracted the most accomplished artisans from across the globe and its glass houses produced patents for the cutting edge glassworks of its day. Today, Kendall Square remains a hub of innovation, and with its industrious roots has transformed into one of the major science and technology centers in the world. Glass House is a nod to the neighborhood’s glass architecture, its inventive history, and its contemporary focus on discovery and exploration.

G

Crispy ale battered Spanish mackerel, chorizo-onion hash, spicy vinegar slaw 12

Griddled foccacia, local cheddar, house pickles & jammy onions 12

KIMCHI TURKEY REUBEN

FALAFEL

EVERYDAY RESTAURANT, VISIONARY NEIGHBORHOOD.

lasagna bolognese

pho french dip

Braised beef short rib, pickled vegetables, fried egg, toasted baguette, pho broth 12

GLASS HOUSE GRASS FED BURGER

12

12

G GLUTEN-FREE UPON REQUEST may contain raw ingredients

Consuming raw or undercooked meat, poultry, seafood, shellfish, or eggs may increase your risk of foodborne illness. Before placing your order, please inform your server if anyone in your party has a food allergy.

Harpoon camp wannamango pale ale 16oz can, MA 5.05 lord hobo boomsauce ipa 16oz can, MA, 8.0% wachusett blueberry ale MA, 4.5% stella artois BEL, 5.0% bud light MO, 4.2% angry orchard crisp apple 12oz can, OH, 5.0% castle island keeper ipa 16oz can, MA, 6.5% pbR 16oz can, WI, 4.7% corona extra MEX, 4.6% stone go to ipa CA, 4.5% notch left of the dial ipa 12oz can, MA, 4.3% kaliber non alcoholic IRL, 0.5%

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Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, pro epicurei insolens ad, cetero detracto eu per. Cu utinam dicunt tritani. WEEKDAY 4PM - 6PM

BEERS

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, pro epicurei insolens ad, cetero detracto eu per. Cu utinam dicunt tritani. WEEKDAY 4PM - 6PM

12

12

Red Wine, Brandy, Fruit Juices, Strawberries LEFT HAND NITRO MILK STOUT 20 OZ CO, 6.0% 12 Red Wine, Brandy, Fruit Juices, Strawberries GOOSE ISLAND GREEN LINE PALE ALE IL, 5.4% 12 Red Wine, Brandy, Fruit Juices, Strawberries BALLAST POINT GRAPEFRUIT SCULPIN IPA CA, 7.0% 12 Red Wine, Brandy, Fruit Juices, Strawberries TWO ROADS NO LIMITS HEFEWEIZEN CT, 5.0% 12 Red Wine, Brandy, Fruit Juices, Strawberries LAGUNITAS PILS CA, 6.0% 12 Red Wine, Brandy, Fruit Juices, Strawberries SINGLECUT BILLY 18-WATT IPA NY, 5.0% 12 Red Wine, Brandy, Fruit Juices, Strawberries SAMUEL ADAMS SEASONAL MA, 5.0% 12 Red Wine, Brandy, Fruit Juices, Strawberries 21ST AMENDMENT HELL OR HIGH WATERMELON CA, 4.9% Red Wine, Brandy, Fruit Juices, Strawberries ALLAGASH WHITE ALE ME, 5.0% 12 Red Wine, Brandy, Fruit Juices, Strawberries SAMUEL ADAMS BOSTON LAGER MA, 4.9% 12 Red Wine, Brandy, Fruit Juices, Strawberries WORMTOWN BE HOPPY IPA MA, 6.5% 12 Red Wine, Brandy, Fruit Juices, Strawberries LEFT HAND NITRO MILK STOUT 20 OZ CO, 6.0% 12 Red Wine, Brandy, Fruit Juices, Strawberries GOOSE ISLAND GREEN LINE PALE ALE IL, 5.4% 12 Red Wine, Brandy, Fruit Juices, Strawberries BALLAST POINT GRAPEFRUIT SCULPIN IPA CA, 7.0% 12 Red Wine, Brandy, Fruit Juices, Strawberries TWO ROADS NO LIMITS HEFEWEIZEN CT, 5.0% 12 Red Wine, Brandy, Fruit Juices, Strawberries LAGUNITAS PILS CA, 6.0% 12 Red Wine, Brandy, Fruit Juices, Strawberries SINGLECUT BILLY 18-WATT IPA NY, 5.0% 12 Red Wine, Brandy, Fruit Juices, Strawberries SAMUEL ADAMS SEASONAL MA, 5.0% 12 Red Wine, Brandy, Fruit Juices, Strawberries 21ST AMENDMENT HELL OR HIGH WATERMELON CA, 4.9% Red Wine, Brandy, Fruit Juices, Strawberries

sweet plates BREAD PUDDING 12 APPLE PIE & ICE CREAM CHOCOLATE CAKE 12

12

GELATO TRIO

Tahitian Vanilla Bean, Passion Fruit, Salted Caramel 12 12

AFTER DINNER

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Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, pro epicurei insolens ad, cetero detracto eu per. Cu utinam dicunt tritani. WEEKDAY 4PM - 6PM

ALLAGASH WHITE ALE ME, 5.0% 12 Red Wine, Brandy, Fruit Juices, Strawberries SAMUEL ADAMS BOSTON LAGER MA, 4.9% Red Wine, Brandy, Fruit Juices, Strawberries

WORMTOWN BE HOPPY IPA MA, 6.5%

DRINKS

JOIN US FOR... drinks

450 KEN DALL ST, CAMBRI DGE, MA 021 42 G L AS S HOUSECAMBRI DGE. COM | TEL: 61 7 . 555. 5555

ON DRAFT

BEERS

BOTTLES & CANS

EVERYDAY RESTAURANT, VISIONARY NEIGHBORHOOD. Glass House is a restaurant, bar, and modern day ‘meeting house’ inspired by the history and present day visionary identity of Kendall Square. Once the center of the nation’s glass-making industry, East Cambridge attracted the most accomplished artisans from across the globe and its glass houses produced patents for the cutting edge glassworks of its day. Today, Kendall Square remains a hub of innovation, and with its industrious roots has transformed into one of the major science and technology centers in the world. Glass House is a nod to the neighborhood’s glass architecture, its inventive history, and its contemporary focus on discovery and exploration.

COFFEE

Regular, Decaf

3.5

loose leaf tea

English Breakfast, Earl Grey, Rooibos, Moroccan Mint, Green

cappuccino 4.5 chai latte 4.5 espresso 2.5 hot chocolate

3.5

3.5

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SOME OF THE MENU DESIGNS

the restaurant is " Marketing so integral to the branding, and since the architecture, interiors, and branding were all being designed together at H+A from one concept, it allowed for a fully cohesive idea and experience. -Hannah

"

Branding the idea. H+A developed a a branding concept inspired entirely by the visionary identity of Cambridge’s Kendall Square. Once the center of the nation’s glass-making industry, East Cambridge's glass houses attracted artisans from across the globe and produced patents for cutting edge glassworks of its day. Today, Kendall Square remains a hub of innovation. The image of a man looking through binoculars is emblematic for the vision, discovery, and optimism of the neighborhood's creative minds. The visual branding combines a modern geometric style with a retro, playful spirit, and its logo represents the ‘glass house’ room within the restaurant, and that next big idea on the horizon. We produced our own photography, and created menus, business cards, gift cards, t-shirts, custom wallpapers, over ten types of signage, and even worked with a local artisan to create custom-designed glass panels. Ryan Grafft, our 'man with binoculars' recently moved to Boston and works at innovation industry leader, General Electric.


is a contemporary " This restaurant, and we wanted

12" .25"

3.66"

graphic imagery in the branding that evoked a retro style, but with a nod to the forward-looking, visionary neighborhood. We also wanted to make it a little irreverant Union Labor Job and fun. A place like this is supposed to be fun! - Emily

.75" .25"

3.66"

.25"

Vinyl Colors:

.25"

3M gloss white #IJ35C vinyl with 3M "Matte" clear protective vinyl overlaminate.

"

Graphics are all printed "Black" ink.

WAYFINDING TO RESTROOMS

SIDE VIEW

Dividers to look the same as the outer frame.

.25" wide " Anodized Copper" stripe.

1/8 white acrylic face. Aluminum frame painted black. (No illumination) Sign mounting t.b.d.

SIGNS

CUSTOM-DESIGNED WALLPAPER

CUSTOM-DESIGNED WALLPAPER Graphics to be digitally printed onto "White" vinyl. (1st surface)

et

OUP

Fax: 978.851.2022 Dwg. Date: 8.19.2016 Release to Production: Rev.1 8.30.2016: sign shape Rev.2 9.16.2016: flat faces Rev.3 9.20.2016: new graphics

Phone: 978.851.2424

Rev.4 9.29.2016: fixed arrow on 3-D

170 LorumStreet, Tewksbury MA 01876

This design/drawing is copyrighted: 2016 Metro Sign & Awning, Inc. No part of this drawing may be reproduced, copied or exhibited in any fashion without written consent from Metro Sign & Awning, Inc.

Approval:

Date

Approved

x Approved As Noted

Revise and Resubmit

File Name: The Briar G_Glass House_16-17311.cdr Sales Rep.:

Tom Dunn

Design: P.Mgr.: Work Order: Drawing #:

SM

16-17311-9r4

5.5” x 7”

FIGURES FROM THE PHOTOSHOOT SHOWN IN FINAL WALLPAPER DESIGN + SIGNAGE

Modeling for this branding project gave me a whole new appreciation for what professional models do. I learned that making a pose look “natural” for the camera means having to hold what are actually very unnatural poses – and sometimes for quite a long time...I don’t know how many jumps it took or how long I held those binoculars to get just the perfect shots! -Rebecca

Red Lines Indicat 25


a project with this kind of " On attention to design details, scheduling can be a challenge. The range of different teams of tradespeople and the highlyskilled artisans collaborating need to overlap at counterintuitive times in order to both stay on schedule, and protect the assets and materials in place. - Brian

"

APRIL 2016

SELECTING AND REFINING THE FINISH OF THE LIGHT OAK BOARDS FOR THE WALLS + CEILING

Working on the custom-designed patterned glass panels was complex, but highly rewarding. We collaborated with artist, Kai Colombo, of Shards Studio in Peabody, MA on the fabrication, which had to be coordinated with frames built by yet another fabricator. Kai's expertise on material and scale was invaluable, and the final result looks fantastic. - Emily

JUNE 2016

THE UNFINISHED MURAL WALL IN THE DINING ROOM MAKING PROGRESS OVER A FEW WEEKS 26

As a designer, one of the hardest parts of the process is construction. Inevitably, despite all the hard design work and careful planning, not everything can always be built exactly as planned. Unexpected site conditions or constraints always come up. You have to remain flexible and willing to create alternative solutions when the unexpected arises. - Rebecca

SELECTING FILM FOR THE GLASS

AUGUST 2016


When designing a unique space, there's still a concern about functionality and durability. We were concerned about honing the already polished darker marble bar top slab, but a polished stone can't always take the food stains expected for a restaurant bar top. The stone supplier did some testing to see what held up the best. - Matthew

LIGHTING BEING INSTALLED

like working with teams " We that we have established trusting relationships with already, but it's always nice in a project like this to be introduced to new craftspeople and local artisans whose work is integrated into the design in special ways. - Mike

"

MARBLE AND TILE FINISHES IN THE RESTROOMS

THE BAR, AND RAW BAR BEYOND

Building it. Once construction began, the first order of business was raising the floor level almost three feet. The design had organized many of the services within the floor to allow for the taller ceiling height, but it also meant that planning where things were located - like the 60 bar taps, the bar and raw bar, power, plumbing, and other equipment - needed to be extremely precise. Once the floor was brought up to level with the entry grade, everything else could progress. And because the entire exterior facade is glass, many elements normally hidden from view had nowhere to hide, so lighting, visibility, and acoustics figured significantly when proofing materials and finishes during the process. There were also challenges when many of the items or finishes specified for the space were delayed in production, difficult to source, or discontinued unexpectedly. Working together was key to coming up with the right solutions.

OCTOBER 2016 27


With temporary furniture and still in progress, this image was taken 3 weeks before completion on OCTOBER 18, 2016. See the finished space yourself...It's now open! Glass House Restaurant + Bar, 450 Kendall St, Cambridge, MA.


29


Does this fit the budget? Is this UL listed? What heights should the lights be mounted at? How thick is the tile? What grout col should we use? Will this paper hold up to food stains? Do I nee door closers? How many beer taps do we need? Can these fab be lined? How much light do these drapes block? How do we find someone to make a stained glass panel? Should the servic ines run in the floor or in the ceiling? Should we use laminate fo the base? Are these drapes acoustic? Does this come in a matt finish? Will this light be able to ship within our timeframe? How many door locks do we need? Is this a comfortable counter heig Will this lighting be dimmable? Is the sign too large? Is this fab wipeable? Does this fit our aesthetic concept? Which finish tell the better story? What company makes copper faucets? What The questions we ask... the lead time? Do these chairs meet CAL 117 or CAL 133? Should this be a vector file for fabrication? Can these fabrics be lined? these chairs stackable? How high can these chairs stack? Wher should the tile start and end? Do we need panic hardware? Wi the sun be harsh at this angle? Does this LED bulb come in a wa color temperature? Should the wall sconce point up or down? I oak the right kind of grain for this look? Should this be ribbed o frosted? Clear or colored? Can this fabric be stain treated? Sh this banquette be tufted or ribbed? Do these armchairs tuck un the bar? Can we print to a matte black vinyl? Is the scale of thi pattern appropriate for the space? Which copper Pantone swa matches the light fixtures? Can that metal be powdercoated? durable is this finish? Will it stand up to daily wear and tear? Ca this tile be sealed, or is it pre-sealed? How wide is this fabric? C t be railroaded? What keeps the doors open or closed? What' the threshold detail between the tile and concrete? Can we prin with copper foiling? How tall are the chair backs? What about hooks here? Should we hone this marble or keep it polished? H are we dealing with acoustic ceiling treatments? What color film 30 works best for this glass? How do we remove this panel for clean


d lor ed brics

ce or te w ght? bric ls t's d ? Are re ill arm Is or hould nder is NOW OPEN! atch How an Can 's nt coat How m 450 KENDALL STREET, CAMBRIDGE MA 02142 I www.glasshousecambridge.com I @glasshouse450 ning?


ONE KENDALL SQUARE (IN THE PLAZA) BUILDING 300 LOWER LEVEL CAMBRIDGE, MA 02139 ALWAYS FOOD TIL MIDNIGHT. WE DO NOT TAKE RESERVATIONS, SO JUST COME ON IN! WWW.STATEPARK.IS 617-848-HELLO

“ State Park’s execution of a

unique concept is right on target. It made us feel like we’d stepped into a party where everyone was having a good time.” - w ww.h un gryfordesi gn rev i ew. com


y r a r o p Contem g n i v i L Kitchen More than ever, kitchens are becoming true living spaces for the modern home. Eduardo Serrate and David Hacin reflect upon the ideas that formed the finished designs for three of our residential kitchens, with commentary from our collaborators, and insights from our clients on why these contemporary living spaces work for them.

35


Atelier 505 PH

Eduardo Serrate

a muted and consistent palette helps unify the rooms.

Continuity is the key word.

Palette, views, circulation...

Our Client The peninsula is a nice big area for working or setting up a buffet

Paneled wall

conceals HVAC unit

cocktails

waiting for 5pm

By taking down the wall that separated the two rooms it opened the entire area up and also opened the view out of the dining room space.

living room


The kitchen location was what it was...

a long, narrow corridor. I love how the glass

I love having a nice big chair and table by the window. I think it's my favorite place to sit and have my morning coffee...

brings the light and the view in.

the sink mess is

tucked away

Eero

from the

Saarinen

dining room

table

- a nod

to midcentury style

Glass Doors

+Backsplash: Super easy to clean and very reflective

Reversing the direction of the wood grain is a subtle way to add detail

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Beacon Street PH1

David Hacin

Paul Reidt (KRH)

Our Client

POT FILLER AS SPECIAL ACCENT

WOOD ABOVE

translucent glass has container and contents working together

Details... Details...

Details...

PAINT BELOW

NOT A TV!

View From Kitchen...

View (city)

informal dining G DININ M ROO

kitchen

View (River)

GIVE HOOD BREATHING ROOM...

The clean redesign of an old galley kitchen is now a hallway of storage holding everything from turkey roasters and lobster pots, to multiple sets of dishes, glassware, and flatware


Surfaces of wood, paint, glass, steel, and stone create a balanced and dynamic composition

We live in the kitchen. Doesn't everyone? We're serious cooks - and eaters - and family and friends hang around the counter, sit at the table, or lounge on the window seats while we work.

YS...

THIS SA

The front face of this island granite inlay and the pot rack above it are greatlooking and functional.

FOLKS " THESE !" Y COOK REALL

VIEW OF RIVER

Open It Up... Microwave And

Warming Below

Counter Level

Unified Materials And Long Areas W/ Views That Help Make Space Feel Big!

diagonal relationship of kitchen and dining makes informal dining area special...

...and dynamic

39


Newton Tudor

Eduardo Serrate

Paul Reidt (KRH)

While the dads have their space to cook and work, their daughter has plenty of comfy spots to play, read, and run around...

the canopy conceals

the hood ducts and grounds the island

the cook's zone space to eat...or work

We love that the kitchen is a true living space. It's perfect for

hanging out and at the same time amazing to cook in.

Our Clients


No more appliances on my counters! Everything has a functional home, tucked within the cabinetry.

tight joints, clean seam = thoughtful craftsmanship by Paul (KRH)

breakfast station: these doors open +

tuck back revealing a counter with the

microwave, toaster, cereal, bread...

most hardware is

concealed - what little

is exposed,

is handcast white

bronze

from one hangout...

...to the next - for casual living

the cook's view

soft seating = comfort, warmth

wrapping materials on intersecting surfaces animates the geometry

Our one request when designing the

kitchen was to make it one of the main

living spaces. The result exceeded all expectations.

41


EAT COOK RELAX

The owners of this Beacon Hill home, restaurateur Pat Lyons and his wife, Kristina, arrived with a passionately full slate of ideas for their kitchen, the size of which was constrained by the building’s existing brick walls and adjacent open living area. An entertainment venue proprietor, he needed a robust chef’s kitchen with tools and supplies at the ready. Meanwhile she envisioned a quiet “coffee shop” with a built-in window seat and an informal family dining bar. The solution arrived in a hardworking L-shaped island that organizes the kitchen into three zones, each with its own character.

Concrete Collaborative Laguna Portland countertop Franke stainless sink White Carrara honed marble wall

Floating wood shelves Window seat reading spot with storage below Shear manual roller shades Franke stainless sink with bottom grid and colander Stainless countertop at 36” height

Hidden coffee bar with coffee mugs, glasses, plates and coffee machine

Storage pantry with glass and wood door Beverage refrigerator Concrete Collaborative Laguna Portland countertop at 42” height Stained walnut millwork by Ray Hatchey Inc.

Silverware, trash, pots, pans, and cleaning items Miele stainless dishwasher Built-in cutting board


Ann Sacks Elements 2x4 white subway tile walls Seasonal items in high cabinets Serving plates and bowls in upper cabinets

XO 48” pro-style hood Wolf 48” dual fuel range 36” French Door Sub Zero fridge

Hanging pot shelves Stainless countertop Pots and pans in lower cabinets

Window seat reading spot with storage below Favorite cookbooks and mystery novels

Plates, serving items and hidden microwave in tall cabinets

Glass partition allows views into formal dining space Bar-height chairs Oak floor matches oak ceiling Step-down into kitchen

Concrete Collaborative Laguna Portland countertop informal dining area

Anatomy of a Kitchen Design by David Hacin + Rob Clocker | Illustration by Michelangelo Latona

43


2009

2010

2012

2016 Best Urban Architect


Hacin + Associates [architecture + design]


CULTURE

+

LOOK

What we’re into right now at H+A Retronaut, www.retronaut.com

This website is described as time-travel without the time-machine...its objective being to scour the world's archives and museums, physical and digital, looking for material that appears to be anachronistic, but is not, and help those collections go viral. You can find pretty much anything from history on this site...from automats in New York City to postcards from 1890s Scotland. There's something for every retrophile out there. [Matthew Manke] The Coolidge at the Greenway, Wharf District Park, Boston

Experience cinema classics under the stars, with the city as your backdrop! The beloved Coolidge Corner Theatre partnered with the Rose F. Kennedy Greenway Conservancy to offer a free outdoor screening series in the summer and early fall months this year and hopefully again next season. [Scott Thomson] MFA Overnights, MFA, Boston

LISTEN

The Museum of Fine Arts just launched MFA Overnights, an all-night party in the Linde Family Wing for Contemporary Art celebrating art and artists with music, dancing, food trucks, art, singing, film, lawn games, yoga, and a further unexpected line-up of programming inside and outside the building. Tickets are free, but the lines are long, so get there early! [Tim Grafft]

2 Dope Queens, podcast

This is a comedy podcast hosted by the multi-talented women, Jessica Williams and Phoebe Robinson. This fierce duo are unflinchingly real in their assessments of the world and stories of personal mishaps and mayhem. Each episode, Jessica and Phoebe along with several guest comedians perform live in front of an audience. This is a fresh must-follow podcast from today's leading ladies of comedy. [Elizabeth Dame] Note to Self, podcast

Note to Self is a podcast about living with technology, including topics ranging from deleting apps for a digital detox to women in tech. Host Manoush Zomorodi calls it a weekly reminder to question everything, like "Is your phone watching you? Can wexting make you smarter? Are your kids real? Check it out for other existential quandaries for the digital age. [Russell Higgins] 46


You’ve never heard of her, but she is an amazing singer: Lurlean Hunter. She had a popular lounge act in Chicago in the early sixties, and may have been killed by her mobster lover! She’s a unique mix of Nancy Wilson, Ella Fitzgerald and Carmen McRae. Listen to “Under A Blanket of Blue” and “It’s the Talk of the Town." [Tim Grafft] You Won't

You Won’t is an extremely talented 2-man-band, performing at the Sinclair in Cambridge this December. The voices of Josh Arnoudse and Raky Sastri are unique and wellpaired, and their live performances are mind-blowing to watch. From accordions to whirring plastic tubes, these two experiment with new and old sounds and make them mesmerizingly beautiful. But my favorite thing about their performances by far is watching mult-instrumentalist Raky. This guy drums, plays harmonica, and mans a keyboard SIMULTANEOUSLY. [Elizabeth Dame] Host of PBS series, Barbecue University, and author of The Barbecue Bible, Steve Raichlen compiled 425 recipes from across America on his quest to find the soul of American barbecue. He draws from the full variety of the nation's barbecue genius, from Texas brisket, to Kentucky pulled pork, Kansas City pepper-rub, and of course, Tennessee's Memphis ribs. Coast-to-coast, this book covers a barbecue extravaganza of more than just meat, celebrating regional grilling styles with recipes for mussels, salads, soups, fruits, vegetables, and even barbecued peanuts. [Jeremy Robertson]

READ

BBQ USA

LISTEN (cont.)

Lurlean Hunter

The Smitten Kitchen Cookbook

The Smitten Kitchen started as a blog and quickly grew a cult following as Deb Perelman’s recipes gained respect with foodies everywhere. Her recipe book feels like something that has been passed down in a family for generations. The food is simple, made from natural ingredients, and completely indulgent. I am partial to the cakes and pies. Her baking recipes take some practice but they are fun to make with a friend or two, and the payoff for all your hard work is delicious. The photos are also GORGEOUS. [Aimee Epstein Norton] NYTimes, Modern Love, online

These New York Times Modern Love stories are published every week, (with adorable illustrations) and even has a new accompanying podcast. These are not fairy tale love stories, but true and raw accounts of the average modern person’s experience navigating love and relationships of all types. [Elizabeth Dame]

47


WATCH

Chef's Table, docu-series

Netflix’s Chef’s Table has its fair share of droolworthy food shots, but it’s the focus on each chef’s philosophy that sets this series apart. The men and women featured come across passionate and accessible unlike the celebrity chefs written about so often. A personal favorite is Chef Francis Mallmann who’s zest for outdoor cooking in fire pits made me want to bury some lobsters in my backyard. A new 4-episode season was just realeased this fall and it doesn't disappoint. [Jennifer Clapp] The Way Way Back, film

A dysfunctional family spends their summer together in this sweet coming of age story. Life lessons are taught to Duncan, an awkward young teen during his summer working at the local water park. He finds a father figure in his friendship with the park manager at a time when he really needs one. The cast is great, including Steve Carell, Toni Collette and especially Sam Rockwell. It was directed by Nat Faxon and Jim Rash, and filmed on Boston’s South Shore in 2013. [Tim Grafft] Cooked, docu-series

Michael Pollan’s new series Cooked, takes a science-based approach to food in four-episodes titled “Fire,” “Water,” “Air,” and “Earth.” This is not food porn. Pollan, known for best-selling books such as The Omnivore’s Dilemma, always brings a political and environmental edge to his stories. A favorite segment is focused on bread-making and gluten intolerance. He has a fascinating opinion on why this issue has become so prevalent in our society. A Berkshire’s bakery is featured, and we can’t wait to order from them! [Jennifer Clapp, Jeremy Robertson] Chef, film

Chef stars Jon Favreau as Carl Casper, a divorced father of one who might be hitting a mid-life crisis. In an unfortunate run-in with a less-than-kind food critic Carl embarrasses himself yelling at the critic on video, which goes viral. With his tail between his legs he ventures to Miami with his son to start a food truck. Their trip back to California is a learning experience for both and could be classified as half food-porn and half heart-warming. [Michelangelo Latona] Munchies, web series

This website and digital video channel from VICE explores everything that intersects with food. With recipes, events, how-tos, and editorial features, there's a video or article about just about anything having to do with food - making it, eating it, finding it. One of my favorite parts of Munchies is their city guides, where they explore a city and tell you where to find great food - whether your pockets are deep or you're on a budget. [Darien Fortier] 48


Little Donkey is brought to you by the people who brought Toro and Coppa to Boston. Opened in Cambridge’s Central Square in summer 2016, it makes for a fantastic date-night spot if you can get a reservation. If the short-rib is on the menu, don’t miss it. They are open for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Unless you're looking for it, you won't see it until you're right on top of it. The open concept floor plan with an industrial vibe really sings in the warmer months when they open the doors/windows to the Mass Ave sidewalk. [Michelangelo Latona, Matthew Arnold]

EAT

Little Donkey, Central Square

Mamaleh's, Kendall Square

For those familiar with the delights of Jewish Soul food, your prayers have been answered. Find all the favorite Jewish deli staples at Mameleh’s - you name it, they have it. For those unfamiliar, acquaint yourself with the comfort of a Reuben sandwich and homemade eggcream,and finish up with some chocolate babka. There's also takeout, so you won’t have an excuse if you return home without some delicious house cured lox and homemade bagels to share. [Joshua Lentz] Naco Taco, Central Square

Naco Taco is a temporary restaurant operating out of a building that is slated for redevelopment. Instead of building a typical kitchen, the kitchen is entirely within a food truck giving the owner the option for relocated the kitchen at a later day. This is an interesting use for a building that might have otherwise sat vacant until it was redeveloped in the coming years. The large patio and the presence of the food truck activate the patio create a lively summer time hangout spot along busy Mass Ave. [Matthew Arnold] The Painted Burro, Davis Square

What’s more festive than a Mexican restaurant? The Painted Burro is one of my favorites when looking to celebrate an occasion with friends. The music and décor give off a celebratory vibe as soon as you walk in. I especially love the large high top tables near the bar – big enough for a group dinner but casual enough to feel part of the bar scene. The food is pretty fantastic too! [Aimee Epstein Norton] The Farmer's Daughter, Easton, MA

If you want the best day trip with breakfast or lunch, drive 45 minutes from Boston to the town of Easton. THE FARMER’S DAUGHTER is a farm to table hotspot, and now they are also open on Friday and Saturday nights...with craft cocktails and a bar tasting menu! [Tim Grafft]

49


SHOP

Bradley St Bicycle Co-Op, New Haven, CT

BSBC is a bicycle cooperative and community space in the East Rock neighborhood of New Haven, CT. It is a place to ask questions, fix bikes, and volunteer. BSBC hosts a number of community programs and events, including Bike Month, which is a celebration of bicycling culture in New Haven in May. Besides an open shop and work space, the Co-op also runs a bicycle recycling program that sources, repairs, and distributes donated bikes to low-income individuals in the New Haven area. [Elizabeth Dame] Frank + Oak, Newbury St, Boston

F&O is a Canadian-based clothing company who has opened their first US location on Newbury street in Boston. F&O conducted a survey to help them decide on their first US location and Boston won. They started off specializing in men’s clothing, but have recently launched a women’s clothing line. Their manifesto includes offering purposeful style, crafting on-trend pieces for work and casualwear, and their services branch out to include in-house barbers, coffee, and more. [Matthew Arnold] 250 Main, Rockland, ME

This is a new, pet-friendly boutique hotel in upand-coming arts focused Rockland Maine. Great for art-buyers, shop the hotel's hallways which are filled with art for sale by local artists represented by galleries down the street. And when you're done, there's a great rooftop terrace overlooking Rockland harbor. It's a good place to base yourself for further exploring (and shopping) mid-coast Maine. Tell the concierge, Lisa, that David and Tim sent you... [David Hacin] Loyal Supply Co., Union Sq, Somerville

Described as a design firm, retailer, and distributor of goods for the home, office, and studio, this business seeks to work with local craftspeople and help build the surrounding community. Loyal sells thoughtfully designed products that make life more enjoyable and can be kept for a lifetime. The space itself is a modern take on a pegboard workshop, and below the retail floor lies an actual workshop, where all of the goods Loyal Supply Co.designs and prototypes are produced. [Michelangelo Latona] Boston Public Market, Haymarket

The Boston Public Market finally became a reality in July, after many years of effort by dedicated folks, determined to showcase quality food grown, produced, or caught in New England. The identity of the Market remains a ‘work in progress’ as local growers + producers compete for space, while the gourmet vendors attract large lunchtime crowds. For the best experience, time your visit to avoid the lunch hour frenzy! Open yearround, Wednesday through Sunday, 8:00am to 8:00pm, and located at Haymarket Station. [Jeremy Robertson] 50


Traveling all the way from Boston to Jackson Hole, WY for dinner may seem like a stretch but this was no ordinary meal. Noted as a roving culinary adventure, Outstanding In The Field honors the commitment of local food providers and highlights sustainable food practices by setting a single table for you and 150 of your new best friends at the origin of the food itself. Tickets for each season’s dinners go on sale annually on March 20th and sell-quickly, so act fast! [Matthew Woodward]

EXPLORE

Outstanding in the Field, nationwide

Musee de Confluence, Lyon, France

This museum combines history, art, and ethnography on a site where Lyon's two rivers meet. It's intended to reflect the city's coming together around the concept of diversity and a new way of looking at culture and nature through an integrated and multicultural lense. The exhibits are creative and spectacularly put together and the museum serves as a place for the whole city to gather together. I loved it. Fun cafe on the roof with great views of the whole city, a Unesco World Heritage site. [David Hacin] San Pedro Market, Cusco, Peru

Get a taste of local life in Cusco's San Pedro Market. Peru itself is colorful and vibrant and this public market reflects that character tenfold. Meats, cheeses, spices, fruits, vegetables, breads, all freshly cut, made, picked, and prepared for buying. There's also a section where locals dine quite affordably on hot meals and sodashop-style counters for freshly made juices. Don't be surprised if you pass a few alpacas in the crowded aisles too. [Emily Neumann] Maison de Verre, Paris, France

This private residence designed by ensemblier, Pierre Chareau, is iconic for its revolutionary use of glass block for the facade, but is little known outside of the design world. The home features ingenious pivoting and movable screens allowing for customizable spaces. The home is not open to the general public, as it is still a private residence owned by well known art historian, Robert M. Rubin, but it can be toured on selected dates by appointment if you are a design professional (or happen to be with one). [Rebecca Rivers] El Moro Churreria, Mexico City, Mexico

The freshest, most decadent churros I’ve tried, served in an art-deco inspired, super modern white-and-blue tile-clad shop. Sit on their street rocking chairs and watch the chef do his magic. With a side of caramel or chocolate for dipping, and hot off the fryer, these things are so good they are worth jumping a wall for! [Eduardo Serrate]

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Preserving history while creating a flexible space for the modern family A historic 19th century Beacon Hill townhouse was reinvented to create a more open, flexible and family-friendly residence. The challenge for architect David Hacin and the H+A team was to reorganize the traditional hierarchy and relationship of rooms and floors within its historically protected and preserved shell. The ground floor was transformed to an open plan for the family and kitchen spaces, with a historic oval staircase rebuilt at its center. The “gut” renovation included the full redesign of the formal dining and kitchen area, making it a fully functional, integrated family/dining space. Rosemary Porto, Senior Designer, Poggenpohl Boston worked with the H+A team to include all the necessary functional components for a busy family kitchen while maintaining the clean lines of a modern space. The new kitchen plan combines workspace, dining area and sitting room altogether in one place. The appliances are integrated into a wall of white Poggenpohl cabinetry, while the granite “waterfall-style” island functions both as


meal prep workspace and the “container� for a moveable and expandable dining table, substituting for a formal dining room. A built-in sofa adds an element of casual comfort to the area, making it feel even more like a family gathering space. High Gloss Polar white lacquer was chosen as the timeless finish to set off the warm wood tones used throughout the dining and lounging spaces. Discrete brushed aluminum handles highlight the strong horizontal language of the design. The Poggenpohl integral backsplash system with floated shelves and a towel rack keep the counters neat and tidy. Throughout the home, simple millwork and furnishings like those in the kitchen consistently contrast with original restored historic details. This juxtaposition of materials, patterns and forms in both the architecture and the interiors reinforces the relationship between the history of the home and its revitalized present. This extensive, even daunting renovation is a triumph in every respect.

To learn more: Poggenpohl Boston Poggenpohl U.S., Inc. 135 Newbury Street Boston MA 02116, USA 617-236-5253 info@boston.poggenpohl.com www.boston.poggenpohl.com


THE FOUR SEASONS

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fter the opening of the Four Seasons in 1959, a journalist wrote, "I want to return often, as often as my money lasts, because I believe this restaurant is a culminating symbol of the Fifties." Designed by renowned architect Philip Johnson, in Manhattan's Seagram Building (designed by Bauhaus architect, Mies van der Rohe) the restaurant was dubbed 'the most expensive restaurant ever built'. Decked out in artwork that rivaled that of New York's best galleries, the Four Seasons itself was designed as art. Johnson said it was an architect's dream job, because the budget and the extent to which design could influence every single item in the place was unbounded. From the Garth and Ada Louise Huxtable-designed silverware and serving carts, to the furniture designed by Mies van der Rohe, Hans Wegner, Eero Saarinen, and Philip Johnson himself, everything in . this place was And we haven't even mentioned the clientele yet. Intended as the first really contemporary American restaurant reflecting New York City's role at the crossroads of the world, this is where the 'power lunch' was invented. On any given day for decades, the restaurant would be graced by the presence of high profile patrons from Vogue's Anna Wintour, to President John F. Kennedy, and even the Dalai Lama himself once dined there. We have our own memories of the Four Seasons, too. David Hacin celebrated his 21st birthday with his father, and his 20th anniversary with husband Tim there, and the H+A team dined there together in 2007 on a New York design visit. When the restaurant announced it would close in July 2016, it was somber news for many.

Architect Philip Johnson photographed in the Grill Room at the Four Seasons.


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The owner's sketch of some of the regulars' favorite tables.

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The windows at Laconia Loft West and the stair design at Zero Marlborough were inspired by elements of the Four Seasons.


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How much on this one? No more than $4250. Fingers crossed! Two lots away now. Ok, $4500... YES! Here goes...

Actual group texts from the day of the auction.

... We lost again...The hammer came down at $4750! Intense! So, so close! This auction is INSANE!


Philip Johnson's regular seat in the restaurant, table 32.

Estimate: $5,000-7,000 SOLD for: $120,000

Estimate: $500-700 mulitple, SOLD for up to: $12,500

Estimate: $3,000-5,000 SOLD for: $35,000

Estimate: $500-700 SOLD for up to: $7,500

Estimate: $5,000-7,000 SOLD for up to: $45,000

Estimate: $2,000-3,000 SOLD for: $8,125

Estimate: $300-500 SOLD for: $7,500

Estimate: $300-500 multiple, SOLD for up to: $1,750

Estimate: $1,000-1,500 multiple, SOLD for up to: $5,938

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Headlines the following day voiced astonishment at the record-breaking totals.

Held in the Grill Room and Pool Room of The Four Seasons restaurant, hundreds of bidders were in attendance and thousands more (like us) were bidding via phone and online until the wee hours of the following morning. As the first item went up to bid - the bronze Four Seasons sign - it was clear within seconds after 10am that it would sell for far beyond its estimated sale price of $5,000-7,000. The auctioneer, Richard Wright himself seemed stunned when the hammer finally came down, it selling for $120,000. Indeed, it set the tone for the rest of the day and every single lot that followed. When Philip Johnson's corner banquette came up for auction, the bidding escalated so quickly that Wright said at one point, "We're at $9,500 and I can't even keep up." With a low estimate of $3,000, the final sale price was $35,000.

The auction broke records totaling at $4,105,623 - over four times the original estimate. If there was ever a question of whether people's memories and emotional attachments to spaces and things influence appraisals of value, the Four Seasons auction answered it with a resounding, "YES."


The live auction online via web and app was fascinating, moving so quickly much of the time that before you could swipe to bid, someone else had beaten you to it.

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Sold at 10:01pm to H+A.

Refresh metal frame with a wire brush, to remove years of patina

Woohoo! Time for a Hacini-tini!

+ 2 oz. Tito's vodka + 0.5 oz fresh pineapple juice + 1 cup ice + 1 lemon wedge

HACINI-TINI

In a shaker, half-filled with ice cubes, combine the vodka & pineapple juice. Shake vigorously until foamy. Serve in a chilled lowball glass with lemon wedge or twist.


Serving cart from the Four Seasons, designed by Garth & Ada Louise Huxtable, circa 1959.

Source ice bucket to replace missing original

Polish metal top Remove existing finish and replace with new walnut veneer

Refresh metal frame with a wire brush, to remove years of patina

Source midcentury barware + accessories for client happy hours

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SOUTH END BUTTERY Photo © Michael Stavaridis


Home at last.

SHOWROOM 240 Stuart Street Boston 617 482 4805 info@showroomboston.com

GROUNDPIECE SECTIONAL SOFA design by Antonio Citterio

FLEXFORM www.flexform.it


Objet d'art noun plural noun: objets d'art a small decorative or artistic object that is valued because it is beautiful or interesting, or has a meaningful value to the owner; an object with artistic value Why do we have the things we have in our homes? As designers we often ask if an object complements the space it is in, if it fits the aesthetic, and if it serves a function. The little things on our shelves, by our bedsides, and in our cupboards often do not, and we feel compelled to keep them anyway. The things we value and keep with us over many years are imbued with meaning defined by our own lives, relationships, and experiences that surrounded those objects. Many times they are beautiful, exquisite pieces of art, but other times these objects defy our sense of beauty, embodying a charm of their own, or a memory we wish to hold onto. Our team shares some of our own objets d'art and the stories behind them. Text + photography by Emily Neumann

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Vintage Car Catalogs [David Hacin] As a teenager I loved cars and collected fancy car catalogs. I've kept them since as a reminder of my childhood and as graphic inspiration.

2 Venetian Glass Bowl [Matthew Woodward] Purchased by my in-laws while stationed abroad, this piece may be eccentric but it symbolizes both my husband's childhood in Europe as well as my father-in-law's dedicated service to the US Air Force. 3 Recipe Book [Rebecca Rivers] This is a collection of recipes and other tips, like napkin folding from the Volusia County Orchid Society which my grandfather started. It reminds me of visiting him and walking through his greenhouse as a child. 4 Wood Toy [Christine + Matthew Manke] This wooden doll on a stick with 'fidgety legs' is just a weird old wooden toy that we found at an estate sale. We like it because it makes us laugh. 72

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1963 Glass Corvette [Matthew Arnold] My uncle gave this to me before he moved to Seattle, WA. At the time, he was living with my mother and I, and I was sad that he was leaving. He gave me the model to remember him by. It's one of the very few things I've brought with me from apartment to apartment for the last two decades.

6 Danish Salt Dish + Spoon [Christine + Matthew Manke] The wooden spoon guy holds salt and its own wooden spoon for serving. It belonged to Matthew's mother.

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10 Pepper Mill [Jeremy Robertson] This pepper mill was designed by Italian architect Ettore Sottsass, with a grinding mechanism by Peugeot. My wife, Rita, bought it on a visit to Germany after having used a roommate's many years ago. It has inspired a lifelong appreciation for cooking...and eating! 11

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Curious Object [David Hacin] My best friend gave this to me as a host gift at dinner one evening, instead of bringing a bottle of wine. It was memorable and is a beautiful object of curiosity. We don't know for sure what it is, but we use it for serving butter.

8 Handmade Mini-Mouse [Jeffrey Brown] This is a handcrafted present and keepsake from a six year old daughter, in clay, and colorfully rendered.

Alessi Bowl [Eduardo Serrate] I bought this Alessi bowl with my first paycheck after college graduation. It's an heirloom in the making.

Matryoshka Dolls [Christine Manke] I started collecting Matryoshka dolls when I was little and my dad traveled to Moscow. These and the little red doll (see #22) are just two from my collection.

12 Wooden Spoon Rest [Srishti Goyal] My dad used to love to carve small pieces of wood into random things like this. He gave this to my mom (who loves to cook) early on in their relationship. She kept it in her kitchen ever since, but I stole it when I moved into my own apartment, as a reminder of home.

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13 Tin Box [Christine + Matthew Manke] This tin box is Norwegian. We picked it up in a little antique store in the middle of nowhere while driving across Norway. 14 Vintage Ledger Book [Jennifer Clapp] I found a box of these buried in my late great uncle's attic recently. They are from his time as a hotel owner in Atlantic City but many are blank so I thought they should be used for my notes at H+A, fulfilling their purpose that my uncle started 70 years ago. 15 Cutting Board [Matthew Manke] This Danish rosemailing cutting board was passed down from my grandmother. 16 Rooster Key Chain [Christine + Matthew Manke] This is a keepsake from our honeymoon in Kauai, Hawaii. We had an incident with a rooster on our first night in Hawaii that landed Matthew in the hospital. 17 1930's S & P Shakers [Emily Neumann] I inherited these characters from the collection of a great uncle who had a wacky sense of humor. I love their expressions and they remind me that you can find humor in almost anything. 18 Bronze Turtle [David Tabenken] The turtle was rescued from my grandfather's scrap metal shop in New London, CT and lived in my bedroom where the hidden compartment under its hinged shell kept my baby teeth for years. 19 Shaker Box [Jeffrey Brown] This box is from the Union Village Settlement in Ohio near where my grandmother grew up. It fit her neat German aesthetic and it would always have assorted chocolates when I visited as a child. It now holds my keepsakes, like a baby cap that my grandmother knit. 20 RSD2 Coffee Mug [Russell Higgins] Star Wars is the first movie I remember seeing and my mother made this mug for me because I was so obsessed with it. I've had it for close to 40 years now.

21 Copper Candle Lantern [Rob Clocker] This is a family heirloom I received from my mom when I was in college and I've kept it with me since. It casts a meditative pattern of light when a candle is lit inside. 22 Matryoshka Doll [Christine Manke] Another doll from my collection. See #11 for further explanation. 23 Rubber Ducky [Rebecca Rivers] Every summer, Bill Zimmerman from Miliken Carpet invites H+A to sail on his boat, Miris Grata, in Boston Harbor. The duck has the boat's name on it and reminds me that summer is always around the corner! 24 Bat Skeleton [Jennifer Clapp] I love that this was one of my husband's most successful and romantic gifts. It says how well he knows me. 25 Brass Nutcracker [David Tabenken] When my grandmother moved out of her house in Maine in the early 1990s I snagged her small collection of bronze and brass curiosities, including this pair of brass lady-leg nutcrackers. 26 Antique IOOF Ribbon Badge [Jennifer Clapp] Discovered in a bequeathed attic, this 'Independent Order of Odd Fellows' ribbon from Millstone, NJ is one of many that always conjure images of smoky secret clubs. 27 Green tinted bottles [Hillary Faccio] My mom dug up these old bottles used to hold ink, medicine, beer, and Florida water, found in her wooded back lot in CT. 28 Handmade Coaster [Michelangelo Latona] This coaster was handmade by a friend from graduate school and was gifted to me and my wife Kate for our wedding. I love it because it always reminds me of our wedding day and the reception.

30 Cake Knife [Aimee Epstein Norton] My grandparents used this knife to cut their wedding cake when they got married in 1953 and it has been used in many family weddings, most recently mine, over the last 63 years. 31 Pink Robot [Hillary Faccio] This was a birthday gift. I love it because it has a lot of moving parts, like the eyes that move left and right, and makes robotic noises when you position them. 32 Beach Stones [Elizabeth Dame] My family has been going to Cape Cod together every summer for 26 years, and Nauset Beach has a seemingly endless supply of beautiful beach stones that amass at the shoreline. Each July we collect handfuls to take home, oil them to bring out their colors and make them appear still wet from the ocean, and keep them on our tables as centerpieces until next year’s gathering. 33 Vintage Japanese Children's Books [Jennifer Clapp] My Gram was a children's librarian and loved illustration. She brought these home for my mother who eventually became an illustrator herself. 34 Table Cloth [Elizabeth Dame] My grandfather’s mother died when he was a boy. Her sister, Anna, was born in County Cork, Ireland in 1898 but moved to America to help her late sister’s widower raise his six sons. Anna crocheted this intricate 4’ x 7’ table cloth in her down time, and when she ran out of white yarn she simply finished the last couple of rows in a beige that she had on hand. 35 Glass & Copper Sculpture [Hillary Faccio] I cast this sculpture in hot glass and I love it because it has crazy shiny copper wires sticking out in all directions.

29 Cesar Pelli S&P Shakers [David Hacin] These salt & pepper shakers represent the postmodern era. They were a gift at a time when I didn't appreciate the style, but eventually grew into loving them.

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FOUr

HISTORIC DETAILS, MODERN SPIN.

DEVELOPMENT | CONSTRUCTION

THE HOLLAND COMPANIES ARCHITECTURE | INTERIORS | BRANDING

HACIN + ASSOCIATES

www.four51marlborough.com


Focus A photographic essay of food, plated as notable architectural styles from Brutalist to Bauhaus. Designed & plated by Jennifer Clapp, Matthew Woodward, & Yaoyao Kelly Illustrations by David Hacin Photography by Emily Neumann


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CLASSIC NEW ENGLAND DESSERTS (and where to find them) by Tim Grafft

1. BETH'S FARM MARKET | Warren, ME

Their famous local strawberry shortcake is worth the drive to Mid-Coast Maine.

2. LIL'S CAFE | Kittery Foreside, ME

This charming village, just across the bridge from Portsmouth, NH is lucky to have Lil's Cafe...and their crullers.

3. A& J KING ARTISAN BAKERS | Salem, MA

Always crowded and for a reason: best sticky buns in the state.

4. RED HEN BAKING CO. | Middlesex, VT

Get anything...but especially their fruit pies!

5. SWEET WILLIAM'S BAKERY | Salisbury, CT

The best ice cream sandwiches in the world.

6. CHOCOLATE SPRINGS CAFE | Lenox, MA

Saveur Magazine named it one of their TOP 10 star chocolate makers in the United States.

7. KANE'S DONUTS | Saugus, MA

The original. Worth the trip and a huge selection of donuts.

8. DELEKTA PHARMACY | Warren, RI

A real old time soda fountain, famous for their coffee cabinets shakes.

9. HALEY HOUSE BAKERY CAFE | Roxbury, MA

The best chocolate chip cookie you will ever eat.

10. THE SOUTH END BUTTERY | South End, Boston, MA

New pastry chef, new chocolate layer cake...yum!

1. FLOUR BAKERY + CAFE | various Boston locations Certainly discovered...but have you tried their humble rice krispie treat?

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THIS PAGE The staff cafe at the Living Proof Headquarters © Michael Stavaridis FRONT COVER A design meeting over lunch at H+A styled by Jennifer Clapp © Emily Neumann BACK COVER Walter, enjoying post-meeting leftovers styled by Jennifer Clapp © Emily Neumann

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H+ MAGAZINE IS CREATED, DESIGNED, AND PUBLISHED BY ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN FIRM, HACIN + ASSOCIATES 1 1 2 SHAWMUT AVENUE , STUDIO 5A, BOSTON , MA 021 1 8 www.hacin.com | media@hacin.com | 617.426.0077 /HacinAssociates

@HacinAssociates

#TeamHacin

@HacinAssociates


H+ Magazine | No. 4 | Fall-Winter 2016