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Secretaries of Affiliated Local GWP Clubs East Delaware

Twin Cities GWPC

Valley GWPC

Dr. Francis Sakiey

Cheryl Burch-Schoff

Rd 1, Box-167 Georgetown (609)298-6061

Rd. Columbus,

NJ 08022

691 So. Victoria, St. Paul, MN 55102 (612) 227-7087

Obi<> GWPC Christi Schoessow 4508 Marks Rd. Medina,

GWPC of minois Victoria Gillette

OH 44256

(216) 722-8935

700 Grand Ave. Elgin, IL 60120 (312)931-7657

Fort Detroit GWPC Kathy Yates 4000 Morks Pinckney, (313)837-0115

GWPC of Wisconsin Sue Clemons

MI 48169

1031 Amy Bell Rd. Germantown,

WI 53022

(414)628-3452 GWPC of Arizona

GWPC of Eastern Nebraska Ken Anderson

Marilyn Powell 1150 E. Roberts Rd. Phoenix,

AZ 85002

2424 No. 45th Ave. Omaha,

(602)993-9702

(402)553-5149

SeanTe-TtUDma GWPC

GWPC

Yolanda

Fall

2105 Hemlock

St. SE Auburn,

WA 98002

(515)677-3172

GWPC of Southern linda Rice

California

36236 - 53rd Street East (805)944-0520 GWPC of Northern Silke Alberts

Palmdale,

CA 93550

California

901 AJameda St. Vallejo, CA 94590 (707)644-8068

Oregon GWPC Mary Howard 2912 Wembley (206)636-5335

of Central Iowa

Dan Archip Box 24, Rt. 1 Minburn,

(206)939-6196

Paek Rd. Lake Oswego,

OR 97034

NE 68104

10 50167


Officers & Board of Directors

of the German Wirehaired Pointer Club of America

President

National Field Futurity Cbainnan Genetics Committee Cbainnan

John H. Writer PO Box 420 Yorkville,

GWPCA's OFA Representative

IL 60560

(312)553-5042

Ray Calkins, DVM 13235 S.W. Bell Rd. Sherwood,

Vice PresidenL

(503)682-2968

Marilyn Powell 1150 E. Roberts Rd Phoenix,

A2 85022

National Events Board Cbainnan

(602)993-9702

Larry Mason 37010-200 Ave. S.E., Auburn,

Secretary1

(206)939-2224

Laurie McCarty 2506 Ann Arbor Lane

Bowie, MD 20716

OR 97140

WA 98002

Yearbook Editor 1988-1990

(301)249-2753

Laurie McCarty 2506 Ann Arbor Lane Bowie, MD 20716

Treasurer

(301)249-2753

Nancy Mason 37010-200 Ave. S.E., Auburn,

WA 98002

(206)939-2224

GWPCA Tropby Cbainnan Laura Miles 22730 Echo Lake Rd. Snohomish,

WA 98290

(206)668-5337

Director-Eastern Bernee

.AlIK<C-!JlI<$hl$"'~'"

Foster Braun

Patricia Laurans

1408 Pineville Rd.

54 Mt. Pleasant

(215) 598-3990

(203)426-9169

Director-Midwestern Ken Anderson 2424 N. 45 Ave. Omaha,

NE 68104

(402)553-5149

Director- Western Ray Calkins 13235 S.W. Bell Rd. Sherwood, (503)682-2968

GR-PCA WIRE-NEWS

OR 97140

Rd. Newtown,

CT 06470


The GWPCA WIRE-NEWS Editorial Staff

Advertising Rates Front

1 Page Story & Photo $70.00

IBdJ6fJ"ptl'

Rl.

Ccl.l(>T

With

Carol Stuart 2 Box 182 Altoona, PA 16601 (814)943-4045

Back

CoVC?rWitl.>Photo $50.00

Inside

Front Cover With Photo $45·00

Inside

Shout News & Top

2820 N. Shefm3n York. PA 17402

....nem"".", J\~ 18501 (6091259-7579

(7F)

Ray Dlkins 13235 S.W. Bell Rd.

755-6716

Full Page - No Photo $30.00

663 So. Main St.

Sh~, OR 97140 (503)682-2968

Athol. Mass OJ331 (617)249-8360

Obed~ News & Top T~ AnnKostishak

Hisorical

4925 Chilton

Rt. 1 Box 307A

Shannon

Dr.

Dallas, TX 752Ii (2141338-2288

Hulding

Full Page With Photo $35.00

St.

GWP ResCJU! Upd4k Linda 5troth man

Top Ten, GePUdi.csReport

{$,

Nof.t!s

Island

1/2 Page - /Vo Photo $25.00

1/2 Page With Photo $25.00

Humor & Fiction

1/2 Page - No Photo $20.00

Tina "'Whitmore

WalkilJ, NY 12589 (914)895-3254

Medina, OH 44256 (216)722-8935

NAYHDA

Coming Events & Book & VuUo Rer;ku,

Bobby Applegate 218 n. Lincoln lane

RI. 2 Box 182

4508 Marks Rd. 1/4 Page - No Photo $15.00

Carol Stuart Altoona,

lL 60004

Additional OJarpe For Second

Above Ads

(8141943-4045

$15.00

Staff Arlist

Be" Murry Rt. #] Box 102

S. Gail Richardson

Uiurel, DE 19956

Met:Jmora, Mi 48455 (313">678-2529

1232 Brocker

(302)629-8"''6

Additiorz.al Cbarpe For More Than One Photo

Rd.

$5.00 per photo

Forum

Regina Sch~<lbe, 81 Wayne Ave.

C%r

Q!1

PA 16601

Lo=1&,*s

Education

V2 Page With Photo $30.00

Florek

Judy Ford Rd 1 Box 228 La", Rd.

Arlington Hights, (312)394-5188

Island

Monticello, MN 55362 (612)878-2029

Test News

Cover With Photo $40.00

Carol Anderson

Jen\' Clark RD 3, Box 2752

Field NeuJ$

Back

Legis/aUon Updah

TI!7f

Stud Dog Diredory (For 4 Issues)

DVM

$10.00

Stony Point, NY 10980 ADVANCED

(914)947-1224 TJuGWPCA.

WIRE-h"EWS

ispublishod

to prQI'I"Dte and develop Ik Gmrw.n G"rI'Pinthe United States.

T~GWPCA ascopie3

';I,IIRE·NFR'Sis ofa

$4.00 per copy The.

specific if

W'uehaired

pubtilhed

Poirur.

for the rnerri>en

issue an.cvailable.

EditorsofT~ ~lfR£·NER'S ""isb

sun:

e.ach year by Tk.Gc:rTnen

Reque.stsfor

Since

1959. theGVr"PCA

of the GWPCAand purch.ue

'Wirehaired Poiraer

should

is.

Oubof

bas been recop;niz.od by ~

benefit ofnwnbership

be addressed

A.meric.a.lnc.

to the Ediu:Jr

TIr.GVt''PCA

is .• non-profit

American

Kenncl Club as the member

inttisclub.lndividual

copies may be purchased

m1 xn

&ions withappropriatc

paymcrt..

PA YME"T

IDinoiscorporation

GWFCA

club responsible

in 19S9

for the deve~pmen:

of the

by ooo-mernbersfor membcnmay

ONLY

""'hich was founded

$4.00 per copy as long

also purchaSie extra copies at

desired.

to pritt any letters or articles or its

foortimc.s

I....er:r.rspcnainingtD

tocnCOUl'1!e

everyone

Jellt into the P.7R£·Nt:WS.

to ~

Artides

GVt"PCA Board business

and~r

ani.dcs

or letten aaivjties

or infomw.tion

.•ppcarins:

in T~

shoWd beaddrened

ofirurur: GRIPe), 10

to our mcmbets.. P.'IR£·!{EK·S

the Club Secretary

TbcEditors

do nol nccc..uarily for PubliClltionin

ofT~GWPCA WlR£·N£M'Sruerve reflect the views of the GVlFCA. the GWPCA

M"UJi-N,!w/,ldrn-which

the rip.:

10 edit or rcfuSle

The GWPCA. WIRE-NEM'S deals ~;th Official Club

I Business a~ meetings.. In:iivjdua.ls is charged

IntereSted

in membership

fur new members.

in theGWPCA

should corn.ct

lhe Clllb Treasurer . .AnnuaI ducure

SI5.00for

individlUl

members: an:f S2O_00 pu COQplc. A one time iritiation

fec.of$5.00


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~W~IM 'r~'~' ~ ~~,IgQ-Ng'\I-X~ U'\".~ 4~~:, . CONTENTS

I

SUMMER 1990

BARKS FROM THE EDITOR 1990 G.W.P.C.A. NATIONALS 1989 G.W.P.C.A.

INFO

4 5

BOARD MINUTES

7-14

NATIONAL SHOW FUTURITy LETTERS TO THE EDITOR LIMITED REGISTRATION INFO

15-20 21 23

SHOW NEWS BY JERRY CLARK ...........•.................... 25 OBEDIENCE NEWS BY ANN KOSTISHAK 27 HUNTING TEST BY JUDITH FORD BEHAVIOR MODIFICATION BY STEPHEN RAFE

31 33

NA VHDA BY BOBBY APPLEGATE

37

LOCAL BARKS BY BEVERLY MURRAy RESCUE UPDATE BY LINDA STROTHMAN NATIONAL DOG REGiSTRy

42 44 45

ACTION 81

48

SPORTING 01RECTORy A GI LITY

51 53

AMERICAN

55

DOG OWNERS ASSOCIATION

ANIMAL- VUES SERVICE ORGANIZATIONS

59 61

PET FOOD LABELING

62

BEHAVIORAL

DEVELOPMENT

& DISORDERS

64

TRAVELS WITH WIREHAIRS BY R. SCHWABE STUD DOG DIRECTORy .......................................•......

71 75

YEARBOOK INFORMATION MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION

77 79


BARKS

FROM THE EDITOR

We're improving is only a tad late.

.

....

this

Issue

of the WIRE-NEWS

Thanks again to Jack Writer for much assistance. He ran the cover and the "info" pages plus worked with his local printer and wrestled with the mailing. And he thought he could simply resign. His is a tough act to follow and without his expertise we wouldn't have gotten this far. This is the long planned "service" issue. Included is information concerning various clubs and organizations normally outsie the Wires' realm. Space constraints limit listing all the groups, but I shall follow up with further info in the future. Perhaps some of you will contact these organizations and further the "versatile" reputation of the Wires. I am extending and invitation to all members to please feel free to submit opinions, editorials, stories, or tall tales to the WIRE-NEWS. If you've got something to say, write it down~.---

The Nominating Committee, chaired by Marilyn Powell, has submitted the following slate of Officers and Directors for 1991: President: Western Director: Midwest Director: Treasurer:

Marge Owen Aloysia Hard Ann Kostishak Nancy Mason

Pursuant to Article V, Section 4(8) of the GWPCA constitution and Bylaws, additional nominations may be made by written petition addressed to the Secretary and received at her regular address not later than September 15th in each year, signed by five members and accompanied by written acceptance of each such additional nominee signifying his willingness to be a candidate.

4


GERMAN WIREHAIRED POINTER CLUB OF AMERICA NATIONAL SPECIAL TV INFORMATION

TROPHY DONATIONS

CATALOGUE ADVERTISING 1st 1990 to:

Please sand ads by September

Donations Laurie MoCarty 2506 Ann Arbor

for the

will be gratefully Lane

1990 National

and cheertully

Speclalty

accepted

and National

by Judy

FIeld Events

Cheshire.

Please

send your donations to:

MD 20716 (301) 249-2753

Bowie,

Judy Cheshire 46 Southridge Drive Glen Cove, NY 11542

Rates:

(516) 671-3564 Full Page, No Photo

Second

$35.00 40.00 25.00 30.00

..•.....•...

Full Page, With Photo Second Ad, Full Page.

................••. No Photo

..••...•.

Ad, Full Page, With Photo

............•..

MAKE CHECKS

PAYABlE

TO GWPCA

- DEl.J\WARE

VAllEY

1990 ANNUAL MEETING Multlple

Ad Rates fa< Full Page Ads Only Half Page, Quarter

MAKE CHECKS

20.00 15.00

No Photo

Page,

No Photo

PAYABlE

TO GWPCA

- National

Will be held on Sunday, October 21, 1990 at the Clubhouse on the grounds of the Assunplnk Wildlife Management Area. The time will be announced at a later date.

Ev9nts Catalogue PlAN

TO ATTEND

I

HOST MOTEL 1990 BANQUET AND DANCE Will be the Townhouse

Motel

at Hightstown,

New Jersey. There will be a cash bar from

Special

7-<3p.m.

1-<300-922.{1622

Call Toll Free: Rates are:

$50.00 60.00

All you can eat buflet and dessert bar held at Jesse's October 22, 1990 beginning at 8:00 p.m.

1 Double Bed 2 Double Bees

on Monday,

FollowIng dinner, there will be music and dancing! BE SURE TO MENTlON

YOU ARE WlTl-l GWPCA Reservations Cost Is:

TRAVEL ARRANGEMENTS

must be received

with American

Nrllnes,

Usa Bruzzone

to:

31 Franklin Avenue

Is able to

Toms

offer the following special fares far travel to and from the Nationals:

To make

reservations,

MAKE CHECKS

fares

con1act

PlEASE Fresh Pond ca!enl to people

travelling

PAYABlE

Diane Vv'hltslt, Fresh Pond Travel Toll Free Number:

CALL WEEKDAYS

River, NJ

(201) 244-0421

45% oH full coach fares 5% oH discount

1-<300-225-4897

BE1WEEN

8 lLm. AND 5 p.m. EASTeRN

wttl1 animals I Be sure to men1lon you are wttl1 GWPCAl

5

12th.

$23.00

Send your reservatlon(s) Fresh Pond Travel. in conjunction

no later than October

STANDARD

TIME

TO GWPCA

08753


SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

Saturday, Oct. 20th

Sunday, Oct. 21st

·Camden County Kennel Black\o.iood, New Jersey Jim Rau, Superintendent

TATTOO CUNIC For those persons who would like to have their dogs tattooed, en experienced tattoo -'8rtlst" by the name of Deb

Club

KIdwell, from Virginia, will be on hand to tattoo ycur dogs. An agent for the National Dog Registry, Deb will tattoo your dog with whatever 10 you prefer. f1 you wish to use NOR. she will provide you with the necessary registratlon form. If you use

·South Jersey Kennel Club Vineland. NJ

.nother registry, she can still m.rk your dog, .nd you can register it yourself with the r.glstry you use.

Jim Rau, Superintendent National Membenhlp Meeting to b. held et Assunplnk

WIldlife Management

Hospitality

prior to meeting!

Coot Is $10.00 per dog

Area Oubhouse

NOR r.glstr.tlon I. $35.00 (. one·tlm., IIletlm. f •• ) .nd appll.s to all dogs subsequently

Monday, Oct. 22nd

GWFCA N.tlonal Sp.clallty and Ob.dl.nce Puppy Sw•• pstakes Assunplnk Wlldllf. M.n.g.ment Alea National

Hunting Test Olmlted .ntry • 20 braces) Derby CI.sslc Assunplnk Wlldllf. Man.gement Ale.

W.dn.sd.y,

National Am.teur Championship Wat.r Test 'Come

registered.

This reglslr.tlon Is optlon.I, but r.memb.r, if your tettoo Isn1 reglster.d, there isn't a record of ItI

Banquet

Tu.sd.y, Oct. 23rd

Oct. 24th ..

Trl.1

BLOOD TESTING CUNIC FOR LYME'S DISEASE AND VON WlUEBRAND'S DISEASE

As You /ve" Dinner

Assunplnk Wildlife Management Ale. Thursday, Oct. 25th ...

Puppy CI.ssic Futurity Sta~e Assunplnk Wlldllf. Manegement Ale.

Friday, Oct. 26th

N.tlonal Championship Stake Assunplnk Wlldllf. Man.g.ment

Blood samples for e.ch of these t.S19will b. dr.wn by Del.w.r. Valley GWFC memb.r Dr. Reglne Schw.b. (yes, sh.'s • vet, and • gr•• t on•• t thatl). Th. lab work will b. don. by the New York State Hem.tology Lab, with Dr. Jean Dodds supervising the testing for Von Wlilebrand's Olse•••.

Ale. The total cost for both t.sts Is $25.00. You don1 h.v. 10 have both· but the price slays the same. Results of the•• tests will be confidential· and rel.ased only to the dog own.r.

*To obtain premium lists for 1l1eseshows oontact: Jim Rau Box 6898 W. Re.dlng, PA t9611 215-376-1880

HORSE RESERVATIONS FOR AELD EVENTS Dally or for the we.k, contact the Wr.ngl.r: W.yn. Scubelek, 6132 Sheller, Chamb.rsburg, PA, 17201, or call him .t 717·264-0476. n you can1 reach him, call Bern•• Br.wn .t the number IIsl.d below. ALL HORSES WILL BE TENNESSEE WALKERS.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ... CONTACT

Show Chalrm.n .......• , ......•.....• , .....•....... Trophy Chalrm.n , .....••..... , , Obedience Chairman ...•...••.....•....• , Field Events Chairman ..... , .....•......•......•...... Hunting T•• t Ch.irman ..•......••.....•.....•....... Catalogu. Adv.rtising .....•.......•.....•• , .... , .. ,.

Use BrulZone .......•.....•.....•.....•....• Judy Cheshire . , ...• " .. , •.... , Undo Krep.k ....••... , ....••....•• , Berne. Brawn ....•....•.....•....••....•......... Jerry Clark ..••....•....••....•....•....... Lauri. McCarty ..... , ..........•....•......•......

6

, ,.

,. , ..

201·244-0421 516-671-3564 215-29&-2857 215-598-3990 609-921·7600 (day) 301·249-2753


GWPCA

NATIONAL

BOARD

September

MEETING

24,

MINUTES

1989

The GWPCA National Board meeting was called to order at approximately 10:15 p.m. at the Albert Lee Best Western Hotel, Albert Lee, Minnesota. The following Board members and guests were present: President, Jack Writer; Vice President, Marilyn Powell; Western Director/Futurity Chairman, Ray Calkins; Treasurer, Nancy Mason; Eastern Director, Betty Stroh; National Events Coordinator, Larry Mason. It was announced that a quorum was present. ELECTIONS. Jack Writer reviewed the 1990 slate of officers submitted by the nominating committee. The position of Eastern Director is the only office being opposed by Bernee Brawn and ballots for this office will be timely submitted to the membership for a vote. A nominating committee for the 1991 year was selected by the Board. Upon MOTION duly made by Betty Stroh and seconded by Nancy Mason, it was unanimously agreed that Marilyn Powell will be the chairman of the nominating committee along with committee persons Shannon Florek, Penny Ljungren, Suzette Wood and Gail Richardson. The nominating committee is to have its slate to the Board no later than July 30, 1990. The positions to be filled are President, Midwest Director, Treasurer and Western Director. YEARBOOK. Jack Writer reported on the status of the Yearbook, which is at the printers now. All of the screens and pedigrees had to be redone prior to submitting it to the printers. Upon MOTION duly made by Ray Calkins and seconded by Betty Stroh, it was unanimously agreed that Laurie McCarty will be the subsequent GWPCA Yearbook editor. Guidelines for the position of Yearbook editor will be outlined and presented to the Board for their comments and approval. AKC GAZETTE. It was brought to the attention of the Board that the AKC Gazette's Secretary's Page listed that a fine had been levied against the GWPCA by the AKC for late submission of field trial records. It is believed that this was as a result of a Ft. Detroit GWPCA trial. No further field trials will be sanctioned by the GWPCA until it has been paid. Nancy Mason reported that she believed Ft. Detroit had paid the fine; however, she will follow up and verify that that has occurred. The GWPCA is not utilizing its space in the Breed Column of the Gazette. It was further stated that the Breed Column is not only a source of information to GWP owners, but could serve to enhance membership. Upon MOTION by Marilyn Powell

7


and second by Nancy Mason, it was unanimously agreed that GWPCA Wire-News editor be responsible for seeing that a breed column appear in the Gazette each issue wherein sporting group is represented.

the GWP the

CARL SCHNELL MEMORIAL TROPHY. It was reported that several attempts have been made to obtain the mold from Bob Arnold for the Carl Schnell Memorial Trophy. However, apparently Mr. Arnold has been in bad health and Carol Stuart has not been able to obtain any substantive results from her attempts to contact him. If it is going to be difficult producing the trophy, we should change now before there are several awards to be given. Gail Richardson was present at this time for the purpose of proposing that she will paint a 16 x 20 watercolor of the dog being presented with the award, matted and framed, including a plate stating the name of the award, name of the dog and date. Gail stated that she would do this for not more than $100.00. Upon MOTION duly made by Ray Calkins and seconded by Betty Stroh, it was unanimously agreed to change the Carl Schnell Memorial Trophy from the head plaque to the 16 x 20 watercolor to be painted by Gail Richardson. Upon MOTION made by Ray Calkins and second by Betty Stroh, it was unanimously agreed to rescind the purchase of the head mold from Mr. Arnold. It was reported by Ray Calkins that he knows of at least five Master Hunter titles that have been awarded thus far in 1989. In order to have the paintings completed in a timely manner for presentation at the annual meeting, Ray Calkins volunteered to keep track of those GWP' s obtaining Master Hunter titles, contact the owners as soon as the titles have been published by AKC to obtain a photograph and submit it to Gail. Upon MOTION duly made by Ray Calkins and seconded by Betty Stroh, it was unanimously agreed that Ray Calkins will keep a record of the Master Hunter titles obtained by GWP's, contact the owners of the dogs after publication of the title by the AKC to obtain a photograph of the dog and forward it to Gail Richardson. NATIONAL EVENTS. Larry Mason reported that the Sea-Tac club is the only club bidding for the 1991 Nationals. A copy of the bid proposal was submitted to the Board. Upon MOTION duly made by Betty Stroh and seconded by Marilyn Powell, it was unanimously agreed that the 1991 National Events will be hosted by the Sea-Tac club. Larry reported that representatives from the Delaware Valley Club will make a presentation to the Board tomorrow regarding their hosting of the 1990 Nationals. Nancy Mason reported that she has not yet received report from the Southern California club on

a written the 1988


Nationals; however, profit of $2,706.56.

was

advised

verbally

that

they

made

a

TREASURER. There is at this time $13,259.38 total in the bank accounts, of which $10,275.04 is in the market interest account. Additional expenses of the purchase of the caps and mugs and the outlay on the Yearbook. There were 62 new members and 45 non-renewals. 13 names were presented to the Board for membership. Upon MOTION duly made by Ray Calkins and seconded by Betty Stroh, the names submitted by Nancy Mason for membership were approved. We have a total membership of 249 members. A membership

roster

is in the process

of being

prepared.

There being no further business to come before the Board, upon MOTION by Nancy Mason and second by Betty Stroh, it was unanimously agreed adjourning the meeting at approximately 12:00 a.m.

~----'i(/1?~2 Marilyn

APPROVED:

Jack Writer

K. 'Powell


GWPCA

NATIONAL

BOARD

September

MEETING

25,

MINUTES

1989

The GWPCA National Board meeting was called to order at approximately 4:45 p.m. at the Albert Lee Best Western Hotel, Albert Lee, Minnesota. The following Board members and guests were present: President, Jack Writeri Vice President, Marilyn Powelli Mid-West Director, Ken Anderson; Treasurer, Nancy Strohi National Events Mason; Eastern Director, Betty Coordinator, Larry MasoniAloysia Hard, Laurie McCarty, Bernee Brawn and Judy Cheshire. It was announced that a quorum was present. SPECIAL AWARD. Jack Writer advised that inasmuch as Paul Frederick had recently won the Canadian National Chuckar Championship with his GWP, that he be given a special award for this accomplishment. Upon MOTION duly made by Marilyn Powell and seconded by Nancy Mason, it was unanimously agreed that Paul Frederick shall receive a special award for winning the Canadian National Chuckar Championship. SHOW FUTURITY. Aloysia Hard presented to the Board an outline for the running of the show futurity. 1991 would be the first year of the holding of the Show Futurity, pending AKC approval of the futurity rules. To be eligible for the 1991 show futurity, litters would have to be whelped between 4/1/90 and 3/31/91. There will be three divisions: Senior (12-18 months), Intermediate (9-12 months), and Junior (6-9 months). Litter forfeit would be due no later than 90 days from whelp. Forfeits would be as follows: Senior - 3 forfeits of $10 each; Intermediate - 2 forfeits of $15 each; Junior - 1 forfeit of $30. Entry fee for the Show Futurity would be $10. There would be no trophies giveni rosettes to all placesi and a purse to only the first place in each division, best and best opposite. The purse is broken into eighths. Upon discussion, it was agreed that it is not necessary at this time for owners/breeders to be parent club members in order to be eligible for the Show Futurity. Aloysia will have a draft of the Show Futurity rules and regulations submitted to the Board shortly for their review prior to submitting to AKC for approval and publication in the Wire-News. Aloysia thereafter left the Board meeting. NATIONAL EVENTS. Bernee Brawn and Judy Cheshire presented an outline and budget to the Board for the running of the 1990 National Events in New Jersey. The events will run similarly to those of 1987. The projected dates would be October 22 through October 26, 1990. There are two all-breed shows and a field trial available the weekend of October 20 and 21. Monday, October 22 would be the National Specialty, Tuesday

10


would commence with the Hunt Test and Derby, unless it appears better to run the Hunt Test and Futurity together. It is planned to have available testing for CERF, Von willabrand's, and Lymes as well as a tatoo clinic. Upon MOTION by Marilyn Powell and second by Betty Stroh, it was unanimously agreed to approve the 1990 budget and judge's s late presented to the Board. Judy Cheshire and Bernee Brawn thereafter left the Board meeting. YEARBOOK. Laurie McCarty presented to the Board her ideas for enhancing the Yearbook and otherwise opening communication between members. It was the Board's general consensus that the Yearbook is historical in nature and content and is used extensively by breeders as a reference guide and therefor should not contain non-titled or "pet" photographs. Laurie explained that she believed we needed to do more in the way of communication with the membership and especially those who own "pet" Wires. It was reported that in the past it had been the treasurer's job to send out new membership packets to each new member. Upon MOTION by Betty Stroh and second by Ken Anderson, it was unanimously agreed that membership packets are to be sent to each new member by the Treasurer. Discussion was held regarding implementing an annual publication for non-show pictures. It is Laurie McCarty's opinion that the club does not lend support to GWP pet owners, and she would like to explore ways of bringing something to them. Upon MOTION by Nancy Mason and second by Betty Stroh, it was agreed that Laurie McCarty is to explore the feasibility of a special annual publication. Marilyn Powell stated that she believed a lot of Laurie's concerns had already been addressed by the Board and action taken thereon, as indicated by Carol Stuart's taking over the job as editor and the expanding of the contents of the Wire-News which will apply to all of the membership, including "pet" owners. CORRESPONDENCE. Jack Writer reviewed with the Board a letter received from the AKC regarding whether or not we would like to be included as eligible for an Amateur Walking Puppy and Amateur Walking Derby stake, which was originally proposed by the German Short hair Club. Upon MOTION by Ken Anderson and second by Betty Stroh, it was unanimously agreed approving the Amateur Walking Puppy and Amateur Walking Derby stakes for German Wirehaired Pointers. According to the letter from AKC, these stakes should be available by July I, 1990. Upon MOTION by Ken Anderson and second by Betty Stroh, it was agreed that the 1991 National Field Trial shall include an Amateur Walking Puppy and an Amateur Walking Derby stake. Carol Stuart is to notify AKC of the Board's decision.


WIRE-NEWS. It was reported by Jack writer that Carol Stuart has agreed to take over the editorship of the Wire-News and he would continue at this time with production. Upon MOTION duly made by Betty Stroh and seconded by Marilyn Powell, it was the unanimously decision of the Board to appoint Carol Stuart at editor of the Wire-News. MEMBERSHIP. Nancy Mason presented the names of two additional persons for membership. Upon MOTION duly made by Betty Stroh of the names and seconded by Marilyn Powell, membership presented by Nancy Mason were accepted. There being no further business to come before the Board, upon MOTION by Marilyn Powell and second by Betty Stroh, it was unanimously agreed adjourning the meeting at approximately 6:00 p.m.

APPROVED:

Jack Writer

12


WILSONVILLE RAY''''OND

VETERINARY L.

9275

CALKlf>JS. BARBER

WILSONVILLE. TtLE:PHONE

CLINIC V.

M.

ST.

onE.

97070

C,82路3737

(~03)

1989 G.W.P.C.

D.

of A. Futurity

Income: Litter nominations Renominations Entries

#28 @ $20.00 /147 @ $10.00 #14 @ $40.00 Total

Income:

$560.00 $470.00 $560.00 $1590.00

Expenses: ~ of set up fees

@ 1988-1989

Futurities $2.80

Bulk envelopes Envelopes Postage Renomination certificates Additional

$1 .15 $8.87 $7.60

expenses

Premiums & other printing Postage Trophies Ribbons Federal Express Debt- not forwarded by Sobie 'fotal Expenses: Cashiers

Pre-trial

check.

$10.00 $30.00 $100.00 $13.65 $22.00 $110.00 $306.07 $3.50

$1280.43

balance:

13


'•... n ••.. ,\. I

,ULI ••" ll'-L.lull,-V STATEHENT OCTOBER

OF

5, 19M

I--"UlllL\...l INCOl1E

THROUGH

'-IUU UI

I

AND EXPEHSES SEPTE2'ffiER

20, 1989

n:CO::E flU! :s 15,'S

l:ATJOliUS

BUWF;T

t:!I,27u.51 3,000.00

ADVfJiCE

15,5 1!ATIOJi!J..5 PROFl T SHl.RE ru;w C, SCli;:ELL T"OFIfY

HJhBOOK

VOL. VII

1 ,u75. 25 5,00 2,236.08

& VIII

\',IEL-JiI'.3 ADS FUTU;"ITi Pf.YBf,CK P.r::n'lSliiATIVE fESS-LICEI!SED l·:~;\ChJ; fJ flISE 15'58 IUtTJ.O:iIJ.5 liD PA)}lEHT

2,05)j.OO

1,318.81 200.00 u09.00 75.00

CLUBS

TOTAL

pnK IW:K

$

5i,,iVI CE CH:.i'Gr...s PRIIiTI!W VII

3,697

& VIn

F..sFUj-~DS

fuTURITY, PU~5E 19G8 rD:'3T;,GE lWfIOi:ALS EiJ S!:SE TILT-:S rOR SJUiOUSTTE TEO?Hlr:S EATlOilAL TiWfHILS 19[,8 liATIO;JALS

LJ scn:SED

1909 & 1990

AD\'/d:CE

CLUB

SfECIALlTY

91.01

5:10'.-.' TROPHIES

P,l:C fEES C1J'S

25.00

, 85.00

J:UCS

DIP..

.140

2,665.u7 u27,OO 937.01 u8.00 1,089.57 319.29 27.79 32.92 u72.76 3,000.00

193;

11;:"U k~!iCE

, 969

1u.28 u9.05

CHECK

E:,fiBOJK VOL. h:Ifu:,· IT\',S

$15,050.60

51 ATE GSPC Of h.

T nu~SUEEli.

17u.22 100.00 26.3B

DELAi';ARE

EXFEH5E

TOTAL r~P~ET

INTEfa5T

BEGII;NIJJG IliTE2E.ST

ACCOUNT

PALA:ICE ACCRUE.D laJ:DS

CHECK

ORDER

$10,000.00 275.0u TOTAL

BALANCE

CHECKING

BALANCE

HARKET

2,98h.3u 10,275.0u

IHTEfili-ST

RESPECTFULLY

SUBHITTED,

NANCY

TREASURER

$10,275.0u

$

ACCOUNT

TOTAL

HASON,

$13,!J(l5.15

14

$13,259.38

lllll...ll\..U


GERMAN WIREHAIRED POINTER CLUB OF AMERICA NATIONAL SHOW FUTURITY

The word "Futurity" implies looking into the future. In the case of the GWPCA, it means a conscientious attempt to insure the future excellence of the German Wirehaired Pointer. The Show Futurity program, coupled with the Field Futurity program, is a means for the continuation of the development and improvement of the German Wirehaired Pointer. "Futurity" can also imply challenge or a gamble on the future. The breeder has picked a certain bitch to be bred to a certain stud. It is that breeder's opinion that this breeding will produce offspring of the desired conformation and ability that will win in competition over the offspring of other breedings that are enrolled in the Futurity program. To back up his faith in his own judgment, he pays monies into a fund that will be divided among the winners of the Futurity. These monies are correctly termed "forfeits" as the breeder agrees to forfeit the money if his opinion of his breeding does not prove to be correct. The German Wirehaired Pointer originated as a hunting breed for the purpose of finding and retrieving game. Why then should there be so much concern about good conformation? A hunting dog l1~eds more than just a good nose and intelligence in seeking out likely game. He must also have the stamina and rhythm of movement to travel easily over all types of terrain for long periods of time, without tiring, if he is to fulfill his role as a hunting companion. Good conformation is therefor extremely important. Proper conformation for a hunting dog is the basis for the German Wirehaired Pointer standard. This standard describes the perfect German Wirehaired Pointer. While we cannot hope to achieve perfection, the standard sets a goal for the conscientious breeder to strive towards. The breeder's next step, after the breeding has been accomplished, is to nominate the bitch to the appropriate Futurity program and when the puppies are whelped, register the litter. The proper forms for these steps are available from the National Secretary or Futurity Chairman. Because of the dates that govern the Show Futurity, there are three age groups at the final date of judging. Show Futurity pups will vary in age from approximately 6 months to 18 months old. These pups, as. the rules state, are judged in three different age groups.


The goal of all Futurity breeders and owners is, of course, to record a win in the Futurity. The ultimate goal is to win both a Show Futurity and a Field Futurity with the same dog. A breeder or owner can also take great pride in a placement in any of the futurities. It should be remembered that all of these pups are bred for excellence, and a placement in this type of competition is indeed a prestigious accomplishment. Along with the prestige involved, there are also financial rewards for winning or placing in the Futurities. All of the forfeits that have been paid, minus a percentage for expenses, are divided among the winners of the Futurity and the breeders of the winners. It is in the owner's interest and the interest of the breed as a whole to see that the individual puppy remains eligible by paying the necessary forfeits and by seeing that the puppy is given the proper training so that it can compete to the best of its ability. The rules of the Futurity permit the use of a professional in training and showing these pups. Many owners, however, choose to train and show their own pup, and the records will show that they are often successful in both the show and field events. The owner/handler who will take the time to learn the fine points of training and campaigning his dog will certainly realize a great deal of personal satisfaction from the accomplishment. Both owner and puppy will benef it from the close rapport that results from the training necessary to prepare the dog to complete in the Futurities. If conditions and abilities permit, there is much to be said for the owner who campaigns his own dog. GERMAN WIREHAIRED POINTER CLUB OF AMERICA SHOW FUTURITY RULES A.

INTRODUCTION

The purpose of the Futurity is to stimulate and encourage breeders to give prime consideration to improving the German Wirehaired Pointer by planning their breeding programs to conform to the German Wirehaired Pointer standard and its intent as well as retaining and improving the inherent hunting ability of the German Wirehaired Pointer. B.

ELIGIBILITY

1. The Futurity will be open to German Wirehaired Pointer dogs and bitches whelped between April 1 of the year preceding the National Show and March 31 of the year of the National Show as illustrated below. WHELP DATES

LUTTJRITY_YEAR 1991 1992 1993 1994

Between Between Between Between

16

4/1/90 4/1/91 4/1/92 4/1/93

and and and and

3/31/91 3/31/92 3/31/93 3/31/94


2. If a futurity puppy the new owner.

is sold, eligibility will continue

to

3. At the time forfeits are paid, the GWPCA will consider the owner of a futurity puppy to be the owner shown on the futurity form. 4. At the time of competition, ownership will be determined by the same conditions affecting entries as required by AKC. 5. All futurity eligibles may compete in only one show futurity. Once the pup has been entered in one show futurity, it may not enter or show in a subsequent year. C.

NOMINATION/CLASSES/FORFEITS

1. Bitches must be nominated within 90 days of whelping. fee is $15.00 and must accompany the nomination.

The

2. The Futurity classes will be divided by sex and will consist of the following: a. Senior Class: Open to dogs and bitches whelped on or after April 1 through July 31 of the year preceding the National show. Three forfeits shall be paid as follows: 1st forfeit of National Show

$10.00

by

February

1 of the year

of the

2nd forfeit of $10.00 by June 1 of the year of the National Show 3rd forfeit of $10.00, which shall count as the entry fee, by closing date for National Specialty show. The age of the Futurity entrants approximately 18 months of age.

will

be

from

12 months

to

b. Intermediate Class: Open to dogs and bitches whelped on or after August 1 through November 30 of the year preceding the National Show. Three forfeits shall be paid as follows: 1st forfeit of National show

$10.00

by

February

1 of the year

of the

2nd forfeit of $10.00 by June 1 of the year of the National Show 3rd forfeit of $10.00, which shall count as the entry fee, by closing date of National Specialty show. The age of the Futurity entrants will be from 9 months months ..

17

to 12


c. Junior Class: Open to dogs and bitches whelped on or after December 1 of the year immediately preceding the National Show through March 31 of the year of the National Show. Two forfeits shall be paid as follows: 1st forfeit of $20.00 by June 1 of the year of the National Show 2nd forfeit of $10.00, which shall count as the entry fee, by closing date of National Specialty show. The age of the Futurity entrants will be from 6 months to 12 months. 3. Individual nomination forms, along with copies of the Futurity Rules, will be sent to the breeder to give to the new owners. Prior to the National show, forms will be sent to owners of properly nominated dogs. These forms must be filled out and returned with the final forfeit to the designated National show secretary along with the regular show entry. 4. Q.

All forfeits become the property of the GWPCA Show Futurity.

PAYMENT OF WINNINGS 1.

Futurity winnings are paid by check.

a. The owner (s) of a futurity winner receives made out to all co-owners.

one check

b. The breeder(s) of a futurity winner receives one check made out to all co-breeders. c. When the breeder and owner of a futurity winner are identical, only one check may be written COmbining the winnings. d. Checks will be mailed to breeders or owners not present at the show. E.

DIVISION OF MONIES, TROPHIES AND AWARDS

1. All Futurity monies will be kept in a special account. It shall be deposited in an interest bearing account(s) as advised by the Treasurer and directed by the Board of Directors. 2. Actual Futurity expenses will be deducted from the Futurity monies. The remaining Futurity monies shall be divided as follows: a. 12.5% to the winner of each class (senior dog, senior bitch, intermediate dog, intermediate bitch, junior dog, junior bitch).

18


b. If there are classes in which there are no entries, the prize money will be equally divided among the other classes and added to the winners 12.5%. c. 12.5% additional Best of Opposite Sex.

to the Best in Futurity

and to the

d. Each winner's share will be further divided: 60% to the owner and 40% to the breeder. 3. Rosettes shall be awarded to each placement, Futurity and Best Opposite Sex to Best in Futurity. F.

Best

in

ADDITIONAL RULES

1. If a nominated dog is sold prior to the Futurity, the dog will remain eligible if the new owner continues to pay the forfeits. 2. Nominated dogs who have Futurity show remain eligible. 3. The handlers.

Futurity

is

open

to

become

champions

both

professional

prior and

to

the

amateur

4. The judge for the Futurity shall be chosen by the Board of Directors of the GWPCA. No individual who has nominated a bitch, regardless of whether or not individual dogs have yet been nominated, shall be eligible to judge that year's futurity. 5. Dogs entered in the Futurity must regular class at the GWPCA National show.

also

be entered

in a

_ 6. The German Wirehaired Pointer Club of America Show Futurity will be held in conjunction with the German Wirehaired Pointer Club of America National Show and Field Trial. 7. The Futurity Chairman will provide the necessary forms and owners and will handle the rules to the breeders and/or administrati ve work pertaining to eligibility lists and financial records. 8. The Futurity Chairman will notify the Treasurer and cause checks for monies won to be issued and disbursed to all Futurity winners. 9. The premium list for the National specialty shall state that all dogs entered in the Futurity must also be entered in one of the regular classes provided at the specialty. 10. Fees as stated herein are subject to change upon notice by the Board of Directors.

19


GWPCA NATIONAL SHOW FUTURITY 1991 LITTER REGISTRATION FEE:

$15.00

Registered Name of Bitch: Registered Name of Sire: Date Bred:

Date Whelped:

Number in Litter: __ (Males)

(Females)

Registered Owner(s) of Bitch: Address:

Phone: Make checks payable to:

GWPCA Show Futurity

Mail to:

Aloysia Hard 1085 Elysian Penngrove, CA 94951

Phone:

(707) 795-1846 LITTERS MUST BE NOMINATED WITHIN 90 DAYS OF WHELPING

20


April 23, 1990 Dear Editor: I have been vacillating with a problem for many years now. I guess what brought on this soul searching was the expanding media coverage of environmental problems and our individual roles therein, especially as they relate to natural wildlife and companion animals. It is also my belief that we as a unit should be doing something outside of our little "dogdom" world to benefit both society and animals. I would welcome any ideas to bring before the Board and the membership (i.e., funding to assist appropriate licensed agencies to rekindle extirpated or threatened native wildlife, community public education, GWP rescue, etc.). For years I have heard from sporting dog breeders/hunters that the GWP was bred to hunt and that we must continue to cultivate that natural ability. Some have even gone so far as to infer ownership should be restricted to those who advocate hunting. Times are changing rapidly, and it appears incumbent upon us that we must begin developing the other natural qualities of the GWP. No longer does the man of the house go to the woods with his dog to hunt food for the family. He goes to the Safeway. The dog's role thus has already evolved from a valuable tool to assist man in securing food for his family to a different role of being primarily companion and watchkeeper. As Americans we have the right to hunt by virtue of the united states Constitution and the National Rifle Association. However, do we not also have an obligation to replenish that which we continue to take? I personally have great difficulty in holding a Bob White quail and feeling its warmth one minute and the next watching it blown to bits (obviously not killed to fill the pot) in order to win a prize. I know I am not in the minority on that point. Just as the argument that a bitch needs to be bred to be fulfilled is false, so is the argument that since the GWP (or other sporting dog) was originally bred for hunting he must continue to hunt, ad infinitum. Is the real need to hunt or win instilled more strongly within the hunter than within the dog? It is common knowledge that field trial and hunting grounds are becoming harder and harder to find year after year. Even becoming more sparse is the natural game that use to be plentiful 20 years ago. "Natural" game has to be pen raised and released to conduct training and trials. The time will come when the price of killing wildlife for sport will end -- if not through legislation, then through decimation. The two major causes of extinction are hunting and destruction of habitat. (Senate Commerce Committee Report on the Endangered species Act of 1973.)

21


I have been a vegetarian since birth. I have never shot a gun in my life. However, I have owned sporting dogs since 1973. I have passively gone through the expected rigors of field training and field trialing dogs. However, it has always been done with a certain distaste, as I have never been able to justify such actions of needless killing. And in my mind for my purposes, there is no justification. I do not want my children to grow up with the misunderstanding that killing is okay if it is done in the name of "sport." As individuals, we must each take a personal stand. As a club, which "promotes the breed," perhaps we should take steps to "promote wildlife and its habitat" in order to ensure an environment will exist within the next decade. As breeders, it is our responsibility to look at what we are producing, when we are producing and how we handle the product. Are we "flooding" the environment with animals who will surely end up in the pound, in a rescue organization (if it is lucky) or standing in the euthanasia line? Selective, limited breeding is a stand for the environment we can and should take ._- a stand against not breeding that dog or bitch, not having that additional litter, and not turning out litter after litter, year after year. We must each determine if producing another litter is really necessary. Does "promoting the breed" mean populating the earth with GWP's (or any other breed)? Is there enough of a "quality" marketplace for the GWP that breeders can continue to mass produce? If you haven't visited your local pound lately, perhaps such a field trip would be enlightening. It is not someone else's problem. It is our problem. Are you as a breeder willing to accept the responsibility of taking those animals back when they are unwanted, neglected or running the street? And the stud owner, when it is so easy to pocket the stud fee with no apparent further responsibility for the litter (except to boast upon hoped-for future accolades), does have as much of an obligation for the get of his stud as the owner of the bitch. Surely there are readers who may be angered at my remarks just as there will be a counterbalance of those who agree with them. The purpose of these remarks are not to try to deny anyone their unalienable right to hunt or breed but to encourage an awareness that not all is black and white and that it is not someone else's problem. We have a responsibility to the continuance of our breed and our world by not taking indiscriminately and by replenishing that which we take; by not breeding indiscriminately and by being responsible breeoers and caretakers of that which we have allowed to be created. By so doing, we have contributed to society and to our environment a breed that has the ability to evolve along with our changing world. We will have continued "to do all possible to. bring the natural qualities of the German Wirehaired Pointer to perfection." (Article I, section 2 (A), GWPCA Constitution and By-Laws) Marilyn Powell

22


Instructions For Obtaining A limited Registration Certificate In an issues survey undertaken in 1986, 79.9 percent of thc dclcgates and 83.6 percent of Cl\ZglTE readers who responded agreed or strongly agrced with the statement: "AKC should provide a not-forbreeding form of reglstratlon." This response Initlated the process of establishing a limited registration option to serve as another choice for breeders who wish to limit tile breeding of a dog IJlII do !lol \Vlsil 10 sell their dogs without papers. or who du !lot walll to have their dogs neutered or spayed. though they will be ineligible to compete in a licensed or member dog show.

At the June 1989 delegates' meeting, the limited registration option was formally approved. It will be numbered Section 4A of Chapter 3 of the Rules Applying to Regc'tralion And Dog Shows, and will be added to the field trial rules for Bassets, Bcagles. Oachshun<ls, Breeds, Dogs

r:"elrievers. Spaniels a!1cl Pointing \vith a limited registration can partici-

pate in obedience trials. tracking lests, hunting tests and field trials. The following instructions are for obtaining a Iimited registration certillcate: Effective January I. 1990, there will be a change in Section A of the reverse side of each registration application form issued. At present. lhere are two boxes which can be checked in Section A of each application. Efl'ective January I, there will be three boxes appearing in Section A (see illustration). In order to obtain a limited registration certillcate, the litter owners would check Box # I in Section A of the regisLration application form, and all Iiller owners would be required to sign Section 1\. No other information should be completed on the reverse side of the application,

On the face

of the application,

a name

request

to exchange

applicalions

nlust

be accornpa-

n!ed by a fee of $6. As stated above, once a dog Is registered with the limited reglstratlon, the dog w11lcontlnue to carry the limited restriction rcgardless of the number of limes the dog is transferred. The registration status can only be changed from limited to non-limited If all the III kr oWIll'r(s) :II..!ITC", 1\ spcd:lI !'onll will be provided by the AI,C to be completed by the litler owner(s) as well as the present owners for this purpose. A fee will be chargcd to change the registration status of the dog at that time. If a dog is registered

without

restriction,

later c1ate the owner, who was not the decides that the dog in question should the dog's status cannot be changed to a tration. However. thc owncr would havc selting the dog either without papcrs spay / neu ler agreeillent.

and if at a

litter owner, not be bred, limited registhc option of or unclcr a

And Keep in Mind It cannot be emphasized too strongly that the decislon of whether or not the dog will be sold with a Iirnited registration should be made prior to the time the dog is sold. That way the Iiller owner will have the limited certificate avallabie for the purchaser at the time of sale. If. for sOlne reason, the certificate is not available at the time of negotiating the sale, the litler owner should clearly advise the buyer or the recipient that the dog must first be registered In the liller owner's name and that the buyer will then be furnished with a limited registration cerutkate. The sale should not be consummated until the limited certificate is available. Any correspondence

or applications

in connection

choice as well as the sex and color of [he dog should with the lilllited registration should be sent to the be indicated. Tile application should then be'submitallention of Department L atl\l<C. ted with the required registration fee of $6. The appliThe offspring of a dog registered with a limited regcalions should be submitted to the attention of istration eertilkate are nol eligible for N,C registralion. Therefore, If you intend to register the otlspring Department L. The Iiller owners will then receive a limited regisof a mating between your dog and another dog of the tration certirtcate (see illustration). The certificate will same breed, it Is Incumbent on you to be certain that . clearly stale "Offspring of this dol-( not ertgiblefor .reg- ..-the clog -is .reglstcred ..wilhfull-registration. privileges istration." The certirtcate will diller from the present and that the person who represents himself to you as certilkate in that!t will have an oranl-(e border rather the owner of the dog Is the actual owner of record. Ulall a purple

Tile only

border.

If the dog is sold or given away, the reverse side of the certillcate would be completed by the ownerls) in Section A indicating the particulars of transfer to the new owner. The new owner would complete and sign Section 0 and submit the certificate with the required transfer fee of $6. The dOl-(will continue to carry the limited registration regardless of the number of times the dog is transferred. If you have a dog that you wish to have I-(ranted a limited registration cerllficate and for which the I. 1990 (if application was issued prior (0 January you have an application without the appropriate box for limited registration designation). you may exchange the application at no charge for a period of six months. Simply submit the application with a note requesting that a new application be issued. The application should be sent to the AKC, attention Department L. However, after July I, 1990, any Reprinted from Pure-Bred

Dogs/American

way to deterlllille

Kennel Gazelle, December, 1989.

23

lhls

is to delll,ulll

to see

the actual registration certirtcate for Ihe dog berore a mating takes place. The person who represents himself as the owner of the dog should be named as the owner on the face of the registration certificate. If the dog is not yet registered or transferred, or If the owner is not able to present to you the actual registration certilkate. do not breed to this dog. Do not accept a pedigree as proof that the dog Is rcglslcrcd or eligihle for registration or that its offspring can be registered. A dog registered with an AKC limited registration shall be ineligible to be entered in a breed competition in a licensed or member dog show. It is eligible, however. to be entered in any other licensed or member event. A full AKC registration certificate is white with a purple border. The limited registration certificate is white with an orange border.


INSTRUCTIONS

ptEASE

TYPE - OR USE PEU. NO PENCIl.

ErasUlcs

0< Corr~Il()nS

SEC. A. TO BE COW:••..ETED IN ruu ANO SiGNEO BV a.·INER OF UTTER tArlO CO'0\"'1~[ns IF ANV) Check one 1 I fwe} 51111own Ihls dog. and I ("""OJ apply lor;) U'AlfED REGISTRATK)N~FSPR'I'JG and 10 h.we ownershIp rect)l'd£.-d In my (our) n<lme(sl and only 2 r (we) sill! own lhls dog. and I (weJ ao[)ly lor lun regslrahon and '0 have ownership one box

m.1y Ciluse le'Utll 01 ;JoolocaloonlOl

0

3

0 0

I (we) cerhly

thai this dog was !ranslerred

DIRECTLY

TO THE FOllC1MNG

VVlLl"NOT recorded

P£RSONfS)

BE

EUGl8lE

,1n e"'fJ~ln;lll()tl

FOR REGISTRATION

C

rn my four) nc1me(sl ON

PRINT NAME(SI OF PERSONI~) 10 W1-l0M DOG WAS UtHECTLY lRANSFERRED

roo

(Lty

byow •.•.••lsl C'<fl~l •.••

ADDRESS

I CERTIFY, BY MY SlmlAiURE.

THAT I AM IN GOOD SiAN()lNG

] O,VNEJ:l

SEC.B .

!',JGNEO BY TItE f1:1l:;QN1$1 NAJ-'(O A h.1S ''.If'l:Slf'lu<d tl>c (\0<;1 to ~ oIh('o< ~s.o<>i.'\l.

•••.......-(1 '" ~C

~

musl cOmp/el,

~ g:

Address [

THE AMERICAN KENNEL

ClUe

[ CO·{JVnllllllf

ANYlQf llrlEllAI

OIHIII

r.-.SEe A AOCNE PRQ'JlOCO obi;"'"

2 S.~"":al

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l-

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Address

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$6.00

REGISTRATION FEE MUST ACCOMPANY APPUCATION. $2.00 FOR EACH ADDITlONAL TRANSFER OF DOG (SUPPUM'NTAL TRANSFE" STAT'EMENT) DO NOT SEND CASH. fEES SUBJEC1 TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE MAKE CHECKS OR MONEY ORDeRS PAVABll TO 1HE AMERICAN KlNNll ClUB MAil TO TH[; AMERICAN KENNEL CLUB. 51 ~hson Ave. New York. NY 10010 Aophc;atlOn brcomf's l1'()flf'~ly 01 THE AMERICAN KENNEL ClUn whp.1l SlJhmlllt'tl

BACK

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BREED

POINT COMPETITION 1990

BREED POINT COMPETITION - Only those dogs of our breed beaten during period Jan. 5 - Feb. 23, 1990 as reported in AKC AWARDS, through Vol No 4, April, 1990 are included.

the 10,

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Ch C Wobegon Warrior (D) - 44 - P Swanson Ch Mar Mac Bonanza (D) - 27 - M McManus Ch J and J Show An Tell JH (D) - 24 - J & J Hussar Ch Jamars Oh Henry (D) - 11 - L Jaffe Ch Liebenwaid War's Razzamatazz (D)-lO- R Friedell/D Nordum Shurcan potogold Sheza McRae (B) -9- D & J McCallum/B Halligan Ch Windhavens Wheel of Fortune (B)-8-M McLain/J & H George/R Furlong Creaghan's Carolina In My Mind (B) - 7 - M Creagan Ch Shadra's Et Tu Brute O'Johmar CD (D) - 7 - J & L Clark 9. Ch Afterhours Cassios Landlord (D) - 3 - C Whitmore/C Schoessow 10. Ch Windmill Dillon CD - 2 - B Watkins 11. Ch Weidenhugel Donner V Nico (D) - 1 - J & F Sumner Ch Thornwood's True Grit (D) - 1 - P Diehl

GROUP

"Wires" receiving group placements as reported in AKC AWARDS, through below.

PLACEMENTS 1990 for the period Jan. 5 - Feb. 23, 1990 Vol 10, No 4, April, 1990 are listed

J Anderson D C M Mrs. 4th Ch of Windhaven's Wheel Date 3rd 2ndBooxbaum B L Placement Young h C Fortune Wobegon Warrior C C Wobegon Warrior M T L Ch Downing Ch C Wobegon Warrior Dog's Judge Name

OVERALL

COMPETITION 1990

These rankings are based on group placements and the number of dogs related to those placements as reported in AKC AWARDS, through Vol 10, No 4, April 1990. 1. 2.

Ch C Wobegon Warrior Ch Windhaven's Wheel R Furlong

(D) - 1297 - P Swanson of Fortune (B) - 110 - M McLain/J

25

& H George/


BREED

POINT COMPETITION 1990

BREED POINT COMPETITION - Only those dogs period Jan. 5 - April 7, 1990 as reported No 6, June, 1990 are included.

of our breed beaten during the in AKC AWARDS, through Vol 10,

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Ch C Wobegon Warrior (D) - 67 - P Swanson Ch Mar Mac Bonanza (D) - 42 - M McManus Ch J and J Show & Tell JH (D) - 34 - J & J Hussar Ch Jamars Oh Henry (D) - 29 - L Jaffe Ch Wyr'N Lady Luv on Golden pt (B) - 25 - F & J Renner Ch Cassio Laurwyn Frosted Cake (D) - 17 - R Koeppel Ch Shadra's Et Tu Brute O'Johmar CD (D) - 13 - J & L Clark Ch Liebenwaid War's Razzamatazz (D) - 13 - R Friedell/D Nordum 8. Ripsnorter's Aspenglow Warrior (D) - 12 - M Foster/H George 9. Ch Windhavens Wheel of Fortune (B)-ll-M McLain/J & H George/R Furlong 10. Ch Windmill Dillon CD (D) - 9 - B Watkins Halligan Shurcan potogold Sheza McRae (B) - 9 - D & J McCallum/B

GROUP

PLACEMENTS 1990

"Wires" receiving group placements for the period March 17 - April 7, 1990 as reported in AKC AWARDS, Vol 10, No 6, June, 1990 are listed below. Date

Placement C Tacker W F Hixson M M C Mrs J Martorella H 4thJ 1st Harris Rich B Patterson Ch Windhaven's Wheel of Moebius Fortune 2nd C Burg Taylor Farmgate's C Ripsnorter's Warrior Brita Doc Von Holiday Judge C Wobegon Ch Name Mirwan Sophisticate Dog's

OVERALL

COMPETITION 1990

These ran kings are based on group placements and the number of dogs related to those placements as reported in AKC AWARDS, through Vol 10, No 6, June, 1990. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Ch C Wobegon Warrior (D) - 2864 - P Swanson Ch Jamars Oh Henry (D) - 357 - L Jaffe Ch Windhaven's Wheel of Fortune (B) - 327 - M R Ch Farmgate's Brita Von Moebius (B) - 180 - J Ch Ripsnorter's Doc Holiday (D) - 168 - S & V Mirwan Sophisticate (D) - 168 - D Culbreth,

26

McLain/J & H Georgel Furlong & P Moebius Crouch/H George Jr/P Hopkins


BY ANN KOSTISHAK

Obed ience - 5pr inq 1990

For all of you who have been wondering published, (a.k.a.

blame me.

The Texas Torrent)

article.

Actually

possibility

I have

one dog

and I was too busy studying

like most Texan's

of stocking

'Nuff said. retired

started

pointed

another.

hermit

Judging

While

she was

This included champions~

Not one dog rescued

had an obedience

sure you've

experience

heard

benefits.

short

title.

involved

the

and spring.

I've

list of new

title

Carol Stuart

in the Wire

Rescue,

60

major pointed and field pointed dogs. Perhaps

there

is that there are numerous

them all before

with, take to vet's etc.

this winter

from the

I can think of several good reasons.

fact.

wires were rescued. My own personal

this

It's spring, it's light out after work - come people

Without being preachy

out an interesting

to write

and buying a bass boat!

felt like an obedience

and

ark designs

would be

spring rains

that's a tall tale - I was really exploring

the backyard

holders, I'm not the only one. let's train!

Why train?

when this issue of the newsletter

In Texas this spring we were visited by enormous

is a corollary

benefits

there?

to training.

- easier to travel with, easier

I'm

to go to shows

Brisk heeling with your dog may even have cardiovascular

But the bottom line is - its fun, try it, you'll

like it.

Fiqure Eiqht Thouqhts

This is probably

the most dreaded Novice exercise.

My friend Karen tells the story

of how she always hated this exercise until one day she practiced after

walking

through

wet

grass.

After

perfectly

matched

footprintsjpawprints

perfectly

mat~hed,

but then she has OTCH goldens).

always enjoyed

and appreciated

There are a few prerequisites

on

a few mi nutes the

pavement.

she

her figure eights

not iced

two

(Of course

pa ir 0 f

they

Since that experience

were

she has

the figure eight.

to teaching your dog the figure eight.

The dog and

handler must be able to heel in a straight line, do left turns and right turns, although one school of thought holds it is easier to do circles before turns.

27


The footwork

on the figure eight is the most complex

be practiced, eight this:

sans dog, until the handler

in Novice work.

feels comfortable

isn't an eight so much as it is as "X" connected

The handler

walks

straight

along the

(which should be at the shoulders to the straightaway.

with

This should

it.

The figure

by two half circles.

and pivots slightly

Like

at the ends of the "X"

of the two posts) to perform the turns and return

At the pivot point the handler

length from the shoulder of the post.

should be approximately

arms-

Since I usually train using inanimate objects

as posts, I mark my pivot points with chalk (this also assures that I hit them when concentrating

on my dog).

Around the turns the handler

With most dogs it is advisable slow turn from the sit. exercise

to start to the left so that the dog goes

Introducing

the dog to the figure eight,

slowly until the dog is comfortable.

straightaways

should single track.

Then gradually

speed up so that the

are done at a normal pace and the outside circle at a fast pace.

the dog is doing this comfortably,

the handler

then does the entire

normal pace while the dog adjusts pace to stay with the handler of the whole exercise ring

- handler's

(and in training)

Lonely Editor's

When

exercise

at a

(this is the point

speed remains constant, dog adjusts pace).

the handler

dog, but must move at a constant

Hey people,

into the

do the entire

can change the length of stride

In the

to assist

the

pace.

Club

I'm sort of lonely.

if it's of use to anyone.

Every quarter

I write this column and have no idea

Drop me a line, tell me topics you'd

about - if I don't know the answer I'll find someone who does. well in competition This is your column,

like me to write

If your dog is doing

send me a brag, or if you're too modest have a friend send it. I just string the words together!

28


New Title Holders

As published

in Show Awards Vol.

Comoanion

DOQS

Heywire's

Rowdy Riffraff,

Ripsnorter

Mad~m

Butterfly,

through Vol. 10, No.5

Barbara

CD (B)

Otto Von Bosworth,

Ripsnorter's

10, No.2

&

Joseph Novak, Jr.

CD (D)

George S. Chan

CD (B)

Jeffery

&

&

Susan Teller-Chan

Carol Anderson

&

Helen George

But My Dog ... PEOPLE

GIVE a number

of reasons

for not spaying or neutering their pets-most of them based on misconceptions. · .. is a purebred. That dog has a lot of company in shelters around the country. According to the Humane Society of the United States, at least one-fourth of the millions of animals found in animal shelters each year are purebreds. Registration with the American Kennel Club or United Kennel Club is no guarantee that a dog is well bred. Only dogs free of hereditary defects, with good temperament and conformation should even be considered for breeding. · .. should bave a litter first. All medical evidence indicates just the opposite. It is much healthier for a dog to be spayed before even the first heat cycle. · .. is a male. Perhaps your backyard won't be filled with puppies, but your neighbors might not be so lucky. Your dog may sire many lit-

ters, contributing to pet overpopulation. His urge to roam may also take him on dangerous adventures in the streets and yards of your neighborhood. Neutering your male will not make him feel like "less of a dog:' He won't know the difference-and will probably be a lot happier. · .. should be protective. Don't worry, most dogs are instinctively protective of their homes and families, and this trait is not affected by sterilization.

In addition,

neutered

animals are not distracted by turbu· lent hormonal innuences and respond just as well, if not better, to training. · .. "ill get fat. Just like its human companions, a dog gets fat because of overeating and lack of exercise. While it is true that neutering slows a dog's metabolism, a slight adjustment at dinnertime should eliminate any problem. · .. is special. Of course it is. You will never find another dog just like it, even among its offspring. Even

professional breeders who work with several generations of well-planned litters are not able to completely control the outcome of their efforts. It's best to appreciate your dog for its unique qualities. If you want another pet, look among the many already born and in need of homes. Even a pet owner who finds loving homes for any puppies his or her dog gives birth to has still contributed to the problem of pet overpopulation. The number of animals as well as the potential for many more has increased, and fewer homes are available for those already waiting. Simply put, more animals will die. Parents who want to illustrate the facts of life for their children should consider how much easier it is to find a good book at the library or rent an appropriate video than to clean up after a litter of busy puppies and pay for their he'l.!!.h care.",ay Responsible pet carefor is a wondefn!+ to teach respect all living beings.

DOC FANe!'

29


BRAGS ••••••••••••••••••••••

CH. Nordic's Viking Brandy, CDX has been tearing up the Obedience ring. A second place at Centralia with a 195 1/2, First place and High-in-Trial at Corvallis, Oregon 'vith a 198, and a First place at Salem with a 197 1/2. She earned a Second place at Bremerton with a 197 and to top it off, a First Place and High-in-Trial at the Washington State Obedience Club show in Seattle, WA, with a 197 1/2.

CH. Rheindorf's Heidi von Kawell,CD,JH earned the Fort Detroit Versatility Award. This animal finished her breed championship at 18 mos. of age. She began competing in obedience and completed her CD, one week later she earned a qualify score toward her Junior Hunter title. A severe leg injury put her out of commission until tho surgery had healed and one month later she earned the necessary qualifying scores to complete her Junior Hunter title. Along the way she was certified by OFA.

Letter to the editor from

Mary E. Diesem 1733 Crescent Rd., Rexford, N.Y. 12148 Recently I was involved in some family problems of a daughter of mine, and I realized how often I have personally used the little poem published in your July 1986 issue of Front & Finish, Page 39. I found it helpful not only in dog training, but also in facing 50 many prob. lems of everyday life. If it could help others as much as I've been helped by it, perhaps you may wish to publish it again.

Failure "Failure doesn't mean you have accomplished nothing-It does mean you have learned something. Failure doesn't mean you've been disgraced. It does mean you were willing to try. Failure It does Failure It does

doesn't mean you are inferior-menn you are not perfect. doesn't mean you'll never make itmean it will take a little longer.

Failure doesn't mean you should give up-It does mean you must try harder. Failure

doesn't mean you are a fnilure-

It does mean you haven't succeeded yet." I do believe that the most successful people in life, have the largest amount of failures, . because they are the ones who try the most things (methods, ways) - the largest number of times.

30


HUNTING

There

was a knock

day of small shooting

game

on my door

season

preserve

TEST

COLUMN

just

last year.

lost his

6 month

after

dark

A hunter

on the opening

on the neighboring

old shorthair

on its first

hunt. We have

a lot of dogs

and the hunter

thought

show up at our house.

It didn't.

considering

its loss was predictable.

it's

The hunter keep

a puppy

a hunting

wanted

a dog

in the house

dog!)

The hunter the dog

life,

but the dog didn't The hunter the kids'

thought

clothing

ridden

sociations And didn't

help

worked

in the day.

too.

too far.

It was icing

he last

on the cake

to leave the hunt

of

was ridiculous. the puppy

he realized

had

and once

negative

as-

the dog was missing

- he kept on hunting.

Maybe

know who he was and had never would

thought

magically

in this

find him

my suggestion

saw the dog was pretty

31

in awhile

an article

to the new home

him before

The hunter

where

it" once

for

it at all.

once

situation

with

with

to

out back.

the dog had some pretty

actions

to the place

The

- once

the dog who didn't

in the field

And

coddle

and caring

that vehicle

if it recognized

the whole

it.

who he was.

he started

before

the hunter's

he figured

later

with,

know

"messed

You know,

Something

shouldn't

so feeding

my suggestion

where

in twice

to the vet's.

Dad

really

you

tied to a dog house

a long day

He left his car there. only

(and anyway,

fell to the kids.

found

but it was an inconvenience

so it lived worked

No one ever

his dog might

situation

to go back ridiculous,

was that

the dog


had no collar,

tags or other

a collar

get caught

would

A successful the hunter bonds dog

hunting

and the dog.

to the kids.

that barely A house

the optimal you.

A backyard

dog cared

my mind

\-lho they

a bond

for by the kids,

that people

are to hunt

between

expect

hunting

experience.

\-lithyou and

have

He hunts

to \-lastetime

a

for them. pack

proofing

It starts

your with

with

never

hunting

your

hunting

searching

member

for your

dog without

attatched.

catching

problem.

the mistakes

partnership

should

you form with

provides for dog,

your

collars

my neighborhood last

name,

to start

\-lellbefore your

through

take minimal

Special

is the time of year

starts

that grows

that you

firmly

This

partner

the bond

the bond

And it requires

repeat

requires

said.

sees you as the alpha

ing.

brush

her owner

partnership

"I thought

on.

dog who

It strengthens

number

marks

\-lithyou.

Loss hunt.

in the brush"

It boggles

knows

You don't

he stays

identifying

precautions

exist

to ensure

hunter

new puppy.

obedience

address,

made.

trainlike

and phone

to negate

Your

hunting

for many years.

Be critical of issues that turn you off but also offer reasonable, workable solutions. Critics in areas from politics to poodles and from drugs to dogs offer the same trite solutions: educate or legislate. This is a simple if unworkable solution to a complicated problem but it puts the onus of fin'ding a solution on another's shoulders.

32

the

that you won't

BE CRITICAL

i

the


AN E:<A~\INATION OF' THE USE OF' GE:lJl\V10l\-~lODI TO TEACH POINTING-BREED DOGS TO POINT

by Stephen

F'ICATIml HSTHODS BIRDS RELIABLY

i<afc

The objective is to use behavior-shaping to train a dog that has been bred to have a strong desire to hunt upland gamebirds such as quail and pheasant to point the birds he finds, rather than flush, chase, catch, and eat them. The method requires turning the dog's natural hesitation that occurs when it comes upon the scent of such birds -- just before it jumps in on them -- into an highly developed pointing behavior. It can be assumed that the hesitation is the weakest part of this natural behavior and the competing behaviors of flushing and chasing are the most powerful .. As the basic level, it is necessary to extend the dog's natural hesitation into what is called a "point" and have the dog hold that position until or unless commanded to move. This is relatively easy to establish when the dog is not in a field where birds may be present. However, the addition of field conditions and the presence of birds are two variables that add to the complexity. In addition, such dogs are often at a considerable distance from their handlers when they locate birds. Thus, they also have to learn to remain on point even when their handlers can not take direct control. In addition, they have to hold point until their handlers overtake them, walk in front of them, and flush the birds themselves (thus depriving the dogs of their next meal, in effect). It is hard to come by reinforcers that could be conditioned to overpower the natural reinforcement the dog receives as an outcome of his own, natural flushing and chasing behavior. Food is risky because the dog could learn to associate it with eating birds. Playing "fetch" also has its drawbacks because it may reinforce chasing and catching behaviors. Important: Punishment can not be used to inhibit or terminate the behavior -- especially while the bird is still on the ground -since punishment has a high likelihood of causing the dog to refuse to locate and point birds in the future. (This is called "blinking" and makes the dog undesirable as a hunting dog.) Some trainers try to avoid the problems of punishment by waiting until the dog had already put the bird in the air and was chasing it -- at which time they shock the dog or flip the dog in mid-air at the end of a training cord. However, even these more-remote forms of punishment have a high failure rate. Presently, I train the dog to respond to a command ("Whoa"), shaping his response to that command to a high level in hierarchical fashion through the variables of duration, distance, degrees of difficulty (direction of the handler in relation to the dog, as well as locations of escalating difficulty), and distractions (five increasingly difficult levels).

33


I respect the rules of variable control throughout, including tl1'-" probability that recently acquired behavior will slip momentarily each time a new variable is introduced. I always train with positive, enthusiastic voice tones and body language, using "Good \-<hoa"as the only reinforcer. When the dog will perform the command at the level appropriate to his training ten times out of ten without requiring corrections (which I translate to mean silently and quickly placing the dog in the correct position), I drop the training back to much lower levels in order to maintain the dog's ability to succeed as I begin to pair the presence of birds with the whoa command. Because stimulus-intensity levels escalate as one moves progressively from dead/frozen birds, to dead/unfrozen birds, to live birds, I train the dog in the presence of each, in that order. When I move to live birds, I put the dog on a table to increase his dependency upon me and to reduce the likelihood that he will chase. Then I give the dog the command to whoa. the live bird (caged) through a pulley set-up shield and up to the dog's eye level.

If he obeys, I raise from behind a plywood

If the dog jumps at the bird, I command "Heel" -- a command that I highly trained previously -- and walk the dog off the table. I say "heel" because, if he refuses, I feel it is better for him to associate the chokechain punishment with refusing to heel, not with breaking a whoa command on birds. I also don't want to say "whoa" again if he's chasing because this would pair "whoa" with the act of chasing rather than with whoaing. If the dog doesn't jump at the bird, I reinforce with "Good whoa" so he associates the word with his behavior and with praise. Then I lower the bird and heel the dog off the table. I expose the dog to three sessions, I phase out the word itself, a secondary conditioned

birds per session. Over several "whoa" in an effort to make the bird, stimulus for the same behavior.

Until now, the dog has seen the birds and only after I whoaed him. Now I begin to teach him to depend upon his scenting ability. At this level, I no longer say the word "Khoa." I phased it out while conditioning the dog to accept the sight and (consequently) scent of a live bird as stimuli for the same behavior -- whoaing. Next, I take the dog to a field. I no longer use a table, but I do use a similar set-up with caged birds that I elevate on a pulley when the dog comes within scenting range and establishes point. The first sessions are done with the dog on a loose, 30-foot cord for control should the dog try to jump in on the bird. If the dog tries to jump in rather than point the bird, I command "Heel" and follow through as previously described. If he remains stationary, I praise with "Good \-<hoa"and leave the dog on point.

34


with the bird cag~d. I toss sticks, l~aves or grass into the air to test the dog's ability to hold in the presence of this level of distraction. (He was conditioned to do this during earlier training before birds were introduced.) If the dog jumps in. I command "Heel" and follow through accordingly. If he holds point, I praise with "Good Whoa," then command "Heel" and walk the dog out of the area. After ten sessions in a row in which the dog holds point successfully, I introduce gunfire (to which the dog was previously conditioned to have no response). I start with the light sound of a 22~ blank pistol, advance to a 32-blank pistol, and then introduce the shotgun. (I keep my body between the gun and the dog to reduce both the sound pressure and the decibels.) If the dog tries to jump in on the bird at the sound of the shot, I command "Heel" and follow through as before. If he holds point, I praise with "Good whoa," then command "Heel" and walk him out of the area. Once the dog is holding point consistently as I "flush" items other than birds and as I fire guns, I begin releasing the bird from the cage as I say "Good Whoa." My intent is to pair the flight of the bird with this well-conditioned, verbal reinforcer. I then gradually phase out the praise words altogether. After all process, again

Registrable Neutering the

this is accomplished through shaping.

Breeds Applying .

Atthe May 9, 1989 Board Meeting, Board of Directors of the AKC

approved the policy that will require dogs of registrable breeds 路to be neutered before ILP applications are granted. This would not apply to dogs of the Miscellaneous Class breeds. This will become effective

I begin

for ILPs

to teach

JVill Require

after September I, 1989, for an unregistrable dog of a registrable breed, all such applications must be accol11panied by a certification frol11 a veterinariall

or

animal

shelter

\"cri-

fying that the dog has been spaved or neutered. The American }.;ennel Club's

September I, 1989. The !.loard, acting to close a loophole on indiscriminate breeding of unregistrable dogs of registrable breeds and the use of the Indefinite Listing Privilege as an alternative form of registration with unregis-

primary function is to regulate the breeding and exhibition of rcgistcred pure-bred dogs. The issuance of an Indefinite Listing Pris路ilege for an unregisnable dog is strictly a discretionary accomodation. Certification tbat a dog has been

trable dogs being bred on the basis of the ILP number, approved the following policy: Effective for applications for Indefinite Listing Pris路ileges received

spayed or neutered must be attacbed to all application forms receis路ed by AKC after September I, 1989. The fee for an ILP remains S2S.00 ILP dogs

continue

35

to

be

eligible

the retrieve

to

be

entered

in

Obedience

Trials

or

in

Tracking Tests (in!l-. This spav(neuter requirement for application for an Indefinite Listing Privilege applies only to registrable breeds and not the I'v1iscellaneous Class bl eeds: Australian Kelpies, !.lorder Collies, Canaan Dogs, Cavalier }';ing Charles SpanieLs, Chinese Cre.sted, Chinese Shar-Pei, (jreatcl S\\iss J's!ountain Dogs, Miniature !.lull Terriers, Petit Basset Briflon Italiani.

Vendeen,

and

Spinoni


NEW L1TrER SlRE:

WHELI'ED

DOTY'S WHIRLWIND

5/18/90 SlR GABBY

Gabby, The 1989 I\ational Derby Classic Champion, has 4 points to\\;[rds his Field Championship and three placements in Gun Dog/All Age Competitioll ;lg;li Ilst Shorthairs. Gabby's littermate is The 1989 Futurity Champion Uodibar's Fallny I'altani.

l<a\\lee SIRE:

DOly's Whirlwind

Gene's

Sir Cabby Rawhide's

Rall'hide's Dizzy Lizzy Rawhide's

DCH & AfCH DAI\I:

Lutz's

Rip Too Hey Jude

J-Ieiko Zur Cadcnhurg Lulz Zur Cadenburg CD 'I'D Birke V D Alten I\ller

Krisy Vun Steuben FCH & AFCH Barun \'0111 Seh: rental Von Steuhen rCH & AFCH C;ldenhIJr[! 1\:1('('h:II1:1Ie V I. & STUD SERVICI' CONI'MT Feldlehen

FOR PUPPY I\VI\IIAIlILrnRON SCIIMmL

PDK'S Baron VOIl preffer Delight fCH Rawhide's IIay \\'indy

Cajun

((JI\BBY'S TRl\INER/lII\NDLER/IlREI (512) 65'i--D'JI4

36

'.J)ER)


NORTH AMERICAN German Wirehaired

Pointers

Liebchen's Tiger Swallowtail Wilton Browning v Zeb Danrock's Arne Wasatch Uinta Tekka Hike

VERSATILE

DOG ASSOCIATION

NAVHDA Tested between 01/01/89 1- ~

1- 1 (1-10

1- 1

Ripsnorter's Madam Butterfly Kettle Creek's Elsie Wingmaster's Ultra tieg.al iloway Ace Vom Grafenauer Running Rudie Ace v Schoenblick Afterhours Annalise Afara KT3 F:adar v Zeb

0-10 0-11

Elkhorn's Sun Dodger Megalloway Aspen Wingmaster's Vulcan Docoh's Stosh

1110-

Utility Preparatory Dogs Name

HUNTING

1- 0

1-

0-11 0- 7 1- 4

0-11 2 3 0 8

04/01/89 04/02/89 05/13/89 OS/28/89 04/01/89 05/06/89 OS/28/89 06/24/89 04/29/89 04/02/89 04/22/89 04/09/89 OS/28/89 06/24/89

82 81

80 80 80 79 79 78 76

70 67 60

OS/28/89

~~

04/22/89

30

, ....1.,,:,

None None

III

III III None None III III III None None None NonE None None

&

06/30/89

Jeffrey and Carol Anderson David Tolbert Burley E. Daniels John W. Hicks J. & C. Anderson/Helen George Douglas Dakin John Kegel Earl F. Caddell, III Thomas R. Running Edgar H. Leander Walt & Christine Whitmore Donald Soter David M. F'oe Susan J. Riley Richard Kostrzewa Jeff Henke

Test Date

Age Yr Mo

1- 8

Beargrease's Mind Bender Hurka v Wildwings Wilton Mindy v Zeb Cadenberg Magie v Rogue Kaiser Der Jagd

2-

I-

I1892-

Argus v Rothorst Ricco of Case

.

..:..

-.-------1and II III I Br-ashear Thomas Robert None 06/24/89 Wendelin 06/04/89 03/05/89 Carton Ferris 17") 173 178 186 K H. 6. Richardt 2 Wiesa 193 Robert 06/0:",/89 04/16/89 Caven 199 198 F'owell 06/04/89204 02/26/89 165 OS/27/89164 ~1ichaeI OS/27/89 Otto J. 159 Weber 03/05/89 tir. 04/23/89 John tirs. Joe 158 145 P. B. Score Prize Owner Date Lavelle Pete~sen/Peterson Lopez Utility Test Davy A. Joseph Davy Dolejsi A. K. ")

Joseph K. Dolejsi Birko v Weidebach Dogs Name

06/03/89 02/26/89 02/26/89 02/26/89 06/03/89 02/26/89 06/03/89 02/26/89

Score 181

172 168 165 163 153 1:",7

137

Prize

I I I

II II II None III

Owner Mitchell G. Lindberg Marie Neuffer Andy Hall Silke Alberts David S. Carlson George F:. Boyd Steven Case & Silke Alberts

~ ~1 2-11 36-1-ti0 .21-11 7 Age Pub. Yr ..:.'

NAVHDA Sire, Dam and Dog reports, including judge comments may be purchased from the Data Entry Service. For further information: Write NAVHDA C/O Jim Applegate, 218 N. Lincoln Ln, Arlington Heights, IL 60004 IC) Copyright

NAVHDA

1988,1989

Produced

by NAVHDA Data Entry Service.

37


NORTH AMERICAN German Wirehaired Natural Ability Dogs Name Kettle Creek's

Pointers

HUNTING

DOG ASSOCIATION

NAVHDA Tested between

07/01/89

&

10/15/89

Test Age Yr Mo 0- 5

Gem

Gunner's High Brass Adda Over and Under's KG Targa ~lkhorm's Treasured Jade Fix' Jake Snake Plisken Wrya y Treborwolf Agga y Eichenwald Jette v Altmoor Hans v Altmoor Topmost Apache's Wind Song Kettle Creek's Ghost

Morgan's Abby Angi v Cottonwoods McNally's Eric Kettle Creek's Eve Red Baron's Axel Byron Van Claburn ~aldjaeger's Buddy Waldo of Wendberg Inka y Treborwolf Jana v Altmoor Red Baron's Alexis Red Baron's Abby Wingmaster's Venus Red Baron's Augustus Red Baron's Abel Aspe v Eichenwald Waldjaeger's Buster Keaton Arrak v Rebel Hill Abby v Eichenwald Inverness Dutchess Express Megalloway Legacy of Belle KT3 Victoria v Braunsfeld Gypsy of Avery Cadenberg Nixe v Tell Apollo v Ostfriesland Wildwings Geschwind Agogo Immergren's Vogel Spaher Wildwings Max Red Baron's Ace Red Baron's Kitrina Aika v Eichenwald McNally's Sako Afterhours Electrick

1- 3 1- 3 1- 3

1- 3

1- 3 1- 2 0- 6

1- 1 0- 9 0- 6

1- 3

Kettle Creek's Edgar Kastor v Dunnhof Danrock's Arne

Outlet

McNally's Casey Dacoh's Stosh Waldjaeger's Rusty Guns Arty v Blitezenhugel Anton v Eichenwald Afterhours

VERSATILE

Uptown Girl

1- 3 1- 3 0- 6 0- 8 0-10 1- 4 0- 8 1- 4 1- 3 0- 9 1- 3 0- 5 0- 8 0- 8 1- 4 0- 8 0- 8 1- 2 1- 3 0-11 1- 2 1- 3 0- 6 1- 2 0- 9

1- 2 0- 7 0-12 1- 0 0-12 0- 8 0- 8 1- 2 0-10 0-10 0-10

1- 1 1- 3 1- 3 1- 2 0-10

Date 08/19/89 09/23/89 09/23/89 09/09/89 07/15/89 09/02/89 09/10/89 09/23/89 08/20/89 09/09/89 09/17/89 08/20/89 09/30/89 09/30/89 09/02/89 08/19/89 09/02/89 09/17/89 09/04/89 10/01189 09/09/89 08/20/89 09/02/89 08/19/89 09/04/89 09/02/89 09/10/89 09/02/89 09/04/89 09/17/89 09/09/89 09/23/89 09/17/89 09/09/89 09/16/89 07/16/89 09/10/89 09/09/89 09/02/89 09/09/89 09/09/89 09/09/89 09/04/89 09/04/89 09/17/89 09/02/89 09/10/89 09/02/89 09/23/89 09/09/89 09/09/89 09/10/89 09/10/89

38

Score 110 110 107 107 106 106 105 105 102 101 101 100 99 98 98

97 97 97

97 95

94 94 94 93 92 91 90 90 90 89 89 88 88

87

Prize

I I I I! I I! II

II

II!

II

II II II

II II

II II II II II

III

II III

II I I I

II None

II I I I I I I

III III III III

86

I I I

85 85

None

83 83 81 81 80 79

79 78

76 74 70

70 67 66

58 57

III I I I

None None None I I I III III

None None None None None None None None None

Owner Paul Dion John Hearin Kevin McCauley & Gregg Banks Michael C. Strum David Fix Daniel Connor Otto Weber Daniel R. Gravatt Ghislain Patry Floyd L. Lunsford Larry Hoscheit Karl G. Sundquist Michael Kennedy Burley E. Daniels, Sr Greg Wentz Rejean Aube Gary Gri eve Philip Bernardo Richard L. Trebil Ben A. Mays Pat & Bev Fountaine Brad Wenberg Roland Smit & Vernon Neuberger Guy Trottier Jim and Karin Bueling Charles and Rebecca Hack Andy Franklin Greg Walton Jim and Karin Bueling Otto Weber Terry Sieminski Carmine Marino, Jr. Peter Mast James H. & Heidi L. Hill Susan J. Riley David C. Helser Scott Avery Barbara and Greg Pirak Kurt & Roland K. Smit Bill Sawyer Larry B. & Nancy F. Mason Tom Barrett Jim and Karin Bueling Larry A. Tangen Duane Cook Ed Gerri tse Eileen Fahey & C. Whitmore Harry Gerri tse Jeff Henke Ron & Karen Clementsen James R. Bolduc Otto Weber Walt Whitmore


NORTH AMERICAN German Wirehaired

Pointers

Ubrona v Treborwolf Anna v Eichenwald Utility Preparatory Dogs Name ----------------Salbei 's Major Jutta's Wildrose

HUNTING

DOG ASSOCIATION

NAVHDA Tested between 1- 4 1- 2

09/10/89 09/17/89

50 50

07/01/89 None None

&

10/15/89

Edward M. Binder Peter O'Hara

Test Age Yr Mo

Fasan

Salbei 's Major Hunt Master's Brunhilda McNally's Chelsy McNally's Chelsy Bridget v d Koopmans Miss Ginger's Magnum Bridget v d Koopmans Ildika v Fasanental o Krautzer v Treborwolf Kastor v Dunnhof Briar's Wildrose Jaeger Clarbally's Kittery v Baron Deacon V L v Wacholder Quartermaster's

VERSATILE

Foot's Ranger

Utility Test Dogs Name

2- 4 2- 4 2- 4 2- 6 2- 4 2- 4 1-12 3- 7 2- 0 3- 0 2- 5 1- 2 2- 4 5- 9 2-12 1- 6

Date

Score

09/04/89 09/10/89 09/10/89 09/24/89 09/10/89 09/04/89 09/02/89 09/02/89 09/10/89 09/24/89 09/03/89 09/02/89 09/10/89 09/15/89 09/24/89 08/26/89

179 178 167 167 165 163 162 159 153 143 141 136 136 135 129 125

None None None

Date

Score

Prize

09/02/89 09/03/89 08/20/89 10/01189 09/30/89 09/03/89 08/20/89 09/02/89 09/02/89 09/09/89 09/02/89 08/19/89 09/10/89 09/02/89 10/01/89 09/16/89 08/19/89 08/19/89 09/03/89 09/10/89 09/17/89

201 198 195 192 178 173 173 170 166 161 160 157 154 150 144 142 140 137 111 106 88

Age Yr Mo

Ridge Hunter's Miss Ginger Ridge Hunter's Magnum Windy Ridge Nika Hannah v Drachenfels Lehner's Baron Gunn Rebel v d Wachtal Wiesa Beargrease's Mind Bender Hunt Master's Born Birdie Ridge Hunter's Dame Zelda Jann v d Vogel route Miss Ginger's Wickett Kaiser der Jagd Annus v d Burkhof Ridge Hunter's Zuhl Lea v Ballenberg Kettle Creek's Devon D CUjO v Treborwolf Jack Ie Montagnard New Moon's Rogue Brewster v Lieben-Waid Chuck v Irishmik

6- 3 5- 5 3- 5 4- 1 7- 9 3- 4 1-10 2- 5 3- 6 3- 8 3- 7 1- 8 1- 6 2- 3 3- 4 2- 3 6- 6 1-11 3-12 7- 7

5- 1

Prize

I

I

II II II

II II II II

III None III

II

I

II

II II

III III III III

II III

II III None None None None None None None None None

Owner Ryan McNally Ray Smith Ryan McNall y Dr. Warner Wales Ryan McNally Ryan McNally Ryan McNally Merrill Hansen Ryan McNall y David B. Hough Blaine Hoffman Michael Kennedy Gary & Kathleen Anne G. Poole

Kevin & Jacqueline Michael H. Draper

NAVHDA

1988,1989

Produced

Michael L. Garriott Allan L. Janny James L. Morrison Rock E. Daniels Andrew J. Lehner Ray Mule Mitchell G. Lindberg Michael L. Garriott James & Carole Moe Otto Weber Victor Connors, O.D. David S. Carlson John McKellop III Jeffrey C. Mochalski W. Fred Birch Hans Grubur Gerald H. Funk Ghislain Martel Michael J. Hanna Larry B. & Nancy F. Mason William J. Matthews

by NAVHDA Data Entry Service.

39

McCauley

Owner

NAVHDA Sire, Dam and Dog reports, including judge comments may be purchased from the Data Entry Service. For further information: Write NAVHDA C/O Jim Applegate, 218 N. Lincoln Ln, Arlington Heights, IL 60004 (C) Copyright

Kirpach


~

~

,

M •• German Wirehaired Tested between 10/15/89 & 12/31/89 ----~ NORTH Pointers AMERICAN NAVHDA VERSATILE HUNTING DOG ASSOCIATION Natural Ability Test --------------Prize THOMAS MICHAEL 93 D. H. BARRETT BRANDT ROCK GEORGE II 11104/89 III 10/21/89 165 E. R. DANIELS BOYD None KENNETH 10/29/89 DONALD KRAIG 10129/89 72 71 87 79 W. SOTER MCWETHY PENDLETON JOHN 10/22/89 Owner Pr Score ize 69 M. Date HUMPHREY III II 12/09/89 94 K. CARTON 146 PATRICK 10/29/89 A. BANNISTER HENRY 11/05/89 59 R. DAIGLE Age Yr Mo Dogs Name 1252 08 9 1- 3 0 4 7 WILDWINGS t1AX BRANDT'S GUNNER Age WOLFSWIESE Yr Mo AUTUM WIND'S ABBEY V FALCOM BARON V WILDHAAR DOLLY V 0 SALZMARSCH KETTLE CREEK'S GABBY ZIPPY V TREBORWOLF MEGALLOWAY BERkUT ALSA V TREBORWOLF

------

- --

Utility Preparatory Dogs Name

Test

ARGUS V ROTHORST DANROCK'S ALPHA Uti Iity Test Dogs Name

----

10/29/89 12/10/89 10/29/89 10/22/89 11/04/89 12110/89 10/28/89

Age Yr Mo

BIRGIT V ZIAWALD JAYMAR'S CHOCOLATE CHIP CLARBALLY'S IRISHMIK V LUTZ BIRCH'S MAKE A WISH SCHNEE WEISS ANNI V BAYFIELD BOSS V ZIAWALD BRANT V ZIAWALD ARES V DROSSELBART

----------

None THOMAS III J. THOMAS GORDON KEITH II I ze 159 157 168 193 K. PHILIPPI LITTLE & CARTON &THOMAS DANZIMMERMANN JANOWICZ J. JANOWICZ DAVID 198 C. T. DateDANIEL Owner Pri Score GARY 154 HEIDLEBAUGH &KRUKAR JOAN HOWARD 199

2- 5 6-12 6- 5 6-11 3- 4 2- 5 2- 5 5- 5

NAVHDA Sire, Dam and Dog reports, including judge comments may be purch~sed from the Data Entry Service. For further information: Write NAVHDA C/O Jim Applegate, 218 N. Lincoln Ln, Arlington Heights, IL 60004 IC) Copyright

NAVHDA

1988,1989

Produced

by NAVHDA

40

Data Entry Service.


NORTH AMERICAN German Wirehaired Natural Ability Dogs Name

Pointers

VERSATILE

HUNTING

DOG ASSOCIATION

NAVHDA Tested between

&

06/30/89

Test Age Yr f'10

Date

Score

Wilton Diva v Zeb

0-11

(12/25/89

112

Chance v Wildflugel Catja v d Einigkeit mber Cascade Wiltons Schatz v Zeb

1- 1

112 112 112 112

1- ~

04/22/89 OS/27/89 04/22/89 06/24/89

Weidenhugel Ah Asprig Quartermaster's Foot's Ranger Wlndfield's Thunder Cara the Feather Dancer Arlo v Hinterwald

0-10

(12/:5/89

112

11- 0 1- 0

04/22/89 05/06/89 05/13/89 04/15/89

112 110 110 110

Weidenhugel Ah Anja Dana v Himmelbogen kT3 Bell a f1ia

0-10

(12/25/89

1ll)

1- 1

04/29/89 04/29/89 06/03/89 04/29/89 04/23/89 06/04/89 04/29/89 OS/28/89 05/13/89 OS/28/89 05/13/89 04/29/89 05/13/89 (12/25/89 05/13/89 06/03/89 02/25/8904/30/89 03/04/89

108 105 105 103 102 101 100 100 99 98 98 98 97 97 94 93 93 93 92

n

St Croi~'s Breezin' Boogaloo Alison's Raggedy Rag Annus v d Burkhof Centa v d Einigkeit Libby v Wildrucken Wingmaster's

01/01/89

VenLls

Holli v kervinshof Fieldmaster's Hollv Terror Alison's Quicksilver Mickey kT3 VIctoria v Braunsfeld Danrock's Alpha Weidenhugel Intrepid v Goetz Chip of Gleason kettle Creek's Elvis Wilton Brenna v Zeb Aer iaI's Tessa of Farmgate Wilton Shatze v Zeb katies Lady of Point St. Croi~'s Sure Shot Frieda Cadenberg Minx v Rogue Lutz v Wildrucken Dam-ock's Anker kettle Creek's Elizabeth Farmgate's Radar Rudi Megalloway A. Wicked Birdy Ivon v kervinshof Wingmaster's Ulrica Ridge Hunter's Heidi kettle Creek's Eager kettle Creek's Fran Arlo v Hinterwald kettle Creek's Flora Wilton Shatze v Zeb

1- 4 0- 8

1- 2

(1-12 1- 2 1-

"2

1- 2 1- 4

1- 1

1- 0

II-

1- 4 0-12 0-10 0- 8

1- 1 1-'0 0-11 0- 9 0-12 0-11

1- 1

I-

I0-1 0-1

III-

I- 0 1- 4

1- 1 0-[[ 0-11

0-[1 1- 1

1- 3

Liebchen's Tiger Swallowtail Wilton Brock v Zeb Wi Idl,ings Zeke Wasatch Uinta Tekka Hike

0-11 1- 0

Sammy Blue v Delgen Flintlock's Cool Breezy Vom Grafenauer Running Rudie

0-11 (J-12 0-11

1- 1

Prize

I

I I I

I I I I I I I I

II II I! II II

II!

I II

II II

Owner Jim Neuffer Ji m Sefton Tom Benvenuti Ray and Lynn CalkIns Lewis D. kimball David M. Yearsley Michael H. Draper Walter Sartori James F'. Si mmons Roger Paugh James and Debbie Sumner Richard A. Wentland Anthony C. t'lule Bruce R. and Susan J. Larsen Brian Rahn John Mckellop III George R. Boyd Dave Molitor Andy Franklin Arni e Gutenka.uf

05/13/89

92

06/03/89 04/29/89 06/03/89 05/13/89 05/13/89 04/22/89

91 91 91 90 90 90

L. f'larkF:eynolds Craig B. & Je~nifer J. Larsen II David C. Helser Rock E. Da.niels Mildred L. Revell II Paul Gleason II Dick koschak Da.vid A. F'arvin Davi d Basi nskl f~one Harlan E. Lemmer Dal e BrUnI None Br i an Hal COiilb Su~.an G. Hel ser Eval Lyden D. Dirks.en Rock E. Da.niels Dua.ne SL,h I III Neal & Dianne Ri~ehart

(16/24/89

90

III

05/13/89 OS/28/89 05/13/89 06/24/89 05/14/89 03/04/89 04/30/89 04/15/89 04/22/89 02/25/89 04/01/89 06/04/89 04/30/89 OS/28/89 05/14/89

89 89 88 87 85 85 84 84 84 84 84 84 83 83 82

41

II II

II II II

II II III II

III

!II Eval

II

III

III III None

III III III III f~one III III

Susa.n

J.

Steve

Foerster

F:iley

,John f<egel Robert T. & Cynthia J. Grady Susan c1. F:iley F'aul H. Wright Roger F'augh l~avne ,1ordan Harlan E. Lemmer Jeffrey and Carol Anderson Da.vid A. F'arvin Edgar W. Sel tzer ,John W. Hi cks kurt f<ocha.nski Davi d ;'1.Foe Thomas R. Running


NORTH AMERICAN German Wirehaired Natural Ability Dogs Name

Pointers

HUNTING

DOG ASSOCIATION

NAVHDA Tested between

01/01/89

&

06/30/89

Test Age Yr

Wilton Diva v Zeb Chance v Wildflugel Catja v d Einigkeit Cascade Kimber Wiltons Schatz v Zeb Weidenhugel Ah Asprig Quartermaster's Foot's Ranger Windfield's Thunder CarOl the Feather Dancer Arlo v Hinterwald Weidenhugel Ah Anja Dana v Himmelbogen KT3 Bella Mia St Croix's Breezin' Boogaloo Alison's Raggedy Rag Annus v d Burkhof Centa v d Einigkeit Libby v Wildrucken Wingmaster's

VERSATILE

VenLls

Holli v Kervinshof Fieldmaster's Holly Terror Alison's Quicksilver Mickey KT3 VIctoria v Braunsfeld Danrock's Alpha Weidenhugel Intrepid v Goetz Chip of Gleason Kettle Creek's Elvis Wilton Brenna v Zeb Aerial '5 Tessa of Farmgate Wilton Shatze v Zeb Katies Lady of Point St. Croix '5 Sure Shot Frieda Cadenberg Minx v Rogue Lutz v Wildrucken Danrock's Anker Kettle Creek's Elizabeth Farmgate's Radar Rudi Megallowav A. Wicked Birdv Ivon v Kervinshof Wingmaster's Ulrica Ridge Hunter's Heidi Kettle Creek's Eager Kettle Creek's Fran Arlo v Hinterwald Kettle Creek's Flora Wilton Shatze v Zeb Liebchen's Tiger Swallowtail Wilton Brock v Zeb Wildwings Zeke Wasatch Uinta Tekka Hike Sammy Blue v Delgen Flintlock's Cool Breezy Vom Grafenauer Running Rudie

t'10

0-11

1- 1 1- 4 0- 8

1- ~ 0-10

11- 2

1- 0 1- 0 0-10

1- 1 (1-12 1- 2

1- 1- 2 1- 4

1- 1

1- 0

II-

1- 4 0-12 0-10 0- 8

1- 1

1-'0 0-11 0- 9 0-12 0-11

1- 1

II-

0-1 0-1

III-

I- 0 1- 4

1- 1 0-[[ 0-11

0-[1 1- 1 1- 3 0-11 1- 0

1- 1 (}-11 (J-12 0-11

Date

Score

02/25/89 04/22/89 OS/27/89 04/22/89 06/24/89 (t2/~5/89 04/22/89 05/06/89 05/13/89 04/15/89

112 112 112 112 112

()2/25/89

1ll)

04/29/89 04/29/89 06/03/89 04/29/89 04/23/89 06/04/89 04/29/89 OS/28/89 05/13/89 OS/28/89 05/13/89 04/29/89 05/13/89 02/25/89 05/13/89 06/03/89 (l2/25/8904/30/89 03/04/89

108 105 105 103 102 101 100 100 99 98 98 98 97 97 94 93 93 93 92

112

112 110 110 110

(lS/13/89

92

06/03/89 04/29/89 06/03/89 05/13/89 05/13/89 04/22/89 (16/24/89 05/13/89 OS/28/89 05/13/89 06/24/89 05/14/89 03/04/89 04/30/89 04/15/89 04/22/89 02/25/89 04/01/89 06/04/89 04/30/89 OS/28/89 05/14/89

91 91 91 90 90 90 90 89 89 88 87 85 85 84 84 84 84 84 84 83 83 82

41

Prize

I I I I

I I I I I I I I

II II II II II

III III

II II II II II II II

Owner Jim Neuffer Ji m Sefton Tom 8envenuti Ray and Lynn Calkins Lewis D. Kimball David M. Yearsley Michael H. Drape~ Walter Sartori James F'. Si mmons Roger Paugh James and Debbie Sumner Richard A. Wentland Anthony C. t'1ule Bruce R. and Susan J. Larsen Brian Rahn John McKellop III George R. Boyd Daye Molitor Andy Franklin Arni e Gutenka.uf

L. Mark Reynolds Craig B. & Jennifer J. Larsen David C. Helser Rock E. D".nie]'; Mildred L. Revell Paul Gleason Dick Koschak D<3.vidA. F'arvin Davi d Basi nski t-.loneHarlan E. Lemmer Dale Bruni None Bri an Hol cOJllb Eval Su<::=.a.nG. He 1 ser rr Lyden D. Dirk"en Rock E. Da.niels Dua.ne Stah I III Neal & Dianne Rinehart III Susan cl, F:iley III Steve Foer",ter III ,John legel Eval Robert T. & Cynthia J. Grady Susan J. F:iley III F'aul H. Wright III Roger Paugh III l>JavneJordan Harlan E. Lemmer None III Jeffrey and Carol Anderson III David A. F'arvin Edgar W. Sel tzer III John W. Hicks t-.loneI路::urt f路::ocha.nski III Dav id 1'1.Poe III Thomas R. Running

II II II II

III II

II

III


LOCAL ~\~are

The

Del

the

most

BARKS Valley

ambitious

•..••.•....... BY Beverly Clubis

yet.

newsletter

Included

~/ere

rrVersatile"

several

MURRAY issLle seemed

winter

pages

of

information

concerning,the Nationals they will be hosting in October. The club also plans to support the entry with troohies for the Chester Vallev Show at Ludwigs Corner, Pa. in May. Club members are also involved with plans for their Spring Field Trail to be held at Assunpink. Besides the regular entries concerning meeting dates and planned events, club membershIp roster. and copv of Club Bv-Laws; the club's newsletter always includes a calendar of upcoming shows and trials; a Brag Box stuffed WIth recent wins and titles earned; a Litter Bo~ listing,

and

many

reprinted

i=.SLlE contained the §azette CheshireJls G.:..zette Column~

articles

of

great

vallIE

to

members.

This

ar'ticle

"F2\.cts About Hip DysplasiCi.I!; "Feedin'~ Tips" fr·o:TI GunD·:Jgs. Also

a.nd

1isted were the AKC Standings

.JUdy

of the top GWP competitors.

The most important reprint that all breeders will need to become famil iar with are the AKC "Instructions for Obtaining a Limited Registration Certificate".

The German WirehaIred

Pointer

Club of Northern

Ohio newsletter

for

Jan.-FeD. indicated that while meetings were usually held at the MedIna Bird Club in warm weather, the winter ones were to be held at the home of Walt Whitmore, president. This newsletter also Iisted a variety of uDcominq events; shows. NAVDHA Training Tests. AKC Huntin~ Tests. and available Obedience classes, and Congrats to members for their

field!

show,

and

obedience

titles.

The Ohio Club"s newsletter also included a reprint of the AVC's article on the Limited Reaistration Certificate. In addition, there was an entire p~ge of g2me bird recioes: a reprinted ~rticle·about the importance of "F'l ayin·~ ~'Ji th your [!Og"; and dF'r'Dfe5siond,1 Hel for Amateurs'l from The Kennel among other useful and inter'esting bits ":<.nd pIeces of dog iore. j:.J

42


liThe Hot \IJlre"

tr'om the

in quantity but liThe F'resident's

'the past

June:

puppy

and

It

more

and

rescue

commenable attention populoLts,

Important. as

welcoming

news;

is

Club

may not

qual ity! reminded

be e;路:tensiVE

beginning

with that

members

that to

the continue

an

a

new

number

members 路of

Show at the K C of Pasadena to

things

the

to

C1Llb:

and

contribute

lots

to

of

Pet

Orphans

efforts.

hope to be; perhaps to

their Specialty

some

doing

Perhaps

breeders

Rescue

Cal ifDf'nla

compensates by its from .Jim Rice that

Message'l

are planning

are

other

qlvinq

Souther'n

than

is not so Important as what we do for the next decade'.

The members in

more

absolute

Clllbs

all

Rescue need

which

needs.

for

RescLIE

sent

materials

Unfortunately work

will

as

become

are

be

the

careful,

responsible

that if we

individllals

we can Keep the number of WirehaIrs minimum.

43

becomes

increasinglv

all of us need to remind ourselves to

seriously

breed

our

we

in need of


G.W.P.

RESCUE

UPDATE

by Linda

Strothman

The last Rescue Update was aimed at stressing the need for accountability. As owners and promoters of Wires and members of the National Club we all share in the responsibility for this breed. Good News from the G.W.P. Club of Northern ollio. Their Board has voted and approved formation of a local club GWP Rescue. The Club Secretary will issue $30.00 to any member to assist in the cost of rescuing a Wire. The animal is housed by a Club volunteer until placement can be found. G.\v.P.C. of Southern California has an informal rescue organization within their local club. They seem to be quite adept at placing Wires in suitable homes. Many thanks to both th2se fine ~roups. How does your local G.l!.P. \~lub h::mdle th" n?scue situation? If your club is interested in forming a local rescue and needs some information on guidelines for rescue, liability waivers, assessing temperament, or adoption/release forms, contact Carol Stuart at (814) 949-9004. We have also made contact with the NAVHDA Newsletter Editor C:lndthey have "qr(~ed to run u L()st/Foutld/l\vuiIClbl(~ column in their magazine. If you have lost/found a \1ire please contact us so lve may let the NA VllDA people knmv. We have also contacted advertising the Rescue.

VDD about

the possibility

of

The interesting situation with vnD is all their dogs are TATTOOED. Everyone of their dogs is "traceable". A lost/found wire can easily be returned to the owner or breeder. To date all the VDD animals have been returned to their rightful owners. One VOD dog had changed hands several times before winding up in the Rescue. I located the VDD breeder and he was so very grateful I contacted him. lie had no idea the original owner had given the dog away. Without that tattoo I wouldn't have had a clue where to start looking. Carol Stuart is tattooing all the Rescue dogs with the l\K\.: #'s if knolm. If not the anilllulis tuttooed Ivith the nelv mmer's SS#. This is one method of tracking the animal if it is lost or stolen. Perhaps the National Club would be willing to list the tattoo numbers of the Wires for a small fee. This way we \Vould have a central clearing house for the information.

44


Make Your Pet "A Marl{ed Dog" Reprinted with permission DOG WEEK MAGAZINE Jo Campbell

of

PLEASE

POST

CONSPICUOUSLY

(May 4, 1987)

The research laboratory surgeon stood scalpel at the ready, an anesthetized Doberman Pinscher lay prepped for the exploratory incision. Out of the corner of his eye, the surgeon saw an unusual marki:lg on the inside of the dog's leg. Drawing back slowly from the incision site, he decided he had better examine the mark more closely. Nine digits. A Social Security number. Putting down the shining scalpel, he moved away from the table to a wall telephone and dialed. National Dog Registry in Woodstock, NY confirmed that the Doberman was, indeed, an owned dog. NOR's Mitch and Bette Rapoport could call the frantic family and tell them their pet had been saved. "All our returns are good ones," said NOR general manager Bette Rapoport, in an interview with Dog Week, "but this was especially good. NOR maintains communication links with legitimate laboratories and has achieved good cooperation," Rapoport said. The 21-year-old organization is in constant touch, as well, with dog clubs, veterinarians, law enforcement agencies and animal shelters allover the United States. The tattoo is a very reliable ownership identification mark for animals. In January 1987, NOR initiated a new state-of-the-art computer system and now registers all markings provided by owners. These stem from many sources: now-defunct registries; and from pet owners' own preferences for AKC registration numbers, phone numbers and code names. Owners may routinely take their dogs to club-conducted tattoo clinics, or to veterinarians who do tattooing. The trick, Mitch Rapoport said, is to remind them that this is just the beginning, that registration is necessary for the dog to be traced if he gets lost. Had his tattoo not been registered properly, and alternative

WANTED

TATTOOED

DOGS & CATS

ARE WANTED BY THEIR OWNERS

CHECK FOR TATTOOS TATTOOED ANIMALS ARE PRIVATE PROPERTY To Report Finding A Tattooed

Animal,

Call

NATIONAL DOG REGISTRY 1-800-NDR DOGS (1-800-637

3647)

P.O. BOX 116, WOODSTOCK, NY ending to the story of the Doberman Pinscher doesn't require much imagination. Even the most careful owners have known the terror of the inadvertant loss of a beloved dog. Circumstances have a way of getting out of control. Show-dog owner Mrs. Mary Jackson of Glen Burnie, Maryland, felt sure one wintry day that her elegant black Miniature Poodle - Glenview's Midnight Misty, in the show catalogs, Ginger to her familywas secure in her shipping crate returning from a

45

12498-0116

show She certainly never pictured Ginger as a hunter, rampaging among the ducks in the swamp near Washington National Airport. But the tiny show winner ended up being a fugitive for four weeks, and piles of bones and feathers indicated that, while a desperate wanderer, she did, indeed, live on ducks! Ginger's adventure began when she returned by plane, arrayed in billowing show coat from her first sizable win - Best in Sweepstakes and Reserve at The Poodle Club of


Alabama's Specialty in Birmingham. Surely, atavism was the farthest thing from Ginger's mind when the plClne's cilrgo bCly doors were ofJened. Somehow her crClte ICltch had broken and Ginger was loose in the cargo compartment. Startled by the strangers approaching her, she bolted into the dusk. Mrs. Jackson searched, advertised, offered a reward - and searched some more. The wraith-like little black dog was seen by airport police, but eluded her pursuers as if she had always been a creature of the wild. Encouraged by these sightings, Jackson called in reinforcements from the dog fancy; tracking English Springers, and Poodle fanciers who empathized with her worry. The scent was too stale for the Springers, but searchers found the traces which showed that Ginger had reverted to her hunting ancestry to live. Swirls of duck bones and even fish bones were found around what had apparently been her sleeping places The cold weather daunted the searchers and made hopes fade as weeks passed. These are the times when worried owners think of the stories told by the Rapoports. The dog theft industry, they say, is growing and has become motorized in a big way. A stolen dog is soon across the nearest state line and sold to a dealer in furs, fightingdog bait or experiment fodder Owners like Mrs. Mary Jackson fight off these visions, but they come

at sunset, when another fruitless search day is gone Ginger was lucky. She ran to the wilderness insteild of "civiliziltion." Amid dlminishirlC] IlOpes, the bl"ck shadow was seen again by the National Airport Patrol. This time, five men surrounded her. No one ever said poodles are not scrappers. The first man who tried to pick up Ginger drew back a slashed hand Another, wearing gloves, was more successful. A bit more scurrying, and he held a resigned - and probably relievedlittle Poodle in his arms The rescuers took Ginger to the nearest animal shelter where she was identified and picked up by her mistress Her experience left Ginger very thin, and shot her show coat for the season Mrs. Jackson said she could picture bits of it hanging on the brambles allover Roaches Run The Run is a bird sanctuary, and the ducks that hang out there must Ilave been indignant to find themselves beset by this mini-predCltor Ginger was Jumpy for months after her session in the wild, but responded to the loving attention at home, and to the body-building diet. Jackson spent hours taking her for walks to get her accustomed to her "real world" Besides some harrowing memories and the revival of hunting skills, Ginger acquired something else she had not had before her safari ~ a tattoo.

Show dogs often don't wear their coat-spoiling collars and tags, and to a casuill observer they would be totilily unidentifiClble EXfJerienced shelter pcrsonrlel and law enforcr,ment officials, veterinarians and even research laboratories, however. are learning to look for the identifying mark on the inside of the dog's hind leg. The owner's Social Security number tattooed there can ensure that the dog can be reclaimed after il phone cilll to the National Dog Registry Why inside the hind leg? Because early lip and ear tattoos were simply slashed off by dog thieves "Oh, he lost it in a fight," they would tell the purchaser. National Dog Registry has been asked to assist Australia and Hong Kong in setting up tattoo-based pet registry programs, In the United States, said Mitch Rapoport, the number of tattooed pets continues to grow. but the program is an ongoing educational process Every yeClr therp is a n['w gcneratrorl of first tillle pet owners who have to learn about getting their beloved pets tattooed and registered with the central system in Woodstock. "We are very proud of our organization." said Mitch Rapoport "You can count on us: we are a constant-we really are." Try thepl Nafional Dog Registry. Box 116, Woodstock. New York 12498 914-679-2355

Tattoo Care Tips Pet tattooers work hard to improve Iheirlechniques anclmake a lallOo legible I'm a lirelime. But an easy to reacllattoo number is useless if il is coverecl with hair. As a responsible pel owner. you've made an invcslmenl in lime, money, and error! to make your pel safe. Don'l waste it all by not

keeping the lalloo area rree from hair. JUSIa scissor clipping is often good enough. Pels thai are relurned most quickly when they are lost are those with a highly visible lallOO. Can you really read each lalloo number on your pet') Check Ihem al leasl once every six monlhs 10 make sure. If a number fades or smears, call your tallooer and

46

ask him or her to loueh il up

1'01'

you, Almosl every tattooer will do it ror free. (['s one morc good idca thai can help save your pet's life. or course, a taltoo will not be of any use whatsoever ir it is not registcred. Be sure to register your pet's talloo number wilh NOR as soon as possible.


Registration Tanoo

Identification

Owner

Name

Application

No.

Protect Your Pet. Register With NDR.

_ _

Address

• Slale of the art eomputeri7.ation, City

_.

State/Zip

Telephone:

_

• Nationally respected • Authorized tattooers

Home Work

IMPORTANT:

• One-time

Give name of relative/friend

NDR can call in an

if you are not available.

emergency Name

lifetime

all tattooed

reputation, nationwide.

fee of $35.00.

Covers

pets ever owned by you,

• Missing pet reward, • No annual renewal fee.

_

Telephone:

• Boarding and medical fees guaranteed as required.

Tattood

b)'

• Free transfer

of ownership.

Address

• Complete State

Zip

Information Call

on

yOUf

Date

_

pelts):

Name

Dog __

_ Cat __

Male __

Other (specify)

Female

__

_

Spay/Neuter

Breed

• Visa and Mastercard

kit. accepted,

• 10% Senior Citizen discount. (Send photocopy of senior card or other 1.0. with birthdate, • Call or write for details on our

_ Age

owner's

_

excellent fundraising programs for organizations, 4H, Scouts, schools and clubs.

Color Special

Markings

If pet requires

Call or write for the name of a qualified tattooer in your area or inquire at the place where you found this pamphlet.

_

special medication

or other

emergency

data:

Please fill in all of the required information. Print clearly. If you have a Post Office Box listed as your mailing address. also include your street address. For morc than one pet, attach o:.lra sheet. Fee: A one lime $35.00 lifctime.

fee for all pets you own during

your

NATIONAL DOG REGISTRY

Mail to: NATIONAL DOG REGISTRY P.O. Box 116 Woodstock, N.Y. 12498-D116 Payment

by:

1-800-NDR-DOGS

o

My check or money order is enclosed. Charge my: 0 Visaill 0 MaslcrCard1:>

Exr.

IIIIII11111

II IIII

SIGNATURE

NECESSARY

FOR ALL CHARGE

Dale __

ORDERS

47

PROTECTING THE NATION'S PETS AGAINST LOSS AND THEFT SINCE 1966


ACTION U; INC. ACTION 81, ACTION

Hi,

OperilLes

and

expose

INC, INC, .:.1S ;1

~\ATERIALS fOR DISTRIBUTION

non-profit l1atiol1~l LIlld

fOl1lJd;ltioll

;"l

organized

ACTION 81 offers the working on pet theft to keep the literature

theft

InLerl1;1tiul1dl

of

privately

following materials problems in their updated~ Update

h:l!;{'r!

ill

VifT,illi:l

IIL.:Lt.Jork

owned

dogs

to groups communities. sheets are

::illc('

Lo prl'Vt'lll,

and

I()](,.

11l1l1dLur,

cats.

and individuals Every effort is included regularly.

made

LEAFLETS: 1) 2) 3) 4) 5) 6)

7)

"For OwnEors of Hissing Dogs and Cats." "How To Start a Lost Pet Registrv." "Prevention of Theft of Dogs and Cats." "The Dealer-Laboratory Connection." "Pound Sales Problems." "The Acquisition and Use of Stolen Dogs i1nd Cilts by fkdlcCll Testing, and Research facilities." ACTION 81 presentation Nat'l Academy of Sciences public meeting, Hashingtoll, I1.C., "VOICE of the HISSING" Quarterly A. 81 ne"'sletter. Nationwide information on dog and caL theft as rerocLed to

Te<lchill.~ at the 2/11/86. A. 81.

BOOKS: 8)

9) 10)

11) 12)

13) 14)

15)

"The lJe"ler-LnboraLory Connection." lIook one. l':Ji6-I<JH7. $15.00 A wide collection of articles and corcespondence pectail.ing tll the dealer-laboratory system of procurement and theft of dogs and cats. The Dealer-Laboratory Connection, Book tl.)O. 1988-1990. $15.00 Current information, correspondence, and articles. Updated 5/<J0. "Pound Sales and Release Prcblems." Updated 3/90. $15.00 This booklet has been requested and used by groups in mallY states and areas with pound-dealer-lab problems. Arti.cles and cocr,'C'pondence. "Dog and Cat Thefe" In-depth repon book I••• ith st;]ts, thert cuses, correspondence. factual presentation. Updated 5/90. $17.00 "VOICE of the NISSINC" collection, 1982-1989. Grass roots, network information on dog and cat theft, pound and dealer Ilper<ltions and corruption. Quotes from Act jcn 81 sources thron~llOnt the U.S.A. tell the story of the current di.s\lOnest systCr.1 of laboLltory-dealcr animal acquisition. $3.00 "lIow To SL;]rt 0 Lost Pet Regist.':.L" Cr;If;s l~ooU; Lype h""k J,·t r",. :neas with pet theft problems. lIe1p!ul .Ll1forlll;!LiolJ. $3.00 "1 Could Have Stolen Your Pet!" Blaze orange cards/ or stickers to le'IVe where dogs and cats are easy prey for thieves. No charge [or orders under 25. Sti.ckers may be cl'pied if Action 81 11;""<-' ~:Ol used. Index Summaries of the Action 81 Books al1d files. $3.0()

ACTION 81 HILL SEND ALL BOOKS fREE OF CHARGE TO GROUPS AIIO/OR PERSONS HIIO HILL RETURN TIIH! 1'!IlEN FINISHED OR IH LL PLACE TIII'.i-1 ] II A 1.1 BRARY. ACTION 81 DOES NOT CHARGE FOR THE LEAFLETS. CONTRLBUTlONS I-IELCmIE!!!!

48


~CTION

f1j INC.

FOR OWNERS OF

fl

L6-6-LY2-9

DOGS & CATS

.~-

:---t

:~c

:~c DEAR FRIENDS: It's terribly hard to lose your dog or cat .... I know .. YOU know .... My German Shephern, "Copper," was STOl.EN in 1974 ... That's ",hy ACTJON 81 was started .... a personal effort to find a BELOVED FAt-lll.Y ~lEMllER .. and to help other owners ..... and their missing dogs and cats, too. THE SEARCH: l.OOK EVERYHHERE .. around the house .. one owner found her poodle in a closed cupboard .. Check the yard, the neighborhood, go door to door .. Comb the area within a 2 mile radius of your home .. abandoned buildings, One dog was shut up in a shed .. ponds, streams, woods, trapping areas, fence lines .... dogs can get hung up .. di soriented .. Halk the fields, talk to farmers .. dogs and CNtS are shot .. poisoned .. run over .. left in ditches .. Check with highway crews who remove dead animals. KEEP GOING!! THE PUBLICITY: VITAL to the recovery of yout animal.. Start this AT O],;CE..If your pet has a registered tattoo, report your loss to the TATTOO REGISTRY .. and TO THE POLICE and/or SHERIFF .. ANUtAL CONTROL .. HU~tANE SOCIETY .. LOCAL LOST PET REGISTRy .... include agencies not just in your area, but in all neighhoring jurisdi ctions .. you have LOST VALUABLE PROPERTY .. ~lake up <t FLYER .. about 8 x 10 .. picture or drawing of your pet .. REHARn FOR INFORttATlON LEADING TO THE RETURN .. Send one to ACTION 81 and distribute them EVERYHHERE .. laundromats, gas stations, super markets, fast food places, vet. clinics, animal shelters .. Distribute them to people who TRAVEL THE ROADS .. mail carriers, delivery men, tel, road repair crews. Put an AD in the newspapers .. flashy .. picture .. colored highlighting .. Change it occasionally .. Contact radio stations, t.oo.. KEEP \.JORKING!!! DON'T GIVE UP !!!!!

Route 3. Box 6000 I Berryvi/le.

49

Virginia 22611 I Telephone

703路955路1278


VISIT IN PERSON: humane societies

Local shelters, GO OFTEN

pounds, collection places, pet shops, Ask to SEE TilE ANU1J\J,SYOURSELF !!!

HHAT ABOUT DEALERS AND LABORATORIES

?????

The Federal Animal Helfare

Act

provides inspection for missing animals by law enforcement officers .. The requirements are stated in Part 2, sec. 2.128 .. you can get a copy of the federal law and the USDA lists of Federal Licensed Dealers and Registered Research Facilities from the USDA-APHIS office in your state capital .. You can send your flyers to dealers and laboratories in your state and neighboring states .... Yes, I know how you feel .. Just do it. A FE\J DON'TS: If you are offering a reward ... or .. if a ransom demand is made to yon, DO NOT TRY TO MEET THE PERSON ALONE! !! Be sure that someone, preferably from thc police, is with you ..... DO NOT GIVE OUT A COMPLE'if, DESCRIPTION OF YOUR DOG OR CAT .. save something .. to let you know if a caller has found YOUR pet .... and .... DO NOT GIVE OUT YOUR PET'S NM~E TOO FREELy .... this gives the new "owner" more control over your pet. .. and NEVER TELL A STRANGER THE VALUE OF YOUR PET .. THEFT IS FOR $$$$$$$ Don't let your dog or cat outside at thE: SMIE TUlF.., Day or night. .... Thieves find out your habits easily ... Don't leave dogs and cats ALONE in yards or cars!!! Case alter case reads: "STOLEn from fenced yard ... .. from my car .. from the back porch." .. HIGH SECURITY fENCES with locks and alarms help, hut the ROTTmt LINE IS ALl-lAYS:DO NOT LEAVE YOUR nOGS AND CATS ALONE \JJ1EI(E TilleYHAY me SEEN AND TAKEN l'J.I(ASE!!! !! sonE DO'S: ALHAYS KNOH HHERE YOUR DOG OR CAT IS: An unsupervised dog or cat is FAIR GM1E ... anyone can pick it up and probably will!!!! NEIGHBORHOOD PROPERTY.

HATCH PROGRAHS

CAN PROTECT

PETS AS \JELL AS OTHER KINDS OF

Pet theft often goes DO\JN in areas with community

awareness!!

TATTOO YOUR PETS: Usually inside the right hind leg ... social security number. .. Tattoo mnst be REGISTERED \HTH A NATIONAL REGISTRY to be effective .... There is a current SURCE of tattoo systems, some state, some commerciaL .. quite confusing .. If in doubt, ask your veterinarian, local humane society or dog club .. Call or write ACTION 81, INC ... All

estimated

T\IO nlLLlON

DOCS ARE STOLEN EACII YE,\!Ziti TillS COUNTRY.

The number of STOLEN CATS APPEARS SLIGHTLY LESS .... many go unreported. The combined financial loss to the missing dog owners is conservatively estimated at ONE BILLION DOLLARS that's counting each owner's investment in his dog as $500 it runs far higher than that, we know. AND .... HOlJ HANY VANISHING DOGS ARE NEVER REPORTED ?????? AND CATS ??? At least 1 out of 3 .... maybe lout of 5 .... BIG OPERATION, ISN'T IT ?? KEEP UP THE SEARCH FOR YOUR niSSING FRIEND ..... PLEASE DON'T GIVE UP ... THERE ARE INSTANCES OF DOGS AND CATS RECOVERED AFTER ~~NY HONTHS .... REHEHBER:

THE ACTION 81 PRAYERS

50

ARE


-

Pheasants

r. o.

..

•...

Jay Jollll!".on

are

currently hosling or tentatively planning sporting clays events either as NSCA tournaments or fund-raising ufun ~shoots. Interested individuals may contact either the national office or a loca! representative for more information on shoots/ membership information.

(515)

Waterfowl

Assn.

Ct., Suite 200. CA 95834

(414)248'1707

424·DUCK

Richard

Way,

Grozik

(Or contact

(312)438-4300

your local

DU chapler)

720 Allen Avenue, WY 02·' 14·3402 Harvey

Kadlec

Orleans.

Randolph

• (CA)

(605)

PA 15037:

352·5268

, (IN. MD. MI. NY. OH. PAl Russel Sewell, 20505 Coshocton Rd. 124, West

lalayette,

Co.

OH 43845;

Jay Johnson,

nalional

W 1402

Directors

(812)

5362272

P O. Box

530. Edgelleld.

Carl Brown, Developmenl

Regional Directors , (CT, DE. ME. MD. PA, AI, VT) Gary Box (315)

SC 29824

186, Williamstown,

NY 13493;

6254427

, (FL. GA, KY, NC. SC. TN, VA. WV) Brian Hyder, 165 Howard Branch Rd., OHo, NC 28763: (704) 524·6564 • (AL, LA, MS) Clark Gordin, 269 Hillsboro St., Forest, (601) 469·2879 • (lA, MN,

MS 39074;

SO, WI) Charles

RI. 1, Box 106. Westby, (608) 634·3886 • (fL, IN. MI, OH)

Burke,

(913)

Cily,

469·0136

P. O. Box 96, Goose Mullin

(319)

(A directory pres8N8s

sfate

Box 6, Hinton,

, (PA) IA 52750

hunting by state,

many

John

Al

87,

Bromtley.

3754

Plckertown Rd., Challonl, PA 18914; (215) 822· 7723 , (DE. NJ. NY) AI CiID. 85 Johanna In.,

Slaten

Island,

of which fearure sporting cfays facilities, is available for $2 postage

(718)983·1200

and handling.)

315 18th Ave., (308) 9958977

• (CO,

NE)

Gloria

NY 10309;

NE 68949:

Rille

& Pistol

Slankey,

Norcross.

Arkansas

State

RIfle & Pistol

P. 0, 80x AR 72205

5503,

lit1le Rock,

(404)

WIlllarn

446·2097

MT. Ul,

Thomas.

WY)

Rd"

Billings, Carder

Fl32810·4785:

Waterfowl

DaVId

Wlellcki

(803)

763 7421

Executive

Director

5t , Columbus.

725.1101

& Revolver

1007. SI/alford.

Delaware

Slale

P.O 80x DE 19899

1786, Wilmington,

Sportsmen's

01 Columbia

Firearms

ShOaling

Sport

P.O. Box 430540. FL 327430540

Assn.

Georgia Sport Shooting Assn .. P.O Box 767. Fort Valley. GA 31030 HawaiI Rifle Assn .. Box 1175, Honolulu. HI 96807

Illinois

Slate

Riflp. Assn.

Iowa

Slate

N Woinbach IN 47711 Rifle

P. 0, [3ox 1093, IA 52406

14th 51. NW,

inc.,

1626 Fargo Ave., Chicago, Il60626 Indiana Stnte Rifle & Pistol Assn. Ave.,

& Pislol Cedar

Assn., Rapids,

Kansas Slate Rillo Assn .. P. O. Box 503. SJlin<l. KS 67402·0503

5410

Ln., Bethesda,

Louisiana

Executive

7780004

Shooting

Assn.,

Assn.,

P. O. Bo)( 513, Shreveport, LA 71 i62 (Maine) Pine Tree State Rille & Pislol

897·9770

Wisconsin Waterfowlers Association Ken Cook.

Inc.,

Kissimmee,

Kentucky Slate Rille & PiSlol P. 0, Box 773, Elizabethlown, KY 42701

(414)

Assn.,

Florida

Society

(301)

Assn.,

SI. NE, Washington,

The Wildlife Grosvenor

Assn ..

CT 06497

1300 Newton DC 20017

Inc .. 1010 EvanSVille,

221·2684

Washmglon, DC 20005; (202) 3711808

MD 20814:

203,

Assn.,

Idaho Slale Rifle & Pistol Assn., 637 16th 51.. Clarkslon, WA 99403

The Wildlife Legislative Fund of America (614)

Shooling

Rille

Assn ..

Assn.,

P. O. 80)(

District 5640

Rifle & Pistol

V,ll1cy Vi ow St., Suiln Grovo. CA 92{jtj5

Connecticut

P. 0, Box 921352,

GA 30092:

Orlando.

Rouge,

M.

Assn.,

Or.. Phoenix,

1974, Englewood,

KY. NC. SC. TN) C

P. O. Box 792, Waukesha.

Erickson,

Holdrege.

Slate

Assn.,

Anchorage,

P. O. Box CO 80150

SUite 51.,

& Pistol

Stale

DaVid Spring,

Wildlife Management Institute

E Forsyth

Arizona

Associations & Pislol Assn., NE, Hunls·.JiUe,

Colorado

LA) Dr

OH 43215.

WV 25951;

Rifle

Slale

l?nr;?

Society

AZ 85745: (602) 620·1220 Regional Directors " (WV) leonald Anderson.

Alaska

Gilfdoll

Rd , Tucson,

, (Fl) lyrle Boyer, 200 Jacksonville. FL 32202: (904) 3583030

242·3046

of NAGA lis/ed

Lake,

Pass

Circle

• (AR.

50 W Broad We 51 Gales

Shooting Slale Rille

2505 Isnbelle AL 35811

1429 W Rockwood AZ 85027

1023 Wappoo Rd., SUite 36B. Charleston. SC 29407

721·0010

Slate

Division

California

South Carolina Association

1400 Lee. Dr.. Coraopohs. PA 15108 Tracy Russell (412) 262·4044

4800

North American Gameblrd Association John

(406)

The Ruffed Grouse

W 78

Programs

Division

P. O. 80)(·141402, AK 9aS14

(4071293·8510

Elk

NW,

• (TX) Jack Schlickenmaier. 11 B OOWfll1l9 rJ/ S<Jn A[llonio. lX 7820~.l512182tj·80\6

nd.,

2291 W. Broadway, Missoula. MT 59802; Bob Munson. Executive Director

NRA Rd.,

• (CA) Or. Benpnli{) Robson. 512 W Badillo, Covina. CA 91722; (818)962·3012

, (Fl)

961·3920

Competilions

Alabama 5ta!e

5990046

Bill Stra\lon. 3902 Dover MT 59105: (406)252'3881

Safari Club International

Dick Aosenlieb,

, (AR. CA. KS. MO. OK) Tony Adams, 11538 BlueJackel, Overland KS 66210:

(713)

Rocky Mountain Foundation

Ave.

828·6243

(202) 828·6153 Shooling Sports (202) 828·6172

Colbert.

• (B,'llISI1 Columbia.

WI 54667;

700 S Washinglon St., Clay IL 62824: (618) 676·1207

Park.

2. Bo)( 479.

NJ. NY.

RD 1,

(913)

Island

Rhode

Shooting

Nunica, MI 494.t8; (616) 798·3410 • (DC. PAl Sal P,lera, 1976 Old

"Chuck"

(5011967'1060

TX 77257·2656: MA, NH.

Tanner,

N Dragoon,

Rifle Association

1600

NRA Hunllng/Shooting Hunter Servicos Division

Jackson,

WA 99005: (509) 276·8578 • (MI) Lance Norris. 12101

• (GA.

, (TX) Rick Wendland. P.O. Box 572656, Houston.

Direclor 01 Chapter (803) 637·3106

16407.

National

(202)

2589 E Lakeshore Or., Balon LA 70808: (504)927.7281

TN 37404·3140:

• (AR) Randy Gulllrle. At Aussellville. AA 72801:

110 Corporale

, (KS, OK) Taz Ridley, 14405 Terrace, Lenexa. KS 66216;

1110,

Ave., (615)

ChaHanooga, 6226903

lelser.

Amateur Trapshooting Association

Washinglon, DC 20036; (202) 828·6000

Sumneytown Pike. Harleysville, PA 19438: (215) 234 8783

Dean,

(703) 694·6979 Dave Howell, RI. 1,

IN 47585:

Kranik,

MS 39236·6407: (601) 982·1863 • (Al, HI. WA) Wanda Nerud,

office

'(MD. NC. PA. VA. WV) Donnie Buckland, P.O. Box

255·7491

(412)4692290

Mike

SpMS .

P. Q. 00)( 567B, Indinn:lpolis, IN 46206: (317) 633·2075

Place. ValleJO, CA 94590; (7071644·7455 , (Al. MS) Harold McDonald, P. O. Box

5459775

• (MN)

1401 Wilson Blvd., Level S, Arlington. VA 22209: (703) 528·1818

Fed.

(508)

SO 57350:

P. 0_ [3ox 731, Pine Valley. CA 92062: (619) 4738592 • (TN) Ed Reachard, 2015 McCallie

Wild Turkey

MA 02662:

• (NY, Ontario, PAl Andrew 961 Scenery Dr., Ehzabettl,

The Izaak Walton League of America

National

Of..

, (lA, K5. MO. NE, OK) Roger Wells. Box 26. Americus. KS 66835: (l16) 443 S817 , (Al. CA, NM. NVI f,,'1Ike MaHllot.

527-6261

Mariann

CO. 10. MT. OR. UT. WA, WY) 5525

Tile following shooting orQ.1niz.1t;ons are sourcos of in/ormation on various S/lOtgUfl

W153190;

Lockwood.

Slendal.

Cody,

(307)

Or., Whitewater, 473·7521

Boise, 1083705; (208) 378·4371 • (KS, NE, NO, SO) Kenneth Solomon, 557 Utah SE, Huron,

Sluarl, VA 24171: • (Il, tN, KY, OH)

Foundation for North American Wild Sheep

Crest (414)

David

• (Al. GA, SC) Tommy national olilee

Grove,

Finlrock,

'(CA.

Regional

Long

Dennis

• (Cr. MA. MF. NH) Judy Keller. Box 718. \48 Ouansel Rd., South

P. O. Box 10041, Augusta, GA 30903 Rocky Evans, Execulive Director (803)637·5731

Ducks Unlimited

NM. NV)

2831\ Ondgl1flOll1tO Dr . Las Vug<ls. NV 09121; (/02) 739·3727 • (IL, OH. PAl Alan Heth, RI. 1 Glacial

• (MN, WI) John Horan, 6940 Dr., Eden Pr,mll;. MN 55344: (G 17) 937 -OO?G

862·3290

Quail Uniimited

Ted Bryant. E"xeculive Director

1 Walertowl IL 60047

461·7142

WI) nlchard Young, RI. 1, BOx 266, lake Geneva, W153147;

(614)

(800)

(612)

MN 55175

, (Il,

up/and game bird huntmg and conservation and/or are

3840 Rosin Sacramento.

· (Al.

51 Paul.

Regional Directors • (lA, MO) James Wooley Jr., AI. 1, Box 136, Chariton, IA 50049;

The following organizarions sources 01 informalion on

California

Forever

Oox 75473.

WI 53187

Direclor;

Assn,

Inc.,

South

Portland,

Maryland

111 Summit

Terrace

Ad.,

ME 04106

& DC Rille

& Pistol

Assn.,

17 Deep Dale Rd .. Timonium, MD 21093 (Massachusetts)

Stale

Rille

& Pistol

Spnrling Clays

51


Assn.

01 Massachusells.

P. O. Box 299. Soulhboro. Michigan P. O. Box

MA 01772

Rifle & Pistol Assn., 1802. Midland. MI48640

Minnesota

Rille

Inc.,

Priory

18111

555 Danbury

Ln .• Minnelonka.

Mississippi Stlllo Rille & PiSlol A~sn .. P. O. Box 53, Grace.

MS 387'5 Sport

Shooting

P O. Box 6756,

Assn .•

Jeflerson

Rlflc

P.O Box Nebraska

& P,slol

Assn

P. O. Box 6532, Omaha, NE 68106 Nevada Siale Rille & Pistol Assn .. A ••.. e .. Las Vegas.

NV 89123 New

Hampshire

Allie

& Pistol

54 Perly 51., Concord, (New

Jersey)

Assn .•

NH 03301

Assn.

of New

Rille & Pistol Clubs, Teaneck, NJ 07666

New Mexico Shoaling Sports Inc., P. O. Box 1205, Roswell.

Rd .•

Assn.

Hew

York

Siale

Rille

& Pislol

Assn.

Inc., P. O. Box 1023. Troy, NY 12181 North Carolina Rille & Pistol Assn .• P. O. Box 25493, Charlolle,

NC 28229 North Dakota Shoaling Sports RR 2, Box 87, Grand Forks.

Assn .•

NO 58201 Ohio

Rifle

& Pistol

2924

California

Assn.,

A ••.. e .• Kettering,

OH '5419·1916 Oklahoma

Rille Assn.

Inc.,

1916lylal In., Choctaw, OK 73020 Oregon Stale Rille & Pislol Assn .• 1 BO') t1r 70\h I\ve .• Portland, PennsylvanIa

Slate

Assn .• P.O.

Box 267.

Rille

1284

Island N Main

Rille

.

New

England

Rd,

Buckhurst

HlIl,

& Pistol

mforma/lon in England and Scotland.} For informallon on United Stales

In

Haggard.

CPSA.

conlaci'

320 Fairfield

Holly

SI. SE, Aiken.

SI , Pans.

France

75008; phone 011 33 I 45223890 (Con/act for information on sporting clays toumamenls and shOOting grounds or five bird shoots in Belgium. Domimcan Republic. France. Germany. MeXICO,Portugal. Spain, and the Umted States.) For inlormation

on UnIted

Slates

membership

In FITASC.

J:lno Pcnny.

rnASe. 381~ nilI"'

Indianapolis.

Shooting

contact· IN 4G220:

Texas

Slate

P. O. 80'

TN 37355

Assn ..

710549, Dallas. TX 75371

Utah Stale Rille & PISlol Assn., P. O. Box 8655 Foothill Sial ion. Sail lake Cuy, Vermont Slale 2140

Dorset

UT 84108 Allie & Pislol

Assn ..

S1.. Shelburne.

VT 05482 VirgInIa

Rille

& Revolver

Assn ..

P. O. Box 563, Orange.

Walnut

Washington

P. O. 80'66481.

Assn

Inc ..

Seallle. WA 98166

Wesl Virginia Stale RIlle & Pistol Assn .. P. O. Box 208. Anawalt.

It/ing,

TX

& Pistol Assn .• Or., Beloit. WI 53511

Wyoming

Shooting

Stale

McDougall

Assn.

Inc .•

Or., lander,

WY 82520 WSSA

National Sporting Association

Clays

P. O. 80' 680007 TX 78268·0007

(800) 877-5338

January-February

CA 94244.2090.(916) Colorado Oept 1313 Sherman.

-

1600

NW. WashIngton.

DC 20036: (202) 828 6000 Services

Shooting

DIVision

Competitions

DiVision

and Training

Division

Slale

Vlllagra

445·5708

Bldg .. Santa

Fe, NM 87503:

(505) 827· 7899

01 Envilonmenlal

Ollice

Ave.,

Bldg ..

Hartlord,

CT 06106;

(203) 566·5599

New

York

Dept.

Conservalion.

01 Environmenlal

50 Woll

01 Natural

& Environmental Hwy.,

Dover,

Resources

Control, DE

89 Kings

Rd .. Albany.

Wildlile

Horth

Dakota

Game

AIIanla. GA 3033':

Resources,

Ohio

Bldg.,

Oep\.

Fountain

of Nalural

Square,

Oklahoma Depl. of Wildlife Conservation. 180 I N lincoln. Oklahoma

Cily,

OK 73152:

(405) 52\·3851

& Nalural Honolulu.

Oregon Depl. 01 Fish & Wildlife. P. O. Box 59. Portland, OR 97207:

HI 96809: (808) 548·6550

(503) 229·5551

Idaho Fish & Game Dept. 600 S. Walnul. Boise. 1083707:

PennsylvanIa

Game

2001

Ave.,

(208) 334·3700

PA 17110·9797;

01 Conservalion, 52<1 S 2nd SI..

lincoln

$pflngllllld, IL G7IOG. (217) 782·6302 Indiana Dupt. 01 Natural Rosources, 608 Slate

OUlce

IN 4620';

(317) 232-4080

Dept

Bldg.,

of Natural

Resources.

Dept.

E

Bldg ..

01 Wildlife

Kentucky Resources.

& Parks.

St.. SUlle 502.

Topeka.

(913) 296·228'

Louisiana Fisheries.

(502) 564·3400

De pI. 01 Wildlife P. O. Box 98000.

& Baton

('01)277·2774 Carolina

South

Dakola

Dept.

445 E Capitol,

Game,

SO 57501·3185; Tennessee Agricultural

TN 3720';

Ellington

Nashville.

(6\5) 781·6500

Texas Parks & Wildlile Dept., 4200 Smith School Rd .• Austin.

TX 7874';

(512) 389-4800

W North

Resources,

Resources

Center.

Depl.

Bldg .• Annapolis.

& Parks

(605) 773·3381

Wlldlite

1636

01 Nalural

Fish. Pierre,

P. O. Box 40747,

Utah

Ollice

& Marine

(803) 73,·3888

Maine Depl. 01 Inland Fisheries & Wltdllle, 284 Slale SI . Station #41. Dept

Wildlife

Resources Dept., Rembert C. Dennis Bldg .. Columbia, SC 29202:

Rouge. LA 70898; (504) 765·2800

Slate

Commission. Harrisburg,

(717) 787·4250

Rhode Island Dep!. of Environrnent:ll Managr!mont, 9 Hayes St.. P,oV1(loncll, HI 02008:

Agency,

Depl of Fish & Wildlile # 1 Game Farm Ad.,

Franklort. KY '0601;

Elmerton

South

Indianapolis.

Ave., Wallace IA 50319·0034:

KS 666'2·1220:

Resources.

Columbus,

OH 43224; (614) 265·6886

(404) 656·3530

Hawaii Dept 01 land Resources, Box 621,

Depl Plaza,

& Fish Oepl..

(701) 221·6300

De pI. 01 Natural

Georgia Depl 01 Natural Resources, Floyd Towers E. 205 Buller SI.,

illinoIs Tower

Resources

Commission, Archdale Bldg .. 512 N Salisbury St., Raleigh.

100 N Bismarck Expressway, Bismarck. NO 58501;

19903:

(302) 736·5295 Florida

Carolina

NC 27611; (919) 733·3391

Dep!.

of Natural Temple,

C;ly, UT 84116·3156;

Resources. Salt

lake

(8011533·9333

Vermont Agency of Nalural Resources, 103 S Main SI.. Wale1bury.

VT 05677:

MD 21401; (3011974·2870

(802) 244·7347

Massachuselts Dcpl. 01 Fisheries. Wlldlile. & EflVHonnlCnlal Law

VIrginia Dept 01 Gilrne & Inland H;.tre:/lus, 4010 W Broad SI..

Enforcement,

Richmond.

100 Camblldge

Basion. MA02202; Oept.

St.,

(617) 727·3151

01 Nalural

Resources,

Box 30028. Lans;ng, MI '8909; (517) 373·1220 Minnesota

Dept.

Resources,

500 lafayelle

Paul. MN 55'55;

01 Natural

(612) 2966157

Jackson.

MS 39205; (601) 961 5300

VA 23230:

(80') 367·'000 Washington Oept. of Wildlife, 600 N Capirol Way, Olympia.

WA 98504; (206) 753·5700 Wesl

Rd .. SI.

Mississippi Dept 01 Wildlife Conser ••.. ation. Soulhport Mall.

Contact the following state agenCle~ for information on game hunting seasonsl regulafions or shooting range facilities.

New Jersey Depl. of Environmenlal Prolection, 401 E Slate St.. CN 402.

North

Michigan

(202) 828·6172

Nye Bldg .. 201 S Fall SI.. Carson

NY 12233: (518) '57·5691

Delaware

& Complex.

Trenlon. NJ 08625; (609) 292·2885 Hew Mc_lco Gamo & Fi~h Dopt ..

CommiSSion,

01 Nalural Resources, nm 718. Denver,

Dep!.

ProteC\lon.

St .•

Capitol

Connecticut

Tawes

Ave.

Rock.

Augusla. ME 04333; (207) 289·2766

Assoclallon,

Resources.

CO 80203; (3031 866·331'

Maryland

Island

EducatLon

WisconsIn RIlle 1831 Arrowhead

Dr .• linle

Call1ornla Fish & Game 1416 9th St, Sacramento.

NRA Youth Programs RIlle

N 33rd

01 Conservation

(603) 27'·3'21

& Fish Commission,

AR 72205; (501) 223 6300

National

(202) 8286038

WV 25808

San Antonio.

HIli In.,

(202) 828 62'3

Rifle & Pistol

Resources

(515128'·5145

75015·2079: (214) 580·2000 (For information on scouting or earnmg a shotgufl shOaling merit badge. contact your local scout master listed In your teleplJone dlfeclory or ava/lab!e from the national office.)

Hunler

VA 22960·0327

1235

1325

Rhode

Slale

Game

900 Jackson

Spor1S Assn ..

Manchester, Rille

Arkansas

91h & Grand Des ".loines.

Of America

Depl.

New Hampshire Fish & Game Depl.. 2 Halen Or .. Concord. NH 03301:

Rd . Phoenix,

#2 Nalural

Kansas

RR 4. Box 264, Brookings. SO 57006 Tennessee S!ate Rille Assn. Inc .• 200 Oakdalf?

W GreonwllY

Iowa

Boy Scouts

Dakota

Dept..

(904) 488·155'

10 Lisbon

Soulh Carolina ShoO ling Assn .• P. O. Box 502. John's Island, South

h:;h

FITASC

AssoclAtidN!

SC 79'55·0502

&

SC 29801; (803) 648·0067

No.

& Parks

2200

C"y, NV 89701; (702) 885·'360

Gilmc

Maqory Sloneman Douglas Tallahassee, Fl32303;

vout#

Assn.,

St.. Providence,

RI02904

Nalural

165 Capllol

169 5TO;

phone 01'" 01 5056221 (Con/act fOf sporting clays tournament

City.

PA 16127 Rhode

.

(317) 251·2161

& Pistol

Grove

Alaska Dep'- 01 Fish & Game, P O. Box 3·2000. Juneau. AK 99802:

(907) '65·<100

Clay Pigeon Shooting Association of England

VollJifo.

OR 97213

Nevada

AZ 85023, (602) 942·3000

membership

NM 88202

(205) 261·3'86

ArIzona

Game

Commission,

lincoln. NE 68503; ('02) '64·0641

TX 78253; (512) 688·3371

107 Epping

Nebraska

& St ..

AL 36130:

2222

Essex,

Jersey

645 Beverly

Montgomery.

FM III ROlh Rd .• San Antonio,

.. . .

,

1762. Billings. MT 59103 Rille & PiSlol Assn ..

120 E Wrgwam

CT 06897;

. ... . 11III

Cily.

MO 65102 Montana

Rd .. Wilion.

Alabama Dep\. 01 Conservation Natural Resources. 64 N Union

National Skeet Shooting Association

MN 553'5

Missouri

Sports

(203) 762·1320

Revol ••.. er Assn.

&

National Shooting Foundation

Virginia

Resources, Charleslon.

Oepl.

01 Nalural

1800 Washington WV 25305:

Wisconsin Resources.

Depl. of Natural Box 7921, Madison.

Missouri Depl. 01 Conservation. P. O. Box 180. Jefferson City.

WI 53707; (608) 266·2621

MO 65102·0180;

5400

(314) 751·4115

Montana Depl. 01 Fish, WlldlJle, & Parks, 1420 E 61h. Helena, MT 59620:

SI. E,

(304) 3'8·2754

Wyoming

Game

Bishop

& Fish Dept.

Blvd .• Cheyenne,

WY 82002; (307) 777·7735

('06) 444·2535

13

1990

52


DOG AGILITY AND THE U.S.D.A.A. Commonly

Asked Questions

What is Dog Agility? Dog agillty is' a competitive sport in which a handler directs his dog over a timed obstacle course, with scoring based on faults as In equestrian jumping evel1ts. Because of its fast pace and simple. objective scoring system. dog agllity has be.:ome an exclting spectator sport.

What obstacles are used in dog agility? The basic obstacles used in dog agillty are the A-frame, weave poles. table. pause box, 'lee-saw, dog walk, cross-over, pipe tunnel. collapsed tunnel, and assorted jumps and hurdles (typically Including the broad jump, tire jump, brush jump, high jump, bar jump, doubie bar jump. and spread bar jump).

I have seen other obstacles. international standards?

Why aren't they listed among those advocated under

Other obstacles occasionally seen are a sway-bridge, slippery-slide, a hoop jump and log hurdle. These obstacles were devised by local groups and individuals as their own creations or experiments. With regard to the hoop jump 'lnd log hurdle. jumps or hurdles of various designs may be used in competition and are permitted under International standards as long as they meet the performance standards of the basic jump or hurdle types. With regard to the sway-bridge and slippery-slide, performance standards and safety concerns have never been adequately addressed. thus preventing these obstacles from serious consideration.

How could new obstacles be added to the approved list? Obstacles may be approved through due-process through the U.S.D.A.A.'s rules and regulations committee if consistent with the overall international standards for dog agility. An obstacle would be subjected to scrutiny during a test period to permit groups and individuals to evaluate the proposed standards. safety and acceptability. To date, U.S.D.A.A. has opted to focus on national standardization In order to foster widespread competition rather than development of new obstacles.

How high will my dog have to jump? Jump heights for hurdle at least one times their half times their height. During 1989, height classes in performance

obstacles are 30", 21". height at the withers.

the rules committee for competition as in dog agillty.

and but

12". Dogs are required to jump never more than one and one-

of the USDAA will undertake to well as recognition for successful

53

erE-ate separate accompJlshment


"hllt is the U.S.D.A.A.r The United States Dog Agility Assoclatlon, Inc. (V.S.D.A.A.) was organized by a group of dog agility enthusiasts to promote this new sport In V.S.D.A.A. promotes through Its adopted ruies and reguiations the standards petition as used In Great Britain, Scandinavia, mainland Europe, Australia parts of the world. Through ongoing relationships with recognized European In the sport of dog agility and through membership In The Agility Club V.S.D.A.A. officers stay abreast of current ruies, regulations and Britain, competition around the worid.

In 1986 the U.S. of comand other leaders In Great trends In

How does U.S.D.A.A. promote dog agility? U.S.D.A.A. disseminates Information on dog agility through its publications, including training tips and rules bookiets, construction plans for obstacles meeting competition standards, videos, and a periodic newsietter on points of interest and changes to rules and regulations. U.S.D.A.A. also supports interested groups in organizing lectures, working seminars, and agility events, and provides a referral network for member groups and indivlduais Interested In participating In dog agility.

What are the bene/1ts of U.S.D.A.A. membership? Members' dues are utilized for advertising and other promotional efforts to the advancement of dog agility. It is these efforts along with the work of local agility groups that encourage others to become Involved in the sport. U.S.D.A.A. promotes International standards for dog agility which enables groups to effectively compete. Group members receive a copy of ail materials published by the V.S.D.A.A. Additionally, promotional materials are available to groups for exhibit and distribution at dog shows and agility demonstrations. Group members appoint a delegate to the U.S.D.A.A. rules and regulations committee. Individual members receive a copy of the rules and regulations bookiet and a one year subscription to the U.S.D.A.A. Dog Agility Report.

Ca.nmixed-bred dogs participate

in dog agility?

Yes. It Is frequently said that dog agility is a "sport for all dogs", in that the sport permits both pure-bred and mixed-bred dogs to compete. One should be aware, however, that not all breeds are weil suited for the sport because of their physical build. 'While agility is a sport which includes mixed-bred dogs, mixed-bred dogs will not be permitted on the show grounds of AKC sanctioned events.

Is "Dog Agility"

recognized by the American Kennel Club?

Dog agility may be held as an exhibit event In connection with AKC events; however, present indications are that no competition rules are being established. An A.K.C. club wishing to hold an exhibit event can only publlsh In their premium list a statement that the event wlll be held at a given time and place along with the name and address of a source for further information. They may no longer publlsh the llst of obstacles to be used or any other detail regarding the event. Also, dog aglilty can no longer be held as a non-regular obedience class.

For further information, phone U.S.D.A.A. at (214) 231-9700 or write to: U.S. Dog Agility Association, Inc .. P.O. Bo!': 850955 â&#x20AC;˘ Richardson, Texas

54

75085


How to respond to anti-dog enforcement?

ADO

A'S

HOW

TO

RESPOND DO NOT

BE AFRAID

and remember

TO

you must assert your rights to protect them.

If you are responsibly

and owning nUisance others,

then

wholesome quality

dogs and not creating

or an unsafe you

situation

are

activity

pets and hobby

are not evil or crlrninal

activity

I-DOG

ENFORCEMENT

for a

raising

high-

animals.

Dogs

by themselves.

Dogs are one of man's panions.

a

conducting

in

ANT

breeding

oldest

Do not feel ashamed

comof your

and do not admit the so-called

"responsibility"

of purebred

for stray dogs or unhealthy

A

breeders conditIons

GU I 0 E

TO

in other parts of the city.

American Dog Owners Association, Inc. 1920 Route 9

YOUR

RIG

Castleton, New York 12033

55

H T S


The officers, directors, and executive committee of the American Dog Owners Association feel that it would be appropriate and helpful to many members living in today's world of restrictions, control, and harassment to publish the following for your guidance. Please save this for future reference and let this be your guide when someone comes to your door. YOU 00

NOT HAVE TO ALLOW ANYONE INTO YOUR HOUSE WITHOUT A PROPER SEARCH WARRANT.

SUGGESTED STEPSTO BE TAKEN IN THE EVENT OF LOCAL ANTI-DOG ENFORCEMENT. The following text outlines methods of inquiry and enforcement which may be used by local officials in attempts to enforce anti-dog ordinances in your community and suggested techniques of response. These techniques are entirely legal and based upon the rights of citizens as stated by the U. S. Constitution. A. TElEPHONE INQUIRY OR THREAT: You may receive telephone inquiries concerning the number of dogs you own and whether any dogs or puppies are for sale. Other questions may also be asked. Your response should be to inquire, "Are you interested in a puppy?" If the answer is, "Yes," ask that person for: his name, address, and phone number. Suggest that you or a responsible breeder will contact that person at a more convenient time for you. If the answer is friendly and genuinely inquisitive, out to look at your puppies ..

invite the person

If the question is asked, "What price is each puppy being sold for?", simply say that puppies of this type are being sold for between x dollars and y dollars in price. Never say that you are selling them. If the question is asked, "Are these your puppies?" should be, "Why do you want to know?"

your answer

If your conversation indicates that the person is representing the county clerk's office or allegedly representing an official body, ask the caller for: FULL NAME, TITLE, PHONE NUMBER SUPERVISOR'S FULL NAME, PHONE NUMBER AGENCY'S FULL NAME AND FULL ADDRESS NATURE OF THE INQUIRY ((what is it about) WHY THE INQUIRY IS BEING MADE HOW YOUR NAME AND PHONE NUMBER WAS OBTAINED Then ask that all future questions from that agency be submitted in writing. If you believe that your are being harassed, do not give your address or your name; it is not your problem to send the letter. Make a complete record in writing of the date and time of each phone call and all the information that was requested by you and the caller. Keep these

56 I i


records with your dog records so that they may be referred to in the future. Under no circumstances should you volunteer information or admit any action which may be in violation of the ordinances over the telephone. You should not attempt to mislead or otherwise lie to a caller nor should you Ireat such a caller with any more respect than you would il magazine salesman. You do not have to incriminate yourself under the 5th Amendment of the U. S. Constitution and you should certainly not make such statements over the telephone. Do not bother to call back to verify identities or information simply because you are requested to (you are under no obligation to spend money to aid a criminal investigation of yourself). U.

PERSONAL INVESTIGATION: If you are confronted with some official demanding to investigate your property, the following responses are recommended: If the person presents a badge, you should ask for: HIS FULL NAME, PHONE NUMBER HIS SUPERVISOR'S FULL NAME, PHONE NUMBER THE AGENCY HE REPRESENTS HIS BADGE NUMBER WHY HE IS THERE TO SEEYOU IF THERE IS ANY COMPLAINT

INVOLVED

WHO MADE THESE COMPLAINTS (he probably won't WHETHER HE HAS A WARRANT FOR A SEARCH REQUEST A COpy OF THAT WARRANT (probably one)

answer)

he won't

have

You should answer no questions but ask that he send or deliver all questions in writing. You should write down the answers to all of these questions as the conversation proceeds. A simple notebook will do the job. If you feel that a search of your home will lead to threatened confiscation of a dog or a criminal complaint you should refuse entry to your home unless the sheriff or police are present with a search warrant. If he says that he can get that easily, then tell him to do so. Remain cool and polite. Call your attorney as soon as possible. If you are faced with a threatened seizure without court hearing or court order, call the police immediately. Also obtain the names of all persons involved, including the police officers This may prevent seizure. Please understand that seizure of property, without due process of law, is unconstitutional, and due process of law should include a court hearing in every action relating to such seizure. If the animal control officials or police seize a dog, they may not destroy the animal or harm him in any way until a judge has ruled that you are inviolation and this can only occur after a full hearing.

57


Call your attorney at the time of threatened seizure and ask him to help you. Do not answer any questions from the police without legal advice. Do not offer any explanations regardless of what they may be (police and enforcement officials have a bad habit of misinterpreting such explanations). Remember, everything you say can and will probably be used against you. Do not volunteer any dogs or other property. Call other breeders in the area to warn them and inform them if the occurrence.

C

COOPERATION: Remember that cooperation will not usually avoid prosecution. Also remember that seizure of one of your dogs without court action, under protest, amounts to prosecution without trial. I repeat, anything you say or do in regard to the attempted seizure or inquiries may be used against you in a criminal or quasi-criminal action. Everything you say or do will probably be used against you. Write down everything that is said and occurs as it happens or as soon after as you can. These notes can be valuable evidence to defend yourself at a later time. Try to avoid anger and avoid violence at all costs Try to obtain as much information as you can: the informers, enforcing officials, officers, ete. Require enforcing officials and officers to put everything in writing. They may not do it, but you can ask. DO NOT BE AFRAID and remember you must assert your rights to protect them If you are responsibly breeding and owning dogs and not creating a nuisance or an unsafe situation for others, then you are conducting a wholesome activity in raising high-quality pets and hobby animals. Dogs are not evil or criminal by themselves. Dogs are one of man's oldest companions. Do not feel ashamed of your activity and do not admit the so-called "responsibility" of purebred breeders for stray dogs or unhealthy conditions in other parts of the city

Do YOU

belong

to ADOA?

breeding

and exhibiting

Its objectives

of dogs as a non-commercial

and to engage in educational mote the welfare

are to protect

of dogs.

and legislative Dues are: $

10.00

Husband/wife

$

15.00

Clubs

$

25.00

-

$100.00

Businesses For further

venture

activities

Individual

information

58

contact

the ADOA

the

office.

to pro-


~~~ ~

Animal - Vues

Goals

Current Activities o Improving commmunications

between

the pet owner and the veterinarian.

oProviding humane education related to the owning of and caring for pets and animals.

oPromoting compassion, respect and ;;ood health for all living things, through responsibile companionship, stewardship and ownership of pelS and animals.

Non-profit Status Animal- Vucs was formed under ilSarticles of incorporation

on February

21, 1984.

We are

incorporated as a non-profit educational corporation and havc received tax exempt status under IRS section 501 (c) (3).

Non-political Animal- Vucs was formed as an educational

o "PClS and Pcople", a 6 week veterinarianinstructed series open to the public. Usually presented twice each year, it provides animal care related information to pet owners. The program includes a classroom lecture series and field obedience/socialization training, the "Good Canine Citizen Program". o "Good Canine Citizen Program", an animal obedience training session in group settings (all breeds). It promotes safe animal and handler behavior in stressful situations bringing a variety of pelS into contact with other pelS and humans in large and small group settings. ["Good Canine Citizen Program" is recognized by the American Kennel Club.J o Animal Crackers, a weekly radio interview show, hosting prominent pet professionals, broadcast in Central Pennsylvania. [ National Public Service Recognition Award, 1981J o Pet Alen Wallet Card/Sticker Project. a window sticker and wallet card describing emergency information about the care and evaluation of pets owned by the carrier. [Covered nationally in major news publications.] o "Animal -Vues and Nues". a newsletter

corporation and does not affiliate itself with political organizations or animal activist groups.

focusing on pet care for the older pet. The newsletter has a national audience and is

Animal-Vues unconditional information.

published quarterly. o "Guidelines for Emergency

believes that each pet owncr has an right to unbiased educational

Professional

Listings

o Bureau of Charitable Organizations o Encyclopedia of Associations o Guide of Health Promotion Programs for Central Pennsylvania o National EducationiPublic Committee,

Service

Delta Society

For more information Executive Secretary Animal Vues Box 71 RD#2 Bloomsburg,

Pet Care".

a

booklet outlining the proper procedures for evacuating or caring for your pelS during a natural and manmade disasters. [Reviewed nationally J

PA 17815-9528

Contributors Animal- Vues receives ilS operating expenses and materials suppon from a variety of sources: o Over ISO contributing members o Bloomsburg University o Champion Valley Farms (Starkist) o Geisinger Medical Center o Pennsylvania Dept. of Agriculture o Sandoz Pharmaceuticals. Inc. o Zoecon Pet ProduclS


INTERNATIONAL

ORGANIZATION

The North American Flyball Association (NAFA) was organized in 1984 to establish a standard set of rules; enable handlers with similar interest to be in contact; to disseminate information; and to encourage the growth of the sport. Whether you belong to a dog club; want to start a team; or just teach your dog a fun activity, the North American Flyball Association can help. FOR MORE • • • • • • • • • • • • •

INFORMATION

ON

How to get started Who to contact Building Jumps Flyball Boxes Clinics/Seminars Teams in your area Tournaments Patches, Books, Videos How to put on or enter a tournament Demonstrations Flyball Titles The Newsletter ($5.00 US funds) NAFA Rules and Policies ($5.00 US funds)

WRITE

Manual

for a Come 'N Get It Ashley Whippet "Cnleh A Flying Oi:-:c" training m~nual. send :1 self-audresseu slamped l'lwclopc 10: COJ1H.:

'N

Gel

It Training

rvlanu;ll

1'.0. Box 5~62. Kalama",o.

~1I 4l)()().1-5X62

Allow 8 weeks for shipment. Goou l)nly in U.S.A. Offer good while supplies Inst.

Inquiries 11l4uiries aholilthe COME 'N GFT IT Canine Frishee disc Chnmpionships The Ashlcv \Vhippet Itwitntionnl should be addressed to: If\' Lander. Executive Director P.O. Box 16279 Encino. CA 91416 (818) 780-4915 (in C;\1 Toll free (outside C;\) I-X()()-42.1-.1268 Orticc hours: (l1adrir CO:l"it Time) p.m .. l\lofl-l·ri.

9-5

The Delta Society® P.O..Box 1080 Renton, WA 98057-1 080 (206) 226-7357 Thl' Dclt:l SocIety was tounded as a non-protit pr, dc"i·· 'ilnn.l1 .lssoci:l.tion in 1977. Private contributions pnn·lc..k \)PlT,lting ~upport for Delta. To make tJ.x-Jeductlbk hilt uf cash. securities. life insurance. or property. or " bequest provision in your wlil, please contaLt the Delta Society for details. l!.'

..1

TO

Objectives

NAFA, Secretary Mike Randall 1342 Jeff Street Ypsilanti MI 48198

• To bn:ome aware, through research inquiry. of pas!. ,md present worldwide studies and findings on the natun: J./lJ .si~nificanLc of the bond that exists between people ,1IlJ the living environment. • To promote study and research relative ro humananim.ll interactions.

(313)-487-5472

When a beloved pet dies •.• To help pet lovers cope with losing a pet, there's now a new field called human-animal interaction. "When you love a pet and it dies, it's like losing a person," says Susan Cohen of the Animal Medical Center in New York. Some services: • In February,

Free COME 'N GET IT Training

the University

of California

at Davis started

a Pet Loss Support hotline that's run by college students. (916) 752-4200 weekdays, 5:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. • Vet schools at the University of Pennsylvania. (215) 898-4529, and Colorado State University, (303) 221-4535, have bereavement programs. • The Delta Society in Renton, Wash., has a list of counselors, (206) 226-7357. -

Mary·Ann B!ad!1

• To establish an interdisciplinary approach to hum.lI1:.1ninul interactions. and to increase the awareness 01 the significance of these interactions among health and sOLial can.: professionals. • To assess the role of animal companions in society and to stuJy the effect of the human-companion animal bond 011 the mental henlth aod physical well-bein~ of people. • To communic.lte the significance of the human-animal bond Jnd Jd.vocatc utilization of research findings, in pJrt through publication of a scientific journal. • To serve JS a resource for persons Jnd groups seeking to establish Jnd maintain programs utilizing .lnimJls in thcr:-tpy. with appropriate techniques. precautions and eVJlu.uions. • To de"elop and distnbute public service educational fO;l(l'r!,lls un the subject of human-Jnimal relationships for children .1I1dadults.

GO


SOME OTHER

ORGANIZATIONS

Intern .•tionul Donna Hawley,

.

Sl(~d Dng Il .•cinq Assn. P.O. 130x tJ4G, Norman,

tJ304!:l-(JI)/ll;

ID

International Weight Pulling Assn. P.O. Box 994, Greeley, CO 80632 BehavioR, William E. Cambell (503) 476-5775 ($25.00 per call fee for nonsubscribers) National Animal (217) 333-3611

Poison

Information

Network:

American Veterinary Medicine Assn. (AVMA) 930 Meacham Rd. Schaumburg, IL 60196 Canine Eye Registration Foundation Veterinary Medicine Data Program South Campus Courts, Bldg. C Purdue University, West Lafayette, Orthopedic University

Foundution for Animuls of Missouri, Columbiu,

Inc.

(CERF)

IN

47907

(OrA) MO 65211

American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty (ASPCA) 441 E. 92nd. St. New York, NY 10128 Humane Society of the United 2100 L St., N.W. Washington,

States DC 20037

Owner/Ilandler Assn. (OHA) Mildred Mesh, 6 Michaels Ln., Old Brookville, NY 11545 American Temperament Fred McNabb 13680 Van Nuys Blvd. Pacoima, CA 91331

Test

Society

Therapy Dogs International Ann Butrick, P.O. Box 2796 Cheyenne, WY 82003

.. Heaven

is by favor.

dog would

If

go in and

it were by merit, you

would -

61

MARK

your

stay TWAIN

out."

to Animals


Reprinted

by permission

PET FOOD LABELING Michael

A Guerber

with Marjorie

With the growing awareness in America of nutrition and ils relationship to human hcalth, there is a corresponding growth in the interest of the pet owners in their pets nutrition. As veterinarians, you probably are particularly conscious of that interest among your clients. You are continually called upon to make pet nutrition decisions and recommendations. However, the multitude of pct foods available today, and the manufacturers many claims, can be confusing to your e1ients. So, which pet food is best for your client? Many people believe that reading the guaranteed analysis on the label of the pet product they arc considering will provide them the necessary information. Others look further and check the ingredient lists. However, it is my belief that the best way to make a pet food decision is to consider three aspects of the pet food label: A) Guaranteed Analysis; 8) Ingredient List; and c) Feeding Instructions. First, looking at the Guaranteed Analysis, pay particular attention to protein, fat, and calcium-phosphorus ralio and quantity. As a general guide, pro(]ucts designed for use by puppies, lactating females, and hardworking dogs will contain a higher protein and fat level along with a boosted calcium-phosphorus level. Look for a minimum of 28'% protein and 15% fat in these products. The adult dog, under normal maintenance conditions, requires less protein and fat than puppies, etc, so the label should indicate that a maintenance product contains 20%-26% protein, and 10% - 15% fat. Proper nutrition for the senior dog, which I classify as age 7 and older in most brccds, rcmains controversial for some manufacturers and practitioners. My belief is that senior dogs require reduced protein and fat, but very high quality and easily digestible sources of those elements. I recommend that a senior dog diet contain less than 20% protein, and less than 10% fat. Feline nutritional requirements are markedly different from canine requirements. As a general guide, adult cats need a product that falls in the range of 30%-32% protein and 15%-20% fat. Kittens and queens energy requirements arc greater and can be met by fec<1ingan increased amount of their normal diets. There arc products on the market, labeled for kittens and queens, which indicate the products contain slightly elevated protein and fat levels, and these products may be acceptable also. Having determined that the product under consideration meets the protein and fat requirements for the particular life stage of the pet in question, the next portion of the label to examine is the ingredient list, paying careful attention to aU the ingredients. The currently popular JOURNAL

of

62

1. Guerber

notion, as indicated by the many comparison charts circulating in the industry, is that the quality of a product is determined by examining the fir~t three or four ingredients. I firmly believe that the entire list must be considered because each ingredient is one part of a whole formula and can not stand alone for consideration. Also, occasionally manufacturers will conceal potentially less acceptable ingredients further down their ingredient lists. So, read the entire ingredient list. Raw materials available today for pet foods are varied and many, ranging from non-digestible by-products of the human food industry to higher quality whole ingredients. Generally speaking, manufacturers select from four basic groups of raw materials; 1.) Protein sources; 2) Fat and fatty acid sources; 3) Carbohydrate sources; and 4) Supplement sources. The quality of ingredients used is determined by the manufacturers specifications to their suppliers. For instance, within the AAFCO approved term 'Poultry Meal", a manufacturer can specify a meal with ia high protein and fat content but low ash content, all thc way to a blend of lower protein-fat and higher ash. The lower protein-fat blend may be a mere percentage from the levels of protein, fat and ash in a "poultry by-product meal", but that tiny percent allows the manufacturer to label it as "poultry meal" rather than show a by-product on the label. Since by-products have generally come to be regarded as less desirable ingredients, there is perceived to be an advantage to labeling that indicates no by-products_ It is my recommendation, in order to assure you and your client of at least a minimum quality of mC<ltbased protein, you avoid commercially produced pet foods which indicate they contain by-product protein sources. Fat and fatty acids, the second main food source, are vital in pet nutrition and are supplied in various ways. The animal protein meals contain fat, grains contain fatty acids, and fat is also available as an individual ingredient. Most manufacturers add fat to their products to assure meeting guaranteed analysis. Again, the quality and type is at the discretion of the manufacturer and can be anything from tallow to tablegrade fat, and can contain a variety of origins. Fat, and fatty acids, no matter what the quality and no matter what the source, must be preserved to prevent rancidity. If the preservative (antioxidant) is not listed in parentheses behind the fat source on the label, look for it further down the ingredient list. Common fat and fatty acid preservatives are BHA, Ethoxyquin, and Propyl Gallate. Less common is d-Alpha Tocopherol (Vitamin E) and Ascorbic Acid (Vitamin C) in combination. All of these preservatives have antioxidant properties, only Vitamin E -+

the Amerieen

Holi~tic VErterinary

Medical ASf:ocietion, May-July.

1989,

PaoA

17


and

Vitamin

C also

have

nutritional

benefits.

If no

antioxidant is shown on the label, you can assume that the manufacturer has chosen not to show that particular ingredient. Ar rhe presenr rime, manufacturers are not required to indicate their preservatives if they did not add the ingredient themselves at the manufacruri11g plant. (EDITOR: This is also true with human foods.) A key to delivering quality nutntlon to pets is the quality of the fats used. Lower grade fats require more prcservatives to stabilize them, but more importantly they are more difficult for the animal to utilize. Table grade fat has a melting point of about 95 degrees. Thus the animals normal body temperature will help melt the fat and make it more readily available to be metabolized. Poorer quality tallow, with a higher melting point requires the animals system to expend energy to assimilate the ingredient. This is counter productive. Unfortunately, ingredient lists do not indicate the quality of the fat source, so the consumer and the practitioner have no way of making comparisons. However, one small clue may be contained in the guaranteed analysis. Some manufacturers will boost their fat content in order to deliver proper energy, whereas another manufacturer, by using table grade quality fat is able to deliver the same amount of energy using less fat. The third part of the ingredient list to consider is the carbohydrate source. Generally, carbohydrates are derived from grains, however some manufacturers use grains as their protein source also, since grains do contain plant protein, although at much lower levels than meat sources. The key to consider when evaluating the grains is the quality. Whole ground grains deliver a higher level of nutrition to the pet than docs a refined 1I0ur or a by-product such as "brewers condensed solubles" or "cereal food fines." A blend of several grains provides even higher nutrition by delivering a broader range of amino acids and other nutrients. Since it is generally recognized that cats are carnivores and require meat protein, and dogs are omnivores and require a certain amount of meat protein, grains are not viewed as an acceptable primary protein source. For this reason, select a product which shows whole grains, but also shows quality meat protein sources. The vitamin and mineral supplements usually bring up the tail end of the ingredient list, but they are a critical factor for the health of the pet. The ideal commercial pet

Ivermectin The

same

food formula, made with the finest raw materials, under the best manufacturing conditions can not always deliver every vitamin and mineral necessary for adequate nutrition for the pet. The manufacturing process itself destroys some of these clements, and raw materials can have varying amounts of vitamins and minerals depending on suppliers, soil conditions, etc. Also, vitamins in the finished product oxidize over the shelf life of the product, so are available to the pet in diminishing quantities. Therefore, manufacturers usually add a premixed supplement rormub to asslIre minimum levels 10 meet NCR standardg. Scientific studies have determined the vitamin levels necessary to be added during manufacturing in order to deliver specific levels to the animal in the finished product. Since oxidation does occur in the finished product, reputable manufacturers recognize the need 10 deliver guaranteed minimums throughout the life of the product, and increase the amount of supplement in order to do so. The final aspect, and in my opinion the most important aspect, 10 consider when trying 10 determine the quality of a pet food is feeding guide. As a rule, most manuracturers are fairly accurate about the amount of their product which must be fed 10 meet the requirements of the particular animal. Generally speaking, the better quality products require less quantity to be fed. Animals will eat to meet their caloric needs. Higher quality products meet those caloric needs with less volume. There are a number of products marketed nationwide as premium products, and priced in the premium range, which require nearly twicc as much volume to be fed as do the premium pet foods which are similarly priced. Therein is the clue to the true quality of the ingredients, and thar clue should be rhe major factor in detem,illillg the desirability of the product. Nutrition is the cornerstone to health and vitality in America's companion animals, and veterinarians are the key to providing the professional knowledge necessary to the pet owner. Using this three pronged approach to label reading of pet foods can assist you in guiding your clients. However, I feel certain that one fact has become very apparent to you, as it has to me. Within labeling guidelines as specified by AAFCO, the FDA, the USDA, and the FTC, manufacturers have a great deal of labeling latitude. The intangible factor in the quality of all pet foods is the integrity of the manufacturer. No regulatory agency, no government agency, and no guaranteed analysis can assure manufacturer integrity.

in Humans ivermectin

used

to

prevent

heart worms in dogs is now going to be used in humans. Lobeled as m~lizaI1, tlte drug will be given only once or twice a year to prevent a worm disease called onchocerciasis ("'river blindness"), which arfects millions of humans in tropic3.1climates. Heres a good eX3.mpleof how canine research has a direct affect on improved human he3.1th.

63


r

?€ V01 r'JJ

I C/Y1

IS' ~

ilaJIC/;"'r -

(-<J

N;J" I U I

}.:/1

t-

J{!d.'{]{

U~V1aYy

/-..1

-..-<--~~-l.--<-...,

.••..

fv,'cs I / '77 ()

CHAPTER 2

Behavior Development and Behavioral Disorders BONNIE

CANINE GROWTH DEVELOPMENT

AND

Sensory Development Puppies arrh'c in a \'cr~' C::.1rc-dcp('IH.lent state, with pourly ucvclc)peu llUlllcoslatic Illl'ch· ,nisms. This is gcnerallv recognized by the scaled eyes and ears, bllt these tw·o outward signs act~ally rellect an incompletely dC\'e1oped nen'Ous system as a whole. The progrcssi\"e .1e\'eloplllcnt of the nerVous system can be monitored bv the gain or loss'of certain reflexes, .nd this timing is useful to e\'aluate the normal maturation of puppies. A puppy is horn with lillie spontaneuus mo\"emcnt ano must rcc.:ci'"e stimulation frum the bitch's lieking to begin breathing, irreguLulv at hrst. Inabi!itv to maintain body hcat means that it is important for a pllpp~' to stay close to the bitch and its littermates. Thus, the rooting rellex, which begins disappearing at 4 a..ys, is important (Fox, 1965). \\'ith this reflex, Ihe PIIPPY will orient toward and pllsh iute> allY •....UIl1 object Ilcar its head, and this ''':ann olljed "onl.1 most likely be the bitch or a Iittennate. A I'n ppy will also orien t toward the source of

V,

BEAVER

lieking directed at its hcad and dorsum, IIsillg it as orientatioll to\\"ard its mother. Dllring the first few days of lire:, muscle tone is pourly developed. and lilere prohahly is all imbalance of nerve supply tn the vertebral extensors and flexors. If thc puppy is suspcnded 1)\' holding it at the base of the bead, the PllPPy w'ill respund during the first ,I days of lilt: with the lIexor dominanee reflex, by flexing the spinc, tail, and limbs. From days 5 to 18, the extensor dominallce rencx takes over. so that the PUpP\' ex~cmls the \'ertebral eoluIIII' and limbs. as if starting a baekhend (Fos, 1%5). Continucd parallel '!c\'eloplllellt of the neurOllluscular skills call be followed IlSill).!: other [;\dors

fi)!"

e\"alualioll"

J

II 1II()\"ill~.

pllppic.:s

rcst

their hellies and use strokillg 1l10Vl'llJellls with their limbs on caeh side. Between G and 011

)0 da\'s, the forelimhs can sIIpport the w'eight of the pUPI'~'. Peh-ie limb support is expected between II and J5 days ill normal, lIot overly fat puppies. \\'ithin a few days of being able to support its w'cight, the PUPp\' is walking arollnd its

cl1\"irOlllllcllt.

Allother

4 weeks

bt.Jorc till' I'llI'll!' C;llI riglll ilSI,If. III adult dugs, till' crossed-extl'lIsor is considcred abnormal. I n puppies age of 18 days, tbe crossed-extensor

is

needed l"('SPOIIS{'

be](,re the response 19

f)4


20

llEllA

\·IOB

I)E\'ELOI'~1

ENT

AN])

BEllA

Um.5). The ~Ia"nlls is a normal reflex (Fox, reflex is present from birth to 21 d,,·s of a<;e HJG5). This rene. is normallv seen in (Fox, Jlllppi('s olll~', IIllt ill adult-;, To [cst 1~J1' it. h"ld lhe hody of the pUppy and rotate tile Ilose to one side. The limbs on the side of the bOlh·

opposite the side toward which turned will he extcnded. The other side \\'ill flex.

the head wa's limhs 011 111(~

VIOBAL

DISOB])EI\S

the third is highlv significant (Scott and FlIller, ] 965). The first period, the neonatal period, "',t, through the fir,t 2 weeks of life and basic:lll~'{·oll<;isf<.; or Illlrsillg 1)()llts illl(Tsp('rs('d willi houts or sleepill~. Since the puppy cannot see or hear and has no locolllotion, its response' to p:lil1ful stimulation is a grc"t deal of distress vocalizatiol1 and side-to-side wiggling (Fox, HJG.5).

Henex urination and defecation, from birth through dav 28, enSures that the bitch ,,·ill be present to remove excreta from the young and thus keep tl]e den site relatively free of predator-attracting odors. 13y 18 d,,,·s of a<;e puppics will start eliminating in a corner ortlle whelping box, amI by 21 days thev start to use a grollI' elimination :.1.rca. The squatting urination posture for both male and female pllppies is present by 28 d,,·s, when the anogenital renex is gone. The ability to regubte budy temperatllre gradllally impro'·es. Bv 2 ,,·eds of age, puppies are slccpng more parallel anu less in a random heap. They can slccp io small grollps [n- ·5 wceks and can sleep alone 1 weck btcr. YislIal and auditory rl'SpOllS('S continllc to dnclnp an"r birth. Initi,illv the pal pel".,,,· are sea Icd closed and the auditu,,· canal is filled I,,· the auricular fulds. \\·ith tim~, the extra tissu~ disappears so that the eyes and ears opell between ]() and 14 (I:\\"s. \·isnal percept inn mllst still develop over time and is probablv not complete lIntil se\eralmonths of al;e. Proteeti\e reflexes such as the light blink and the palpehral reflexl's arc uSllally pn:scnt hefore the eyes open, probably to assure protection as soon as it might he needed. Auditorv startle to soond is present, on the os·erage, at 19.5 da,·s of age (Scott alld Fliller, ]96.5). With eontillued maturation of the central ner\'OliS system, a positive orientation to visual and auditory stimuli first occurs by 25 days of age, and specific recognition of familiar stimlili follo"·s shortly (Fox,

The transitional period of behos·ioral de,·elopment is restricted to days 14 through 21. While the puppy is 1l0W capable of experiencing more of its cJlvironment, the scnses and illataI' skills are still poodv de,·eloped. The pain response now changes to that which is more expected. There arc less vocalization and an increased el1'ort to hack ~l\vay in escape, since the puppv can locate the pain sOllrce. At 3 wecks, the socialization period starts. As a phase, this is the single most important time in the entire life of a dog' This is especially true relative to preventing problems that wOlild hecome obvious as the dog gets older. \Vhile socialization starts at 21 days, the end point is sOIlH'what ·ks ...cll'al'. SUI!lt' stlldil's illdic;lk th:lt period i'\ over at JO wl'(,ks; the s()('ialil',atioll ho\\'c\'('r, SO!1lC other behavioral signs Stich as cllyirulIlllentnl exploration uo not start until 12 weeks. It may be hehaviorally worthwhile to give the I'" PI'\' the henefit of the duuht and use 3 to 12 weeks for the socialization period. A great deal of motor development occurs dllring thi, 9-week Jleriod, and pllppies start to take 01\ t\wir appealing )H'klviors and perSOllalitics. At 3 to 4 weeks, a wild canille hitch would start introdlleing semisolid food to the yonng by returning to the den with a flill by stomach and regllrgitating when stilTllllnted facial licking. This, then, is an appropriate tillle to start the transition from nursing to reglilar dog food. Orv food alone is often too hard for puppies. so l1loistcnC'd dry food and/or canned

dllrill~

1%5).

I()()d

Behavioral Development

At 3.5 to 4 weeks of age, littermates are ph,,·fully interacting. This soon progresses to play fighting, head shaking, and gro,ding. This is the time whell dogs learn jaw pr('ssure. If a littermate bites too hard, the '·victim·· stops

Changes ill heha\'ior arc more easily ouser\'cu thall are changes that indicate maturation of the senses. III reality, both are interrelated. Certainly

it

is c:1sicr

to

see

\\'!Jen

:1 puppy

starts

waggillg its tail than when it first develops forelimb support. Yet both are measures of neuromuscular de'·elopment. 13ehavioral developmcnt in pllppies is oneil divided into four major periods, although only

is

t\\(,.:

best

the

transition.

pia)' immediatel)', and the biter learns that "that"· milch pressure inflicts pain. Play hiting will becoJl1e vcry r('levant to problems or aggression disclissed later in this chapter. 13y 4 weeks, puppies are carrying things in their mouths, guarding these possessions, and pla\'ing tllg-of-war with pant legs and telephone cunls. Littermatcs also show the beginning llf

65


I.ll':HAVlOH DE:\'E:LOnlE:NT

AND UE:IlAVIOHAL DISOHDLHS

21.

coon]inateu groop activities. If one puppy sees something anu goes to investigate, all the puppies follow. UV6 wceks, several adult caninc-spccific be-

dilrerent in propurtiun from that or an adult. When oluer, uogs frequently react aggressively to forms not learned as puppies-like unifoqlleu people or those wearing unusually shaped hats.

haviors begin. The facial, inguinal,

Tile peak nppru;lch

period

pv's firth through

se\'enth

ital approaches meet

each

and <lnugcn-

arc used between

other,

and

they

arc

dogs that

bccullaing

oh-

other

those

PIlPPY,

lIsually

OWllcrs

may.

o\"ersexcd

willi

aS~t1l'i:lll路d

l~lct.

ill

puppy.

:';1':\11:11IlI'h;\\"jor.

cUlIlplain

Humans

are

about

thl'ir

interesting,

.be-

cause play fighting is considcred

to be plav that all hugs is normal plav that in the auult will be associated with hunting. Behavior with a sexual purpose in adult dogs is not osually thought of as having is nOrlnal for puppies.

Pouncillg

ill

perience,

During

and intensity

work

berty

in frequency

approaches

and

then

howc\'Cr,

return

to

it

as pumUre

a

appropriate frequency as the uog continues to get oluer. Uy 7 \\'eeks of age, there can be cooruinated attacks on weakcr littermates (Scutt and Fuller, I~J6.5). This is partieularlv true in the more sulitarv tvpe uf breeds such as sume of the terriers. In those breeds, puppies that rcmain in the litter by this age tenu to fight each other. Precautiulls

should

individuals

togethcr.

include

nu

than

llIore

t\\'o

tant

events

so crilicd. when

an

period. other, Illore importo make this time

are also occurring The

s()(... :ializalioll

iJldivilllial

learns

period

is

to ITCohlli:!.e

llll~ liIlH.~ variolls

spccies of animals as something to be aect'pteu. If a puppy will be expeett'd to relate to other dugs, cats, horses, ur people later in its life, it must be arounu melnbers of cach of these species before ]2 weeks of age. While the total time for socialization to occur is apparentlv quite 110

short,

the

socialization

consequences are very

of incomplete

severe.

Dogs

that

or have

heen fairly well isolated in a household uften du not relate \\'ell to other dogs if expected to Ineeu, care for puppies, interact "'ith uew huusehold pets, or withstanu a week or boaruillg.

The puppy's include

socialization

an introuuctiun

well as lo adults.

Since

role ill the total process

to humans should

tu YOllng visioJl

children

as

plays all imporlant

alld since

visioJl

is not

wlllpletely ue"elopeu by ]2 weeks, the forms "I' humans are learneu. Details are relativelv kss important. The form of a small child i's

(Jill

to socialize

a

{路llllLll.'It.;.

";(J('j;d

sociali/,atiotl

tllC

period,

the puppy

are consistently capable of learning lessons, and it becollle,s a good time tu housetraining.

011

prc\'ious

lessons,

I3ecause

learning

there

comes

are

quite

no

cnsily

and lessons appear to become well engrained. f\:egativc experiences, as viewed from the pup-

p'''s perspective, call actually desocialize the animal. From the veterillarv standpoint, thell, it is important to make sure the first visits to the

veterinarian

are

fun

for

tIle puppy.

U,' ]2 weeks, puppies enter the juvenile pcriod. Thev reach the peak avoicbnt'e periud allu

cntcr

their

IllUSt

active

time

for

cllviron-

HJ6.5). Sucial bOllds have 1)(,:cl1 funned, <llld the individual is now physically mature enough to start exploring its \路..orIel. Occasional reinforcement of socialization Illental

While the things Uiscussed above uecur during the socialization

lime

e't1si('st

'(Tk:..

il

experiences the start uf the ability to rapiuly associate behaviors "'ith stimuli (Scutt allu Fuller, ]965). This becomes the first time that

will increase

puppies;

is tlH'

[veil 1H..:gativc experiences. like die ..: residelll cat's clawing the new puppy, du not afrect socialization at this time (Freedman et ai, 1978).

puppies specific

counterpart

This

11('(';111.0;1'

these play beha"iors

play

a pup-

bt.'illgs,

should. In male puppies,

a

during

weeks (Fox, Hl65).

this timc, n pnppy adively appro;If ..:IH's regardless of the clllutiotlnl ex-

During

violls by this age. Play behaviors expand tu incillde IlHltlllting and pelviC thrusts silllil;lr to

occurs

(Fox,

c.xplor;\tioll

is IH..:cessary to pn.'vetlt the lessons ("rolll slipping ;l\\'ay. At the saine lillie, !Jo\V(;vcr, a tral11llatic.:

experience uuring this jU"enile periou call desocialize a dog. The bratty neighbor kid who keeps poking the clog can create a dog that reacts aggressively or fearfully to the specific child, to all b",'s (ur girls), to all chiluren, or to all people. Littlc things like shocks of static electricity or big things like being hit by a ear call

all calise

ele~ocializilti()ll.

Puppy Selection Pcople usually select puppies Oll impulse because it is bani to resist a cute little hall of fur. There advice !'nllll

ahollt

are some C!10()Sillg

a specific.: !lJ'l'('(,l

that

ask vcterinarinlls

a hreed

before

or all

for

individllal

the actual se!cctioll

is made. ~Iost ur these people have rcally made up their minus about which breeu they want and

simply

66

want

"approval."

A few consciell-


22

BE:IIAVIOH

DEVELOP~IE:NT

AND

BEIIA\']OHAL

tio\ls future pet owners want help selecting the puppy that will best serve them and meet their cspcct;ltions. For this ellort, thcrc arc t\\"o primary considerations. \Vhat breed best suits the person? Which individual should be cho. sell. ? Breed sc!n.:lioll is on(,1l d('knllincd by personal preference based on previous experience or biases. Factors often considered or ones that should he w{'ighed includ(' size, lqlC of klir ('oat, ~r(lolllillg needs, alld UWIH'I" lire slyle. Whilc the first thrce are relati\'ch' obvious. the last is often neglected, and the owner and dog soon have a parting of the wa,路s. Pcoplc \\ho put ill lung hours at work or who trayel a great dcal shollid probably consider a cat, fish, or "no pct at all.路' Those \\路1.0 arc fastidious hoosekcepcrs should rcalize that dogs do track ill Illud :llld will shed all 0\'('1" if Ilot properly groomcd. Brccds that arc highh cscitablc or pain-intolerant may not do well ill a home with acth'e, small children. Potential dog oWllers often hov books dcscribing behaviors of particubr brecds. Whilc these can provide interesting insights into the nceds and behavior of that hreed, it should bc relllC'lTlhcl'cd that tile\" arc lIsll:llk \\TittCIl hv p('ople who h,lVC ,\ l~ll1dlll'sS flJr' tll(' sp('('ifi~ breed. Other hooks such as tlw<;c hy Fiorollc (1970), Pognctti (1980), and Scanziani (198.5) discuss characteristiC's of Illost breeds with sections that inelodc a littlc bit ahout the histories, needs, and beh,,,,iors of tbese dogs. Othcr sources discuss the inbcrited medical prohlcms (H IItt, 1979). Spceifie bchavioral attributcs and faults of thc vario\ls hreeds as a \\"hole are more mandil1icult to f1nd presel1ted in all unbiased ner. Behavior problcms attributcd to spccific brecds ha\"c been reported (Campbcll, 1975; Beaver, 1983; ~lacKellZie ct al. 1986). Thesc, however, are usually not matched \\"ith population distribotion. The stud\' by lIart and I Jart (1988) was done to hell' fulure dog owncrs dctermine which breeds are most likely to mect criteria that the)' belie\'c arc important. Thc 13 specifics inchldcd in tbis stllth' are excitahilit\', general activit~', ~llapping at children, excessh"e barking, playfulness, trainabilitv, \\"atehdog harking, aggression to dogs, dominance over the owner, territorial defellse. alrcctioll demand,

destructivcness,

and

hOllsebreaking

ease. Although gClleral hrecd tendellcies can he stated, it mllst he rt'Illel1thcrcd llwt l'xccplioliS are cOlllmon. If anv certain breed has bcell extremely

popular,

~are

lllUSt he esercised

be-

DlSORDE:HS

cause personalities are seldom an important selection LTiterion for hr('cding animals. There call also he as much variation betweC'1l individuals of a ccrt:lin breed as there is between the specific hrceds. \\"hen it comes to selccting j\lst the right to rl.'lllclllllcr that a dog's PI!p!>Y. it is inlpflr{:tllt pcrsoo"litv will be influenccd by genctics allli cll\"inmlllclll. To help determine the genetic illJHll, PllPPY selectio1\ tests have 1,('('11 11.<;('<1. \Vhile these arc llseful in determining gClIcral personality types, it is important to reillclllber that t'llvironment can greatly modify the "basic genctie personalitv," and the tendency of a dog to lllature \\'ith the personality preclicted by the test has ncver been validated. Campbell (1972) pnblished a popular tcst that is aclministercd to puppies bclwccn 5 and 7 weeks of agc. It consi<;ts of five tcsts-soci;d attraction, ro11owilll2:. restraint d()JlliJ~allcc. social dominance, and cl~~"ation clVlllillallCe~to determine the tendency for dominance, submission, and incJepcnd,'ncc. Work at Texas ;\&~1 University inclicatcs that, besides individual variation, breeds show certain trcnds"

CANINE BEHAVIORAL DISORDERS AND THERAPY P"ppy bclla\'ior problems tcntl to fall into one of" five categories: improper socialization, eatiog problems, elimination problems, destructi\'e chewing. and ag.gression. Not much call he done for the illdividllal puppy's sociilliz;ltioll OIlCC it is older than ]2 wt'eks of ;lg(~, so the importance of proper guidance as previously discllssed is critical. The rClllilinillg fuur categorics wiil bc spccificallv discossed.

Eating Problems Some individual dogs arc picky caters from thc limc thcy first start cating solid foods. Otbcr tillles the complaint of a finicky dog is more re\rlled to thc owncr's perspcctivc than to thc act"al \'olume of intake. Food bulk is thc pri1Il,1l"~' factor thal regulates the amount of rood i"takc wh('" the s"pplv is pkntifld. A "f"II" puppy will cat considcraLl~f more with littermate com pcti tion" llowevcr, once dom i n:lllCe has Iwell estahlished il\ a litt(T, hv 15 weeks or age, the COlllpclitioll IWCOII1('S l~s"<; illlpllrt:lllt and the uOlllin<1ntlsuhordinJ.nt position relative to those around becomes a critical factor. Pup-

67


BEllA \'101\ DEVELOI'~1 ENT AN D BEllA VIOHAL D1S0HDEI\S pks develop taste preferences to sOll1e extcnt, pmhably by 6 months of age. They also 1c.:arn or do not learn table manners rather quickly. If ",d eves and whining bring "people food" in,lead of a balanced diet. the behavior continues. IlL-warding begging at the table ensnres that lhl' heh;l\'ior will continue. Ir the PllPPY call ~d its {ill rr01l1 tilt, t:lhlc. tlj('I"l' is lit) dl'..,in' lo ,-'at puppy c11O\V. Puppies quickly learn to holt!

n\lt for the "people plt'ad longer rl'sist. There l"'()!Jcerneu

than are

food" because

they can

must owners arc willing to also some owners who are

that tile puppy

is not getting

enough

lu cat. It is important to evaluate the physical "\I,dition of the anilnal and its caloric intake. III Illost instances, the m('al~ are quite adeqllate. Some dugs, like SOIlle humans,

remain slender

nnd do not desire large amotlnts of food. Coprophagy, stool eating, is another complaint owners h.n'e. For young puppies, a cert;lin amount of this is normal. even if llll(.lcsir-

.ble from the own('r's perspecti\·c. Puppies "'l11monly eat the feces of older dogs and of littermates. In part, this behavior is probablv Olle

way YOllng dog ..•l'xplore

rcccJlll~'

ils validity

bl'en

has

eat's feces and are described as raiding the lillerhox. Cat feces has a high protein content and is appealing to the dog. The easiest method to stop this problem is to have the owner put the cat's litterbox somewhere that the PUpP)' reach. Taste aversion call also be useu. Punishlllent for a Ilchavior cOllsidered normal

cannot

hy

dog

tll('

Illiderstood. is another orthe ealing

1101

jo.:

Grass eatillg

problems

owners ask about, usually because it is followed by '·omiting. Carnivores consulllC matter ill their natural diets, \Volves

vegctable get it from

the digesti\'e tracts of deer, antelope, or rabbits, and cats get it from mice and rats. The unique thing about this vegetation is that it is already partiallv digested. Domestic do~s have lillie opportuility to hu.nl anu Ililist depend on Illlmans to supply their food. When vegetable matter is insufficient in the puppy's diet, it will seek out tender plants to chew. Unfortunately, carni\'ores lack the enzvme nceded to break dO\\'n the beta honds of ~ellulose to glucose a",1 then to absorbable, volatile latty acids (l3ea\'er, HJ8J). The \'egetable matter iu sul1lcicnt quantity "'ill irrilate t!H": st()IIl~I<..;h alld calise v.olllilillg.

their enVirOJllllent.

It nJav also be the \\'av adopted I)\' se\'eral species for the young to cstahlish their illtcstinal 1l1icroflora. \\"hile this explanation has long il(~cn u:-.ccl,

23

questiolled

(Crowell-Davis and Iloopt, l')1>5). The behavior is most likely to hecome a problem in puppies

A kw cooked vegetables added to a puppy's meal \\'ill help stop the problem of plaot eating without ullbalancing the diet. E.;\til1~ hl}rs(~ and cat llc feces is more related to grass eating than to cupropllagy. Since these

feces aetuallv contain digested IlI'comc

vegetable

sOllrce for to tllt'lll, Inclusio!l

mat-

that do not get enough exercise, !i\'e in a rl'lati\'cly harrell environment, or arc from toy

ter,

hreeds.

cooked \'(·gdal>ies in ti,e did helps decrease the problem, although llre\'Cnting aeeess or

PUJli:..lluH.:nt

hecause

the

Sllccess,

e\:en

is generally

1I11sI1c<.:es~J\lI,

bdl<l\'iur is sclf-rc\\"anling. One with 5c\'cral failures, increases

the Iikclihootj that the beha\'ior

will continue.

Prc\'cnting access to dog feces is the treatment is another technique or choice. Taste a\"ersioll

that can be tried.

Taste ayersioll

is useful to

eliminate

llluuth·oriellted

!J(·ha\"iors.

se\'eral

First, lIse a ruul-tasti]l~ suhstance sllch as a pepper sa\lce. Let the puppy get a guod SllId!

they

pl1pp~'

that

has

taste a"ersioll

a vegetable

access

may be necessary

stop the prohlem.

Elimination Puppies

arri"ill~

at

Punishment

the of

to complet('ly

is not successful.

Problems

gellerally

leaI'll

their

hUllle. It is the patience

new

hO\lsetrailling

after

of the suhstance "",I illllnediatel\' fill the mouth with it too. This teaches the ;;ssnciation of a particular odor and a gosh awful taste. E\erything the puppy would mouth "s a problem s\:ould then be coated with the substance, although in some cases it is necessar\' to limit

and skills of the [let O\\'l1er which will determil1e \\'hether this beha"ior is successfullv \e;,med or whether the puppy i, bal1ished froll1 the house

access

to a few

ohject

is l1louthed,

praise techniqlle of g()ill~ outside witll the dog to a specific area and tlH'll ll'iillg lavish pr;lisc when it eliminates, Three things arc "llluSts"

items.

Now

a little

when

ta\te

a coateo

n":1l1ind<; tile

pup!'v of the had oxperience. Coating the object without the preliminary lesson is usually not successful. Feces

eating

can

take

011

two

other

forms

for

a puppy. Some develop a taste for the resident

or falllily

altogether.

llollsetraining

is ,Jllost

cas-

ih' started around8 weeks, when stahle learning begins. It is most easily accomplished usillg the

for successful housetraining-patience,

cOl1nne-

ment, and schedules. Patience means giving the puppy a fair chance. In some installccs a

few davs is "ery adequate

68

for the puppy,

per-


24

BEHAVIOR

DEVELOP.\lENT

AND

BEIIAVIOHAL

DISORDERS

accident. Other do,i.!.'i hilt e;lch is all individual. Skipping around to try dillercnt techniques or different \'arbtions every few days is very confUSing tu the puppy. and it almost ~\'ar:lIltc('s a lOll,!!. 111'0('("';'), if" not rail11!'t,. Confincment is necessarY tu dC(Tl'a~C the

presence of the

amount

or the dog no longer eonnccts the t\\·o. If the puppy walks up to tlle PWIHT, who ha"i S£,('lI the

haps

with

an occasional

may

take

as

long

as

of exercise

owners

are

away

a )'e;\r,

the and

P;IPPY gets when the a(h';:lntagc of the

to take

tendellcy nol to want to soil it'; own lH'd. Fur owners who are gOlle short periods during the day, a yery small area, like a dog crate, is ideal. \\·hen owners must he gone 10 to 12

dog's

hours at a time, a larger area like a bathroom is preferable. Since tl;e small urinary bladder probably cannot hold urine that long, the larger space lets the puppv get awa'· from its soileu bed somewhat. Schedule is the third fador in housclraining for the puppy. The take the puppy to the elimination

owner shoulu area immediately after it \\'akes lip. \\·hen it be-comcs pl,,·sieallv active, after it eats, ami bcfore it beus down. It is important to rememher that these

events

occur

Preferred during

often

surElees

for young

for elimination

dogs.

are learned

first 6 months. Puppies tr<lin('d to ('liminate Oil paper oncll ha\T ;\ hard tillH' cllll\'crtillg to glass \\'hell they get older. The same type of prol)lem is encountered when grass-train'Cd dogs <lrc expected to go Oil COIIcrete, asphalt, or g:ra'·el. To convert the papertrained puppy. the owncr shotlid vcry gradually Illove tlie papcrs frolll their original location toward the door, then outside. and Gnal!\- onto the

the

grass.

After

a period

of eliminating

('m the

paper in the grass, the p;'p('r call he gradually decreased in size or rCl1loved. While not all pllppies will adjllst to this, gradllall1lodiGeation llsllallv oners the best chance for Sllccess. I'rercrrc(f surfaces can work ill reverse too. For the puppy that was raised outduors and introduced into the house, a shag carpet or throw rug has Illan,' of the characteristics of grass. These puppies ortcn do best if conGned on a hard surfacc nntil they establish an elilllination schedule. When an accident happens in the hOllse. how the owncr hanules it can deterllline whetlier housesoiling will beeollle a problelll or whether it \Vas onlv llll accidclIt. t\fost O\\'ners find a to hours after the beha\'ior mess scvcr~1 minute'S occurred. ing,

Then

rubbing

they punish

its

outside, and/or few days. The or feces alone is no problem,

nose

in

the

the pnppy mess,

bv scold-

throwing

it

gh'ing it :l "culd shoulder" for a puppv quiekl\' learns that urine is no prohlcm, the owner alone but the smell of excreta plus the

Anticipatioll tn heha\'e

oWI)('r

differently,

a big prohlclll.

IlICallS

of this treatment and

the puppy

causes o\Vners

assurne

this

means t.hat the "puppy knows it has done wrong PIlJli<;}lII1Cllt for :l 1)('hecause it looks guilty." Ilavjor, or prai'\<, for lll:ll 111;\(1('1', mllst occllr within a few seconds of the end of the beh",·ior

fi..:ces, and

is Pllllished,

it interprets

the

pUllish-

ment as bcing for the hehavior of walking op to the owner. Thc owner verbalizes the housesoiling problem and assumcs the puppy nndcrstands. Soon punishment becomes the only social contact behyccn the puppy and OWller, hut for the dog, it is better than no contact at all. \\·hat started as an accident has escalated to an attcntion-seckin~ behavior. The cycle can he broken and honsesoiling endecl. The puppy needs

positive

praise

for

interaction

obeying

with

cOlllmands

the and

ownf"r,

so

eliminating

when

outo::;iue are important. There should he unless the puppy is m:lllally caught in the act, and the owner should not C':lrry ri grudge. Consistency call stop this proh110 plll1io::;hmcnt

Iem.

Destructive Chewing Puppies :lrc t1lli\'('rs~lIy' knowll for their chewin~. Initially their antics arc cute, whcn by 3.,5 weeks the~" are muuthing their own feet in ;1 unilJuelv ehllnsy manner. Then they start biting the ears. face, and tail of littermates. This second phase hrings important lessons ahout a!,!gression allll will be discussed later. Ahout the same time, 4 we('ks, puppies start mouthing inanimate objccts, a method llsed to explore the environment. This soon turns into carrying objects ill their mouths [Inti tug-of-war with towels, telephone cords, and pant legs. Excessive amollnts of chewing are usually associated with periods of teething, alld lhis prohahly docs play a role ill chewing frequcncies [or some indi,·iuoals. It does not, however, explain why OJ-all~1 and some puppies do so l11\1ch o:llllagc do it continuollsly until well ovcr 1 ye;l!' of age, Dcstrllcti\'c chewing Ita" bctors related to the er1\'ironment in many puppies. These individ4 uals are often not ~etling enough exercise to ~et rid or their large stores of ('llers:;y, :lnd oftell thev ilrc frolll lIlouth·oricllted hrct'ds. Heldt,\,ers.· for cxamplc, would he Illore likely to take out their extra encrgv orall\' th"n woule! collies. Puppy toys are things owners like to spel"l

69


I3EI-IAVIOn DEVELOPMENT

AN D !lEliA VIOI\AL DISOI\DEI\S

25

money on for their pets; however, care should be u~'ed. First, a puppy is belter on' with onc or two to)'s than with sevcral. This helps the puppy dislill~\1ish things that 1)l'1(l1l~ to it frolll things it wants to grab. Anothcr hctor that is important in toys is that thc)' should be vcry

other pack Illelllbers, subtle threats are usually

t1incrcnt from other things ill t}w cllviroIllllcnL All old sllOc is !lot dislillJ!.lIi ...hablc frolll a ~()(J(I

This

one. Plastic dog toys and children's toys are thc same. A good lawn hose is identical to an old one turned over to the dog. Ilard nylon bones, some rawhide chews. tlnc.l even old socks lieu in a knot are d&erent for mas I puppies. Poppy chewing should be limited to specific toys. While this is easy to say, with some puppies it is a real challenge to do. For the pnppy that chews almust continuuusly, the be-

ciplincd

havior

is excessive

but normal.

Since

or

wallpaper,

preventing

punish-

access

is

Itl'nerally the best method of managing the problcm. Taste a\'ersion can also he used whcn • spcciGc item is targeted. In either case, it is Impurtant to determine the triggering factor &JI(.l

minimize ohiect

C".llIse,

another

pressed

\\'illlOllt

instead

111ings such

If

access is pre\"entcu to a working 011 the r('a1 behaviur problelll will be ex-

it.

chewed

of the destructi\'e

as not enough

exercise

Iltention, especially on a schcduled be contributing bctors.

not

tant that the hUlllan bc considered

chewing. or human

basis, could

Aggression is the fourth

Inajur

category

lhe c:!,,<' hased 011 size alollc'. tll(': puppy Liial has Ile\'el" hl't:lI dis·

of

l"..havioral problems

associatcu with puppies. TIle typcs of aggressi\'e problcllls are quite different from those shown by adult dogs. PainInduced aggression occurs whcn the puppy hnrts. Play aggression can get out of hand for

or

forced

to

submit

may

grow

up

feeling it is the dOlllinant individual and that it controls thc falllily activities. Puppies bite the OWller

who

tries

to take

away

a "stolen"

sock,

take a bow out of their hair, ur leave the house without thelll. Antiaggressive puppy training can be a good procedure to have owners use to he sure

they

can gain

control

of their

pet while

it is physicallv small enough to be "neel'ull)' handled if necessary. Antiaggressive training has man\' little parts. The owner should take the foou bowl away, and if the puppy growls or snaps when the bowl is pickeu up, thc food should remain awav for at least 5 minutes. The puppy should bc h'eld on its back until it quits struggling. The owner can suspend it by holding it around the thorax. Thc muzzle can gently but nrmly be hcld shut until struggling stops. The ears, feet, and tail can be handled, especially since these areas must be examincd and worked

with

later.

Uasic

antiaggression

training

means that anything the puppy dues not like is done repeatedly until it is accepted. /-"!ollthoriented

activities,

e(Hlrag(~d . By :I wceks

in

or ;Ige,

general,

puppies

should

he

dis-

;1l'C chewillg

on

littermates in play. It is during this phase that the individual learns jaw pressure, \Vhen a puppy is biting a littermate, the Iittermate will yelp and stop play at the timc when thc bite bccomes painful. This basically teaches the puppv how much pressure it takes to inflict pain. When thc puppy practiccs this on a humall,

Aggression

dominant.

is lIslI;dly

110\v('\'(,I",

ment fur normal behavior is not ufl(Jerstood, the best tcchnique is to divert the youngstcr's attention to something that is acceptable. Puppics sbould be kcpt in a place where they ha\'e k"CCSS only to their select to\'s, especially when Il<J one is around to watch them. For puppies that chcw primarilv when things within thc houschold change and are doing damage to furniture

to establish ownership. Terriers tend to respect social positions and rrcqll('lltly 1lIIlSl be raised scp;lra\('ly aner 15 weeks. For the dog-human relationship, it is impor-

slIITicicnl

it can learn

puppy

hiting

is

:1n

undesirahle

oftell considered

lesson. cute,

Becallse owners

may tolerate the ]lain to watch the fun. The lessnn learned is that a great deal of pressure is needed

to cause pain. Later on a minor warning

bile from the dog's pcrspecti\'e may actually inflict a serious injury to the owner.

tUlIle owners.

The most signincant aspect of aggrcssion has dominance. Puppies normally cslah· I,," duminauce among littcrlllates by 15 weeks ol agc (Scott and Fuller, 1965). l3efore this "' .•.·urs, puppies challenge each other over pos•..•sions, especially food. After dOlllinance is ntablished among littermates and relative to

to do with

70


THi\VELING WITH

\"iIPEJIi\I"Sby HEGINI\ SCJ!\vAl3E,IJV~1

It is unlikely for three \vires to travel through the Southlvest as it is for a busy Veterinarian to drop everything to go on a two month sojourn with them. Turning 40 does strange things to people. Apparently this need to cXLlminl? one's life at this time is completely normal. l~e opportunity to think at leisure was owed to this profession and my partner. The dogs benefitted too. First problem: what vehicle? A Suburban towing a trailer U3 in was considered. The image of three wet dogs allover the cab was unappealing as the thought of driving along curvy road towing a shaky trailer behind. So the motorhome idea seemed best. We found a 20 foot Winnebago that just fit the bill. The sleep couch in the back could be removed and three dog crates fit nicely. We left New York and commented to each other that New York can look nice with the cake-frosting snow sparkling ill the sun. First stop was New Caledonia State Park in southern PA. The sno\v lilY unl<ll?c1eep in the par)(ing lot und thl? Iliking trail through the thick pines. The dogs ran like crazy. A snow machine couldn't have obliterated the cross-country ski tracks any better. Up a little hill, over some logs .... off they went after a deer. In the 20 minutes spent frantically Ivhistling down our 2路CD's \Vas born the rule that only one dog at a time \Vas allo\Ved off lead. The next rest stop \Vas in Virgilw along the l31ue '"iidge Park\Vay. It was standard and clean with a doggie walk sign pointing up the hillside. Someone Hho knOl路lsand loves dogs must have designed this space. On top of the hill was a 5 acre piney woods with a Hide pat]] cut through. A fence on one side kept the dogs from running into the pasture. A sense of "pet 1路lelcome" existed here. This was the first of miJllYrt':o;t stops such ;)S tillS. Particularly in the South, the Highway Depts. have gone to great lengths to make dog owners feel welcome. At Pebble Hill Plantation in Thomasville, Georgia \Ve Ivere invited to walk the dogs in the woods behind the mansion, let them swim in the lake and generally enjoy the ground. Of course, this house Ivas OIvned by "Hiss Pansy" of the Hana family \vho loved dogs and horses above all. The extensive collection of stirrup cups, game bird prints, and horse and dog paintings made this more of a museum than a hunting lodge. There \vere for example, over 200 sets of placecard holders with game bird themes. In one room hung a print of Otterhouncls SHimming after an otter with the help of two Border Terriers whose job it was to get the otter out of the rocks at the river edge. "Host people can find their breed of dog here," said our guide, proudly. No luck, everyother kind of Sporting dog was represented her somewhere, no GWP's.

71


In fact our fieldtriating friends in Georgia had little use for the Drahthaars. They preferred 路slicks路 as they called the wirey little pointers filling their kennels. One run in a 10 acre cockle burr field showed why. After the watermelon harvest these field grow up with burr and look like a solid brown carpet from a distance. The quail like to nestle right down in there. Let an enterprising Wirehair come along and plunge through this stuff and soon, weighed down by hundreds of these prickly nasty things, their impetus slows. Lumbering awkwardly along, they point and retrieve like old fat dogs. But point and retrieve they did. Finally, for the 2 hours spent in this bird field, one hour was devoted to picking off the burrs that the dogs couldn't get out themselves. In Southwest Texas, a nice old farmer in Asheron let us run the dogs on a fallow area of about 40 acres. This was a first for all of us. Picture sun-baked clay with an occasional mesquite bush and prickly pear cactus and a bit of buffalo grass trying to grow. It hadn't rained in a year and the 路pond" was a green slimy puddle. It there were any birds they would be easy to see in the absence of underbrush. We knew birds liked to hide under the prickly pear and Luke must have gotten wind of one for he ran right over to a cactus and stood as if immobilized. When we got to him we realized he was impaled on the cactus spines. The dogs did find the one small cov~y left in this area. We called them off to start the real work of wielding tweezers to pullout the deeply embedded cactus spines. Then there was the bare field behind a rest stop in Dateland, Arizona. The dogs charged into the inviting open space and started limping immediately. Tiny hard mace-shaped prickers had become embedded in their pads. No fear of the dogs straying here. The very best way to exercise dogs we found in Southern California at the Imperial Sands recreation area. This must be where all the Arabian desert movies have been filmed for this was the only spot where we actually found sand dunes in the desert. Normally the American desert is rocky, dry, hard-baked, cl~ylike and not at all comfortable to sit on. This area was covered in 30 foot rolling sand dunes through which the wind whistled so hard you could not keep your eyes open. We let the fuzzfaces go. Up they went, down into the rippled valley between two dunes. up another one, and then they seemed to slow down. The effort of running in deep soft sand was noticable. One by one they loped back. Now if one could arrange such an exercise area in the backyard, our dogs would be fit indeed! The dogs added immensely to our enjoyment of the outdoors. A tiny hitch occurred in the National parks where hiking with dogs is forbidden. This is to preserve the delicate desert habitate. In the campgrounds and on the road dogs were tolerated. At Padre Island National Seashore in Texas, the dogs finally had a chance to legally chase the seagulls to exhaustion (theirs, not the birds').

72


Fifty-five miles of unregulated beach exists on this barrier island. One of the natural hazards were the portugese Man-O'War jellyfish drying up everywhere on the beach. The dogs needed to roll in these. The skin on their necks and shoulders immediately became inflammed and itchy. Fortunately a little cortisone spray quieted the reaction. Locals told me to use a little meat tenderizer for the jellyfish reaction. Apparently this simple remedy relives the pain best of all. Big Bend National Park in Texas was a desert delight for all of us. Unfortunately hiking with the dogs was absolutely forbidden. Cottonwood Campground in bId Castillo made up for this. The large yellow leaves of the wintery cottonwood trees gave a golen glow to the afternoon light and the peace of the riverbottom seemed to seep into everything. The dogs laid quietly in their X-pen, sniffing the air from the torpid, nearly dry Rio Grande. A group of determined beef cattle wandered into the campground to check out the dogs. Only the young dog stood up ready to bold should one of these cows become aggressive. Later came the coyotes and howled over a kill. The dogs whined a little. Did they want to join in this ancient pack ritual? Then the moon rose full and the hollow rattling of the large cottonwood leaves was the only sound heard by our imperfect ears. The dogs heard much more. During the night I woke up and saw the three heads raised up at attention listening to the seemingly silent desert night. It is not, by the way, too hot to hunt in the Southwaest in the winter. The dogs found quail on a golf course rough near the Powell's in Phoenix. At high noon in tombstone, Arizona on Superbowl Sunday they pointed a covey in a rubble-strewn gulley and put up a second one at the other end of town. Do people in Tombstone know that quail live right behind their courthouse? Yes, according to a cheerful dog groomer named Jay we spoke with. But we don't shoot them, she hastened to add. Most of her high school class of 20 preferred to stay here to live. That speaks for the attraction of the OK Corral. In fact, we met many contented people who seemed to have litle in the way of money or possessions. It has to be the influence of that ever cheerful sunshine. Then there was water. Wirehairs love water. They swam in the Mississippi at Natchez, in the Rio Grande at Laredo, and the Pacific at the San Clemente Nuclear Power plant. They also plunged into the Salton Sea, a dead sea lake near Palm Springs. We should have been warned by the pickledlooking fish a~l over the shore that this was high-potency water. The three Wirehairs emerged from the brine with their hair standing on end as though someone had poured Dippety-Do allover them. They did not even clean themselves off. Worst of all the red clay between their toes hardened into rock-like beads that clinked when the dogs walked. A stripping comb finally cut these little marbles out from between their toes. I believe in spite of all these natural hazards the dogs had a wonderful time.

73


Dogs love to be with their people above all things. Returning to their daily routine of fenced yard and dog run was probably hard. It was amazingly difficult for us to adjust to not being able to see those 3 pairs of eyes at every moment. They were constant companions for two months; we planned our trip to maximize outdoor activities--now to return and forget about them for 8-10 hours every day took some adjustment. We all seem to have made the adjustment to normal life again although once in a while one of the dogs goes over to the parked Winnebago and stands by the door as if asking, "So when are we off on another adventure?"

DOG FIRST

AID KIT: USEFUL

ITEMS

FOR TRAVEL

Flea & Tick Spray (with tick repellent permethrin) Bandage scissor Tweezer Nail Trimmer Bandage material: gauze pads, roll gauze, Vetwrap,surgical tape I" & 3" (bring plenty of each) Earwash and Panolog or similar for ear infections Eye Wash (for washing out foreign bodies and sand) Ophthalmic ointment--antibotic only, no cortisone Betadine Scrub, Nolvasan Ointment 9comes in 8 oz. jars) Benadryl 50 mg. caps. for allergic reactions & tranquilizing Antidiarrheal: Peptobismol, Lomotil, Biosol Amoxicillin or Ampicillin for wounds, punctures, prevent infection Topical cortisone ointment or spray for hot spots, jellyfish bites. Skunk-OFF or Massengill douche to neutralize stench Peroxide to clean wounds and remove bloodstains from everything Optional:

meat tenderizer, dog boots, roll of sheet cotton to pack bleeding paws, cleanout grubby ears, and "Swat" fly ointment to keep insects away from wounds.

When in doubt about the conditionof eye injuries or deep puncture wounds, consult a Veterinarian as soon as possible. Any bleeder no matter how violent, can be stopped with finger pressure. The largest artery in the body has less pressure than a garden hose. So, if necessary, apply pressure to the bleeding part manually until you get help. Don't remove the bandage, just add packing if the bleeding continues. On trips the number one killer is heat exhaustion. Be sure to provide water, shade, and ventilation at all times. My best advice about snakebites is to avoid areas or times of the year when snakes are active. We did not see one during our travels in January and February. A hospital emergency room might be the best place to rush to if a bite occurs. The larger Veterinary hospitals emergency clini~s are usually equipped with anti venom if you can find one in time.

74


CH lAURWYN CASSIO PIECE OF CAKE (CH LAURWYN'S OfEESEBURGER X CH LAURWYN'S OfEESE TWIST) .Breeder: P. Loosell & P. Laurons OWIler:

C. Stuart & J. Brewster RD 2 Box 182, Altoona, PA 16601 (814)943-4045

路Peter" is an All- Breed Best in Show Winner, a Specialty Winner & a Multi-Group Winning Special. A proven Sire of Olampion offspring. He works in obedience, tracking and as a personal gun dog. OFA

CH SHADRA'S ET TIJ BRUI'E OJOHMAR,

CD

(CH jOHMARjUSTIN TIME X jOHMAR CHEYENNE) Brwder: J. L. Horon OWIU!r: J. & L. Qark RD 3 Box 2752, Al/entown, NJ 08501 (609)259-7579 "Brutus" is a BISS dog ('89 DVGWPC Specialty), Group Winner and multiple placer with over 130 BOB's as well as being an obedience placer. Two of his sons placed in the '89 DVGWPC Specialty as BaS in Sweeps and WO in the regular classes. OFA & CERF - inquiries invited.

CH lAURWYN CASSIO MOCHA CAKE, CD (CH LAURWYN'S CHEESEBURGER X CH LAURWYN'S CHEESE lWISD Breeder: P. Loosen & P. Laurans Oumer:

R. Koeppel 0"0 Agent路 JoY Brr!UJSler, R 3 USRt. 6, Newtown,

cr 06470

(203)426-2881

"Mocha", a double Cheese Cake Grandson, was the #1 Show GWP & National Specialty WIDner in 1986. A Sire of Champions, Mocha now has 22 Group Wins. Frozen Semen available. OFA

CH TOWER'S SEPTEMBER PATQlWORK (CH MAXWELL'S PRARIE SUN HAWK X CH PAT'S PUMPKIN KUCHEN) Breeder: D. Wilsall OUlller: B. Wilsall N6481 Co. Hwy. DE, Beaver Dam, Wi 53961 "Patches",

A Group-Placing

puppy at 6-months

(414)887-0403

of age, has sired champions.

CH TOWER'S JUNE PIRATE (CH MA..'<WEU'S PRAIRIE SUN HAWK X CH PATS PUMKlN KUCHEN) Breeder: B. WilSall OW/ler: B. Wi/SOil N6481 Co. Hw)'. DE, Beaver Dam, IH 53961 "Pirate", A well balanced

dog, has pointed

(414)887-0403

get. OFA: Excellent

75

OF A: Excellent


CD SHURCAN BARON OF AFfERHOURS (AMIGO '10M HEDGEROW X QI. LAURWYN'S HEYWIRE CAllIOPE, CD) Breeder: ]. & B. HaUtgan & P. Laurans Oumer: W. & C. Wbtlemore 4508 Marks Rd., Medtna, OH 44256 (216)722-8935 "Baron路 fmi.shed with 4 maj<xs-undefe:ited Baron is NAVHDA NA tested. OFA

at Smonths. A Group Placer and a Sire of Champions,

CD lARKSPUR'S WHITEWATER KAIAC (QI BARB-ED WIRE LEROY BROWN X QI WIllOWRUN'S WHISPER LARK) Breeder: ]. Pupt/lo & K .. Schwer OWller: G. puptllo 4968 Unton Rt #1 拢au C1atr, MI 49111 (616)944-5873 "With limited Showing "Kal" has established himself as a Group Placing Special and a consistent Breed WIDner. NAVHDA NA winner. OFA

CH WEIDENHUGEL MOONRAKER (QI WEIDENHUGEL ARAMIS V. BEAU X HEIDI 'ION HOHENZOllERN) Breeder: J. Yonge Owner: Dr. A. Hard 505 E. Railroad Av. Coati, CA 94928, (707) 795-4797 "Toto" is a U.S., Netherlands andVDH (German) Champion and has won or placed in Groups in the U.S., Holland, Germany and Czechoslovakia. Pedigree and European show records on request. OFA

NICO V.D. BEMMERAUE (BASKOVOM STEINBERGER-WALD X GONNY '1.0. BEMMERAUE) Breeder: R.Jagerszky OWIler: M. Revell 505 E. Railroad Av. Coati, CA 94928, (707) 795-4797 "Nico" is NAVHDA tested - NA Prize I (112 Points). He is our personal hunting dog and the sire of many

DUAL

CHAMPION

&

AFC DUNKEE'S

JUSTA

HOLE'N'ONE,MH

(CH. SUNSHINE)AKE X CH. MALPATS)USTA BUMP, COX) Breeder: Benwe Foster Braun OWller:. Benwe Foster Braull

1408 PtllevtlleRd. NewHope, PA i8938, (215) 598-3990 "Putter", the only Dual east of the Mississippi.. The #1 puppy/derby 1987, #3 Gun Dog 1988. Finished easily on the bench between trial seasons. Good movement, excellent temperment. Frozen semen available

76


YEARBOOK

1987 - 1988 - 1989 The GWPCA Yearbooks are the single best reference photogr3phs will be a valuable addition to your Wire Lauric The

McCarty

projected

will be editing ready

date

the 1987-1989

for this Yearbook

It is vital that 311 tbe photographs, 1990.

Be sure to send

September

The information, pedigrees tool for the breeder.

and

Yearbook. is February

pedigrees,

in the information

source for Wire Fanciers. memorabilia and a valuab!e

1991.

and information

sbeets

early as this will insure

be sent in to Lauric

the earliest

possible

McCarty

return

before

September

1,

of your photographs.

1, 1990 is the last dale of aec~ptance for this yearhook. Any meterial received after this date will be retllTlled to (I,e the fee for each photo. No one will be billed. Ads received without payment will be relurneu.

sender. Be sure to include CRITERIA

FOR

INCLUSION

IN THE

87-89 YEARBOOK:

1.

AKC title in Bench, Field, or Obedience (if you completed 87-89, forward the information for this volume).

2.

Foreign Titles (Canada, the above ARC titles.

3.

Brood Bitch - 3 or more Champion progeny Stud Dog - 5 or more Champion progeny

FEE

FOR

Bermuda,

Etc.)

and Versatile

years

Dog Club Titles

but have earned

will be listed

a new title during

if you have earned

LISTING

$20.00 for the ftrst dog $15.00 for each additional COST

Mexico,

a title in previous

OF THE

dog sent in by a Breeder

87-89 Volume

or Owner

will be $15.00

\VHA T TO SEND: 1.

Photograph - on the back side of each photo A. Thc name of the dog 13. Your name and address DO NOT WRITE INSURE

2. 3.

WRITING

A complete A photocopy

DIRECTLY DOES

4 generation

ON TIrE NOT SHOW

please

print:

BACK OF THE

PHOTOGRAPH

- USE A LABEL

OR STICKER

pedigree

of Certificate

of Title

or Volwnc

#

and month

#

of the AKC

Show Awards

when

published. 4.

The

fee for each listing

5.

Fill out and send

If you have any questions,

TO

THROUGH

payable

to G.W.P.c.A.

in the 'Yearbook contact

Laurie

Form"

on the back of this page.

McCarty,

2506 Ann Arbor

Lane,

77

Bowie,

Maryland

20716.

the Title

was

one of


GWPCA - NATIONAL

fiELD fUTURITY

RULES - GWPCA

QUALIFICATIONS The National Field Futurity is only open to properly nominated German Wirehaired Pointers which have been properly registered with the American Kennel Club. Nomination procedures are as follows: ,. A litter of GWP"S can be nominated for up \0 90 days after the whelp date. 2. An individual GWP from an unnominated litter may be nominated up \0 (, months after the whelp date. 3. Renomination of any GWP must be done prior to it's first birthday. 4. Owners of GWP litters are strongly encoul"ilge.c!\<;Ls~!,dthe names, addresses, and phone numbers of individuals purchas ing pups \0 the Treasurer of the GWPCA so that thellew owners may receive a packet of information about local clubs, breed activities, the GWPCA and the National Field Futurity. The nomination fee shall be $20.oli and the ren~tionshan~

$10,00 (Subject to change by the GWPCA Board of Directors.)

Litters whelped after July 1st of one year and on or before 'lJn.e 30th of these<;ond year, shall b~ eligible to run in the Futurity to be held in the fall of the third year. Dogs l1!'dbitlnes Willbe betw~en sixte"n'and ,twenty-eight InC!f1thsof age. nominations may be made by completing the official nominating form and submittiF18the'$20 ,00 fee. Upon rece!J>tof the Nominating form and fee, The Futurity Chairman will £erwarit,.!!,~Ren~~iO.i~"onns tothe·.appl.i~t;." . PURSE "+>720' "'",i;,;~~~t,,1 '" ..... ~-> The purse shall consist of all nomi~()nirenomination, and entry fees, less the. expenses o(the stak.~"AIIl""nies shall be divided between the first three placeme"tsa~orall1g to the ff>UOlN~g:~~lJ)~L . '. " •.. '. "';i""" 50% to FIRSTPlAOE-· .•... '. (60.% to the owner arid 40%10 the nommator) 30% to SECONDi'LACf . (60% to the.Owner and 40%.to the nominatOr) 20% to THIRD ,PlAC£. • ':.•(60% to the 'o\""er and 40o/~t~ the nominator) ~.w

.,,"

/

~,

'''':<t-.<

BRACING ' .•.•..... '. y.;:.> .. L" .•••• f.e! A minimum of thirty minutes shall ~allotted for each brace in the series. A minimum oftwo seHes and a maximum of three series shall determine ~e placements'. Th." length of additional ",,'ries ~II be decided by the judges. Second and third series dogs shall be given a minimum of fortY-f!v~minut~ :r~ between. braces unJess pennissionfot a shorter, timep<;"iod is agreed to by the handler. The final series shall include a shoot-~retrieve'with shootlng done by official guns. The fina Iser:;,esshaJIbefordogs which, in the judges' opinion, are in placement cont!'"1ion ... '" •

":t.

_ '

,

:.s'

"\,'r

"Yy~

Game birds, the likes of which are native to the area and grounds where ihe futurity is nm, shall be used th~pughoui the stake. A minimum of three Such gaine birds shall.&. placed immedi"Je1y prior to eachbrilce 'of thefirstseri~. The .fir:stseries shall be a single course without bird field. A blank gun shall be fired by the handler on all bird contacts during.all s~rieS'prior to the final

series.

'n

Entry forms shall be mailed to all nominations at least 60 days prior to the running of the stake. The close of en!J:iesaild the drawing shall be the same dateas the close of entries for ~e GWPCA National Field Trial. The Chainnan and any interested parties may attend the drawing at such time and place as designated by the Chairman. The Futurity shall be run in conjunction with the German Wirehaired Pointer Club of America National Field Trial on such date as selected ,byihe Chairman, the National Field Trial Convnittee and the Board of Directors. JUDGING Judges shall be selected by the Chairman, the Field Trial Committee and the Board of Directors. Judging emphasis is to be placed on dogs that show a keen desire to ,hunt, which are bold 'anilindependent, have a fast and yet attractive style of running and demonstrate intelligence in seeking likely bird objectives. All placed dogs MUST point staunchly, Must make a reasonable retrieve, and should show a willingness to handle and please. Ifatall possible, all placements should be awarded. Birdlessdogs may be called back at the discretion of the judges. Four placemet1ts may be awarded. Howev~r,only Mt through third shall share in the purse. HANDLING Horseback hand lers must use horses strictly as a conveyance. The pace of the handlers shall be set by the marshal. Before leaving the directed route, handlers must seek pennission of a judge. Scouts may only be sent upon pennission of a judge. Scouts may help locate a dog, but shall not be used to bring the dogs to the front or otherwise handle dogs. Infraction of handling rules may be grounds for a lower placement or disqualification. GOVERNING RULES Except as otherwise noted herein, the rules for AMERICANKENNELCLUB, Pointing Breed Field Trial, Open Derby Stakes apply. Copies of the most recent AKC Field Trial Rules may be obtained by writing to:

AMERICAN KENNEl CLUB 51 MADISON AVE. NEW YORK, NY,10010 (ATTENTION FIELD TRIAL PLANS)


Wire~News 1990 Summer