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HECO • VOLUME XXIX • NO. 4

CONSUMER LINES

APRIL 2010

Earth Day marks 40 years

A

pril 22, 2010 marks the 40th anniversary of Earth Day. It was proposed in 1970 by former U.S. Senator Gaylord Nelson as a day of nationwide, peaceful demonstration about the state of the environment. In the Senator’s words:

Global climate change may be the most important environmental issue facing the world today. At Hawaiian Electric, we remain committed to taking direct action to mitigate the

The energy agreement, which is the most aggressive such effort in the nation, aims to move Hawaii decisively away from the use of imported oil for electricity and ground transportation toward the use of diverse, local renewable energy andHECO energy efficiency.

It was on that day that Americans made it clear that they understood and were deeply concerned over the deterioration of our environment and the mindless dissipation of our resources. That day…forcibly thrust the issue of environmental quality and resources conservation into the political dialogue of the Nation.1 Since that watershed event 40 years ago, much progress has been made in protecting and pre- serving our environment. Hawaiian Electric Company has contributed to this progress through strict compliance with federal and state environmental laws, aggressive energy efficiency programs, and support of many voluntary environmental programs and partnerships. And yet, there is more to be done. 1

with the Governor of Hawaii; the state Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism; and the Office of Consumer Advocacy, as part of the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative.

The agreement covers a wide range of initiatives, including:

contributions to global warming from electricity production, including promoting aggressive energy conservation and transitioning to clean and efficient energy production. One of our most ambitious partnerships was forged a year and a half ago

“Earth Day ’70: What It Meant” <http://www.epa.gov/history/topics/earthday/02.htm>

A requirement that 40% of electric power sales come from renewable resources by 2030 and establishment of new energy efficiency goals Establishment of a “feed-in” tariff and other programs to help install more renewable energy faster A commitment to reduce the use of fossil fuels for transportation by adopting and promoting plug-in hybrid and electric vehicles Continued on back page

Celebrate at the Grow Hawaiian Festival Bishop Museum’s new native plant garden, a preview of the latest Family Science Night exhibit entitled “Climate Change: The Earth and You,” and a variety of fun keiki activities. Get a lomilomi massage, enjoy ono Hawaiian food, and relax to the sounds of Kaukahi, Holunape, and Weldon Kekauoha. And if you are one of the first 100 attendOther highlights include an 11 a.m. ees you will receive a free, reusable groundbreaking ceremony for grocery bag.

Join us to celebrate Earth Day, Discover what you can do to protect the environment Hawaiian culture, and native plants at the Grow Hawaiian Learn the traditional Hawaiian Festival, on Saturday, April 24, uses of native plants from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. at the Beat kapa, weave lau hala, make Bishop Museum. Admission is free lei, and craft Hawaiian implements for kamaaina and military families. Purchase native plants from Hui The festival will offer interesting Ku Maoli Ola and entertaining activities for Ask Oahu Master Gardeners everyone in the family: how to care for your plants

Find out about climate change, clean energy, and conservation

P r o d u c e d f o r c u s t o m e r s o f : H awa i i a n E l e c t r i c C o m pa n y • M a u i E l e c t r i c C o m pa n y • H awa i i E l e c t r i c L i g h t C o m pa n y C o n s u m e r L i n e s • P. O . B o x 2 7 5 0 • H o n o l u l u , H awa i i 9 6 8 4 0 • t e l e P h o n e : 5 4 3 - 5 6 7 0 • h t t p : / / w w w. h e c o . c o m


PUC approves increase for new biodiesel generating station Effective February 20, 2010, the Hawaii Public Utilities Commission (PUC) approved an additional 1% interim increase in Hawaiian Electric’s 2009 rate case. This increase allows the company to begin recovering the costs of the new 110-megawatt biodiesel-fueled generating station at Campbell Industrial Park (CIP). While the amount of this increase will vary by type of customer and actual electricity use, a typical residential customer using 600

kilowatt-hours of electricity per month will see an increase of $1.34. The CIP generating unit has been successfully tested on biodiesel, a renewable energy fuel source. A contract for the regular supply of biodiesel is before the PUC for final approval. In the meantime, the new generator, which is more fuel-efficient than older combustion turbines, is being used to help meet Oahu’s energy needs during times of peak demand.

Continued from front page Achieving these goals will require unprecedented cooperation and commitment among individuals, businesses, institutions, and government. We have a long road ahead of us, but if we make the needed investments now, we can look to greater energy and economic security for Hawaii, reduced greenhouse gas emissions, and more stable or lower energy costs in the future. For detailed information on the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative energy agreement and an update on the progress we have made in one year, go to “Renewable Energy” on www.heco.com.

Hawaii students head to the nationals! Congratulations to the top middle school students at the MATHCOUNTS Hawaii State Competition: Ethan Vo (Washington Middle), Nikolai Chen (Iolani), Brian Kim (Punahou), and Junhao Li (Waiakea Intermediate). The four are headed to Orlando, Florida, May 6-9, 2010, to represent Hawaii at the MATHCOUNTS National Competition. Leslee Hosoda of Punahou School will serve as their coach. Since 1984, Hawaiian Electric Company has been a proud supporter of the MATHCOUNTS competitions, which are organized by the Hawaii Society of Professional Engineers and a steering committee comprised of businesses and educators. MATHCOUNTS promotes middle school mathematics achievement

Hawaiian Electric Company’s Lynne Unemori and Nathan Yuen flank the top MATHCOUNTS Hawaii students, ( l to r ), Junhao Li, Brian Kim, Nikolai Chen, and Ethan Vo, with coach Todd Chow-Hoy.

and provides students with an opportunity to challenge their math skills and develop self-confidence,

while inspiring them to pursue careers in math, science, technology, and engineering.

RECIPE OF THE MONTH

Fresh Strawberry Napoleons 2 baskets (12 ounce size) strawberries 2 tablespoons sugar 2 tablespoons lemon juice 1 box (17 1/4 ounces) frozen puff HECO pastry, thawed 1 1/2 cups milk 1 box (3 3/4 ounces) instant vanilla pudding and pie filling Whipped cream Powdered sugar Preheat oven to 350° F. Clean, hull, and slice strawberries; put into a large bowl. Add 1 tablespoon of the sugar and the lemon juice; toss gently. printed on recycled paper

Chill. Cut each puff pastry sheet into six 5 x 3-inch pieces. Prick pastry pieces and sprinkle with the remaining 1 tablespoon sugar. Place on baking sheets and bake for 20 to 25 minutes or until lightly browned. Cool. Using the 1 1/2 cups milk, prepare vanilla pudding according to package directions. Spoon pudding over 6 of the baked puff pastries. Spoon strawberries over vanilla pudding. Top with whipped cream. Place remaining 6 puff pastries over cream; sprinkle with powdered sugar. Recipe makes 6 servings.


MECO • VOLUME XXIX • NO. 4

CONSUMER LINES

APRIL 2010

Earth Day marks 40 years

A

pril 22, 2010 marks the 40th anniversary of Earth Day. It was proposed in 1970 by former U.S. Senator Gaylord Nelson as a day of nationwide, peaceful demonstration about the state of the environment. In the Senator’s words:

energy, and support of many voluntary environmental programs and partnerships. And yet, there is more to be done.

It was on that day that Americans made it clear that they understood and were deeply concerned over the deterioration of our environment and the mindless dissipation of our resources. That day…forcibly thrust the issue of environmental quality and resources conservation into the political dialogue of the Nation.1 Since that watershed event 40 years ago, much progress has been made in protecting and preserving our environment. Maui Electric Company has contributed to this progress through strict compliance with federal and state environmental laws, aggressive energy efficiency programs, increased use of renewable 1

Global climate change may be the most important environmental issue facing the world today. At MECO, we remain committed to taking direct action to mitigate the contributions to global warming from electricity

“Earth Day ’70: What It Meant” <http://www.epa.gov/history/topics/earthday/02.htm>

Be careful when picking fruit

An important reminder: Use extreme caution when picking fruit from trees near overhead power lines.

Overhead power lines are energized and can be danger- ous. At Maui Electric, we care about your safety and offer the following tips:

Avoid coming into contact with overhead power lines, directly or indirectly.

Keep yourself and any ladders, fruit pickers, poles, or other tools at least ten feet away from power lines.

Also keep items such as antennas, kites, model airplanes, and metallic balloons away from power lines. Do not hang fireworks from utility poles. If you see anything caught in a power line, do not try to free it. Call MECO’s Trouble Line, from Maui at 871-7777, or toll-free from Molokai or Lanai at 1 877 871-8461, or call 911 if it is an emergency.

production, including promoting aggressive energy conservation and transitioning to clean and efficient energy production.

One of our most ambitious partnerships was forged a year and a half ago with the Governor of Hawaii; the state Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism; and the Office of Consumer Advocacy, as part of the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative. MECO The energy agreement, which is the most aggressive such effort in the nation, aims to move Hawaii decisively away from the use of imported oil for electricity and ground transportation toward the use of diverse, local renewable energy and energy efficiency. The agreement covers a wide range of initiatives, including a requirement that 40% of electric power sales come from renewable resources by 2030 and the establishment of new energy efficiency goals. Achieving the goals of the energy agreement will require unprecedented cooperation and commitment among individuals, businesses, institutions, and government. At MECO, we are committed to working together to identify solutions that will allow increasing amounts of non-firm renewable energy on our islands’ grids while continuing to maintain reliable service. If we make the needed investments now, we can look to greater energy and economic security for Hawaii, reduced greenhouse gas emissions, and more stable or lower energy costs in the future. For detailed information on the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative energy agreement and an update on the progress we have made in one year, go to “Renewable Energy” on www.heco.com.

P r o d u c e d f o r c u s t o m e r s o f : H awa i i a n E l e c t r i c C o m pa n y • M a u i E l e c t r i c C o m pa n y • H awa i i E l e c t r i c L i g h t C o m pa n y C o n s u m e r L i n e s • P. O . B o x 2 7 5 0 • H o n o l u l u , H awa i i 9 6 8 4 0 • t e l e P h o n e : 5 4 3 - 5 6 7 0 • h t t p : / / w w w. h e c o . c o m


Economize when cooking

chicken, you’ll need a larger model than one sized for a cheese melt.

Convection toaster ovens use a small fan to circulate hot air in the oven, allowing foods to cook more evenly. Models with quartz heating elements and reflective crumb trays cook food about 30% faster.

Decide if you want a broiler— most, but not all, models have it. The broiler is handy for cooking items like hamburgers and steaks.

When cooking or reheating a small quantity of food, do you simply pop the dish in your big electric oven? You could cut your electricity cost in half by using a toaster oven instead. If you are shopping for a toaster oven, you will find there is a variety to choose from. In addition to conventional toaster ovens, there are some that use new technologies to improve the cooking process. Some models use infrared light, which provides almost instant heating and speeds toasting time by up to 40%.

Take time to assess your needs and make a wise purchase. Make sure you have enough counter space. While there are models that mount underneath cabinets, countertop models can require a good amount of space, depending on their size and the clearance that may be required due to the heat they produce. Think about your intended use. If you want to roast a four-pound

Make clean-up easier with a removable, slide-out crumb tray. Non-stick or continuous-clean interiors also make cleaning easier. Look for safety features. A bell timer and automatic shut-off can help prevent kitchen fires. Be sure to follow the instructions that come with the toaster oven. Cooking times may vary from those specified for baking in a conventional oven. Additionally, the instructions will provide important safety information.

Agriculture and safety for Maui’s keiki Maui County Farm Bureau’s (MCFB) Ag in the Classroom program introduces children to the vital role of agriculture in our daily lives. Maui Electric has partnered with MCFB and the County of Maui Office of Economic Development in this program since 2007, helping to educate over 800 keiki about local agriculture and living a sustainable lifestyle. We teach children about healthy eating and take the opportunity to share electrical safety messages. In the photo at right, MECO’s Kaui Awai-Dickson is giving the keiki some important tips on picking fruit safely. RECIPE OF THE MONTH

Fresh Strawberry Napoleons 2 baskets (12 ounce size) strawberries 2 tablespoons sugar 2 tablespoons lemon juice 1 box (17 1/4 ounces) frozen puff   pastry, thawed MECO 1 1/2 cups milk 1 box (3 3/4 ounces) instant vanilla   pudding and pie filling Whipped cream Powdered sugar Preheat oven to 350° F. Clean, hull, and slice strawberries; put into a large bowl. Add 1 tablespoon of the sugar and the lemon juice; toss gently. printed on recycled paper

Chill. Cut each puff pastry sheet into six 5 x 3-inch pieces. Prick pastry pieces and sprinkle with the remaining 1 tablespoon sugar. Place on baking sheets and bake for 20 to 25 minutes or until lightly browned. Cool. Using the 1 1/2 cups milk, prepare vanilla pudding according to package directions. Spoon pudding over 6 of the baked puff pastries. Spoon strawberries over vanilla pudding. Top with whipped cream. Place remaining 6 puff pastries over cream; sprinkle with powdered sugar. Recipe makes 6 servings.


HELCO • VOLUME XXIX • NO. 4

CONSUMER LINES

APRIL 2010

Earth Day marks 40 years

A

pril 22, 2010 marks the 40th anniversary of Earth Day. It was proposed in 1970 by former U.S. Senator Gaylord Nelson as a day of nationwide, peaceful demonstration about the state of the environment. In the Senator’s words:

energy, and support of many voluntary environmental programs and partnerships. And yet, there is more to be done.

One of our most ambitious partnerships was forged a year and a half ago with the Governor of Hawaii; the state Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism; and the Office of Consumer Advocacy, as part of the Hawaii Clean Energy HELCO Initiative.

It was on that day that Americans made it clear that they understood and were deeply concerned over the deterioration of our environment and the mindless dissipation of our resources. That day…forcibly thrust the issue of environmental quality and resources conservation into the political dialogue of the Nation.1 Since that watershed event 40 years ago, much progress has been made in protecting and preserving our environment. Hawaii Electric Light Company has contributed to this progress through strict compliance with federal and state environmental laws, aggressive energy efficiency programs, increased use of renewable 1

production, including promoting aggressive energy conservation and transitioning to clean and efficient energy production.

Global climate change may be the most important environmental issue facing the world today. At HELCO, we remain committed to taking direct action to mitigate the contributions to global warming from electricity

“Earth Day ’70: What It Meant” <http://www.epa.gov/history/topics/earthday/02.htm>

Be careful when picking fruit

An important reminder: Use extreme caution when picking fruit from trees or working near overhead power lines.

Overhead power lines are energized and can be danger- ous. At Hawaii Electric Light Company, we care about your safety and offer the following tips:

Avoid coming into contact with overhead power lines, directly or indirectly.

Keep yourself and any ladders, fruit pickers, poles, or other tools at least ten feet away from power lines.

Also keep items such as antennas, kites, model airplanes, and metallic balloons away from power lines. Do not hang fireworks from utility poles. If you see anything caught in a power line, do not try to free it. Call HELCO’s Trouble Line at 969-6666, or call 911 if it is an emergency.

The energy agreement, which is the most aggressive such effort in the nation, aims to move Hawaii decisively away from the use of imported oil for electricity and ground transportation toward the use of diverse, local renewable energy and energy efficiency. The agreement covers a wide range of initiatives, including a requirement that 40% of electric power sales come from renewable resources by 2030 and the establishment of new energy efficiency goals. Achieving the goals of the energy agreement will require unprecedented cooperation and commitment among individuals, businesses, institutions, and government. At HELCO, we are committed to working together to identify solutions that will allow increasing amounts of non-firm renewable energy on our island’s grid while continuing to maintain reliable service. If we make the needed investments now, we can look to greater energy and economic security for Hawaii, reduced greenhouse gas emissions, and more stable or lower energy costs in the future. For detailed information on the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative energy agreement and an update on the progress we have made in one year, go to “Renewable Energy” on www.heco.com.

P r o d u c e d f o r c u s t o m e r s o f : H awa i i a n E l e c t r i c C o m pa n y • M a u i E l e c t r i c C o m pa n y • H awa i i E l e c t r i c L i g h t C o m pa n y C o n s u m e r L i n e s • P. O . B o x 2 7 5 0 • H o n o l u l u , H awa i i 9 6 8 4 0 • t e l e P h o n e : 5 4 3 - 5 6 7 0 • h t t p : / / w w w. h e c o . c o m


Transfer your temporary service

This is an example of a temporary service installation, which is only used while a residence is under construction.

Let us help you move your temporary electric service connection from the temporary pole to a permanent location. Electric service installed on a wooden temporary pole should be used for construction purposes for one year only. Temporary services energized longer than one year may be subject to termination and removal due to safety concerns. To avoid disconnection of service on a temporary pole we encourage

you to contact our engineering department. Our staff can advise you of the process and options for transferring service to a permanent location at your building or to a permanent meter pole. For services in North and South Hilo and from Puna to Naalehu please contact our Hilo Office at 969-0311 or 969-0312. For services in Kau, North and South Kohala, and Kona contact our Kona Office at 327-0510.

Hawaii students head to the nationals! Congratulations to the top middle school students at the MATHCOUNTS Hawaii State Competition, including Big Island champ Junhao Li. The winners are: Ethan Vo (Washington Middle), Nikolai Chen (Iolani), Brian Kim (Punahou), and Junhao Li (Waiakea Intermediate). The four are headed to Orlando, Florida, May 6-9, 2010, to represent Hawaii at the MATHCOUNTS National Competition. Leslee Hosoda of Punahou School will serve as their coach.

Since 1984, Hawaii Electric Light Company has been a proud supporter of the MATHCOUNTS competitions, which are organized by the Hawaii Society of Professional Engineers and a steering committee comprised of businesses and educators. MATHCOUNTS promotes middle school mathematics

Hawaiian Electric Company’s Lynne Unemori and Nathan Yuen flank the top MATHCOUNTS Hawaii students, ( l to r ), Junhao Li, Brian Kim, Nikolai Chen, and Ethan Vo, with coach Todd Chow-Hoy.

achievement and provides students with an opportunity to challenge their math skills and develop

self-confidence, while inspiring them to pursue careers in math, science, technology, and engineering.

RECIPE OF THE MONTH

Fresh Strawberry Napoleons 2 baskets (12 ounce size) strawberries 2 tablespoons sugar 2 tablespoons lemon juice 1 box (17 1/4 ounces) frozen puff   pastry, thawed HELCO 1 1/2 cups milk 1 box (3 3/4 ounces) instant vanilla   pudding and pie filling Whipped cream Powdered sugar Preheat oven to 350° F. Clean, hull, and slice strawberries; put into a large bowl. Add 1 tablespoon of the sugar and the lemon juice; toss gently. printed on recycled paper

Chill. Cut each puff pastry sheet into six 5 x 3-inch pieces. Prick pastry pieces and sprinkle with the remaining 1 tablespoon sugar. Place on baking sheets and bake for 20 to 25 minutes or until lightly browned. Cool. Using the 1 1/2 cups milk, prepare vanilla pudding according to package directions. Spoon pudding over 6 of the baked puff pastries. Spoon strawberries over vanilla pudding. Top with whipped cream. Place remaining 6 puff pastries over cream; sprinkle with powdered sugar. Recipe makes 6 servings.

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