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2572 Park Ave. Memphis, TN 38114 Hours: Monday - Friday 9:30 am - 8:00 pm 901-576-6878 Facility Amenities •Large Banquet & Meeting Room •Commercial Kitchen •Indoor heated pool with wheelchair entry (ages 55+ only except during summer season) •Multi-purpose Activity Room with divider •Art Studio with 2 kilns •Computer Lab & Resource Center •Game Room •Music Room •Fitness Room •Market & Resource Room •City Offices •Administration Office •Video Monitoring Control •TV viewing area •Outdoor Patio with umbrellas and tables •Playground, pavilion & 1/5 mile fitness trail Activities and Programs •Health, Fitness, and Wellness ◦Swimming ◦Aerobics ◦Sit and be Fit ◦Water Aerobics


What's yo favorite color? If you answered "orange," you must recognize the question as the title of Memphis' latest hit record by J. Rock & Noon, aka rap group Da Volunteers. "The song," explains J. Rock, "has actually been out for three years. We dropped it on our last album, Gunz and Rozes, three years ago. Then DJ Sound gave me a track, and the hook came back to me. We dropped the verse over it and put it back out. We put out a mix tape, Da Bandwagon, in Atlanta and Alabama, then brought it back to Memphis. By then, it was crazy." Last April, Orange Mound's own Marlon Jermaine Goodwin, half of the veteran rap duo 8Ball & MJG, heard the track and got on board, helping Da Volunteers shoot a video and prepare 16 more songs for an upcoming album, also called What's Yo Favorite Color?, which will be co-released by 8 Ways/MJG Muzik and Teers Entertainment on October 31st. "Noon and I both grew up in Orange Mound, in the Oakview Apartments on Kimball. We slept in bunk beds together, and we've been rapping together for 12 years. About seven years ago, we decided to get serious," J. Rock says. He claims that their upcoming album will yield 12 singles and pegs "Simon Said," which is already getting airplay on Hot 107.1 -FM, as the next hit. Questioned about the national success of "What's Yo Favorite Color?" -- a song about a Memphis neighborhood -- J. Rock confidently says, "They've made songs about Harlem, Compton, and Atlanta. We love those songs, and now we're teaching them about where we're from. Just like we can relate, they can relate to what's going on in our neighborhood. In Knoxville, where they've got the whole orange thing and the Volunteer theme going on, we expect to sell 40,000 copies of the album. When we go there, we want it to be pandemonium."We're working the next single in Memphis, but 'Favorite Color' is just breaking down markets outside the region," says J. Rock. "We're dropping the record as an independent, but we're also hoping a major might wanna come on board. There are already a lot of offers on the table."


Orange Mound is a neighborhood in the southeastern area of Memphis, Tennessee and was the first AfricanAmerican neighborhood in the United States to be built by African-Americans. Orange Mound is also an official suburb of South Memphis.Built on the grounds of the former Deaderick plantation, the Orange Mound subdivision was developed as a neighborhood for African-Americans in the 1890s with affordable land and residences for the less wealthy.Drugs and crime infected the neighborhood in the 1980s and 1990s. In the 2000s, revitalization efforts were started and show positive effects Deaderick plantation - 1800s Orange Mound stands on the site of the former John Deaderick plantation. Between 1825 and 1830, Deaderick (whose family donated the land in Nashville on which the Tennessee State Capitol was built) purchased 5,000 acres (20 km²) of land and built a stately house there (at what is now the east side of Airways, between Carnes and Spottswood). In 1890, a developer named Elzey Eugene Meachem purchased land from the Deaderick family and began developing a subdivision for African-Americans, selling lots for less than $100. In the 1890s, a typical Orange Mound house was a small, narrow "shotgun"-style house. Vibrant black community - 1970s In the 1970s, Orange Mound was billed as "the largest concentration of blacks in the United States except for Harlem in New York City." The neighborhood provided a refuge for blacks moving to the city for the first time from rural areas. Although the streets of the early Orange Mound were unpaved, it was a vibrant community in which a mix of residences, businesses, churches, and cultural centers flourished. During the era of desegregation, Orange Mound entered a period of decline when younger residents began to move away. Drugs and crime - 1980s-1990s In the 1980s, the use of crack cocaine began separating families, generating violence, ravaging the community with crime, and breaking many homes. The drug use devastated the poor and middle class families, who were doctors, lawyers, homeowners and more. This community had been built on strong families, preachers, churchers, and civil pride, and it was the largest community of black homeowners in the 1940-50's. However, in the 1980s, the community role models shifted away from teachers, preachers, and doctors to drug dealers and gang members. Orange Mound was listed in 1994 as the # 1 area for murders, burglaries, and rapes in Memphis, but since 1994, Orange Mound has cleaned up considerably as crime has moved south & east of it. Revitalization - 2000s In the 2000s, Orange Mound has been the focus of a variety of revitalization efforts. One such effort, the Orange Mound Collaborative, was funded by a Ford Foundation grant and stresses "education through empowerment." The Orange Mound Collaborative's projects include an Early Childhood Institute, and an oral history project in which researchers conduct videotaped interviews with Orange Mound's older residents.


S.M.A.R.T. (2003) - In 2003, Orange Mound was named one of 21 areas in Memphis that are the focus of the S.M.A.R.T. Revitalization Plan ("Servicing the Metropolitan Area through the Redevelopment of Targeted neighborhoods"), a public-private partnership to create vibrant neighborhoods in declining areas. Progress (2004) - In a 2004, editorial in the Memphis Commercial Appeal, Robert Lipscomb, director of Memphis's Housing and Community Development division, wrote that much progress has been made in revitalizing O range Mound, through a combination of code enforcement, tenant education programs, and neighborhood cleanup efforts. Churches The church has always held a prominent role in the Orange Mound neighborhoods through developing community leaders and fostering community stability. Particularly important has been Mount Moriah Missionary Baptist Church, which has been at the corner of David and Carnes Streets since 1926. This church played a role in the American Civil Rights Movement by assisting activists jailed for their activities in support of racial equality. Education Melrose High School is located in Orange Mound and serves as a source of pride and focal point for the community. Every Friday the community comes together to cheer on the Golden Wildcats football team at "Melrose Stadium". Melrose has a great football program; they have played in two of the last five state championships. The Melrose football team has produced many players, such as Dewayne Robertson, Cedrick Wilson, Graig Cooper, Kindal Moorehead and many more. And also Airways Middle High. Key to Orange Mound Tyler Glover, who operates Tyler's Place restaurant at 2481 Park Avenue, has been dubbed the "Mayor of Orange Mound," and his restaurant the unofficial Orange Mound "city hall." During the first term of Memphis Mayor W. W. Herenton, Glover presented Herenton with an orange "key to Orange Mound." Glover's words convey the love that Orange Mound's long- term residents feel for Orange Mound: "This is the greatest community in the world.... I t is the greatest community because I know everybody here and I love working on committees and making this a better place in which to live. I don't want to live any other place than Orange Mound. I have had numerous opportunities to move some place else, but there is no other place in the world I want to live, but Orange Mound, Tenn."


Another important part of community life was participation in and support for team sports. Today, Orange Mound residents look to neighbors such as former Memphis State basketball coach Larry Finch and Denver Bronco football player Tori Noel with great pride. However, no sporting event in Orange Mound has ever surpassed the importance of Melrose High School football. In bringing together family, friends, and neighbors, Melrose High School and its sports facilities take center stage in the cultural landscape. The history of the Melrose school began in 1890 when Shelby County opened its District 18 School at the intersection of what are currently Spottswood and Boston Streets. In 1894, Melrose graduated its first class of five girls. In 1918, Melrose became a city school and moved into a stucco building with eleven classrooms. In 1937, the New Deal’s Public Works Administration (PWA) funded a new three-story brick school across the street. In 1972, grades seven through nine remained at the PWA building while tenth through twelfth grades moved to a modern Melrose High School Building on Deaderick Avenue where the school is still located. The PWA building, which is listed in the National Register of Historic Places, has remained vacant since 1981, although the community is now exploring new uses for the school. Melrose has an active alumni association with chapters in Memphis, Chicago, Los Angeles, Atlanta, and Detroit. This continuing involvement of school alumni with the old school and neighborhood in Memphis provides more evidence of Orange Mound’s significance to its residents’ sense of identity, a sense that continues to endure even for those who no longer live there today. Melrose High School is located in Orange Mound and serves as a source of pride and focal point for the community. Every Friday the community comes together to cheer on the Golden Wildcats football team at "Melrose Stadium". Melrose has a great football program; they have played in two of the last five state championships. The Melrose football team has produced many players, such as Dewayne Robertson, Cedrick Wilson, Graig Cooper, Kindal Moorehead and many more.


Land Marks

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Land Marks


Orange Mound Times  

Orange Mound Times

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