Issuu on Google+

The Journal of the German Wirehaired Pointer Club of America

October/November 1997


on the cover. ..

Ch Larkspurs Storm Trooper owners:

Gina McCain & Kathryn Schwer

In very limited showing, Trooper is already one of the top Wires in the nation. Trooper has captured: 2 - Group l's 1- Group 2 &

several Group 3's & 4's.

Sire: Ch Ripsnorter's Thunderhart Dam: Ch Larkspur's Zoe Dancer Handled by Rober Perry All breed professional handler

MURDERED, YELLOW DOG ACCUSED - Responding to a 3am 911 call of a Duck Av enue woman, Key West Police Officers John Kirvan and Steve Nathanson investigated the apparent murder of Alberto, her Senegalese parrot. According to the woman, when she opened her apartment door, a yellow dog "forced" his way into her abode; then proceeded to jump up, and eat her bird. According to a neighbor, the tow-headed hound escaped with feathers sticking out of his mouth, and had been admitted to the apartment by the complainant because "the dog didn't have a key and wasn't trained to knock yet." The officers located the yellow dog, who allegedly lives in the same apartment complex. Police also collected evidence in the form of scattered feathers. The complainant reportedly told police officers, "Arrest that dog for burglary and murder!" Police advised the woman that she should contact the State Attorney's office to press charges. No arrests were made. from the cyber conch zine a internet newsletter from the Florida Keys PARROT

NATIONAL RESCUE PROCEDURE To facilitate the placement of those GWP's who have become separated from their homes and owners and can't find their way back, we are implementing a new system. This is not cast in concrete; we'll see how it works and then make any modifications. Your suggestions would be most welcome. This in no way takes precedence over any local club's procedure. Please use all the resources you have at the local level. We are just availing everyone of a way to place Wires who take a little longer to find homes for. I. Local Club's Rescue Chairman may place any rescued GWP that they wish on the internet by contacting their respective Regional GWPCA Director. Eastern - Mal Decker (Delaware Valley and Fort Detroit) Mid-West - Liz Dixon (Northern Ohio, Twin Cities, Illinois, Wisconsin, Eastern Nebraska and Central Iowa) Western - Rocky Gilleard (Northern and Southern California, Oregon, Utah and Sea-Tac) Cross Timbers Club and those "independent" rescue contacts across the southern belt, please contact the director who is in your time zone.

2. The Director will forward the information to the Web-Master, who will include it on our Home Page. This information can be e-mailed (preferably). The quickest way the better. The Local Club Rescue Contact needs to include as much of a description as possible on the dog - besides the "vital statistics", please tell us about the dog's temperament, sociability, traits (can he hunt, does he do tricks etc). We'd like a photograph, too, if possible. 3. Those who "hit" on a particular dog from the website can contact the Director, or if the local club rescue contact wants their phone number placed in the "ad", they may be contacted directly. Remember, we aren't given much notification to save some of these dogs. The faster someone who is interested can make contact, the better the chance of placing the dog. We are currently searching for someone who could be the National Contact Person ...the person whose name is listed in theAKC Gazette. Any volunteers??? Please call Linda Strothman-Thompson at 508-249-8360 (Eastern TIme Zone). Thanks for your interest and suggestions.


LOCAL CLUB

ADVERTISING

RATES

SECRETARIES DELAWARE

VALLEY

GWP CLUB

Judy Cheshire 46 Southridge Dr., Glen Cove, NY 11542 (516) 671-3564 FORT DETROIT GWP CLUB Barbara Hein 3838 Davison Lake Rd, Ortonville, Ml 48462 (810) 627-3566 GWP CLUB OF NORTH OHIO Jean Renner Rt 7 Box 332, Georgetown, (803) 546-3495

SC 29440

TWIN CITIES GWP CLUB Liz Dixon N7815 County Rd .. N Spring Valley, WI 54767 (715) 778-4675 GWP CLUB OF ILLINOIS Sandra Hoesel 425 N. School St., Braidwood, (815) 458-0116

IL 60408

GWP CLUB OF WISCONSIN Sue Clemons 1031 Amy Belle Road, Germantown, 53022

WI

(414) 628-3452 GWP OF EASTERN NEBRASKA Derek Jackson 5110 So. 163rd St., Omaha, NE 68135 (402) 896-2655 GWP OF CENTRAL IOWA Dennis Brown 2412 Athlone Court- RR2, Ames, IA 50010 (515) 233-2710 CROSS TIMBERS

WIRE-NEWS

INFORMATION

IF YOU ARE MOVING YOU MUSTSEND YOUR CHANGE OF ADDRESS TO THE TREASURER. IF WE DO NOT RECEIVE YOUR CHANGE OF ADDRESS WE WILL ONLY REMAIL YOUR ISSUE WITH A $3.00 FIRST CLASS CHARGE TO YOU. The Wire News is mailed Bulk Rate and can take up to three weeks to arrive. If you would like your Wire News mailed First Class, please send $10.00 to the Treasurer and you will be placed on the First Class mailing list. (This is to cover the postage) Make this check payable to GWPCA Wire News. The Wire News will be published in the following months: February,April,June, August,October and December. Deadlines for advertising is the 1st of the preceeding month, ie @November 1st for the December issue.

publishing

If you have an article that you think would interest members of the GWPCA please send it to the Editor. If this article is a re-print, please get re-print approval before you send it in. Clubs are encouraged to send Specialty reports, field trial reports and hunting test reports. Pictures will be

GWP

Kandy Scaramuzzo 4714 Lester Drive, RR#7, Arlington, TX 76010 (817) 429-8469 GWP OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA Sharon Jahn 1360 Estates Dr., Dixon, CA 95620 (916) 678-2289 GWP OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA Suz Rawn 631 Baylor St, Pacific Palisades, CA 90272 (310) 454-0405

The Wire News Staff

I .

'oo',d,dif 'pso,Pji

Editor & Production Bernee Brawn 1408 Pineville Rd., New Hope, PA 18938 (215) 598-3990 justagwp@tradenet.net Show News & Top Ten- Jerry Clark 157 Rt. 526, Allentown NJ 08501 (609) 259-7579 Field News & Top Ten-Lynn Sandor, 255 Flood Ave., San Francisco, CA 94122 (415) 585-5555 NAVHDA & OFA- Bobby Applegate 218 N. Lincoln Ln., Arlington Heights, IL 60004 (708) 394-5188 Health & Genetics- Regina Schwabe, DVM 18 Call Hollow Rd., Pomona, NY 10970 (914) 362-8476 Rescue -HELP NEEDED- contact Bill Richardson or Karen Nelsen Local Barks- Karen Nelsen 25821 Lucille Ave., Lomita, CA 90717 (310) 530-3264 Obedience Top Ten & New Titles - Lorie Sargent,1 0382 Fenner Rd., Perry, MI 48872 (517) 675-5876 Staff Artist S.Gail Richardson, 1232 Brocker Rd., Metamora, MI48455 (810) 678-2529

GWPOFUTAH Hal Christenson

GWPCA

Officers

and

Directors

(801) 255-9391 OREGON GWP CLUB Mary Hanson 17941 SW Sandra Lane, Aloha, OR 97006 (503) 848-6845 SEATTLE-TACOMA Dave Shelden

GWP

3250 164th, Sea-Tac, WA 98188 (206) 244-1234

President: Vice

Bill Richardson

President:

Secretary: Treasurer: Eastern Mid West Western

Penny

Karen

Nelsen

Linda

Michaelis

Director: Director: Director:

1232 Brocker

Ljungren 25821

Elizabeth

Lucille

Lomita,

Ave.,

Monticello,

1951 Hoffmansville Dixon

Rocky Gilleard,

Membership Chairperson:

Ave.

PO Box127,

Mal Decker

Rd., Metamora,

28124-199th

N7815

County

MI48455

SE, Kent,

CA 90717 MN 55362

Rd., Fredrick, Rd N Spring

13224 Hillside Rd., St. Ignatiuis,

Rhonda Amucdson

(810)

WA 98042 (310) (612)

678-2529 (206)

631-6232

530-3264 878-1685

PA 19435 Valley, MT 59865

(610) 754-0072

WI 5476 (715) 778-4675 (406) 745-3998

W8751 340th Ave, Hager City, WI 54014 (715) 792-2913

Web Master: Sheri Graner, 5521 Carlsbad Ct, Albuquerque,

MN 87120 (505) 890-1148

manatee@RT66.com


DESIGNS FOR DRAHTHAARS Designs for Drahthaars offers a growing collection of sculptures of Drahthaars ranging from cabinet size miniatures to large multi-species scenes. This extensive collection is created by noted artist T Acevedo. These Cold-Cast Bronzes contain a heavy concentration of powdered bronze distributed throughout the casting. Each piece is hand buffed to bring out the lustre of the bronze and finished with a hand rubbed wax patina. No color paints are used in finishing these pieces. These pieces are of heavy bronze content and intricate designs that produce a more enduring quality collectible at a competitive price.

LIMITED EDITION of350 German Wirehair Pointing at Flying Grouse on Hardwood Base 17.7 5x8x5. 5" Item # 61-070-1

I

$175.00

COLLECTOR SERIES Small Standing Dog 5.5x5. 5x2" Item # 63-070

$40.00

SIGNATURE SERIES German Wire Hair Pointer with Duck on Hardwood Base 11.5x6.5x3.5" Item # 62-070

$140.00 send check or money order to: vom SoDak Kennels Larry Houck 1206 Skyline Drive Watertown, SD 57201 (605) 886-9436

Mailing and Handling Purchase Amount Add: $50.00 & under $ 5.00 $51.00-$200.00 $10.00 $201.00 and up $20.00


The GWPCA Wire News is published by the German Wirehaired Pointer Club of America, Inc. The GWPCA is a non-profit Illinois corporation which was founded in 1959 to promote and develop the German Wirehaired Pointer. Since 1959, the GWPCA has been recognized by the American Kennel Club as the member club responsible for the developement of the GWP in the United States. The GWPCA Wire News is published for the members of the GWPCA and is a benefit of membership in this club. The Editors of the GWPCA Wire News wish to encourage everyone to send articles of information of interest to our members. The Editors of the GWPCA Wire News reserve the right to edit or refuse to print any letters or articles sent into the GWPCA Wire News. Articles or letters appearing in the Wire News do NOT necessarily reflect the views of the GWPCA, the GWPCA Wire News or it's Staff. Individuals interested in membership in the GWPCA should contact the club Treasurer.

1-

SECRETARY路S NOTES Karen Nelsen

The ads which appeared in the various magazines (like NAVHDA's Versatile, Gun Dog, Bird Dog News) created an absolute nightmare for me and Linda Michaelis. Added to this were inquiries which came from our website manned by Sheri Graner. The total number of letters and phone calls have yet to be tallied, but I can tell you we were overwhelmed. To that end, the Board has appointed Rhonda Amundson to handle ALL membership inquiries and to maintain the membership rolls. Future ads, as well as the website,

will have her name and address as the contact person. Membership dues will continue to be sent to the Treasurer. Rhonda will keep the lists of names and other information. If you have a question about your dues, please contact Linda Michaelis, not Rhonda.

There are several changes in the Obedience regulations being proposed. These include jump heights, allowable collars, handler qualifications for Novice A and Open A classes and the elimination of measuring every dog prior to Open and Utility classes. The Director of Obedience, Robert Squires is asking all interested to review these proposed changes and let them know your opinions. If enough positive feedback is received, the changes will take effect on January 1, 1998. FMI contact the AKC Obedience Dept.

our website with placements. This procedure is included in this issue. Club members are encouraged to make suggestions to this procedure, as it is not "cast in concrete", but a starting point. We do appreciate your input.

In order the facilitate our Breed Rescue on a national level, we have instituted a

Now, its off to the Nationals!

OFANEWS

AKC UPDATES OBEDIENCE CHANGES

procedure that we hope will enable us to handle rescue situations on a more timely basis. We would also like to make use of

As of July 1, 1996 AKC will only accept OFA evaluation results for dogs that are positively and permanently identified at the time of testing. A micro chip or tattoo is an accepted means of identification. The dog's AKC registration number and the microchip or tattoo number must be reported to OFA at the time test results are submited for evauation. It is also recommended that these identification numbers be noted on the x rays when they are submitted to OFA. Please note that this in an AKC policy. OFA will continue to process dogs without permanent I.D. OFA now has complete breed lists avialable on diskettes. The fee for each breed is $25.00. In an effort to gather data and reduce the expense for breeders, OFA is offering a "kennel rate" if data on multiple dogs is submitted at the same time. First 5 $15.00 per dog Second 5 $7.50 per dog Over 10 No Charge The GWP has shown an increase in the percentage of Excellent certifications since 1980. We have risen from 13.8% to 17.1 % with a decrease in dysplastic dogs from 9.9% in 1980 to 9.4% in 93-94. Keep on x raying those dogs. And please remember to submit your OFA numbers with your advertisments.


'I

LOCAL BARKS By: Karen Nelsen

GWP CLUB OF ILLINOIS "THE INQUISITIVE WIRE" by Sandy Hoesel Guy Rezzardi is in the news ...he has been appointed the club's representative to the National Field Trial Advisory Board, his girl "Badger" is now a Field Champion (she only needs one point to finish her Amateur title too) The Club held a Hunting Test in midApril, and thanks to the cooperation from Mother Nature, the weather was good, although a bit windy. One of the dogs entered had run off course and got himself lost... who you gonna call ...well the hero on the white horse (in this case an ATV) of course, in the person of Guy Rezzardi (is there nothing this man can't do?) Off he went, searching high and low, zipping through the fields ... finally finding the lost critter ...and where did the dog ride on the way back, well up front with Guy ...no one was quite sure who was doing the driving! Guy and Badger also won the Seneca Fun Trial with six birds in eight minutes! Al Brady put JH legs on Kosta's dog Duke. Brian Washa got a leg on Tasha and Frank Susi qualified Bruna, both in SH. Sandy Hoesel put another leg on Boise in MH. This is Boise's 7th leg ...(mighty strange looking dog, with "seven legs"). In fact, Brian and Frank finished the SH titles on Tasha and Bruna at another Hunting Test in early June. Also, Sandy Hoesel put Boise's MH on him in March. Bob Aardema finished Jake's JH title. Congrats! Kosta Sunda's Flintlock's KS Tzarr Schwarz has been doing well in the field, and now has his Derby points. NAVHDA held a "Find, Flush & Fire" event, and several club members had placements: in the One Person/One Dog category, Gary Martin took First Place, Carol Maynard took Second, and John Homles took Fifth. In the Two Person/One Dog category, Carol and Gil Maynard took Third Place. Sounds like fun! The Club's Annual Awards Banquet was held in April. It was reported that everyone was "all spiffed up and no one smelled like stinky quail". (If that's the case it's a wonder everyone recognized one another!) The event was organized by Baltimore Ortega, and they had more than two dozen members at the affair.

Shortwire's Hunt Warrior (Baltimore Ortega) Ch Ripsnorter's Die Zauberflote (Pat Ranker) Smokie Piette's Buckwheat CD (Carol Piette) Smokie Piette's Bandit CD (Dick Piette)

Senior Hunters: Ch Feldschau Feisty Fraulein CD (Carol Maynard) Shortwire's Hunt Warrior (Baltimore Ortega)

Master Hunter: Shortwire's

Hunt Warrior (Baltimore Ortega)

Companion Dog: Flatlander's Boise (Sandy Hoesel) Ch Feldschau Feisty Fraulein SH (Carol Maynard)

Bench Champions: KS Tzarr Aga JH (Kosta Sunda) Farmgate's Sly Guy (Paula Moebius) Meastro's Justa Snuffleupagus (Pat Ranker)

Versatile Champion: Ch Feldschau Feisty Fraulein CD SH (Carol Maynard)

FROM THE GWP CLUB OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA Susan Cutter; Editor Cindy Heiller 's Weidenhugel Gabby V Merlin finished her bench title in May. Two weeks later she earned her JH title. As of Susan's last newletter, Gabby had gone BOB six times, has made the group cut at least once, and went BOS twice at the Ventura cluster. Not to be overshadowed by her litter sister, Wiedenhugel Garbo V Merlin finished her bench title in June. And she'll be following suit with a field title as well according to Cindy. Other club members getting the purple ribbon at shows are: Ralph Rangel's Weidenhugel Guermo V Merlin went WD at the Wine County KC Show; Jill Otto and Mary Myers' Weidenhugel Eliza V Pilot went WB a the Contra Costa KC Show; Mildred Revell's Weidenhugel Patchee v Roscoe took a three point major at the Wine County show. The Club held a Field Trial open to GWP's, Weimaraners and Vizslas in mid-July at Hastings Island. the report is elsewhere in this newsletter.

Junior Hunters:

The Club sponsored a training day in March. According to Club President Randy Berry, a lot of exposure and a little training really made a great improvement in a number of older dogs. In fact, he was quite impressed with Doris Erlich's ''Tari'' whose first bird

Maestro Justa Renegade (John Holmes) Maestro Justa Allegro (Brian & Alexis Washa)

was pointed from a distance of 35 yards ...at least twice as far away as his nearest

Dogs being honored for their accomplishments were:

competitor. In fact, if an award was given for "Longest Nose" Tari would have been the winner! It was suggested that actual awards be given for dogs demonstrating field characteristics: best nose, most intensity, most style and so on!

FORT DETROIT GWP CLUB "THE BARBED WIRE" By Lori Sargent They have been going crazy in the show ring ...getting titles, purple ribbons and group placements! It all started with Ross VanDerRos' SevemRun's Chatelaine, MH getting WBIBOW and BOB to finish her Bench title. Linda Blanchard's Robbie (SGR Classic Design) went WD for a three point major at his very first show! At the Genesee County Kennel Club Show in May, Debi Blanchard's Bartig Kleiner Schmetterling went WB and BOW one day, then Ross' Maggie, Dutchman's Wildfowler Maggie MH, did it the next day. Sue Owen's puppy Sneakers (Schnellberg's Sneak Preview) went WD ~ BOW one day. The co-owned Ch Schnellberg's In the Rough JH (Sargent and Owen) went BOB both days. In K-a-l-a-m-a-zoo, Tina Purins could hardly keep her feet on the ground when Ch Kaizan's Cinnamon Toast took BOB at three of the four shows in the cluster. Cinnamon also took a Group Third one day! And in the field, the ribbons were handed out as well to several members whose Wires had qualified at various Hunting Tests: Bob Moses got two legs in JH on Kat (SGR Lady Katrina Mayfly). This finished Kat as a JH. Steve Kreuser got three more senior legs on Tac (Ll's Blazing Wildfire) ...one more to go. Tim and Nicole Ryan's Hanker (Ryan Yon Hanker SH) got three legs toward his MH title, one at the Club's April Hunting Test. Hanker was handled by Walter Furesz (see he hasn't retired!) And John Weingarden's Jessie (Jessie James) got his final SH leg! Mark and Lori Sargent's Hannah (SGR Fa1creek Silent Ambition SH) got two legs toward her MH title. Bill Schmidt's Zipper (Winhawk's Hold'n It Together JH) qualified in SH, along with Maestro's Miss M (Millie) who belongs to Robert Linn. Millie was handled by Walt Furesz. In the JH category, Paul Kelly's Coach (SGR Coachman), Kevin Keller's Spike (Keller's Spike) and his Smokecreek's Suzzi's Hitail (Suzzi) all qualified.


DEL VAL GWP CLUB "THE VERSATILE" by Jan Fast Bernee Brawn's Topper, DC/AFC Dunkees Justa Top Flite, qualified for his final leg in Master Hunter! Two weeks before this auspicious occasion, Topper took a Group Two and a Group Three at recent shows. Jeane Reese's Wires have been doing very well. Jerelin's Hurricane Harriet (Gadget) finished her bench title with a five point major, and Ch Jerelin's Stix N Brix, UD, JH (Gizmo) got her third leg in Utility! (At 11 years old no less!! And congratulations to Tom Jarnich who recently finished his dog Ch Walnubberg's Upland Thunder JH. The NAVHDA Chapters in the area (Rappahannock and Keystone) have handler's clinics, training days and Natural Ability testings coming up.

You get all this for

ONLY

$60.00 ....,. 60 minute Video Action-p:lck(...o

~

Training

cntl.:rtainin~

and

dCll1orlMr:Jtions

on

J()~

hallJlill~

Manual

Iktllih;d c:tSY10 follow instructions tn\inin~ your

flJ

lor

point find retrie\'e

~

Monthly

~

Car Logo Decal

~

NAVI!DA Tests Rules

~One

GWP CLUB OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA "THE HOT WIRE"

dll~

Magazine

Year NAVHDA Membership

r----------------Name

-----

f

-------~.

Address

State_

City

by Karen Nelsen

As the saying goes, "All's quiet on the Western Front." That stork made a trip out here ...dropped eleven puppies off at Nikki Litwin's house. Everybody's getting ready for the Nationals in Washington. The results of the one-day all walking GWP only Field Trial are reported elsewhere in this issue. That's all Folks!

Zip--

Telephone Breed of Dog Please

give UPS Mailing

Address

Check out the GWPCA Web Page at www.gwpca.com PUBLISHING SCHEDULE DEADLINE

ISSUE National Edition

(Cover Available)

Nov 1

Report on the 1997 Nationals Events Breeding and Health

Feb/March

(Cover Available)

Dec 1

April/May

(Cover Available)

March

1

Top Dog Issue- Top Ten Show/Field/Obedience

standings

Inside front cover, back cover and inside back cover are available on most issues. Don't be shy. Call for availability. Arrangements can be made for late submissions, but you MUST let me know if you want to place an ad if it will be after the deadline. This is the only way I can be certain of getting the newsletter to you on time. Thanks for your help and understanding.

I!! Important

I!!

Since the Wire News is mailed Bulk Rate, the Post Office will not forward to a change of address. Please make sure you send any change of address to the Treasurer- not to the Editor.

First Class delivery is available. (received within a few days of mailing, compared to 3 weeks) Send a check for $10.00 (to cover First Class postage)to the Treasurer. If you do not receive an issue of the newsletter, contact Rhonda Amundson (715) 792-2913. Rhonda has all of the extra copies of each issue.


Cflunt by Mark & Lori Sargent

As full-time professional wildlife biologists we often use our training to help us have a successful day with our recreational hobby, bird hunting. We have found over the years as we pursue game birds in both our home state of Michigan and on our hunting trips to other areas of the Midwest, that there are many methods of improving our success in finding plentiful birds on our hunting trips. Several factors include: a thorough knowledge of the biology of the birds we are hunting, an understanding of the area, and knowledge of the local hunting methods that seem successful.

BIOLOGY Improving your odds of finding game birds takes a good dog, but you must make sure you are guiding the dog into cover which will have birds. The habitat, food and cover, of a specific species may vary by the season, the time of day or weather. For example, early in the season ruffed grouse broods are still together and are finding food in all types of forest stands so they can be found in al~pes of habitat, from mature maple and beech stands to dense stands of aspen. This continues into the period when broods are breaking up. During thi's dispersal stage grouse can be found anywhere. However, as the season goes on your success will improve if you focus your attention on dense stands of aspen and brushy areas. Later in the year, birds will focus more on dense stands of young aspens and brush because of food resources and the valuable escape cover it provides. Habitat preferences can also change daily and from night to day. Pheasants roost overnight in dense standing grasses and in cattail sloughs, leaving these areas in the morning to go to feeding areas such as a com field,. They spend the middle of the day in brushy fencerows, woodland edges, and other thick cover to loaf and then go back to feed in the late afternoon and return to roost in the location they used the night before. Once you understand these daily migration movements you can take advantage of hunting different types of cover depending on the time of day. We have watched many a hunting party start first thing in the morning by driving a com field to only move a few birds, while we're hunting an adjacent grassland keeping our wirehairs more than busy pointing birds. Later in the morning we move toward the com finding the spot driven earlier in the day now full of roosters and hens. Not only do you need to know the habits but you also need to know the habitat. If you have had a successful woodcock hunt in Michigan you will know that many birds will be found in the lowland brush of dogwood and spotted alder. The key to hunting these birds is being able to identify these key habitats and shrubs. If you can find these key habitat types you have done your part and its now up to your dog to do his/her part of the task at hand. Depending on your shooting ability, by combining your knowledge with your wirehair's skills you may even get home that evening with a limit of woodcock and a brace of ruffed grouse to boot. Information on the habitats and habits of game birds is easily available from many sources. There are books on the market that describe the habitats and habits of game birds and if you are lucky you might even find a handful of information at your local library. Your state wildlife or game department will most likely also have fact sheets and flyers on the individual game birds covering their habitat needs and uses. Also with the information highway, don't forget the Internet. Its amazing how much information is now available from your home through the Internet, and more is becoming available each day.

KNOW THE AREA As your hunting trips take you into different areas of your state or if you travel to other states it is important to know the area you are hunting. Is this part of the state going to give you the bird hunting experience that you are looking for? Is it the best area for the type of hunting in which you want to participate? Several years ago on a hunting trip to North Dakota we were looking for an area that we could hunt a wide variety of upland birds as well as waterfowl. Although not the best place to hunt pheasants or sharptails, with research we found an area that would provide us with a diversity of different game species. At the end of the week we had hunted, pheasants, sharptails, Hungarian partridge, ducks and geese and even sandhill cranes. We would be lying if we said that we shot one of each, but we indeed found all these birds and tried hard to harvest at least


, one of each. This type of diversity is what our wirehairs were bred for. Topography, or the lay of the land, can also be important. Teal prefer shallow marshes, while mallards like deeper wetlands. Sharptails can often be found in draws or sides of hills. This knowledge with a good topographic map can help you focus your hunting effort toward success. As I mentioned earlier, woodcock prefer wet areas, once again by studying a topographic map you can focus your hunting effort. Local wildlife biologists can give you information on local species preferences and are places where you can get topographic maps and other useful maps for the area you intend to hunt. In many states general habitat maps, state property habitat maps, and even detailed wetland maps are available. Another useful map is the county soil map for your area. This book has aerial photographs on which soil maps have been overlaid. From these maps you can identify habitat types such as farmland, woodlands, grassland, and wetlands and by reviewing the soil types you can determine if it is a wet woods of cottonwood, alder and willow or if its a dry woods of oak and hickory. These maps will also give you a feeling for the lay of the land and the topography.

LOCAL HUNTING METHODS When traveling to any area it is useful to get a feeling for the local hunting methods in that area, for that time of year, and for the type of game birds you are hunting. Last December while on a work trip to Nebraska, we decided to spend several days after the meeting to hunt pheasants. After talking to numerous wildlife biologists and local hunters we had decided to hunt the northeast part of that state. Several reasons for the decision were; good bird numbers, relatively easy access to private lands, and the excellent winter habitat. This area had a strong Conservation Reserve Program, an agricultural long-term set-aside program, with many acres planted to switchgrass, an outstanding winter habitat type. By focusing our efforts in this area and hunting mainly switchgrass fields, we were finding over 200 birds a day in the late part of their season. Not bad for out-of-towners! Although we were finding birds, many of them were flushing far in front of us. By talking to some local hunters we were able to learn that even though the birds were in heavy grass cover, to be successful during this later time period it is important to set up small mini-drives by posting one or two hunters at the end of a ravine or portion of grass to be hunted and to take several hunters and dogs to the other end and slowly hunt toward the posted hunters. With this local update our success significantly increased and our dogs started to get their due rewards of retrieving a bird. By doing your homework, understanding the biology and habitat of the birds you hunt, understanding the location where you hunt and reviewing local hunting methods, your trips should become more rewarding to both you and your dogs. In the next couple of issues we will try to share with you some more details on the specific bird biology, habitat and habits at least for the common species in our area. Mark and Lori Sargent are both wildlife biologists for the Michigan Department of Natural Resources and avid hunters of both upland birds and waterfowl and have discovered the versatility of the German wirehaired pointer. They are members of the Fort Detroit GWP Club. Lori is the editor afthe Fort Detroit newsletter and both she and Mark are involved in the show ring, obedience, agility and hunting tests.

SUBSCRIBE

NOW ...

to the only magazine in the world devoted exclusively to pointing dogs:

Pointing Dog" J'O'U'R'N'kL .•.•• u •••'q,.u ••,••,· ••" ••'•••,.,<TOIU

•."

THE

Pointing Dog® J,O,U·R·N·A·L Join us as we take you on great hunts with great dogs, to the greatest places on earth. Every issue features interesting and informative articles on training, testing, trialing, hunting, and living with your dog, written by the most knowledgeable bird dog authorities in the world. One year - six, big, full-color issues of 100 pages or more - only $23.95. PWN Send your check to: The Pointing Dog Journal, P.O. Box 968, Traverse City, MI 49685 For faster service, use your VISA or MasterCard and call us toll free 1-800-333-7646.


testing program consisting of four levels: Basic Instincts, Apprentice, Trained,and Master

AHDC SECRETARY BOX 145 GRANBY, CT 06035

If you are looking for help in training your hunting dog, The American Hunting Dog Club may be the solution! This organization, established in 1986, was formed to preserve and improve the American hunting experience and heritage. The Club participates in numerous activities promoting game conservation, safety, and sportsmanship within the hunting community. The AHDC has developed a comprehensive training and testing program that provides the dog owner with the tools to produce a "finished" hunting dog. The AHDC is unique in providing a training program and support for the hunting dog owner. Membership is open to owners of all hunting dog breeds. The Club program is based on training (consecutive correct repetitions and praise), not breaking. The program is di vided into three sections: basic, intermediate, and advanced training. Each element of basic training is broken into units that can be controlled, so that success can be assured and praise lavished on the dog. Each unit of work is taught thoroughly so that it can be used to prevent mistakes in the next step of difficulty. and some intermediAll 6a.sic ~ ate work are conducted on a training table, which is about 2 feet wide by 8 feet long, with ramps at both ends. Height is adjusted so that the dog's head is just below waist level. Use of the table helps to concentrate the attention of the dog on the trainer. Three commands are taught in basic training: Heel, Whoa, and Fetch. Inte.rrrted:i.m:e -training expands the conditions under which the dog works. "Whoa" is taught to voice, hand, whistle, and gunfire. The fetch command is expanded to include marked retrieves on land and water and retrieves from a drag trail on which the dog is started.

~ ~g teaches steadiness to wing, shot, and fall; retrieving under all conditions on land, water, or marsh; marked and blind retrieves; retrieving from intercepted trails on land andwater; hand signals; honoring; and, all the other refinements that produce a truly finished sporting companion. The training program is based on "Training the Sporting Dog" written by Don Smith and Erv Jones, published by the AHDC. This manual is 324 pages with more than 100 explicit training pictures. In order to evaluate progress and document accomplishments, the AHDC has a

rrtie '.Basi.cI~ test is for dogs under 16 months of age. This test evaluates the dog's potential for becoming a finished hunting dog before any concentrated training has taken place. The test rates hereditary instincts, temperament, coat, and conformation. rrtie ~ fDog test, for dogs under 30 months of age, is appropriate to a dog learning his trade, where assistance and control input are to be expected. rrtie <T~ fDog test assumes the dog is controlled by the situation, but may need assistance in completing some tasks. rrtie:Mast:er fDog test requires the dog to work under all conditions with a minimum of assistance and in many instances with no cautions or commands. All the tests are based on, and represent as realistically as possible, situations which are routinely encountered during most hunting seasons. Dogs are scored using a 10 point system. The dogs must score 6 points, or be~ each category to qualify. Failure in any category results in overall failure until the next testing period. The scoring represents a consensus of three judges. The results of all tests are entered into the Club database. The program is set up to produce finished dogs of all the sporting breeds. About 20 breeds are currently represented in the Club. The choice of type and breed is a personal one and should be based on the type of hunting you do. The environment varies considerably from hunting southern quail in early fall to hunting off-shore ducks in New England in January. Because of this, many members, who hunt a wide variety of birds, have more than one type and/or breed of dog .. It would be unfair to expect an upland bird dog or a heavy-coated retriever to function in extreme environments for which they are not designed, despite their ability to do so. The American Hunting Dog Club originated in Southern New England. Additional chapters are now active in the Pennsylvania and New Jersey area, Michigan, and Maine. Plans are being made to work with sportsmen and sportswomen in other areas, as well.

NATIONAL

ird

Hurters ASSOCIATION The NBHA trials are walking trials held on a single course as near natural hunting conditions as possible. Quail are liberated around the course before the trials starts. Birds are planted in objective areas where you would expect your dog to enounter wild birds. There are enough birds planted around the course so each dog has a fair opportunity to be judged on his hunting ability. We usually plant approximately thirty birds before the trial starts. They are replaced by bird planters with gloves when they are bagged or fly off course. The course is reseeded after lunch or any other extended period or interruption, with half that many birds. A finished walking shooting dog is required to handle, point, back and retrieve. The dog is only required to be steady to the flush by the Rule Book. There are seven recognized stakes in the NBHA. The Open Stakes are open to both professional handlers and amateur handlers. A professional handler is anyone who takes any form of compensation for handling or training a dog. An amateur handler is anyone who does not take any form of compensation for handling or training a dog. The stakes are categorized by the dogs' age. The recognized stakes in the NBHAare: Open and Amateur Walking Stakes including Shooting Dog, Derby, Puppy andRestricted Breed Shooting Dog. The NBHA Rule Book and by-laws detail the minimum requirements of performance and qualifications for each stake. .The dogs are drawn in each stake by pairs. There are two judges for each stake. The judges evaluate the performance of each dog and compare his performance to the other dogs in that stake. They may choose three dogs if there are six starters in each stake and place them first, second and third: or they may withhold any or all placements if the minimum requirements for the stake have not been met. The judges ride horses and the gallery may be on foot or horseback. There are numerous levels of competition in the NBHA. They are: Club Trials, State Classics, Regional Championships, Futurity and National Championships events.


My name is Whitetail's Botolof, SH, NSTRA CH, but my friends call me "Spanky". My best friend is Eddie Green, and he is a highly intelligent and sophisticated cosmopolitan. I'll do anything to make him happy, although he would not approve of me using his computer to write this article. What the heck, he's at work. I live in a condominium complex, "The Kennels," in the northwest corner of South Carolina. Recently, some visitors referred to me and the other residents as billy goats, which provoked me to ponder my origins. Naturally, I asked Eddie because he is always teaching me new things; however, he has great difficulty getting his point across. I listened with great interest as he told me that my existence was the result of the breeding by Billy and Deb Darby at Whitetail Kennels in Walhalla, South Carolina. Eddie seemed very uncomfortable discussing breeding, and I seem to know instinctively more about it than he does. I have met the Darby's and they appeared human to me so I doubt Eddie fully understands the process. Although I have not seen an exhibition ofthe Darby's breeding, I have serious doubts that I would be an offspring of their union. But Eddie said they produce many field and show champion dogs. Here at "The Kennels'" we paw through each issue of the Wire News as soon as it arrives. Everyone here loves to read about all the activities and accomplishments of our wirehair friends. Really, this magazine is good enough to eat, or at least chew on. Best of all, we know the Eddie will soon have us participating in some of these activities because he is not only our best friend, he is the best Activities Director a condominium complex could have. Oh Dog! We love those AKC Hunt Tests and AKC Shows. Hey, this NAVHDA sounds wonderful and this bitch I met the other day said a new NAVHDA chapter is starting up in Raleigh, North Carolina. I'm sure Eddie will have us involved with that also. But you know, our favorite activity hasn't been mentioned in the magazine. Oh Dog! I'm trembling with excitement just thinking about it. uh, oh, I'm getting too excited-you'll have to excuse me for a minute. Sorry about that; I almost wet the carpet. (I need to tell Eddie that something's causing my favorite bush to die.) Let's see where was I? ... Oh yeah, my favorite activity. That is NSTRA which is an acronym for run, fun and find birds ..NSTRA, National Shoot-To-Retrieve Association, was founded in the late 1960' s by a group of sportsmen who wanted to enjoy their pointing dogs beyond the normal hunting season. Currently there are recognized trials throughout the US and Canada with members in every state and several foreign countries. Their goal was to have equality among all pointing dog breeds, and to date championship points have been awarded to every pointing breed.

Unlike theAKC shows where the fields are so small you don't have room to run, (really, I don't even get off the leash) there is no cover to hold the birds, and at the last show there were probably 2,000 dogs of every breed and not one found a bird. Now the AKC Hunt Tests and Field trials you can run and find birds, but unfortunately there are very few Field Trials in this area. The Hunting Tests we have plenty of, but wl}at do you do after you are a Master Hunter? I don't get real excited about beating a Standard. Especially since every time Eddie says I'll be competing against a Standard, it doesn't show up, and I'm braced against one of the more familiar pointing breeds. Eddie is a fair and knowledgeable judge, but he never gets to judge me. I would have a lot better chance if he did. Instead I get judges like Earl Fowls and Jim Murphy, guys who's Wirehairs _ are Master Hunters. They expect you to do it right every time, really now! One day these guys will get too close to my stakeout. Anyway, at the end of the day people go around congratulating all the other dogs because they collectively beat the Standard. Now a Standard must be a great dog, but still, how exciting can it be when all the other dogs are competing against just one Standard. It's just not fair. My understanding is NAVHDA competes against these Standards also. From reading about the tests, they must be using a better bloodline of Standards because they are harder to beat. You know, I hate to beat those Standards because I'm afraid that once I've accomplished that and receive my Master Hunter title, retirement is next. Now let's talk about NSTRA. It is real competition against all the pointing breeds, except those darned Standards. There is only one winner at the end of the day, and this is the highest scoring dog out of the 32 dogs entered. Before each trial a drawing takes place to determine bracemates. Sixteen braces of 30 minutes are run each day in a field of 30 to 50 acres in size. Birds are placed randomly in the field, beginning with 6 birds in the first brace and 5 birds before the start of each of the remaining fifteen braces. There can be a bird buildup if a brace fails to locate all of their birds. In this game you are rewarded for finding the most birds. It's what I do best. I suggested that a honor system for scoring be used, but so far this has been ignored and impartial judges are used. After leaving the blind, where we are during the planting of the birds, the handler and I have 30 minutes to locate, shoot and retrieve as many birds as possible. Generally, I locate the birds, Eddie shoots them, and I retrieve them. Although, at times we have done different combination of the above. This year I plan to do sorne shooting since Eddie has cost me several placements by missing. I feel a great sense of accomplishment when I finish parading around with the bird in my mouth and finally complete the retrieve to Eddie. I have just completed the big picture of locating and retrieving of game. Then, suddenly, I remember the critic on horseback. Do you think he is focused on the big picture? No! The judge analyzes each aspect of the find and scores me from 0-100 points.


NSTRA cin't. Depending on the number of points you earn during the year, you could be invited to compete in the NSTRA Nationals Championships. The Purina Hi Pro Endurance Championship is held on Labor Day weekend, the Dog of the Year Trial at Amo, Indiana is in October. The Quail Invitation is in February, the Champion of Champions Trial is in April and the Grand National is in June. I went to the Dog of the Year and the Grand National Trial. My friend Kate Darby (Ch Whitetails Katrina SH, CGC, 2x NSTRA Champion) was invited to these trials and she finished 14th at the Grand National. She also went to the Purina Trial and Quail Invitational Trial.

Plus factors. are exceptional style, steady regardless of interference, extreme intensity, a hard slam point, high and intense during a long flush. I have no problem with these plus factors; however, the minus factors clearly show the lack of understal\ding of canine behavior and the failure to consider input from dogs. For instance flagging. I do this to help Eddie locate me quicker. The same as humans do when they wave their arms to be noticed. Now when I' creeping, I'm just wanting to see that what I'm smelling is actually there. In case it's not, I don't want Eddie to walk all that way for nothing. Laying down makes me the maddest of all. Hey listen, you run around with Eddie for a day and you'll not just lay down but run for the nearest cover. I'm sure you will agree that the elimination of judges and the use of an honor system would give a truer picture of my performance. Oh, and it's not enough that the critic judges my find. He then proceeds to score my retrieve from 0-100 points, then he grades my ground coverage from 0-100 points. Next he has an opinion about my backing, or as he suggested, whether I actually backed at all. Somewhere between 0-75 is how they score this. You only get scored for your first opportunity to back, so you have to do it right the first time. Finally, they score my obedience from 0-75 points (no plus factor for my demonstration of independent actions or consideration for my inability to hear certain sounds while running). Points are awarded for placements; 3 for 1st, 2 for 2nd, 1 for 3rd. It takes 18 points to become a NSTRA Champion, 9 of which have to be 1st place points.

Come on all you Wirehairs out there, we' Fea minority here. We need more of our kind at these trials. Uh oh, here comes Eddie, I better get off the computer now. Your friend, Spanky Green

Annual dues are $20.00 **Canada: $30 .. (US Funds). With this membership you receive bi-monthly a NSTRA magazine mailed to your door, updating you on the latest field activities. FMI NSTRA 226 North Mill Street #2 Plainfield, IN 46168 (317) 839-4059

PO Box 322, Dillsburg, PA 17019 (717) 432-9154 (717) 432-7664 fax

*Emphasizing

*Developing

*Handling

*Boarding

Abilities

Dogs to Hold Point Forever

Retrieve

with Delivery

for NAVHDA

*AKC Senior / Master

*Ruffed

and Control

Your Dog's Natural

*Encouraging

*Trained

Obedience

and AKC Testing

and NAVHDA

Grouse & Woodcock

and Training

to Hand

Programs

Utility

Exposure

Levels

August

Preferred

through

March

Full Time & Year Round at the Warrington

Club

Shooting Starr's Ivy

Deadwood's Forest Moss

Master Hunter (1997) NAVHDA Invitational (1996) NAVHDA UT Prize 1 186 pts. NAVHDA NA PRIZEII 99 pts. NADKC AZP Prize 1

NAVHDA NA Prize 1 106 pts. NADKC Derby Prize I


CONGRATULATIONS

CH WHITETAIL'S

KATRINA SH

TO THESE WHITETAIL WIRES!

CH WHITETAIL'S

2X NSTRA Champion 1996 &1997 Owner/Handler Billy Darby

WHITETAIL'S

BOTOLF SH

WHITET AIL'S DIRTY HARRY SH

NSTRA Champion Winner SCR Elimination Trial '96 1 pt. away from Conformation CH. Owner/Handler Eddie Green

WHITETAIL'S

CASSANDRA

DUTCH SH

2nd SCR Preliminary Trial 1997 Owner Billy Darby Handler Deb Darby

MH

2nd SCR Elimination Trial 1997 Owner/Handler Jeff Joyner

WHITETAIL'S

10 NSTRA points Owner/Handler Billy Darby

BRIANA MH

Owner/Handler Jim Murphy

WHITETAIL KENNELS P.O. Box 529, Walhalla, SC 29691 (864) 882-0215 Billy and Deb Darby


Permission

to reprint

from the American Canine Spotts Medicine page and Arleigh J Reynolds DVM, PhD American

Canine Sports Medicine P. O. Box 82433 Baton Rouge, LA 70884 Robert L. Gillette, DVM

Association

Web

Association

sportsmedvet@kctera.net

Arleigh J. Reynolds, DVM, PhD

The amount of water gained each day by a working dog is exactly balanced by the amount lost. Each day a dog looses water through its urine, feces, saliva, breath, and sweat. The only place a dog sweats is through its foot pads. Unlike humans, dogs loose little water to sweating. Evolutionary biologists believe that dogs may have retained the ability to sweat through their foot pads because it gives them a superior grip when running on smooth surfaces. The dog's inability to sweat from the rest of it's skin probably stems from its large surface to volume ratio. Water loss from such a large surface area would put the dog at constant risk of dehydration if it perspired from its entire skin surface. In humans, a relatively small surface area and large volume inhibits heat dissipation. Dehydration from sweating is less of a risk than heat accumulation. Most of the water a working dog looses each day leaves its body through urine, feces, respiratory vapor, and saliva. The contributions of each ofthese factors depends greatly upon the dog's health environment, workload, and diet. For example, consider the same 20 kg (44 lb.) working dog as a couch potato dog, a sprint racing dog, and a distance racing dog. Each day the couch potato dog, living in a climate controlled environment, looses about 1000 ml of water through urine, about 100 ml of water through its feces, and about 300 ml of water through evaporation of respiratory water and saliva. If the dog moves outside and it becomes an open class sprint racing dog, he will loose about 1500 ml through his urine and 150 ml through his feces. Assuming an ambient temperature of at least 0 degrees Farenheit, this dog will also loose 300 ml of water from evaporation during a one hour run and about 800 ml of water from evaporation during the remaining 23 hours of the day. If this dog now becomes a distance racing dog his water loss to urine and feces will increase to about 2250 ml/day and 250 ml/day, respectively. Assuming the dog works 12 hours at about a 40K of V02 maximum workload and rests 12 hours in an ambient temperature of 0 degrees Farenheit or below, it will lose between 2000 and 2500 m] of water during exercise and about 400 ml of water during rest to evaporation from his mouth and respiratory tract. As one can see, the combination of exercise and living in a cold environment dramatically increases the dog's daily water requirement. The increase in this requirement is about two-fold for

the sprint dog and about four-fold for distance dog as compared to the couch potato. The larger losses of urine and fecal water seen in working dogs are mostly due to their increased food intake. A larger food intake leads to an increased productio~feces which are usually 80-90% water. More food also means the generation of more ions and metabolic wastes which are then filtered by and excreted from the kidneys. The excretion of the additional wastes results in an increased urine volume and consequently a larger urinary water loss. The most remarkable increase in water loss observed in working dogs is from increased evaporation from the mouth and respiratory tract. Depending on the dog's exercise intensity, and environmental temperature and humidity, evaporative water losses may increase 1O-20-fold during exercise. At cold temperatures, the air a dog breathes in has very little moisture in it. When the cold air reaches the lungs, the air is saturated with water so that about 6% of every exhaled breath is water. In warm climates the inhaled air is more nearly saturated with water and so the dog looses less water from the lungs with each breath. However, because dogs pant to coo] themselves, water loss through evaporation of saliva often leads to evaporative losses in warm conditions equal to or in excess of those in cold environments. Health problems may also greatly influence daily water loss. Urinary water losses increase dramatically in renal disease, systemic infections, diabetes mellitus, and other hormonal abnormalities. Most affected dogs are sick enough that they would not be able to perform as working dogs and require veterinary attention. Increased watr loss from the 01 tract is more common and often less serious. Nearly all kennels experience stress diarrhea during the course of a working season. Often, dogs will continue to perform well with these conditions as long as their hydration can be maintained. However, the rate of dehydration resulting from severe diarrhea, as canine parvovirus infection, can be a life-threatening situation. In any case, the fluid lost through the feces must be replaced or the dog's health will deteriorate rapdily.


Kennels \.7on Duffin is proud to shom you

"Cid"

N. A. NATURAL

v.

H. D. A.

ABILITY TEST

COLUMBIA

CHAPTER

CH OAKHYLL'S OBSIDIAN VON DUFFIN GWP PRIZE I 112 PIS. 04/12/96

Terry and Rnn Duffin

64155 rr fitDs 9Z Bend OR 97701 t54lJ 388--3739


In 1969, NA VHDA (North American Versatile Hunting Dog Association) established a system of comprehe!;!sive tests that truly measure all aspects of work for the versatile hunting dog breeds. The tria ling systems in use in North America before this time were established for specialists. The NA VHDA system provides for testing at various stages of maturity. Performance records are kept and made available through our Test Information Service since they provide invaluable information for both breeder and buyer alike. To be truly meaningful, tests for versatile hunting dogs must meet certain criteria. They must be conducted in an environment which reflects actual hunting conditions and situations. They must test the important qualities of a good versatile dog. Judges must be knowledgeable, consistent and objective. All testing and evaluation is to be within the context of judging dogs as useful, productive hunting companions. NA VHDA tests have been designed with these requirements in mind. In addition, our record keeping provides an accurate, complete performance evaluation on each dog tested The results of these tests for specific breeds are available through our Test Information Service. In order to eliminate direct competition between dogs, entrants in a NA VHDA test are judged one at a time, by three judges, with their performance scored against a standard. The only exception to this is the Invitational Test, in which dogs are braced in the field so each dog can demonstrate his willingness to back and work effectively with another dog. Prizes are awarded on the basis of numerical scores achieved in the test. Each dog that meets or exceeds minimum standards in all areas of work is placed in one of three categories: Prize I, II or III. Prize I being the highest classification. If all dogs entered in aNA VHDA test perform well, all can receive a prize. For more information on NA VHDA, see their ad in this issue.

IA/kt S ~ ~

fIicg

#

mand, the better off you are. The judges examine the physical characteristics (coat, teeth ...they actually count them, cowhockiness) of the dog after the water test. The judges explain each phase of the test to you,

tiLe ~

tIi.r J(JI'?

by Karen Nelsen I had met Tony Ray, the. secretary of the Central Coast Chapter of NAVHDA, at the Hunting Test Judges Seminar that the GWP Club of Southern California put on in January of this year. Tony told me about their brand new chapter would be holding its initial testing in February and would send me information. I decided to enter the "couch potato" Storm and the "p.i.t.a. puppy" (that stands for "pain-in-the") Lark to see what it was all about.

WHAT'S IT'S ALL ABOUT NAVHDA tests at three levels, Natural Ability (like Junior Hunter), Utility Preparatory and Utility ("broke dogs"). They do all the NA dogs on one day, and the broke dogs on the second day. Each dog is tested individually, not in a brace. At the test I entered,of the two judges, one was Bodo Winterhelt, founder of the organization. Well, I knew that Lark could find birds and point (she has a Junior Hunter title), I also knew that she would go in the water without a problem. NAVHDA uses a bumper rather than a bird when water testing a dog. The dog must enter the water twice, and it is not necessary that the bumper be retrieved. It is the willingness on the part of the dog to enter the water that is being tested. The thing that was new to us was the tracking ...in the NA test the dog has to track a flightless pheasant. We shall see what we shall see! For the Utility Prep and Utility dogs, the criteria is much more stringent. There is a blind retrieve involved as part of the water test. ..and ducks are used. And I knew that my Master Hunter bitch, Storm, would do well in the field work ("please don't break ..."), and she's a whiz in the water. Again, there is a tracking phase involving the drag of dead game ...here is where we would make it or break it! The dog's cooperation, nose, desire to work and obedience are all taken into consideration. The handler must use a minimum of words or commands. The less you talk to your dog, other than the initial com-

what be looking for.intimidate~ They a\e by extremely helpful during for the their test, and asthey'll a handler, I was not them, adn was grateful encouragement. (Here I was, an "AKC"-person.) I felt that every dog being tested starts out with a passing score ...the dog, by his own ability just writes his score and the prize he will receive.

SATURDAY There were three GWP's being tested in Natural Ability, and one in Utility Prep on this weekend in February at Vandenburg AFB in Central California. The weather was cool and very breezy. The first GWP to go was Rick Ramirez' one-year old, Scout who is out of Weidenhugel Kennels. At the mini-lake, Scout went into the water like a duck and brought back the rubber bumper...no problem here. Then came Heide Johnson's girl, Joy. Joy went in, came out, ran around the shore, up the hill and back again. Heide finally got Joy under control, and she finished her water work. Then it was my puppy Lark's turn. She, too, went in the water without any problem, swam up to the bumper, took one sniff, said "its not a bird" and returned to shore. Remember, the dogs are evaluated on their desire and confidence in the water phase ...they don't have to retrieve. So far, all three GWP's are doing fine! At the field site, the cover was wonderful, with lots of objectives for the dogs, and plenty of room to run. The young dogs are tested for at least twenty minutes, and in addition to looking at hunting ability and pointing, gun shyness is also evaluated. As the dogs are searching for birds, a gunner (who walks behind the handler) shoots off a couple of blank rounds from a shotgun, and the judges watch the dogs' reactions. So, in the same order, Rick's dog takes off and has terrific field work; not gun shy at all, this guy. Heide's dog Joy follows, and she takes off...only in the opposite direction! Heide gets her under control and they, too complete their field work. Then it was Lark's turn, and she decided to become an "all age" dog. I thought she was going to run back to L.A. But, we got her around to work on birds. All three had nice points, nice style! Again, the three Wires were doing OK ...we hope! Then came the tracking parat. And glory be! All three did it! Rick's dog was the best at this part. Joy, too, did it. Lark kept going off the scent and wanted to "hunt", but after a couple of points in the right direction, she found the scent...just as time was running out. I wan't sure she passed this phase; as the judge said "sorry" as we finished. But remember, its the desire to work and concentration thats important. We'd have to wait and see. The final results would be announced at the dinner that evening. Bodo Winterhelt, judging his last test, gave a commentary about each dog and handler. And when he announced that all three GWP's had passed, we were all very excited. Rick's dog got a perfect score and was awarded a Prize I. Joy and Lark were each awarded a Prize III. It was great! We all passed.


SUNDAY On Sunday, the Utility Prep and Utility dogs did their thing. Storm was the only GWP and the oldest dog being tested. In addition there were a couple of GSP's and three Pudelpointers. We began with the water work as the wind was less blustery and the scenting conditions were better. Storm will retrieve just about anything out of water ...and she enters the water like a cannonball! But the first exercise was a blind retrieve, there is no mark to make, no sound of a shot duck falling into water or reeds. I fired the blank shotgun ...well, she looked at me like "where do you want me to go? I didn't see or hear anything." The judge (Bodo) is telling me not to say anything, let her figure it out. So she methodically started searching the reeds closest to the shore, and worked her way down wind about 60 feet. Into the water she goes, paddling out to the island of reeds she's using her nose to catch a scent...nothing. She searches ...nothing She swims back to shore. At his point, Bodo told me I could fire a second round, but it would lower our score. I didn't care; it was great to see her working. So I fired off a second round, this time more in the direction I wanted her to go ...a little more upwind. Off she went toward that island again. This time she really worked those reeds, and then all of a sudden she caught wind of something and headed into the wind. Me? I'm standing on shore not saying a word ...do you know how hard that is ...especially when I'm used to praising the dog when she's doing so well? Bodo's muttering under his breath "good girl"! Anyway, I couldn't believe it when I saw her turn with this big dead duck in her mouth, and she was bringing it back to me ...In this test too, it isn't the retrieve thats important, its the search. Although, if a dog does make contact with the duck, the retrieve is a must! Now, we're off to the field. I was more nervous about this because I knew what to expect of Storm as a Master Hunter. Well, she did not disappoint! A couple of observers wanted to see what goes on (and permission must be asked of the handler), so I said, "sure, why not?" Storm had a total of six finds in a 25 minute period. Her style was intense, and her points were staunch. Her retrives were to hand. They could have been a little quicker, but she was a little out of practice. The gunners were great - one was the 15 year old sone of one of the judges and the other was the sergeant from the base. Next came the tracking phase. They drag a dead pheasant for a distance that must have one turn -like a "dog-leg". Some feathers are scattered at the starting point. When you send the dog, they are supposed to follow the track (scent) and retrieve the bird. Stormie got the initial scent, then veered off into the wind to "hunt", but she didn't go far. She'd circle and come back to the line of scent, go out again, but she didn't quite catch on. I sent her a second time, this time with a verbal command of "out front" ...her nose dropped to the ground and she had the bird. The scary part was that she stopped and looked at me for the command to fetch it up, but I said nary a word ...she figured it out, scooped up the bird and brought it back! Hooray! I knew we'd get a lower score because of the verbal commands, but I'd rather do that than NOT have her find the bird and get a big fat goose-egg. The final result...she missed a Prize I by one point! But you know what? I was perfectly happy that I took this five-and-a-half year old bitch, with virtually no training for NAVHDA, and we passed ...we were operating on "Natural Ability." The NAVHDA people were wonderful. Everyone was extremely helpful, and encouragement is given to each participant. Handlers got to know one another, and we were all happy when someone's dog received a prize. I encourage you to make your Wirehair as "versatile" as he can be ... the show ring, obedience, agility, hunting tests, field trials and NAVHDA. They can do it all. It just takes a little effort on your part!

I thought it would be nice to have a complete listing of all GWP Master Hunters. List is up to date to the August 1997 AKC Awards book Please note they are not in order of the date their title was earned.

GWP MASTER HUNTERS Ch Allison's Drahted Brunhilda MH (B) Shortwire's Hunt Warrior MH (D) Azura Vom Treborwolf Mesha MH (B) DC Cascade Rogue MH (D) Cadenberg Cascade Kirby MH (B) DCI AFC Cadenberg Magie V Rogue CDX MH (B) Ch Cascade Cate Von Duffin MH (B) DCI AFC Cascade Ike MH (D) Ch Silent Storm A-Brewin MH (B) FCI AFC Cascade Steamer MH (D) FC Casta V Schyrental Sureshot MH (B) Clarbally's Kittery Vom Baron MH (B) Clint Vom Fasanent~. Greenflats Boomer M~MH (D)(D) Ch Desertmill's Jaegermiester CD MH (D) DC! AFC Dunkees Justa Hole-N-One CD MH (D) DCI AFC Dunkees Justa Top Flite MH (D) Ch Flatlander's Boisy CD MH (D) Ch Heywire's Wynfall O'Shadra MH (B) Isbella Vom Fasanental MH (B) Jay-Mars Blake's Whirlwind MH (D) Just a Bit of Damino MH (B) Ch Just-A-Sec of Four Seasons MH (B) Kaese Kuchen MH (B) Kettle Creek's Moe MH (D) Ch Marmick's Benno Von Pines MH(D) Ch Marmick's Trudi Von Pines MH (B) Chi AFC Marsu Jay-Mars Katie MH (B) Marsu's Morning Star (B) Wirewoods Mysterk Rendezvous MH (B) Marta's Otto Von Pines CD MH (D) FC Navaho Sidekick MH (B) Ch OTCH Nordic's Vikikng Brandy UD MH (B) Ch Ripsnorter Fire Starter VRDR CD MH (B) Sadie V Quartermaster's MH (B) Ch Schnellberg's Rudy CD MH (D) Ch Schnellberg's Sydney CD MH (D) sire of: DC! AFC Schnellberg's Greta MH (B) Sniffin Griffen MH (D) Ch Severn Run's A-Shaggy Dog MH (D) Dutchman's Wildfowler Maggie MH (B) Ch Severn Run's Chatelaine MH (B) DC SGR Silent Running CD MH (D) Katrin Jaeger MH (B) SGRWitchcraft MH (B) SGRSilent Knight MH (D) sire of: Gustav Jaeger MH (D) Ch SGRWitch Hunt MH (D) Ch Soo Lines Lil' Abner MH (D) DC!AFC Sure Shot's Point Blank MH (D) FCI AFC Sure Shot's Maggie MH (B) Von Duffin's Liebchen MH (B) Von Grafenauer Ludwig Geist MH (D) Ch Weidenhugel Merlin V Nico MH (D) Whitetail's Briana MH (B) Whitetail's Cassandra MH (B) Wright's Hot Toddy MH (D)


WOBE AND A FEW OF HIS PUPPIES WILL BE AT THE NATIONALS. THEY WILL BE 5112 MONTHS OLD. PLEASE DROP BY AND TAKE A LOOK! FROZEN AND FRESH CHILLED SEMEN IS AVAILABLE AND OF COURSE A.I.'S WITH FRESH SEMEN

ROBERT PERRY (209) 274-0901 OR VOICE MAIL (209) 547-3073

ASP END E L

EMAIL -ASPENDEL@AOL.COM

GWP'S VISIT OUR WEB PAGE- WWW.CLASSIAD.COM/PERRY


J2lke z!athe'l, J2lke S011

q;he 7:)ad

/' CH

ROGUE

ISAAC

OF A Excellent FC / AFC Cascade's Tuffy x Dualborn Lady Varner Owners: Ann & Terry Duffin - Bend, OR

<7he S011

RU-WYRD MVP Shortstop Ivan Owner:

] ust

On Point Kennels - Kimberley Harris & Charles Waukau, WI

three from

the

litter

of 13 whelped

Moreman

March

30,

1996


I!lke /I1othe1zt I!lke 7)au~hte1zs CZhe

CH

lED'S

SILENT NAVHDA

DC/NFC/NAFC

/110m

STORM -UPTPrize

II-166

A'BREWIN', Poinb

MH,

CD

Of A Good

Cascade Rogue, MH/UT Prize IT x Ch Jed's SGR Silent Panda, JH Owner: Karen Nelsen - Lomita, CA

RU-WYRD MVP TRIPLE PLAY,JH

CASCADE MVP LAC Y J

NA VHDA Natural Ability Prize III Owner. Karen Nelsen

Owner: Ron Gross La Grande, OR


Introduction

dog sports. But comparing a remote trainer to a shock collar is like comparing apples and oranges. A remote trainer and a shock collar are both "electronic collars," but they are quite different in the way they function and in their intended use. Therefore, this first article will be a quick overview of the history of electronic collars. Our goal is to help clear up misunderstanding about the functional design of the equipment and its application in today's progressive training techniques.

To

Remote Training By Jim & Phyllis Dobbs and Alice Woodyard

At the Tri -Tronics Training Center we are frequently asked about using the electronic collar for the competition obedience dog. Is it useful? Is it appropriate? What exercises would it help? How does the trainer avoid mistakes? And, since it is basically a corrective tool, how do you use it and still make sure you keep the "up" and happy attitude that's so important in a winning obedience dog? There are many ways to use the electronic collar in a training program, and the one we'll present in these articles is hardly the "only one," of course. It's also not static. Like all dog trainers, we're constantly adding and improving things. However, one thing doesn't change. Our program has always been based on the use of very low level stimulation. A low-level program gives the dog gentle comparisons, and teaches it that it is in control of the collar. We've found over the years that this approach makes it possible to take advantage of the powerful benefits of remote training collars (consistency, perfect timing and impersonality), while not sacrificing the dog's good attitude or enthusiasm for training. In fact, the remote trainer helps maintain a dog's happy attitude because corrections given with it can be perfectly timed. It is therefore much easier for the dog to learn, and the time needed for developing reliability is greatly reduced. A dog associates perfectly-timed corrections with its own actions-rather than thinking the trainer ~'got me." Its attitude stays confident because it also believes that it can avoid corrections through its own actions.

What's the Difference Between a Remote Trainer and a "Shock Conar"? There can be a lot of misunderstanding about the use of electronic collars, based on their history and images from the old "shock collar" days, and the way collars were used by some trainers in the field

The History of Electronic Collars Electronic training collars have come a long way since the early devices of the 1950's. These "shock collars" were designed to break dogs of unwanted behaviors such as chasing deer or livestock, and they were used to force dogs to come in when hunters wanted to go home and the dogs didn't. When a dog wearing one of these collars chased the wrong thing or refused to come when called, "lightning struck." The collars were so effective at delivering powerful remote punishment that trainers began exploring how the collars could be used to simplify other lessons. Unfortunately, the electronic collars of that time were too strong to be used very effectively to reinforce trained responses. Most dogs that had been jolted too often lost spirit and became afraid to work for fear of doing something wrong, or they reacted to corrections with panic and lost the clear mind needed for learning. It became clear thatin Cliifferentelectronic were needed fore they could be used \ positive manner collars to motivate desired beresponses. Tri- Tronics launched a major research effort to determine how both electrical and sound stimulation could be used humanely to motivate correct behavior in dogs rather than just as a tool for punishment when dogs acted undesirably. Understanding that dogs are individuals with different temperaments and sensitivities, Tri-Tronics developed a new generation ofremote training collars that can be used to deliver very low levels of electrical stimulation. These modem collars can be adjusted to suit each individual dog's sensitivity level, giving the trainer the opportunity to create what the dog perceives as mild discomfort rather than a shock. (The type of electrical stimulation they deliver is similar to the mild stimulation produced by the medical devices that are worn by people to distract them from chronic pain.) These modem electronic collars gave trainers the ability to make it easier for dogs to learn by enabling the trainer to make perfectly timed corrections that were mild yet motivating. The new, adjustable intensity collars greatly increased the number of training situations in which the electronic collar could be used. At the same time, the new generation of adjustable collars made it possible to use powerful training systems which were based on "escape" and "avoidance" principles rather than on punishment principles. To utilize the escape and avoidance method for training dogs, it was essential to have low-level electrical stimulation available while training the dog to turn off the collar in response to a command or cue.

A Step-Sy-Step System The low-level stimulation method of dog training is a step-bystep system. This system starts by teaching the dog to understand the basic commands you plan to use. Then, utilizing the principle of escape training, the dog is taught to turn off low-level electrical stimulation by performing commands it already knows. Through repetition, the dog becomes quick at performing commands, because it learns that, not only can it turn off stimulation by performing, but it can beat it altogether when it performs quickly. Dogs introduced to the remote trainer this way feel that they can control mild stimulation by their own performance. They do not see control as being "forced" to do something by their trainers. Rather, they see it as something they want to do. They come to see "beating the


correction â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘as sort of a game. When a dog has this attitude toward electrical stimulation, the number of situations in which stimulation can be used to guide the dog's choices becomes very great.

Basic Principles for Remote Training: When you introduce remote training to a dog using the low-level system, there are several principles to remember. 1. Train to develop willingness to obey. Use a technique that relies primarily on the avoidance training technique rather than on punishment. 2. Make training enjoyable for the dog. After putting the collar on the dog, start off with a play session before beginning any collar work. Then keep collar lessons short, and include plenty of praise and play throughout the session. Quit when you see some progress, and don't ask for more progress in the same session. This helps the dog come to believe in itself. Don't "grind on" your dog. 3. Teach the command first. The dog should have a basic understanding of a command before you use a remote trainer for reinforcement. 4. Guide the dog while its a beginner. Teach the dog how to respond to stimulation correctly before you use the collar in an exercise. Even though the dog knows the meaning of a command, it will not immediately understand what to do to turn off stimulation. Give the dog physicalor verbal guidance during this stage so that it can easily make the connection as to "what works." 5. Select the correct intensity level. When you begin training with the remote trainer, tailor the strength of electrical stimulation to match your individual dog's physical sensitivity. (If the level is too high, the dog may lose the clear mind it needs to be able to "turn off' the collar.) The proper level for beginning training is just enough to give the dog a comparison. It is the setting which causes the dog to move its head as if from a flea bite, often with a quizzical expression on its face. If the dog vocalizes, the setting is probably too high. If your dog doesn't react correctly to stimulation, don't assume that the level is too low. The dog may not be refusing to obey-it just may not know how to react to turn off the collar. It is better to give a dog more repetitions at turning off the collar while you guide it into compliance (see No.4) than it is to increase stimulation during early lessons.

6. Start with the Three-Action Introduction. To properly prepare a dog to understand electrical stimulation in training, it is best to teach it that it can turn off the collar by performing three different motions-Come, Go, and StoplRemain Stationary. This keeps the dog in balance. It is good preparation because most commands you will reinforce with the remote trainer are extensions of one of these actions. 7. Give the dog a comparison-simplify right away. The dog will learn more quickly when it finds out what does work, not just what doesn't work. Right after correcting the dog with the remote trainer, try to simplify the task to the degree that the dog can't help but perform correctly in its next repetition. Then increase the degree of difficulty again. Using an "immediate comparison" technique is far more effective than letting the dog get in trouble several times in a row before you simplify. Remember, a bewildered dog is a stressed dog, and a stressed dog is an unhappy dog. 8. Don't create a "collarwise" dog. The role of the collar is to help create good habits and it can't do this if the dog's not wearing it' The dog should be so used to wearing the collar that it doesn't think about whether the collar's on or off. It just accepts wearing it as a part of training-training which it always views as fun. Training with the collar sometimes on and sometimes off will teach the dog to be collarwise. Then it will behave differently depending on whether or not it's wearing the collar. When this happens, you can lose much of the benefit of the time you in training. Theim'\.sted do~ should continue to wear the collar during training until you have observed that it has developed permanence of habit, and you no longer need to press the button. This includes having the collar on the dog when you first start taking it to fun matches, so that you can make a correction if you need to. It's not unlikely, in a match environment, that the dog will regress a little, and make mistakes that it seemed to have gotten past.

First Appeared in: Front & Finish DOBBS Training Center 9627 Spring Valley Road - Marysville, CA 95901 (916) 741-0375 - FAX (916) 741-0242 ecollar@otn.net


JED'S CH JED1S SILENT POLAR EXPRESS

Kennels presents

"The 801,ls"

"8ea"'路

Trained in the field by Jim Basham of Nova, Ohio, Bear has his major and many placements in the field. Handled recently by Ed Tucker he need's only his retrieving points to finish his Fe. This fall we plan on his Master Hunter title and the rest of his field requirements for a Dual title. Water certified. Bear is the sire of 2 litters, the first producing "5ammi" , the second producing "Bauer". He is consistently producing great coats, dispostion and fantastic birdiness. Look for them in

-BAUER"

a field near l,Iou.

Just a baby- but still a great nose

Bear}s ....SOOA. to be

Q

-

fother.agoin ~-

Bred to FCNsvohFl:~Siq~hick:;~Rowned bl,J d~*, 路'::'t'ctyt:-:,$:/; 9;~~?-,GuyBezzoiai~ purJpiesdue~mig~pt~mber.

USAMMI"

like Father - like Daughter; a great disposition and a marvelous nose


&

Children

in

Flield Geor

CH JED'S SPITZE GESCHUTZ SH, GCG IIGun--

Trained and handled by one of his owners, Ed Tucker, Gun needs one leg to finish his Master Hunter Title. Gun has sired 2 litters this year. 80th litters have shown a keen sense of birdiness, fantastic coats and great dispositions. Gun is also producing the desire to please. When not in the field, you can find Gun at home honing his couch potato skills. Gun is also water certified.

Ch Chancellor V Schnellberg FC Chancellor's Sierra DriFter Liesel A Chrichtonbach DC Cascade Rogue MH Ch Fritz Von Rank Ch Walker's Cascade Tess Walker's Miss Fortune Ch Bach V Schnellberg DC SGR Silent Running CD MH Schnellberg's Vanilla Mausse Ch Jeds' SGR Silent Panda JH Cherokee's Ka-U-Ga SGR Pepperbox Thompson's Heidi

Owners: Ed & Jim Tucker PO Box 677 Grass lake, MI 49240


THE TRAINED RETRIEVE PART I By Jim & Phyllis Dobbs and Alice Woodyard

......"

Notice that we call this the "trained" retrieve, not the "force" retrieve. There is a world of difference, as Larry Mueller, gundog editor for Outdoor Life discovered during his visit to the Tri-Tronics Training Center. In an article about his experience entitled "A Farewell to Force Fetching," he wrote, "Teaching your dog to fetch no longer has to be a painful experience, because the current trend is toward the "trained retrieve." In the trained retrieve, we show the dog how to be successful by first thoroughly teaching it what to do before we begin reinforcing the command "Fetch." We start by teaching the dog to hold an object calmly. "Hold" really tells the retriever, "Keep your mouth calm. In other words, don't drop or chew." To teach the dog "Hold," we use a sequence that makes it easy for the dog to learn without stress. At first we place an object in the dog's mouth, so the dog can identify what is correct. Then we let it discover that not holding onto the object leads to mild discomfort, which is "turned off' when the object is back in the dog's mouth. Through this comparison the dog can easily identify what is correct. We feel that there are two commands that are critical for the young retriever to learn early. Those commands are "Here" and "Hold." Only when the dog understands that it must obey these two commands, is it ready to begin marking practice in the field, or a season of hunting. When you have control in these two areas, you can begin to develop the young dog's retrieving desire, without it developing mouth problems, delivery problems, or problems identifying who's in charge (not your dog, we hope !).

MOUTH PROBLEMS To help prevent mouth problems, you should become aware of your dog's natural tendencies before you begin training "Hold." In general, excitable dogs are more prone to bite down hard and chew. Sensitive dogs are likely to pick things up by the end and frequently drop them. Many partially trained dogs tend to "claim the prey" and are reluctant to complete the retrieve because they want to keep it rather than delivering to you. For the excitable dog, use hard, large-diameter objects. For the sensitive dog, use retrieving objects that have ends which are uncomfortable so that the dog will hold them in the center. (You can do this by removing the rope from a bumper and wrapping the ends with wire.) For the dog that doesn't deliver to hand, spend time reinforcing the "Here" command. For those dogs that are reluctant to give up the bird, reinforce "Drop" with your collar. It shouldn't take but a session or two to convince the dog to deliver to hand properly. You can also help avoid mouth problems if you don't put the dog in a situation that is too challenging before it's ready. The tendency to crush birds is often caused by allowing the dog to retrieve a wounded pheasant before it has been taught to hold properly. A dog that is unaccustomed to holding a struggling bird may discover that crushing it stops the flapping and scratching. Once started, such hardmouth problems are difficult to eliminate, so take the time to prevent them in the first place.

THE TRAINING TABLE We start the trained retrieve on a training table, which is 16 feet long and two feet wide. A training table allows you to control the dog and keep it compliant. A table also saves your back if you're working several dogs.

When you introduce "Hold" and "Fetch" to the dog, you must be able to concentrate on what the dog is doing with its mouth. The training table limits the dog's motion and leaves your hands free. You can concentrate on teaching the lesson rather than physically struggling with the dog. If the dog isn't familiar with a training table, have it walk back and forth and get used to being up there. After you see that the dog is comfortable on the table, secure it to a collar attached to the end post. Also, to prevent pawing, we put Velcro hobbles on the dog's front legs. You should remove the hobbles as soon as they are no longer needed

INTRODUCTION TO HOLDING With the dog secured on the table so that it cannot move about, push your index finger into the corner of its mouth. As soon as the dog opens its mouth, slip two fingers of your gloved hand behind its canine teeth and place your thumb lightly under its chin. Typically, when you put your fingers in the dog's mouth, it will try to spit them out. Don't let it succeed, and be sure to remain calm. If you get excited, the dog will too. Do not give the command to "Hold" at this stage of training. You will add that shortly.

THE "DROP" COMMAND Keep two fingers behind the dog's canine teeth until the dog stops chewing. At that moment, say "Drop" and let the dog pull its mouth off your hand. The dog will soon realize that when it stops chewing you will allow it to get rid of your fingers. If the dog won't let go, just wiggle your index finger on the back of its tongue as you say "Drop."

THE "HOLD" COMMAND Now that the dog has learned that holding your fingers calmly will lead to getting them out of its mouth, you can begin teaching it to hold calmly for longer periods of time. To do this, leave your fingers in the dog's mouth after it has stopped chewing. The moment the dog starts to chew again, grab the skin on the back of its neck with your free hand. This technique causes the dog to calm down and stop chewing. The timing makes the dog realize that chewing on your fingers leads to displeasure. Once the dog accepts holding your fingers without resisting, start giving the "Hold" command when you put your fingers into its mouth.

HOLDING THE DUMBBELL After the dog will calmly hold your fingers for at least a minute begin using a dumbbell. Open the dog's mouth and place the dumbbell behind the dog's canine teeth. Close its mouth over the dumbbell, and help the dog hold the dumbbell for a few moments by keeping your hand under its chin. Now get ready to correct the dog for dropping the dumbbell. Take the dog's ear flap and hold it between your thumb and finger. When the dog drops the dumbbell, immediately apply mild pressure by rubbing your thumbnail and fingernail against the dog's ear while you pick up the dumbbell and put it back into the dog's mouth. Stop the pressure as soon as the dumbbell is back in its mouth. Calmly praise the dog. After the dog has held the dumbbell a moment, give the command "Drop."


At this stage, you are not trying to teach the dog to reach for the dumbbell. You are just teaching it to hold. Let the dog make the comparison. When it drops the dumbbell, it causes discomfort to its ear. When the dumbbell is in its mouth, there is no pressure, just calm, soothing praise. After several repetitions in which you see that the dog accepts holding the dumbbell, begin tapping lightly on the end of the dumbbell. At first, this tapping will cause the dog to drop the dumbbell. Soon, however, the dog will learn that dropping the dumbbell leads to uncomfortable ear pressure and will grip it more firmly. Sometimes move your hand toward the top of the dog's head or toward its chest without taking the dumbbell. You do not want the dog to think that reaching toward its head is a signal to drop. Show the dog that only when you take hold of the dumbbell and command "Drop" is it supposed to release. Each time the dog drops the dumbbell before being given the release command, apply pressure on its ear until you get the dumbbell back in its mouth. Be consistent; create mild discomfort when the dog drops the dumbbell, and pleasure when it holds. Soon the dog will want to hold and not drop.

HOLDING OTHER OBJECTS When the dog is reliable at holding the dumbbell, remove the dog from the collar that is attached to the post. Attach a short lead around the post and through the dog's collar to give the dog enough freedom to move its head about 12 inches. Place a bumper in the dog's mouth and say "Hold." If the dog drops the bumper, apply pressure on its ear. If the dog begins chewing after holding the bumper for a moment, grip the scruff of the neck and command "Hold." Repeat the procedure using several different objects until the dog is reliable at holding all of them.

INTRODUCTION TO BIRDS Next, have the dog hold frozen birds, then freshly-killed ones. If possible, use all the types of birds the dog may retrieve in the future. Be sure to include large game birds such as ducks and pheasants. Introducing birds when the dog is up on the table and under control enables you to help the dog learn how to hold them properly. When dogs are introduced to birds in this kind of controlled situation, they are much less likely to develop hardmouth problems

REINFORCING "HOLD" WITH THE TRITRONICS COLLAR Once you have completed the above procedures, and you notice that the dog will open its mouth as you offer the bumper, you can begin using the Tri-Tronies collar to reinforce "Hold." Place a bumper in the dog's mouth. If the dog drops the bumper, apply very low electrical stimulation. Release the button as you place the bumper back in the dog's mouth. You must use a collar with continuous stimulation and variable intensity to work on the trained retrieve, including the "Hold" command. Continuous stimulation means that the stimulation stays on until the trainer releases the button. Variable intensity means you can change

the strength of what the dog feels by changing colored plugs or contact points on the collar. The correct level of stimulation to use to reinforce "Hold" is quite low. For example, if a dog works in the field with a # 4 plug, you'd normally use a # 1 or # 2 plug for reinforcing "Hold" in the yard.

INTRODUCTION TO CARRYING You don't want the dog to "Hold" in a stationary position so long that it thinks "Hold" is a command that also means stand still. So unfasten the dog from the post, and lead it up and down the length of the table while having it carry a bumper. When the dog drops the bumper, press the low button. Release the button as you place the bumper back in the dog's mouth. With repetition, the dog will realize that letting the bumper fall out of its mouth causes mild discomfort from the collar.

THE DELIVERY TO HAND While the dog is up on the table and being taught "Hold," you have an ideal opportunity to develop a nice delivery. At this stage of training the dog would like to drop the object rather than hold it. So by allowing the dog to "get rid" of the object by giving it to you, the dog will develop a nice delivery to hand. To develop your dog's delivery on the table, don't reach for the object the moment you stop walking and the dog stops beside you. Wait until the dog looks up at you. Attract it if necessary by tapping your chest or saying "Look." The moment it looks at you, take hold of the object and say "Drop." Because of the dog's desire to get rid of the object, it will soon be looking up and presenting the object for you to take.

"HOLD" AND CARRY ON THE GROUND After the dog will carry a bumper while having it carry a bumper while off the table and the dog drops the bumper, reinforce "Hold" with the same way you did when you walked the dog

on the table, practice walking on a leash. If the Tri-Tronics collar on the table.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS: Jim, Phyllis and Alice are the authors ofTri- Tronics Retriever Training. Jim and Phyllis are the directors of the Tri- Tronics Training Center and have been giving retriever training seminars throughout the US and Canada since 1982. Alice competes with her retrievers in hunting tests and field trials. First Appeared in: The Retriever Journal v.l,# 1 Oct./Nov. '95 DOBBS Training Center 9627 Spring Valley Road - Marysville, CA 95901 (916) 741-0375 - FAX (916) 741-0242 ecollar@otn.net

1 would like to thank the Dobbs 'for giving us permission to reprint this article in the Wire News. In afuture issue we will print part II.


CASCADE

Look back into the pedigree

After the decision to breed ... Comes the search for the sire!

FC Chancellor's

Sierra Drifter

NAYHDA UT

1974-1990 OFA- 248-T

Ch Chancellor v Schnellberg x Leisel A Crichtonback

DC Cascade Rogue, MH NFC- 1985 NAFC - 1987 NAYHDA UT

1979 - 1992 OFA -434-T

FC Chancellor's Sierra Drifter x Ch Walker's Cascade Tess


&

consider

DCI AFC CASCADE IKE, MH 3X NFC -1991,1994 & 1995 NAFC -1994

/ Third generation FC Second generation DC, MH, NFC & NAFC

DC Cascade Rogue, MH X Cascade Misty Morning DOB: 8/31/88 OFA 1068G24M-T

Ray Calkins, DVM Wilsonville Veterinary Clinic 9275 Barber St., Wilsonville, OR 97070 (503) 682-3737 FAX (503) 682-3540

13235 SW Bell Rd. Sherwood, OR 97140 (503) 682-2968


I

TOP DOGS 1997 Field Standings

1997

How Top Ten Points are Figured Wins & Placements are taken from the "AKC Awards" magazine as the trials are pubfished. 4-7 starters= 1 pt 8 - 12 sat rt ers= 2 p t

. 4 x the stake pOints . 2nd - 3 x the stake pOints 3rd - 2 x the stake pOints . 4th - 1 x the stake pOints 1st-

13-17 starters=3pt 18 -24 start ers= 4 p t 25 or more s tart ers= 5 pt Now, if you won a 1st place in a 3 point stake, you would multiply 4x3=12. Second in a 2 pt. stake multiply 3x2 =6, and so. NOTICE; As of January 1, 1997 separate top ten lists will be kept for Open Gun Dog and Amateur Gun Dog placements. Open and Amateur Puppy & Derby placements will be combined Numbers compiled by Lynn Sandor, 255 Flood Ave, San Francisco, CA 94412 (415) 585-5555 Standings reflect placements from January 1 -June 30th, 1997 trials as recorded through the August 1997 AKC A wards.

Dogs Defeated

GWPCA Points

M Hemphill, W A 1 Demoura B&G Richardson, MI J Landis W &MTait, NJ M Lee, OR 1&J Collins, CA J Collins/N Litwin

145 87

59 48

81 64 74 43

42 30 29 28

OPEN SENIOR DOGS (GUN DOGS) 1. FC Flintlocks Addition 2. Flintlocks Ezekiel 3. SGR Dirty Laundry 4. Flintlocks Liesel Von Diesel 5. DC/AFC Schnellberg's Gretta MH 6. FC/ AFC Sure Shot Cruise 7. Ch Jay -Mar's Blakes Windczar SH 8. Ch Jay-Mar's Blakes Whirlwind MH 9. Sure Shot's Justa Miss Marker JH 10. Soo Lines Dark Magic

33

23

59

21

P Ljungren, W A E Barrett Dixon. WI

28 23

20 20

W&MTait, NJ J&K Yates, MI RAmundson EFowls, GA J Tucker, MI G Rezzardi, IL P Ljungren, W A K Nelson, CA R&L Calkins, OR P Ljungren

78

48 36 23 18 16 16 16 16 15 13

AMATEUR SENIOR DOGS (GUN DOGS) 1. DC /AFC Schnellbergs Gretta MH 2. FC/AFC JimKath's Allure 3.Ch Soo Lines Allied Freighter 4. Wilsons Wild wire 5. Ch Jed's Silent Polar Express 5. FC Navaho Sidekick MH 5. Sure Shot's Golly Miss Molly SH 5. Ch SGR Witchhunt MH 9. NFC/ NAFC/DC/AFC Cascade Ike MH 10. Sure Shots Justa Miss Marker 1H

41 36 26 31 21 21 18 26

42

JUNIOR DOGS (PUPPY/ DERBY COMBINED) 1. Flintlock's Lady Hawk 2. SGR Laundry Daze 3. Sure Shot's Hot Rocks JH 4. Cadenberg Wicked One V Ike 5. Flintlocks Bandit 6. Wilson's Dixie Dawggy 7. Flintlock's Additional Trick V Rahnhaus 8. Backwoods Western Flyer 9. SGR Silent Running Brooke 10. Flintlocks K-S Tzar Schwartz

M Hemphill, W A B&G Richardson, MI D Ljungren, W A W &M Tait, NJ/S Owen H Christensen,UT M Mordorzki, MN R Gilleard, MT LDixon, MN R&L Bultman/G Ward,MN K Sunda, IL

58 41 33 50 35 45 34 36

41 30

28

18 15

37

28

27 25 20 20 19

Congratulations to our newest AMATEUR FIELD CHAMPION FC JimKath's Allure (B) SN03795609 (5/24/97) by Overbaron's Country Hustler x FC AFC SGRWitches' Brew Breeder: Gail Richardson & Bill Richardson; Owner: Kathleen Yates DVM & James Yates


blu sands kennels

proudly announces the breeding of

ch jed's silent polar express

fc navaho's sidekick, mh

ofa excellent

ofa good

need's 4 ref. pts. for his "fc"

17 months

master hunter -

bench pointed - 10 months field champion

- 3 yrs.

afc - 1 ptto go

fc chancellor sirerra drifter dc cascade rogue mh ch walker's cascade tess

ch jed's silent polar express dc sgr silent running cd,mh ch jed's sgr silent panda jh sgr pepper box ch arkayem's thornbird cd jh ch navaho trail blazer jh ch martins abby

fc navaho's sidekick mh ch liebenwaid wars razzmatazz ch maestro wind son of navaho jh ch ripsnorters die zauberflote

puppies due september

jh

14

breeders: sandi & guy rezzardi

(815) 467-4667 best -wisl1es to u{{ tl1e '997 nutionu{s purticipants


CONGRATULATIONS

TO OUR NEW GWP HUNTING TEST TITLE HOLDERS

JUNIOR HUNTER Cadenberg Ursus V Trey (D) SN1 1421108 (4/5/97) COX MH; Breeder: Silke Alberts; Owner: Bob Rittenhouse

by Ch. Weidenhugellntrepid

V Goetz

x DC AFC Cadenberg Magie V Rogue

Cadenberg Warlock V. Ike (D) SN33800705 (5/11/97) by NFC NAFC DC AFC Cascade Ike MH x DC AFC Cadenberg Rogue COX MH; Breeder: Silke Alberts; Owner: Thomas Poorker

Magie V

Ebbtide Baycrest Spring Hunt (D) SN34968409 (5/3/97) by DC AFC Dunkees Justa Top Flite JH x Ch. Ebbtide Summer Breeze JH; Breeder: Shyla Gunther & Garnett Persinger; Owner: James Hanna & Garnett Persinger & Shyla Gunther SGR Lady Katrina Mayfly (B) SN1 3777702 (5/17/97) by Gustav Jaeger MH x Katrin Jaeger MH; Breeder: Edwin Wilkins; Owner: Bob Moses Weidenhugel Cooper V Pilot (D) SN231 48001 Mildred Revell; Owner: Eillen Newsome

(5/25/97)

Ch. Weidenhugel Gabby V Merlin (B) SN36046501 V Rap JH; Breeder/Owner: Cynthia Heiller Swanee's Bush Man Max (D) SN27626508 Ronald Wilson; Owner: Donald Swanson

by Weidenhugel

(5/18/97)

(6/15/97)

Pilot V Nico x Ch. Hunter V Hannah CD; Breeder:

by Ch. Weidenhugel

Merlin V Nico CD MH x Ch. Weidenbach

by DC Uodibar's Bush Man x Sure Shots Miss Fancy Pants;

Ulla

Breeder:

SENIOR HUNTER Jessie James (B) SN24564201 Jonathan Winegarden

(5/18/97)

by SGR Silent Knight MH x Rolanda Thora Ellery SH; Breeder:

Weidenhugel Whistle V Jersey (B) SN09681 303 (5/17/97) by Ch. Weidenhugel Breeder: Patricia Roberts & Mildred Revell; Owner: Wallace & Mary Lou Linge Maestros Ju$\ta Ranker; Allegro Owner: JH (B)Brian SN261 18910 Breeder: Patric~ Wesha

(6/7/97)

Lawrence & Eric Fifer;

Jersey V Nico x Ch. Weidenhugel

Owner:

Rue V Gemstone JH;

by DC AFC Dunkees Justa Holenone CD MH x Ch. Ripsnorter's

Die lauberflote

JH;

MASTER HUNTER Greenflats Boomer Hermann Heydlauf

(D) SN1 8934806

(5/3/97)

by Clint Yom Fasanental MH x Greenflats

Alicia;

Breeder:

Robert Kroder;

Owner:

Jay-Mars Blake's Whirlwind SH (D) SN03465807 (4/13/97) by Haag's Director TO SH x Rawhides Flake; Breeder: M. Jay Collins; Owner: Nickol Vampotic & M. Jay Collins Wirewoods Mysterk Rendezvous SH (B) SM82299501 (10/7/95) by Wirewoods Wild Thing JH x Marsu's Morning Starr MH; Breeder/Owner: Jimmy Rice & Linda Rice DC AFC Dunkees Justa Top Flite JH (D) SF897246 (6/1/97) by DC AFC Dunkees Justa Holenone CD MH x Sure Shots Justa Racie Lacie; Breeder: Bernee Brawn; Owner: Bernee Brawn & Dr. Francis Sakiey # Of Hunting Test Titles earned by GWP's in 1997 JH -18

SH - 12

MH

-6

OBEDIENCE STANDINGS 1997 These ran kings are based on competition during the period January 5 - June 30, 1997 as reported in AKC Awards through Vol. 17 NO.6 August 1997 compiled by Lori Sargent who can be reached by email atSARGENL2@state.mi.us.

NOVICE

DELANEY POINTS

1. 2. 3. 4.

Bris's Ripsnorter Mullica-Frauline - S. Kelzner Afterhours Lady Liberty CD - S. Nunes Ch. Cagle's Larkspur Duchess - T&N Cagle Doc's Wild Like the Wind - C. Milachek/D. Hensley Ch. ADPG EZ Come El Go JH - K. Craggs 5. Weidenhugel Ukiah V Rap JH - M. Revell

6. Jay-Mar's Ab's Tasha Yar - P. Palmer/N. 7. Hellbender's Jesse James JH - D. Dec 8.

Vampotic

Ch. Cadenburg Urchin V. Trey - S. Alberts Ch. Ripsnorter's P Willy Whiskers JH - K&D Conner

FRONT & FINISH 14 21

33 26 11

16

9 9

7

o o o o o

9 8

7 7 7

4

OPEN 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Neekohaus' Spicy Thistle CDX SH - H. Madsen Larkspur's Little Miss Ditto CD - D. Watson Ch. SGR Whispering Winds COX JH - M. Brook Schnellberg's Jake CDX JH - S. Owen FoxHill's Mr. Badger UDX JH - S&J Shafer Ch. Schatten Waid Tag Spat Biene NA CD - B. Boes

48

25 4

14 10

12

o o o

15

5 3

UTILITY

32 19

1. FoxHill's Mr. Badger UDX JH - S&J Shafer 2. Ch. Jerelin's Stix N Brix CDX JH - J&W Reese

COMPANION

DOG

CONGRATULATION

32 7

TO OUR NEWEST OBEDIECE TITLE HOLDERS

Ch. Cagle's Larkspur Duchess (B) SN1353261 1 (6/7/97) Gina McCain & Frankie McCain; Owner: Tommy & Nina Cagle

by Ch. Ripsnorter's

Thunderhart

Jay-Mar's AB's Tasha Yar (B) SN20898508 (6/1/97) by Jay-Mar's Blusassy's Baron Breeder: M. Jay Collins; Owner: Peggy Jo Palmer & Nickol Vampotic

x Ch. Larkspur's

x Ch. Jay-Mar's Autumn

loe

Dancer;

Breeder:

Reign CD SH;

UTILITY DOG Ch. Jerelin's CD; Breeder:

Stix N Brix COX JH (B) SE4591 03 (5/9/97) by Ch. Laurwyn Cassio Piece of Cake x Ch. Jerelin's Chin-E-Chin-Chin Geral Krepak & Linda Krepak; Owner: Jean Reese & William Reese II


FORT DETROIT FIELD TRIAL The Fort Detroiters held a walking field trial in May. In keeping with the cooler springtime weather, the temperatures were much to the dogs'liking. A lot of members pitched in to help make the event a great success. Debbie Totten made a special trip to cook up lunch; Barb Hein was kept in practice with the paperwork; Mark Sargent and Ross VanDerBos were excellent gunners; Dick and Pat Uhnavy helped line marshall; Lori Sargent held the title of "OddJob", and also planted birds. A big round of thanks also went to their judges - Mark Sargent, Bob Hein, John Schoonover, Mark Mc Kinley, and Bill Richardson. Club members placements were as follows: Open Pull.py: (4 starters) 3. Rickie (GWP) - John Schoonover Open Derby: (5 starters - GWP's only) 1. Flintlock's Bifrost's Odin - Dick Uhnavy 2. Rickie - John Schoonover 3. SGR Laundry Daze - Bill Richardson 4. Jed's Bewitched - Ed Tucker Amateur Gun Dog: (10 starters) 1. FC JimKath's Allure - Jim Yates 2. SGR Dirty Laundry - Bill Richardson 4. Ch Jed's Silent Polar Express - Ed Tucker Amateur Limited Gun Dog: (10 starters) 1. FC JimKath's Allure - Jim Yates 2. Ch Jed's Silent Polar Express - Ed Tucker Congratulations to Jim and Kathleen (DVM) Yates, as the first place in AGD gave Allure her Amateur Field Champion title!

GWP OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA FIELD TRIAL Karen Nelsen Southern California GWP club held an all walking, wirehair only field trial on August 23 and, as usual, it was very, very hot and very humid as well ....like about 95 degrees. Th~ dogs climatized very well, thanks to the water on course and at the bird field. Chairman Jay Collins had the entire Collins clan working at various jobs to make the event a wonderful success. Thanks go to our wonderful judges, Bill and Cindy Leffingwell, who spent the day in the saddle and were so considerate about the dogs' wellbeings. Terry Duffin made the drive from Oregon by way of a hunting test in northern California (where he put the last Master leg on Ch Yon Duffin's Halley's Comet), and Marylou Linge came from Las Vegas ...she said it was cooler here! Here are the placements of the four stakes held: Amateur Gun Dog (11 starters - 2 points) 1. Ch SGR Witch Hunt, MH o/h Karen Nelsen 2. Ch Jay Mar's Blake's Blue Win, SH o/h Dominic Milano 3. Ch Jaymar's Blake's Windczar o/John Collins h/Marylou Linge 4. Ch Yon Duffin's Halley's Comet, MH o/h Terry Duffin Open Derby (10 starters - 2 points) 1. Yon Duffin's Nutmeg o/h Terry Duffin 2. Jaymar's Misty o/h Collins 3. Jaymar's Outlaw Babe o/h Nikki Litwin 4. Withheld Open Puppy (2 starters) 1 Jaymar's Honor V Schnellberg o/Litwin h/Jimmy Rice 2. Swenberg's Runaway Riley o/h Rick Gailing Open Gun Dog (10 starters - 2 points) 1.Ch SGR Witch Hunt, MH o/K. Nelsen h/Paul Doiron 2. Wirewood's K.c. o/h Jimmy Rice 3. Ch Jaymar's AB's Lieut. Warf, JH o/Kidder h/Paul Doiron 4. Ch Yon Duffin's Halley's Comet, MH o/h Terry Duffin A Water Test was also held and of the dogs entered, Yon Duffin's Nutmeg and Jaymar's Honor V Schnellberg received passes.

GWP OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA FIELD TRIAL The weather was warm and windy with mosquitoes giving the handlers a run for their money on Saturday. Dr. Cindy Heiller gave her usual outstanding First Aid presentation of Saturday evening just prior to the BBQ. Here are club members placements: Open All Age: I. Ch Cadenberg Victor V Trey (Vic)- OlMildred Revell H/R Berry 3. Deja Vu (Kelly) - O/H Frank Fermandez 4. Rush's Right (Bubba) - O/H Randy Berry Open Puppy: I. Rader's One Over Par (Bogey) - O/KenRader H/Randy Berry 3. Saddle Up Anja V Lutz (Anja) O/H Jimmy Peters 4. Wildwing Britta V Penngrove (Britta) O/H Joe Langlois Open Derby: I.Rader's One Over Par (Bogey) - O/Ken Rader H/Randy Berry 4. Yon Duffin's Nutmeg (Nutmeg) - O/H Terry Duffin Open Gun Dog: 2. Wildwing's Party Girl (T) - OfLynn Sandor H/Joe Langlois 3. Ch Cadenberg Victor V Trey (Vic) - OlMildred Revell H/R Berry 4. Rush's Right (Bubba) - O/H Randy Berry Amateur Gun Dog: 1. Deja Vu (Kelly) O/H Frank Fernandez Amateur Puppy: I.Rader's One Over Par (Bogey) 2.Saddle Up Anja V Lutz 4. Hellbender's Bugbite (Bugbite) - O/H Terry Duffin Water Test Passing: Neekohaus SpicyofThistle (Spice) jHelena Madsen Rader's Cricket Quail (Cricket!> - Ken Rader Weidenhugel Highway (Willie) - Gary Bonini Weidenhugel Brie V Simon (Brie) - Sharon Jahn Deja Vu (Kelly) - Frank Fernandez

BACKWOODS KENNELS Bird Dogs Trained Field Trial/Hunt Summer

&

Test Training

Handling

Camp / North Dakota

Winter Camp / Texas

Robert Perry


C

h Larkspurs

NAVHOA

Goodrunofbadluck

NA 100 pts.

We would like to thank Gina McCain and Katie Schwer for all of their help and support with Gunner, and most of all for allowing him to become a part of our lives. Gunner is a wonderful dog who is always so eager to please whether in the field, show ring or at home.

Look for Gunner this fall as we work toward his CD, and next year as we begin working for his MH and NAVHDA UT.

Proud Owners:

.Shane!&~Heaiililâ&#x201A;ŹcB()x .". ,;);<+' ,">. I;>; ;<;.';'::;;;::;)..$:;

3501 E. St. Rd. 16, Monticello, IN 47960 (219) 253-7761

Gina McCain & Kathryn Schwer Eau Clair, MI


CO~IMG IVINT, SPECIALTIES/SUPPORTED

NOV

28

ENTRIES

FT DETROIT SPECIALTY

HUNTING

13

GWP OF ILLINOIS SPECIALTY

18&19

OCT

31-NOV 2 GWP OF NORTHERN CA FIELD TRIAL, SPENCEVILE SILKE ALBERTS, (707) 644-8068

SKOKE VALLEY KC, PAULA MOEBIUS (608) 987-4302 14

DEL VAL GWP- SUPPORTED LEHIGH VALLEY KC

ENTRY

DEL VAL GWP SUPPORTED CHESTER VALLEY KC

ENTRY,

GWP OF SOUTHERN CA- HUNT TEST- TEJON RANCH, LEBEC, CA, SUZ RAWN (301) 454-0405

31-NOV 2 DEL VAL GWP FIIELD TRIAL, MEDFORD, NJ MAUREEN TAIT, (609) 261-3271 NOV

MAY 98

TRIALS

OCT

NEW MSU EXPO CENTER, DEBBIE TOTTEN (517) 631-5168 DEC

TESTS/FIELD

8&9

GWP C SOUTHERN CA, FIELD TRIAL, CALIF. CITY LINDA RICE (805) 533-0520

8&9

FT DETROIT GWP - FIELD TRIAL, IONIA, MI BARB HEIN (801) 627-3566

29&30

GWP OF UTAH, HUNT TEST, ST GEORGE, UT HAL CHRISTENSEN (801) 255-9391

Please note: Parent from Club the consent no longer needed only for Speci~ has givenParent "Blanket to these. A written response parentisclub is necessary in el1'S'esoevents.AKC f a denial, otherwise Club Approval" consent will be considered automatic. Parent Club approval is still needed for Field Trials, however. Regardless, please send all information of your club's upcoming events to Karen Nelsen for inclusion in the "Coming Events" .

Whew! This is a subject that seems to be getting a lot of attention. And rightly so. Lets face it, without the proper coat, we are just another shorthaired hunting dog!

Aka: Breed type.

LeTS TALK COAT Lisa Jaffe FairOak Wires

I feel however, that equally important is the animal residing underneath the hair. Did anyone hear of the saying: Don't throw the baby out with the bathwater? It truly applies here. What good is proper coat if the animal is dysplastic, or so agressive he can't be trusted in public, or the carrier of some fatal, hereditary disease? We must not lose sight of the dog under the hair. I am by no means saying to give up trying for that perfect coat, oh no, never. But, remember coat is the easiest thing to correct in a breeding program unlike shoulders,tailsets, front assemblys, bad rears, temperment, etc., that once implanted in a line, are very difficult to get rid of. And what about hunting ability? There are alot of hunters out there. Would you rather have a dog with a great coat that can't find his lunch on a hot day, or a dog that could slam on point, before even out of the car, but didn't have such a great coat? Everything must balance. Naturally you want a great hunting companion with a perfect coat, we all do. But you must balance the pros and cons,and realize what you have to work with, and go upward from there. So you've got a great bitch, with a not so great coat, what do you do, spay her? Absolutely not! You find a dog that comes from great coats, (even if his is average, he will produce what is behind him). Beware the dog with the great coat, that comes from a solid line of problem coats, as this is what you will get. And how do you measure a great coat? Well, aside from texture, there is the length factor. Our standard dictates 1-2 inches. Anything less, or more than that is incorrect. Have you measured the length of a hair taken from your dog?? It's very simple, just pluck a hair, tape it to paper, and measure, ( hair folicle doesnt count) Most people are surprised at just how long 2 inches really is. The true wire coat is perhaps the most difficult to achieve, however, with careful breeding an average coat can produce very good coats. I just don't want to lose sight of the dog underneath, for without him, all you have is a pile of hair.


G\YPCA

NATIONAL

CHAMPIONSHIP

PLACEMENTS

1882- GREEN RIVER, ILL 1. WITHELD 2. DC CASCADE ROGUE MH 3. FC SCHROADER'S MAINE HEIR 4. WITHELD

CALKINS WILKINS

1983- SELAH, WA (SEATTLE TACOMA GWP CLUB) 1. FC AFC BARON VOM SCHYRENTAL 2. FC HALB'S REGIMENT 3. DCAFCCADENBERG BACCHANALE V LUTZ 4. AFC DRAUFGANGER HEMP 1984 - KILDEER PLAINS, OH. (FT DETROIT 1. FC AFC HALB'S SURE SHOT 2. DC AFC WALKERS BLUE MOVIE 3. DC CASCADE RUGUE MH 4. FC TACK'S PEPPER MILL

14 entered WEATHERTON CALKINS FERNANDEZ SOBlE

GWPC) 1ST AKC NATIONAL LJUNGREN HAAG CALKINS TACK

1985 BRANCHED OAK, NEBRASKA 15 1. DC CASCADE ROGUE MH 2. PDK'S BARON VaN PFEFFER 3. FC CASCADE SMOKIN JO 4. FC AFC CASCADE STEAMER MH

CALKINS MCDULLEY CALKINS CALKINS

1986 FT HUACHUCA, ARIZONA (GWPC OF ARIZONA) 1. DCAFC SURE SHOT'S POINT BLANK CD MH 2. FC AFC HALB'S SURE SHOT

18 LJUNGREN LJUNGREN

3. FC AFC FREDRICH'S FIGURE IT OUT 4. DC MARSU'S SIERRA CASS

FREDRICH DECKER

CH.21

NATIONAL AMATEUR CHAMPIONSHIP 1982 1. FC AFC HALB'S MISS CHIEF 2. FC SCHROADER'S MAINE HEIR 3. FC AFC AHLIN'S DYKE ANN 4. FC AFC FREDRICH'S FIGURE IT OUT

LJUNGREN WILKINS JIRKNANDERSON FREDRICH

1983 16 entered 1. FC AFC HALB'S MISS CHIEF 2. DCAFC CADENBERG BACCHANALE V LUTZ 3. FC AFC BARON VOM SCHYRENTAL 4. DC FLINTLOCK'S MEDICINE MAN

LJUNGREN FERNANDEZ WEATHERTON HEMPHILL

1984 1. FC 2. FC 3. DC 4. FC

TAGK HAAG LJUNGREN

26 AFC HALB'S SURE SHOT TACK'S PEPPER MILL AFC WALKER'S BLUE MOVIE AFC HALB'S MISS CHIEF

1985 16 1. FC AFC 2. FC AFC 3. FC AFC 4. DC AFC

1987 ASSUNPINK, NEW JERSEY (DEL VAL GWPC) 10 1. FC HALB'S REGIMENT MCCOY 2. FC AFC CASCADE STEAMER MH CALKINS 3. DC AFC FREDRICH'S ROSY BEAR FREDRICH 4. DC AFC FREDRICH'S VOGEL JAEGER FREDRICH

CASCADE STEAMER MH HALB'S MISS CHIEF FREDRICH'S FIGURE IT OUT SURE SHOT'S POINT BLANK CD MHL

LJUNGREN

CALKINS LJUNGREN FREDRICH JUNGREN

1986 16 1. FC AFC CASCADE STEAMER MH 2. FC AFC HALB'S MISS CHIEF 3. DC CASCADE ROGUE MH 4. DC AFC SURE SHOT'S POINT BLANK CD MH

CALKINS LJUNGREN CALKINS LJUNGREN

1987 1. DC 2. FC 3. FC 4. DC

CALKINS GASKA MCCOY FREDRICH

10 CASCADE ROGUE MH MARSUS'S ABIGALE OF BAYFIELD HALB'S REGIMENT AFC FFREDRICH'S ROSY BEAR

1988 10 1. DC AFC SURE SHOT'S POINT BLANK CD MH 2. FC AFC CASCADE STEAMER MH 3. FC AFC CASCADE TUFFY 4. DCAFCDUNKEE'S JUSTA HOLE N ONE CD MH

LJUNGREN CALKINS LEE BRAWN

1989 ALBERT LEEM MINNESOTA (TWIN CITIES GWPC) 19 1. DYKE ANN'S BEST SHOT AHLIN 2. FC AFC CASCADE STEAMER MH CALKINS 3. DCAFC DUNKEE'S JUSTA HOLE N ONE CD MH BRAWN 4. DC AFC SURE SHOT'S POINT BLANK CD MH LJUNGREN

1989 16 1. DC AFC SURE SHOT'S POINT BLANK CD MH 2. DYKE ANN'S~ SHOT 3. DC AFC DUNKEES JUSTA HOLE N ONE CD MH 4. BARON VaN BUDWIZER

LJUNGREN AHLIN BRAWN LARSON

1990 ASSUNPINK, NEW JERSEY (DEL VAL GWPC)(OLGD STAKE) 11 1. FC SELKIRK'S BOUNTY HUNTER SAKIEY

10 SELKIRKS BOUNTY HUNTER SGR SLiENT RUNNING MH AFC MARIE LAVEAU VaN STEUBON AFC CASCADE STEAMER MH

SAKIEY RICHARDSON SCHOONOVER CALKINS

SCHOONOVER CALKINS ADAMS LEE

1988 CALIFORNIA CITY, CALIFORNIA 1. FC MARSU'S CASCADE SKIPPER 2. FC AFC CASCADE STEAMER MH 3. DC CASCADE ROGUEMH 4. DC SGR SILENT RUNNING MH

(GWPC OF SO. CALIFORNIA) DECKER CALKINS CALKINS RICHARDSON

14

2. DC SGR SILENT RUNNING MH 3. DCAFC DUNKEE'S JUSTA HOLE N ONE CD MH 4. FC AFC SURE SHOT'S CRUISE

RICHARDSON BRAWN LEE

1990 1. FC 2. DC 3. FC 4. FC

1991 SUNNYSIDE WASHINGTON (SEATTLE TACOMA 1. DC AFC DASCADE IKE MH 2. DC AFC DUNKEE'S JUSTA HOLE N ONE CD MH 3. FC AFC SURE SHOT'S MAGGIE MH 4. WILDWINGS CASCADE ZOEY

GWPC) 20 CALKINS BRAWN LJUNGREN ADAMS

1991 21 1. FC AFC MARIE LAVEAU VaN STEUBON 2. DC AFC CASCADE IKE MH 3. WILDWINGS CASCADE ZOEY 4. FC AFC SURE SHOT'S CRUISE

1992 BRANCHED OAK, NEBRASKA (GWPC OF NEB.) 25 1. FC DOTY'S WHIRLWIND SIR GABBY DOTY 2. FC AFC MARIE LAVEAU VaN STEUBON SCHOONOVER 3. FC SURE SHOT'S MISTER CHIPS LEE 4. DC AFC DUNKEE'S JUSTA TOP FLITE MH BRAWN/SAKIEY 1993 IONIA MICHIGAN (FT DETROIT GWPC) 22 1. FC AFC MARIE LAVEAU VaN STEUBON 2. DC AFC CASCADE IKE MH 3. FC AFC ST CROIX'S RAWHIDE RUBY 4. DC UODIBAR'S FANNY PALTANI 1994 SMARTSVILLE, CALIFORNIA 1. DC AFC CASCADE IKE MH 2. FC AFC SURE SHOT'S CRUISE 3. FC AFC SURE SHOT'S 4. CH All DEL CHISOLA

1995 IONIA MICHIGAN (FT DETROIT GWPC) 28 1. DC AFC CASCADE IKE MH 2. DC UODIBAR'S BUSH MAN 3. SURE SHOT'S JAKE TIQUES PRIDE 4. FLINTLOCK'S EZEKIAL 1996 SOLON SPRINGS, WISCONSIN 1. DC UODIBAR'S FANNY PALTANI

LJUNGREN HARD

MUELLER DIXON LJUNGREN

STEUBON

3. AFC SGR WITCHES BREW 4. ST CROIX'S BREEZIN' BOOGALOO

1. 2. 3. 4.

SHCOONOVER RICHARDSON MUELLER

18

CH AFC JUSTA TEQUILA SUNSET DC AFC DUNKEE'S JUSTA TOP FLiTE FC SELKIRK'S BOUNTY HUNTER SURE SHOT'S JAKE TIQUE'S PRIDE

1994 25 1. FC AFC CASCADE IKE MH 2. FC AFC SURE SHOT'S CRUISE 3. FC AFC ST CROIX'S RAWHIDE RUBY 4. SURE SHOT'S GOLY MISS MOLLY 1995

CALKINS PRATT PRATT DEMOURA

(TWIN CITIES GWPC) 37 SHELLEY

2. FC AFC ST CROIX'S RAWHIDE RUBY 3. SOO LINE'S DARK MAGIC 4. SURE SHOTS JUSTA MISS MARKER JH

1. FC AFC MAIRE LAVEAU VaN 2. WITHELD

1993 SCHOONOVER CALKINS MUELLER SHELLEY

(GWPC OF NO. CALlE) 25 CALKINS LEE

MISS TIQUE SH

1992 22

SAKIEY BRAWN BRAWN/SAKIEY SAKIEY PRATT

CALKINS LEE MUELLER LJUNGREN

22

1. FC AFC ST CROIX'S RAWHIDE 2. DC AFC CASCADE IKE MH

RUBY

3. DC AFC DUNKEES JUSTA TOP FLiTE MH 4. DC AFC SCHNELLBERG'S GRETTA MH

MUELLER CALKINS BRAWN/SAKIEY TAIT

1996 31 1. FC AFC BREEZIN' BRITTA VaN KINNI 2. DC AFC DUNKEE'S JUSTA TOP FLiTE MH 3. FC JIMKATHS ALLURE 4. SURE SHOT'S GOLLY MISS MOLLY

MANNS BRAWN/SAKEIY YATES LJUNGREN


GERMAN

WIREHAIRED POINTER CLUB

OF AMERICA

CODE OF ETHICS The members of the GWPCA are devoted to the continued preservation, protection and improvement of the German Wirehaired Pointer. This Code provides guidelines for ethical practices and care, and seeks to promote good sportsmanship. RECORDS: GWPCA members will maintain complete and accurate records for each dog and litter. BREEDING: GWPCA members will evaluate any dog or bitch used for breeding, using the criteria set forth by the breed standard. Only those dogs free of recognized genetic defects shall be used in a breeding program. Breeders will be selective with respect to the physical and mental soundness, health, temperament, and natural hunting ability of the dog or bitch. CARE AND TRANSFER

OF DOGS:

No puppies or adult dogs shall be bred, sold or consigned to pet shops or other commercial enterprises. Proper care shall be provided for bitch and puppies. Puppies shall be kept until seven weeks of age. All prospective buyers should be carefully screened to assure that puppies have a safe, loving and stimulating home. An honest evaluation of the quality of the puppy will be made. Purchasers are to be encourage to spay or neuter all dogs that will not be used for breeding. New owners 1. 2. 3. 4.

/

will receive the following documentation: Written sales contract or co-ownership agreement Copy of the AKC registration Feeding instructions ~edical records

5. Three-generation pedigree 6. Training recommendations 7. Copy of this Code of Ethics GWPCA members are prepared to assist puppy buyers when questions or problems arise for the life of the dog. New owners are encouraged to become involved in GWPCA activities, regional GWP Clubs, dog training, and/or dog performance events. SPORTSMANSHIP: GWPCA members shall always conduct themselves in a manner which will reflect credit upon themselves, their dogs, and the sport of dogs, regardless of location or circumstance.

r----------------------------------------~

Bird Dog News The information source for the hunting dog owner We give you information about places to hunt, training tips, bird counts, seasons, recipes, news from the internet, trial dates and much more. No one covers upland and waterfowl hunting like Bird Dog News. Come see us on the internet we have the largest hunting dog site on the net at; WWW.Bird-Dog-News.com Now in our fifth year. Bird DOt!:News 563-gw 17th Ave NW New Brighton, MN 55112 PhlFx 612-636-8045 six issues $17 /yr Gi ve us a try ... ~----------------------------------------~


Wire~News 1997 Oct.-Nov.