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GOAL 2

GWP: A knowledge hub Creating and sharing water knowledge is a fundamental part of GWP’s work. This includes finding new ways to produce, customise, and communicate useful information to a wide range of stakeholders. The GWP Technical Committee (which comprises internationally recognised professionals) provides high-quality advice and support and develops knowledge products to help practitioners improve their understanding of the many complex issues surrounding water management.

address its unique water resource management challenges. IWRM was introduced almost 20 years ago in countries across Eastern Africa and it is still a work in progress. The main challenges involve a need to build professional, technical, and institutional capacity.

Technical Focus Paper No 8: Integrated water resources management in Central and Eastern Europe: IWRM versus EU Water Framework Directive The countries of Central and Eastern Europe faced many challenges in becoming EU Member States. In the water sector, the environment and water quality requirements of the EU Water Framework Directive New knowledge products dominate water resources planning and management. Background Paper No. 21: Promoting effective water Many see this as a surrogate for IWRM, although this management cooperation among riparian nations has a much broader focus on sustainable social and This paper argues that we need more refined measures of effective cooperation and examples to provide nations economic development and not just on the environment. This paper explores the relationship with possible models to adapt to a specific basin. between the aims of the EU Water Framework Directive Cooperation among basin-sharing nations for its own and the principles of IWRM. sake will not necessarily provide the benefits needed. Benefits must be measurable. Some benefits, such as shared hydropower revenues or a firm allocation, will be Technical Focus Paper No. 9: Forecasts of mortality and economic losses from poor water and sanitation in immediately measurable; others such as restoration of sub-Saharan Africa (online only) ecosystem services will take more time to measure. This paper presents country-level estimates of water, Measurable cooperation benefits generally require a sanitation, and hygiene (WASH)-related mortality and legal framework. economic losses associated with poor access to water and sanitation infrastructure in sub-Saharan Africa from Technical Focus Paper No. 6: China’s water resources 1990 to 2050. The paper examines the extent to which management challenge: The ‘three red lines’ the changes that accompany economic growth will Throughout China’s history water has always been an ‘solve’ water and sanitation problems in the region and, essential part of political and economic life and if so, how long it will take. The simulations suggest that important to the country’s prosperity and stability. WASH-related mortality will continue to differ markedly Today, China is facing a great challenge as water across countries in sub-Saharan Africa. resources begin to constrain economic and social development. This paper describes the key water challenges facing China and the steps being taken to introduce new stringent boundaries: the so-called ‘three red lines’, which set limits on water use, efficiency, and water pollution. Technical Focus Paper No 7: Integrated water resources management in Eastern Africa: Coping with ‘complex’ hydrology Extreme and unpredictable rainfall patterns, intense floods, and droughts add significantly to the cost of controlling and managing water resources in Eastern Africa. This paper describes the different approaches being taken in selected countries in the region and how each country has interpreted the IWRM principles to

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GWP in Action 2015 Annual Report

Profile for Global Water Partnership

GWP in Action 2015  

The 2015 Annual Report of Global Water Partnership (GWP)

GWP in Action 2015  

The 2015 Annual Report of Global Water Partnership (GWP)

Profile for gwp-publ