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the ideal place to s t u dy l aw in action contents 2

Why GW Law?

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The Law School

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Environmental Law

11 Government Procurement Law 15 Intellectual Property Law 23 International and Comparative Law 31 Litigation and Dispute Resolution 35 National Security and U.S. Foreign Relations Law 40 A Livable City 42 DC + GW 4 Beyond the Classroom/ 4 Student Resources 46 International Students 47 Financial Planning

Powerful Experience GW Law’s strong academic program, coupled with its central place in the D.C. legal community, allows students to both study and participate in the law. Engaged Legal Minds Here, outstanding legal scholars are deeply dedicated to teaching the law. A faculty of experts engages students in the classroom and helps them put their learning to use in practical ways.

48 Admissions 49 GW Law at a Glance

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A Vibrant Community Only in Washington, D.C., can students access so many significant local, national, and international legal institutions—many a short walk from campus. Students also enjoy the cultural offerings of a truly international city, as well as the resources of a large university.


The Law School

Why GW Law? An interview with Frederick M. Lawrence Dean and Robert Kramer Research Professor of Law community on a range of practical problems, from administrative and immigration law to small business and consumer law. In addition, our students are regularly provided opportunities to hold internships in important legal institutions, including local, national, and international organizations that are never more than a short Metro ride away. We also bring an array of prominent, often controversial speakers to the Law School, both into classroom settings and in special lectures.

Dean Lawrence leads campus visitor and speaker Justice Stephen Breyer (left) through the Law School before a symposium on media.

Why study law in Washington, D.C.? There is simply no better place to study law. Every day, momentous legal events change the way in which we all live. Our country’s highest court and most important lower courts, our national legislature, every major federal organization, and many important international institutions conduct their business here. How does GW Law fit into that world? Legal events—big and small, domestic and international, legislative, judicial, and administrative—are the stuff of the legal system and the heart of the curriculum of any great law school. But what separates us from other law schools is the close vantage point from which our students observe and study the law. We’re just a few blocks from the White House and the State Department. The International Monetary Fund is literally across the street. Our students study with and learn from major decision makers.

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What are the distinctive advantages to GW Law? Our professors may be the leading scholars in their fields, but their first priority is teaching. Drawing heavily on the legal events and institutions that surround us, our exceptionally able and accessible faculty offers a curriculum that is as rich and diverse as it is demanding. With internationally recognized expertise in almost every legal discipline, we provide our students the opportunity not just to observe the law in action, but also to understand it and, even more important, to participate in it. How does GW go about educating its students? Rigorous training in the doctrines and history of the law is complemented by an exceptionally broad range of opportunities to meld instruction in legal concepts with practical training. Some of that takes place in traditionally taught courses, some in skills training courses, and some of it occurs in our clinical program, where students work directly with clients in the

What kind of person pursues graduate work at GW Law? Every year we attract a remarkably talented and diverse array of students who will develop the expertise and the understanding necessary to become leaders of the bar, leaders of governments and international organizations, and leaders of business in the 21st century. These students, from a broad variety of backgrounds and experiences, invariably possess a commitment that rivals that of our faculty to make the world a more just and humane place. And more often than not, the people drawn to GW Law are looking for a cooperative, congenial, and collaborative learning environment. As they embark on their exciting and challenging graduate studies, our students teach, stimulate, challenge, and inspire each other in ways that will uniquely prepare them to become the kind of legal professionals who truly can make a difference in the world. Dean Frederick M. Lawrence earned a B.A. from Williams College and a J.D. from Yale University. He came to GW Law in 2005.

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ounded in 1865, The George Washington University Law School was the first law school established in the nation’s capital. Since then, GW Law has maintained its position as one of the country’s premier centers of legal scholarship, producing leaders in government, business, judicial, and private legal spheres. Here, a faculty of experts with extensive real-world experience and a devotion to teaching connects with students in the heart of Washington, D.C. The Law School is housed on The George Washington University’s main Foggy Bottom campus, across the street from the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund and four blocks from the White House. The State Department, the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, and numerous other governmental and arts organizations are in the immediate vicinity. The nine-building complex was recently renovated to better facilitate the open, collaborative atmosphere of the Law School.

Classrooms incorporate the latest video and audio technologies. Students enjoy wireless Internet access throughout the facility, including in the spacious student lounge areas. Three fully equipped moot court rooms lend an authentic air to simulation courses and skills competitions. GW Law has a student population of about 1,975 (including more than 2o0 graduate law students), 100 full-time faculty members, and 288 adjunct professors.

The University The Law School is one of nine academic units of The George Washington University, which was established by charter of Congress in 1821 as the Columbian College, fulfilling the wishes of the nation’s first president. The University has a total enrollment of 20,000 and includes the Columbian College of Arts and Sciences, the School of Medicine and Health Sciences, the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, the Graduate School of Education and Human Development, the School of Business, the Elliott School of International Affairs, the School of Public Health and Health Services, and the College of Professional Studies. Law students have full access to many amenities on the GW campus, including the Lerner Health and Wellness Center, a state-ofthe-art complex featuring a wide range of fitness facilities and classes. ★

www.law.gwu.edu

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degree information The Law School offers two graduate law degrees: the Master of Laws (LL.M.) and the Doctor of Judicial Science (S.J.D.). With the exception of the Litigation and Dispute Resolution program’s classes, which are limited to LL.M. candidates, graduate law students take courses with Juris Doctor (J.D.) students. Graduate students are able to combine traditionally taught courses with in-depth seminars, internships, skills training, and clinical experience for a complete approach to legal education. General LL.M. Program Graduates of non-U.S. law schools may pursue the General LL.M. as a means of studying a range of issues in U.S. law. The General LL.M. program accepts a limited number of U.S. law school graduates to study in areas other than those covered in the specialized programs. U.S. law school graduates applying to the General LL.M. program must submit a proposed program of study that includes courses to be taken and a general statement outlining the intended area of concentration for the thesis. Upon admission, the student is paired with a faculty member in that area who will assist in further developing a curriculum and supervising the student’s thesis.

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Recent General LL.M. candidates have focused in such areas as labor law, constitutional law, health care law, criminal law, and antitrust law. Areas of interest are limited only by the availability of faculty advisers. Specialized LL.M. Programs In addition to the General LL.M., specialized fields of study include Environmental Law, Intellectual Property Law, International and Comparative Law, International Environmental Law, Government Procurement Law, Government Procurement and Environmental Law, Litigation and Dispute Resolution, and National Security and U.S. Foreign Relations Law. Degree Requirements U.S. law school graduates must fulfill the following requirements: completion of 24 credit hours, including the required curriculum in the specialized programs; attendance for a residence period of a minimum of two consecutive semesters; achievement of a cumulative grade point average of 2.67 at the time all requirements are met; and completion and acceptance of a thesis (except for candidates for the degree in litigation and dispute resolution) unless this requirement has been waived if authorized.

Non-U.S. law school graduates must fulfill the following requirements: completion of 24 credit hours, including the required curriculum in the specialized programs; attendance for a residence period of a minimum of two consecutive semesters; achievement of a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 at the time all requirements are met (2.67 for non-U.S. law school graduates who previously earned an LL.M. from a U.S. law school); completion and acceptance of a thesis unless this requirement has been waived; and completion of Fundamental Issues in U.S. Law. Candidates for the S.J.D. must complete the following requirements: a residence period of not less than one academic year; a course of study and research, designated by the candidate’s dissertation committee, of no fewer than eight credit hours; and completion and acceptance of a dissertation. The dissertation must be submitted no later than three years from the date of matriculation into the S.J.D. program. Thesis Requirement The thesis is expected to be a scholarly paper of the same quality and length as a law review article. With the approval of the program director or thesis adviser, an extension of up to one calendar year may be granted for completion of the thesis; continuous enrollment must be maintained during the period of the extension. Students may request a waiver of the thesis requirement if authorized; candidates who are granted a waiver must complete the minimum required credits of course work graded on the basis of a research paper as outlined in the Law School Bulletin.

Environmental Law Since its inception in 1970, GW Law’s program in environmental law has been at the forefront of the field. Environmental issues have an increasing influence on the business, government, and social landscape. Here, students study an array of topics, including federal environmental regulation, land management, energy and the environment, and the increasing connections between international and environmental law. Faculty members come from the highest levels of the field, with decades of real-world experience in environmental law.

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degree requirements LL.M. in Environmental Law Twenty-four credits, including the Thesis course and a minimum of 12 credits from the following courses, are required; if the thesis is waived, an additional 4 credits in courses in the field graded on the basis of a research paper are required:

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he study of environmental law has evolved significantly over the past four decades, with globalization, new technologies, climate concerns, and increasing cultural and political awareness combining to continually redefine the field. GW Law’s Environmental Law program synthesizes the study of all these factors, giving students a complete understanding of the way the legal, governmental, and business spheres address the many facets of environmental regulation and legislation. The LL.M. Degree The Environmental Law program offers three fields of study leading to the LL.M.: Environmental Law, Government Procurement and Environmental Law, and International Environmental Law. Each of these fields provides a grounding in the core areas of pollution abatement. The Environmental Law field gives students flexibility in planning their programs of study, allowing them to choose from many environmental law courses. The Government Procurement and Environmental Law field addresses the environmental work done by governments

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at the federal, state, and local levels using government contracts. The field also covers the legal problems involving both contracting and environmental laws that many firms doing business with the government face. The International Environmental Law field focuses on environmental policy on a multinational scale, from international trade to global climate change. GW is developing a fourth environmental focus area addressing the critical issues of energy and climate. About two-thirds of environmental law graduate students attend full time and complete the program in

one year (two semesters and one summer). Part-time students are expected to complete their degree requirements in two years. Internships Students can individualize their degree programs through the Graduate Environmental Placement course, which places students in internships with appropriate government agencies or nonprofit organizations. Students can engage in legal analysis and policy formulation at the White House Council on Environmental Quality; the Environmental Protection Agency; the Departments of Justice, Energy, the Interior, and Defense; or nonprofit environmental organizations. The placement program is a valuable tool for students with specialized interest in a wide range of topics including environmental impact review, endangered species, marine fisheries, and environmental enforcement.

• Air Pollution Control • Water Pollution Control • Trade and Sustainable Development • Coastal, Navigation, and Wetlands Resource Law • Energy Law and Regulation • Energy and the Environment • Natural Resources Law • Control of Solid and Hazardous Wastes (RCRA and CERCLA) • Toxic Tort Litigation • Federal Facilities Environmental Law Issues • Environmental Issues in Business Transactions • International Environmental Law • Sustainable Regional Growth Seminar • Environmental Crimes • Environmental Crimes Project • Graduate Environmental Placement • Environmental Lawyering

LL.M. in Government Procurement and Environmental Law Twenty-four credits, including the Thesis course and the following courses, are required; if the thesis is waived, an additional 4 credits in courses in the field graded on the basis of a research paper are required: • Air Pollution Control • Water Pollution Control • Control of Solid and Hazardous Wastes (RCRA and CERCLA) • Formation of Government Contracts • Performance of Government Contracts • Government Contracts Cost and Pricing

LL.M. in International Environmental Law Twenty-four credits, including the Thesis course and the following courses, are required; if the thesis is waived, an additional 4 credits in courses in the field graded on the basis of a research paper are required:

• Air Pollution Control • Water Pollution Control • Trade and Sustainable Development • Control of Solid and Hazardous Wastes (RCRA and CERCLA) • International Environmental Law • International Law • International Business Transactions or • International Organizations

The curriculum consists of a core of in-depth courses on the EPA’s “media” statutes (the Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act, the Solid Waste Disposal Act, and the “Superfund”) and approximately 20 additional environmental credits. Most specialized environmental law courses are offered in the early evening, and many are taught by adjunct faculty who are among the nation’s leading public- and private-sector practitioners as well as experts in the areas they teach. LL.M./M.P.H. The Law School and the School of Public Health and Health Services offer a joint LL.M./M.P.H. program that includes a specialization in environmental-occupational health. Students must be admitted to both degree programs separately. Six credit hours of successfully completed course work may be transferred between programs. An LL.M./M.P.H. candidate may use the Law School’s thesis to satisfy a portion of the special project requirement of the M.P.H. program.

★ www.law.gwu.edu/environmental

Al Gore spoke at the conference “The Future of Environmental Protection” hosted by GW Law’s Environmental Law Association in 2007.

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co-curriculars The Environmental Law Advocacy Center (ELAC) Established in 1995 and composed of three independent projects— the Environmental Crimes Project, the Shapiro Environmental Law Clinic, and the Environmental Legislative Group—the Center operates under the direction of Professor Jonathan Turley.

Natural resources law is an important part of the curriculum.

The ELAC enables students to focus on international, national, and local issues in areas ranging from environmental justice to community outreach programs. Students may focus on litigation as part of the Shapiro Clinic or on investigations as part of the Environmental Crimes Project. In past years, Professor Turley and his students have worked on a series of precedent-setting cases through the Environmental Crimes Project, which works exclusively in the area of environmental criminal violations, including cases with the United Nations, Congress, and foreign countries. The Center also offers legal consultation and legislative drafting for congressional offices as part of the Environmental Legislative Group. Animal Law Litigation Project (ALLP) Led by Professor Joan Schaffner, the ALLP is a joint venture with

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Roberta Ja mes

the Animal Protection Litigation Section of the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS). Students attend the Animal Law Lawyering seminar at GW while working side by side with HSUS attorneys on their cases. GW Law has also hosted the annual Animal Law Legislative Drafting and Lobbying Competition and a chapter of Student Animal Legal Defense Fund. J. B. and Maurice C. Shapiro Environmental Law Conference Hosted annually by the Law School, this conference is an important national forum for leading scholars and practitioners to address cutting-edge topics in the field and investigate public policy solutions to environmental challenges. In 2007, former vice president Al Gore was the featured speaker at the National Association of Environmental Law Associations conference hosted by GW Law, “The Future of Environmental Protection.” Past conference presentations have included “Global Warming: Developments and Solutions,” “International Trade and the Environment: From Marrakesh to Singapore and Beyond,” and “Biotechnology and the Human Environment.” The 2009 conference will address the future of the National Environmental Energy Policy Act as it reaches its 40th anniversary. Environmental Law Association (ELA) The ELA organizes and participates in a variety of environmental law events, convenes high-profile environmental law panels, organizes a rafting trip open to all GW Law students, hosts environmental law career panels, and sponsors “Meet the Professors Night.” The ELA also provides members tips on finding environmental law positions with firms, nongovernmental organizations, and government agencies. In March 2007, ELA hosted the 17th Annual NAELS Conference at GW.

faculty Leroy C. (Lee) Paddock B.A., University of Michigan; J.D., University of Iowa Associate Dean for Environmental Law Studies

LL.M. ’08, Environmental Law After working for six years at a number of large law firms, Roberta James was ready to practice environmental law in a context that offered greater autonomy and a wider range of focus. She took a job as assistant attorney general within the Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE) and, at the same time, decided to pursue an LL.M. to expand her knowledge and solidify her expertise in the field. James’s GW Law professors comprised a veritable honor roll of environmental and energy law luminaries; studying with experts at the center of policy and practice provided James practical insights and contemporary knowledge critical to her work as counsel to MDE’s Air and Radiation Management Administration. She is currently developing regulations for the first Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative CO2 Allowance auction. Even beyond her job, James’s LL.M. has opened doors. A paper she wrote to fulfill her LL.M. writing requirement was published in the University of Baltimore Journal of Environmental Law, she was invited to be a fellow for the Maryland Bar Foundation, and this past summer she taught Environmental Law at The Johns Hopkins University.

Dean Paddock practiced in the Minnesota Attorney General’s Office, where he was director of environmental policy for 13 years. For eight years, he was a senior consultant on environmental issues to the National Academy of Public Administration. He serves on the governing council of the ABA Section on Environment, Energy, and Resources. His most recent article is “Green Governance: Building the Competencies Needed for Effective Environmental Management” in Environmental Law Reporter News & Analysis.

David Freestone LL.B., LL.D., University of Hull; LL.M., University of London Lobingier Visiting Professor of Comparative Law and Jurisprudence David Freestone has previously served as deputy general counsel, and for eight years he was chief counsel and head of the Environment and International Law Group at the World Bank. He has written widely on international environmental law and is the founding editor of the International Journal of Marine and Coastal Law and a member of the editorial boards of the British Yearbook of International Law, International Yearbook of Environmental Law, and European Yearbook of Environmental Law.

Jamie A. Grodsky B.A., J.D., Stanford University; M.A., University of California, Berkeley Associate Professor of Law Professor Grodsky teaches and writes on science and technology, environmental, and natural resources law. The author of two award-winning genomics articles, she is currently co-editing a book on genomics and environmental regulation to be published by The Johns Hopkins University Press.

Sean D. Murphy B.A., Catholic University; J.D., Columbia University; LL.M., Cambridge University; S.J.D., University of Virginia

International law scholar Thomas Schoenbaum (center) filed an amicus brief before the Supreme Court in the Exxon Valdez appeals case. Patricia Roberts Harris Research Professor of Law Professor Murphy recently co-authored a new edition of the first casebook in the field, Foreign Relations Law and National Security, and is the author of Principles of International Law, published in 2006.

Adjunct Faculty Ronald J. Borro B.S., U.S. Naval Academy; J.D., George Washington University Professorial Lecturer in Law

B.A., J.D., University of California, Berkeley

Mr. Borro serves as assistant general counsel (Installations and Environment) for the Department of the Navy in the fields of environmental, natural resources, and real estate law.

Manatt/Ahn Professor of International Law

Samuel B. Boxerman

Dinah L. Shelton

Professor Shelton recently authored Regional Protection of Human Rights and is co-author of Guide to International Environmental Law. Her article “Reparations for Indigenous Peoples: The Present Value of Past Wrongs” was published in 2008.

Jonathan Turley B.A., University of Chicago; J.D., Northwestern University J. B. and Maurice Shapiro Professor of Public Interest Law; Director of the Environmental Law Advocacy Center; Executive Director, Project for Older Prisoners Professor Turley is a nationally recognized legal scholar who has written extensively in areas ranging from constitutional law to legal theory to tort law. He has served as counsel in some of the most notable cases in the last two decades, including representation of the Area 51 workers at a secret air base in Nevada; the nuclear couriers at Oak Ridge, Tennessee; and the Rocky Flats grand jury in Colorado.

B.A., University of Illinois; J.D., Harvard University Professorial Lecturer in Law Mr. Boxerman is a partner in the environmental practice group of Sidley Austin, LLP, in Washington, D.C.

Charles E. Di Leva B.S., University of Rhode Island; J.D., Vermont Law School Professorial Lecturer in Law Mr. Di Leva is lead counsel in the Office of General Counsel, Environmental and International Law Unit of the World Bank.

Donna M. Downing B.A., Harvard University; M.P.P., University of California, Berkeley; J.D., Georgetown University; LL.M., George Washington University Professorial Lecturer in Law Ms. Downing is an environmental protection specialist and attorney in the EPA’s Office of Wetlands, Oceans, and Watersheds.

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GW’s location makes internships at groups such as Earthjustice possible.

David Friedland

Debra Jacobson

B.S., J.D., Georgetown University

B.A., The University of Rochester; J.D., George Washington University

Professorial Lecturer in Law

in federal electric, natural gas, and environmental regulation. Additionally, he served for three years as the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission’s first general counsel.

Mr. Friedland is a principal with the firm of Beveridge & Diamond, PC, chair of the firm’s Environmental Practice Group, and past chair of its Clean Air Act practice.

Professorial Lecturer in Law

Patricia Godley

Thomas R. Mounteer

Professorial Lecturer in Law

B.A., Trinity University; M.A., Memphis State University; J.D., University of Texas

B.A., Union College; J.D., LL.M., George Washington University

Ms. Petsonk is international counsel for the Environmental Defense Fund.

Professorial Lecturer in Law Ms. Godley is a member of the firm VanNess Feldman, where her practice focuses on the natural gas and electric power industries.

Ms. Jacobson has worked in energy and environmental law for more than 25 years. She is currently a consultant in the field of renewable energy.

Professorial Lecturer in Law Mr. Mounteer is a partner in the firm Paul Hastings, where he helps businesses comply with state and federal environmental laws.

Raymond W. Mushal William A. Irwin B.A., University of Michigan; J.D., University of Michigan Law School Professorial Lecturer in Law Mr. Irwin has taught environmental law and other subjects at the University of Iowa College of Law, The Johns Hopkins University, American University, and the National Judicial College. In 1982 he became an administrative judge with the Interior Board of Land Appeals; he concluded his career there in 2006.

B.A., Yale University; J.D., University of Pennsylvania Professorial Lecturer in Law Mr. Mushal joined the Department of Justice in 1973 and has spent his entire career in the field of environmental law. In the mid-1970s, he began working on criminal prosecutions and since 1982 has worked exclusively on criminal matters.

Robert Nordhaus B.A., Stanford University; J.D., Yale University Professorial Lecturer in Law Mr. Nordhaus is a member of the firm VanNess Feldman, where he specializes

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Annie Petsonk B.A., Colorado College; J.D., Harvard University

Douglas W. Smith B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; J.D., Yale University Professorial Lecturer in Law Mr. Smith is a member of the firm VanNess Feldman, where he specializes in electricity and natural gas industry regulation as well as environmental and energy policy.

Lance D. Wood B.A., University of Richmond; J.D., University of Michigan; LL.M., George Washington University Professorial Lecturer in Law Mr. Wood is assistant chief counsel of the Environmental Law and Regulatory Programs of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

Government Procurement Law With the federal government alone spending hundreds of billions of dollars each year on acquisitions, knowledge of international and comparative government procurement law is a critical asset in the legal world. GW Law’s program, the only one of its kind in the nation, makes graduates particularly appealing to employers based in Washington, D.C., the epicenter of the field. Both full-time and adjunct faculty members have extensive experience in the federal government and private sector.

★ www.law.gwu.edu/faculty

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degree requirements LL.M. in Government Procurement Law Twenty-four hours of credit are required for the LL.M. in government procurement law. The Thesis course and a minimum of 10 credits from the following courses are required; if the thesis is waived, an additional 4 credits in courses in the field, including 2 credits graded on the basis of a research paper, are required: Courses

GW Law students enjoy unprecedented access to lawmakers and their staffs.

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here is no more logical place to study government procurement law than in the nation’s capital. The government agencies here not only provide valuable internships and research opportunities, but also supply the Law School with an expert faculty with extensive real-world experience in the field. An LL.M. in government procurement law from GW Law puts graduates on the inside track for employment in this critical area where government and private sectors meet. Acquisition of services, supplies, and construction by the federal government alone accounts for more than $350 billion of the annual federal budget. State and local government procurement adds significantly to the total volume of government procurement and the associated legal practice opportunities. Further, both the evolution of the World Trade Organization and the growth of the European Union (boasting a public procurement market exceeding $1 trillion annually) have sparked fresh dialogues about the role of public procurement for developing and developed countries alike.

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Established in 1960, the Government Procurement Law LL.M. program is the only one of its kind in the United States. For more than 30 years, the program was headed by professors emeritus Ralph C. Nash, Jr., and John Cibinic, Jr. Their treatises, indispensable references for government procurement law practitioners, are published under the auspices of The George Washington University. Today, the program offers expanded faculty resources, course offerings, and professional development opportunities. The public procurement faculty offers students in the program an opportunity to learn from educators with years of experience in the federal government and the private sector.

The LL.M. program in government procurement law has proven attractive to attorneys with substantial experience in both the federal government and the private practice of law, as well as to more recent law school graduates. GW’s record in the field makes program graduates especially attractive to employers, many of which are located in the Washington metropolitan area, the center of the practice of government contracts law. Many alumni hold prominent positions in government agencies, the Judge Advocate General’s Corps, law firms, and corporations, and they constitute a network that includes many of the leaders of the government procurement bar. In recent years, the Government Procurement Law LL.M. program has offered a series of colloquia and symposia for both students and professionals in the field. These symposia address vital issues and feature esteemed speakers from academia, government, and private practice. ★ www.law.gwu.edu/govcon

• Formation of Government Contracts • Performance of Government Contracts • Government Contracts Advocacy • Government Contracts Cost and Pricing • Comparative Public Procurement • Government Contracts Seminar • Graduate Government Contracts Placement • Government Procurement of Intellectual Property Seminar

Students may attend the program either full or part time. Admission is generally granted for the fall semester; spring admission may be allowed in special circumstances at the discretion of the program directors. The practice of government procurement law today increasingly intersects with other disciplines of public law. In recognition of

Public Contr act L aw Jo u r n a l

Produced jointly by the Law School and the Public Contract Law Section of the American Bar Association, the Public Contract Law Journal is the premier journal read by practitioners in the field of government procurement law. The staff includes both J.D. and LL.M. candidates, who have the opportunity to become members and officers of the journal or to serve as members of its advisory board.

Pa t r i c k E . Tol a n, Jr .

the important relationship of the two fields, the Law School offers an LL.M. in government procurement and environmental law, which is described in the Environmental Law program section of this brochure. Related Courses To supplement their programs of study, students may choose from the broad range of courses offered by the Law School. A list of suggested courses is given below. Course descriptions for all courses may be found in the Law School Bulletin. • Administrative Law • Advanced Antitrust Law Seminar • Antitrust Law • Business Planning • Corporate Taxation • Employment Discrimination Law • Environmental Law • Federal Courts • Government Lawyering • Health Care Law • International Business Transactions • International Commercial Law • Labor Law • Law and Accounting • Law and Economics • Legislation • Legislative Analysis and Drafting • Local Government Law • Mediation and Alternative Dispute Resolution • Negotiation and Conflict Management Systems Design • Patent Law • Public Law Seminar • Quantitative Analysis for Lawyers

LL.M. ’02, Government Procurement and Environmental Law Selected by the Air Force to pursue a sponsored LL.M., Patrick Tolan, Jr., turned his sights on GW Law, wanting to attend the nation’s premier program in government procurement. Given his broad interests, Tolan decided to pursue a dual concentration in environmental law. Among the distinguishing experiences of his GW years, Tolan cites studying with leading federal officials, having access to the Pentagon for thesis research, practicing before the Court of Federal Claims, and participating in the government contracts moot court competition. After GW Law, Tolan led a staff of 30, providing a full range of legal services as staff judge advocate at Hanscom Air Force Base in Massachusetts. Upon retiring from the Air Force in 2005, he joined the faculty at Barry University Law School in Orlando, Florida, where he is now an associate professor. Tolan’s goal is to advance the education of lawyers who want to make a difference in the world by helping those in need. He established the award-winning Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program, which has helped more than 700 lowincome clients complete their tax returns in the past two years.

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faculty Steven L. Schooner B.A., Rice University; J.D., College of William and Mary; LL.M., George Washington University Associate Professor of Law and Co-Director of the Government Procurement Law Program Professor Schooner recently co-authored the article “Incrementalism: Eroding the Impediments to a Global Public Procurement Market,” which appeared in the Georgetown Journal of International Law. He is a fellow of the National Contract Management Association and a certified professional contracts manager.

Joshua I. Schwartz B.A., Harvard University; M.R.P., J.D., Cornell University Professor of Law; Co-Director of the Government Procurement Law Program Professor Schwartz teaches in the fields of property, administrative law, government contracts, and legislation and is a member of the Advisory Committee for the U.S. Court of Federal Claims.

Christopher R. Yukins B.A., Harvard University; J.D., University of Virginia Associate Professor of Government Contracts Law; Co-Director of the Government Procurement Law Program Professor Yukins has published on procurement reform in scholarly journals and recently co-authored the article “Incrementalism: Eroding the Impediments to a Global Public Procurement Market,” which appeared in the Georgetown Journal of International Law. He is an advisor to the U.S. delegation to the working group on reform of the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL) Model Procurement Law.

Moot Court Competition

Adjunct Faculty

The McKenna Long & Aldridge “Gilbert A. Cuneo” Government Contracts Moot Court Competition is an annual intrascholastic competition open to both J.D. and LL.M. students. Each participant has the opportunity to argue both sides of a government contracts case before sitting judges from the various Boards of Contract Appeals and the U.S. Court of Federal Claims. The final round is argued at the U.S. Court of Federal Claims. The competition problem and best briefs are published each year in the Public Contract Law Journal.

Stephen D. Knight B.A., J.D., University of Virginia Herman Professorial Lecturer in Government Contracts Law Mr. Knight has specialized in government contracts law since 1978 and is widely published in the field. He is a partner in the law firm of Smith Pachter McWhorter PLC.

Steven L. Briggerman B.A., University of Chicago; J.D., LL.M., George Washington University Professorial Lecturer in Law Mr. Briggerman is engaged in private practice in Washington, D.C., where he specializes in government procurement law.

Daniel I. Gordon B.A., Brandeis University; M.Phil., Oxford; J.D., Harvard University Professorial Lecturer in Law Mr. Gordon is the deputy general counsel and ethics counselor of the U.S. Government Accountability Office and an active member of the American Bar Association’s Section of Public Contract Law.

Richard Lieberman B.A., Cornell University; M.A., University of Wisconsin; J.D., Georgetown University Professorial Lecturer in Law Mr. Lieberman is a principal of the firm of McCarthy, Sweeney & Harkaway, PC, where he practices in all areas of government contract administration. ★

www.law.gwu.edu/faculty

Intellectual Property Law The George Washington University Law School has been a leader in intellectual property education and scholarship for more than a hundred years. By the time the Intellectual Property Law LL.M. program was first established at GW in 1895 as a Master in Patent Law program, our alumni had already written the patents for Bell’s telephone, Mergenthaler’s linotype machine, and Eastman’s roll-film camera, among hundreds of other inventions, and dozens of our alumni had worked in the Patent Office.

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degree requirements LL.M. in Intellectual Property Law Twenty-four hours of credit are required for the LL.M. in intellectual property law. The Thesis course and a minimum of 10 credits from the courses at right are required; if the thesis is waived, an additional 4 credits in courses in the field, including 2 credits graded on the basis of a research paper, are required. Students generally begin the program in the fall semester; spring admission may be allowed in special circumstances at the discretion of the program director.

Patent 821,393: Orville and Wilbur Wright, Flying Machine. Attorney: H. A. Toulmin, Class of 1882.

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n the early 1950s, long before the term “intellectual property” was in wide use, The George Washington University Law School recognized the close relations between patents, trademarks, and copyrights by establishing the Patent, Trademark, and Copyright Foundation, the country’s first research institute in any of those areas. As legal issues involving technology have expanded beyond the field of patent law, GW Law has remained at the forefront. In recent years, as intellectual property law issues have themselves become more tightly interwoven with issues in commercial law, computer and Internet regulation, communications law, and the regulation of medicine, GW Law has been among the first to add faculty and courses in those areas. At the same time, GW Law has not neglected its core strength in patents and has continued to develop an unparalleled patent law faculty and curriculum. The result: an Intellectual Property Law LL.M. program that is second to none and equips students for the innovations of tomorrow. The LL.M. program is designed for both U.S. and non-U.S. attorneys interested in intensive study of 16

U.S., international, and comparative intellectual property law. Many U.S. attorneys complete the program to gain the specialized knowledge necessary to practice, teach, or regulate in a legal field that has been one of the most dynamic for the last several decades. Many non-U.S. attorneys complete the program to get their first in-depth look at U.S. intellectual property law, while qualifying to take a bar examination that will enable them to practice in one of the U.S. states, such as New York. While student enrollment at the Law School numbers approximately 1,975, enrollment in the Intellectual Property Law LL.M. program is limited to approximately 30 to 50 students each year.

Internships For many students, internships have proven to be one of the best ways to gain mentorship from members of the local IP community. The Washington, D.C., area has the country’s highest concentration of internships with nonprofit and trade groups, courts, and government agencies specializing in intellectual property, including the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, the U.S. Copyright Office, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, and the House and Senate Judiciary Committees. The GW Law Intellectual Property program maintains an IP internship guide for the benefit of students, and GW students have been successful in getting internships at these organizations. Students who arrange for an approved, nonremunerative placement may receive up to four hours of credit for their work, with five hours of work per week being required for each credit. ★ www.law.gwu.edu/ip

Students with—and without— technical backgrounds are drawn to the program.

Sunita Sreedhar an

Courses The courses below count toward the minimum 14 credit hours in intellectual property courses required for the LL.M. in the field. • Patent Law • Copyright Law • International Copyright Law • Trademark Law and Unfair Competition • Entertainment Law • Patent Strategies and Practice • The Federal Circuit • Licensing of Intellectual Property Rights • Intellectual Asset Management • Chemical and Biotech Patent Law • Patent Enforcement • Patent Appellate Practice • Computer Law • Law in Cyberspace • Art, Cultural Heritage, and the Law • International and Comparative Patent Law • Intellectual Property Antitrust Seminar • Government Procurement of Intellectual Property Seminar • Intellectual Property Law Seminars, including: History of IP IP Legislation Advanced Entertainment Law Advanced Trademark Law Digital Copyright Multinational IP

Both full- and part-time programs of study are offered. Part-time students in the program often hold positions with a U.S. government agency (particularly the Patent and Trademark Office), serve as law clerks in federal courts, or are in full-time private practice.

Related Courses Please note: These courses do not qualify toward the 14 required IP credits. To supplement their programs of study, students may choose from the broad range of courses offered by the Law School. A list of suggested courses is given below. Descriptions for all courses may be found in the Law School Bulletin.

The Intellectual Property Law program welcomes applications from qualified graduates of non-U.S. law schools. A strong international presence in the student body is considered a vital element of the comparative focus of the program. In a typical year, we welcome students from more than a dozen countries.

• E-Commerce • Sports Law • Antitrust Law • Advanced Antitrust Law Seminar • Communications Law • Telecommunications Law • Information Privacy Law • Formation of Government Contracts • Genetics and the Law • Law and Medicine

LL.M. ’06, Intellectual Property Law Sunita Sreedharan decided to pursue her LL.M. during a sabbatical from her work as a partner at one of India’s leading law firms, hoping to gain knowledge and skills that would add value to her practice. Sreedharan chose GW Law for its rich IP curriculum, the strength of its faculty, and its stellar international reputation. She also wanted ready access to institutions relevant to her study of intellectual property law—the Supreme Court, the Federal Circuit, and the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, among them. Sreedharan’s years at GW Law yielded a host of new interests and perspectives, and a year after completing the LL.M., she sacrificed a lucrative equity partnership to open her own firm. In just a few years, she has built a thriving practice in New Delhi with a multinational client base and the mission of “finding solutions to IP matters that go beyond prosecution and litigation.” In 2008, she was nominated for the IP Woman of the Year Award—which recognizes “the most significant roles played by exceptional women from everywhere in the world towards modernizing the intellectual property field.”

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centers + summer study

faculty

Creative and Innovative Economy Center (CIEC) The Creative and Innovative Economy Center conducts research and educational activities regarding the market, business strategy, globalization, localization, and institutional characteristics of creativity and innovation in the world economy. The CIEC’s activities are organized into six programs: biomedical and information technology innovation; drugs and health security; informational and cultural creativity; public policy, administration, and international diplomacy; enforcement, judiciary, and dispute settlement; and trademark and brand management.

John M. Whealan

Based at GW Law in D.C., the CIEC also conducts programs at the Munich Intellectual Property Center, a consortium of GW Law and the Max Planck Institute for Intellectual Property, the Technische Universität München, and the University of Augsburg.

The India Project builds bridges between the U.S. and Indian intellectual property communities.

The Dean Dinwoodey Center for Intellectual Property Studies Directed by Dean John Whealan and Professors Martin Adelman and Robert Brauneis, the Center sponsors research, lectures, conferences, and activities on a broad range of intellectual property issues, including an Intellectual Property Workshop Series that regularly brings in academics from all over the United States and the world to present papers at the Law School. The Center also sponsors symposia that bring together leading academics and jurists to discuss important intellectual property policy topics. For example, GW Law and the Software and Information Industry Association recently co-sponsored a daylong conference on intellectual property protection of factual works. India Project Established in 2004, the India Project uses legal education to help build bridges between the United States and India. GW’s expertise in intellectual property law, coupled with the recent boom in India’s technology sector, has shaped the Project’s initial work, which focuses on the international and domestic dimensions of patent law. In its first two years, the India Project has sponsored four conferences in major Indian cities. Attracting legal scholars, judges, lawyers, business leaders, and government officials from around the world, the conferences have heightened awareness in India of the benefits of a strong IP law regime. The India Project has also been the driving force for the Law School’s recent agreement with the prestigious Indian Institute of Technology-Kharagpur to assist in the development of the new Rajiv Gandhi School of Intellectual Property Law in Kharagpur, India.

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B.A., Villanova University; M.S., Drexel University; J.D., Harvard University Associate Dean for Intellectual Property Law Studies; Professorial Lecturer in Law Before joining GW Law in 2008, Dean Whealan worked at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, where he served as deputy general counsel for intellectual property law and solicitor since 2001. He also assisted the U.S. solicitor general on virtually every intellectual property case that has been heard by the Supreme Court since 2001 and served as counsel to the U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary for the last year. The Munich Program draws students from GW Law, other U.S. schools, and other countries.

Munich Intellectual Property Summer Program In 2003, the Law School embarked on a unique international partnership—the Munich Intellectual Property Law Center in Munich, Germany. The MIPLC was established in cooperation with three German partners: the Max Planck Institute for Intellectual Property, Competition and Tax Law; the University of Augsburg; and the Technische Universität München. Participants in the Munich Intellectual Property Summer Program, held each July at the MIPLC, study current intellectual property issues with a focus on international law in the city known as Europe’s intellectual property capital. Leading academics in the field offer courses in topics such as international patent law, copyright law, and Internet law. Special lectures and visits to institutions such as the European Patent Office are part of the program. Professor Robert Brauneis of the Law School faculty is the director of the program.

Martin J. Adelman B.A., M.S., J.D., University of Michigan Theodore and James Pedas Family Professor of Intellectual Property and Technology Law; Co-Director of the Intellectual Property Law Program; Co-Director of the Dean Dinwoodey Center for Intellectual Property Studies Professor Adelman has written numerous law review articles on patent law, the economics of patent law, and patent-antitrust law. From 1977 to 1988, he was one of the co-authors and currently is the sole author of Patent Law Perspectives (Matthew Bender). He is a co-author of Cases and Materials on Patent Law (West Group 1998, 2003).

Robert Brauneis B.A., University of California, Santa Cruz; J.D., Harvard University Associate Professor of Law; Co-Director of the Intellectual Property Law Program; Co-Director of the Dean Dinwoodey Center for Intellectual Property Studies

Making IP History for More Th a n 1 3 0 Ye a r s Michael B. Abramowicz From the 1870s to the present day, GW Law alumni have been leaders in intellectual property law. They have written thousands of patents, encompassing many of the highlights of technological progress over the last 130 years. Some of the most transformative patents include the telephone (Alexander Graham Bell), the flying machine (Orville and Wilbur Wright), the nuclear reactor (Enrico Fermi and Leo Szilard), fiber optics (Robert D. Maurer and Peter C. Schultz), and the Cohen/Boyer Cloning Patent (Herbert W. Boyer and Stanley N. Cohen). Other landmark patents written by GW Law alumni include those for the linotype machine, calculating machine, roll-film camera, alternating current electric distribution, dirigible (zeppelin), space telegraphy (radio), triode vacuum tube, seaplane, nylon, negative feedback amplifier, geodesic dome, astroturf, computer mouse, miniature electronic calculator, parallel processing supercomputer, CAT-scan machine, and oil-eating bacteria (B. cepacia).

B.A., Amherst College; J.D., Yale University Professor of Law Professor Abramowicz specializes in law and economics, including intellectual property, civil procedure, corporate law, administrative law, and insurance law. His research has been published in numerous law reviews, and he is the author of Predictocracy: Market Mechanisms for Public and Private Decision Making (Yale University Press).

John Fitzgerald Duffy B.A., Harvard University; J.D., University of Chicago Professor of Law; Oswald Symister Colclough Research Professor of Law Professor Duffy has published articles in the University of Chicago Law Review, Columbia Law Review, Texas Law Review, and Supreme Court Review, and he is the co-author of a casebook on patent law. He teaches torts, administrative law, patent law, and international intellectual property law.

Susan R. Jones B.A., Brandeis University; J.D., M.A., Antioch School of Law Professor of Clinical Law Professor Jones is the supervising attorney of the Small Business/ Community Economic Development Clinic. Her research interests include the legal aspects of entrepreneurship, economic development, nonprofit organizations, and the arts.

Orin S. Kerr B.S.E., Princeton University; M.S., Stanford University; J.D., Harvard University

Professor Brauneis’s interests include property, copyright, trademark, and intellectual property theory. He is a member of the managing boards of the Munich Intellectual Property Law Center and the Creative and Innovative Economy Center. In 2007-08, he served as president of the Giles S. Rich American Inn of Court.

Professor of Law

Patent 174,465: Alexander Graham Bell, Telephone. Attorney: Marcellus Bailey, Class of 1866

Professor Kerr is the nation’s leading authority on electronic surveillance and a recognized expert on the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA). He is the author of the casebook Computer Crime Law as well as Searching and Seizing Computers and Obtaining Electronic Evidence in Criminal Investigations. He posts regularly on national security and surveillance topics at the popular weblog The Volokh Conspiracy, available at http://volokh.com.

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Daniel Justin Solove

Lynne G. Beresford

Donald R. Dunner

James E. Hopenfeld

B.A., Washington University; J.D., Yale University

B.A., J.D., Rutgers University

B.S.Ch.E., Purdue University; J.D., Georgetown University

B.A., University of California, Berkeley; J.D., University of Michigan

Professor of Law

Ms. Beresford joined the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) as an examining attorney in 1979 and became commissioner in 2005. Under Ms. Beresford’s guidance, electronic application filing has risen to 95 percent while application processing costs and application fees have been reduced.

Professorial Lecturer in Law

Professorial Lecturer in Law

Mr. Dunner is a partner in the Washington, D.C., firm of Finnegan, Henderson, Farabow, Garrett & Dunner, LLP. He has worked in all phases of patent law, including prosecution, licensing, litigation, validity and infringement studies, and counseling.

Professor Solove is a leading authority on privacy. His writings include the casebook Information Privacy Law as well as four other books on information privacy in the digital age. He is a frequent panelist and speaker on national security law–related subjects, including electronic surveillance and data mining.

Joseph G. Straus LL.B., University of Ljubljana, Slovenia; Dr. jur., LudwigMaximilians-Universität, Germany

Thomas D. Morgan

Joan E. Schaffner

B.A., Northwestern University; J.D., University of Chicago

B.S., J.D., University of Southern California; M.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Oppenheim Professor of Antitrust and Trade Regulation Law Professor Morgan teaches antitrust law and professional responsibility. An author of articles and widely used casebooks in both subjects, he also writes about administrative law, economic regulation, and legal education.

Dawn C. Nunziato B.A., M.A., J.D., University of Virginia Associate Professor of Law Professor Nunziato’s primary teaching and scholarship interests are in the areas of Internet law, intellectual property, and law and philosophy. Her articles have appeared in a variety of law reviews and journals, including the Brigham Young Law Review, Berkeley Technology Law Journal, and the Chicago-Kent Law Review.

Sarah Rajec B.S., Brown University; J.D., University of Michigan Frank H. Marks Visiting Associate Professor of Law and Administrative Fellow Professor Rajec’s primary research interests are in the areas of patent law and international trade law. She was a patent litigator at Fish & Richardson, PC, in Boston and clerked for Judge Donald C. Pogue of the U.S. Court of International Trade.

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Associate Professor of Law Professor Schaffner is faculty advisor and editor-in-chief of the American Intellectual Property Law Association Quarterly Journal.

Roger E. Schechter B.A., George Washington University; J.D., Harvard University Professor of Law Professor Schechter teaches a variety of intellectual property courses, including copyright law and trademark law. He is a member of the advisory council of the McCarthy Center for Intellectual Property and Technology Law of the University of San Francisco and sits on the advisory board of BNA’s Patent, Trademark, and Copyright Journal.

Jonathan R. Siegel B.A., Harvard University; J.D., Yale University

Marshall Coyne Visiting Professor of International Law Professor Straus is a professor of law at the Universities of Munich and Ljubljana and director of the Max Planck Institute for Intellectual Property, Competition, and Tax Law in Munich. He is author or co-author of numerous publications in the field of intellectual property law, with a particular focus on the protection of biological invention.

Adjunct Faculty

B.A., Princeton University; M.Sc., London School of Economics; J.D., Yale Law School

Michael Dzwonczyk

Mr. Hopenfeld is a partner in the Fish & Neave intellectual property group of Ropes & Gray. His practice focuses on intellectual property litigation and counseling specializing in patents and trade secrets. Previously, he was an honors program trial attorney for the Intellectual Property Section in the Commercial Litigation Branch of the Civil Division at the U.S. Department of Justice.

B.S., Temple University; J.D., Dickinson/Penn State Law School

Jack Q. Lever

Professorial Lecturer in Law

Professorial Lecturer in Law

Mr. Bernstein is a litigation and intellectual property partner with Debevoise & Plimpton LLP in New York. He is a past counsel and director of the International Trademark Association.

Mr. Dzwonczyk is a partner in the law firm of Sughrue Mion PLLC. Prior to practicing as a patent attorney, he was a synthetic organic chemist at FMC Corporation’s agricultural chemicals research facility in Princeton, New Jersey.

David H. Bernstein

Ronald A. Bleeker Professorial Lecturer in Law

Shamita D. EtienneCummings

Mr. Bleeker is a partner at Finnegan, Henderson, Farabow, Garrett & Dunner in the firm’s chemical/metallurgical practice group.

Professorial Lecturer in Law

B.S., J.D., Columbia University

Deborah S. Cohn

The Honorable Randall R. Rader

B.A., American University; J.D., George Mason University

B.A., Brigham Young University; J.D., George Washington University

Professorial Lecturer in Law

Professorial Lecturer in Law President George Bush nominated Judge Rader to the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit in 1990. Previously, he served on the U.S. Claims Court, appointed by President Ronald Reagan in 1988. Judge Rader is co-author of a casebook on patent law used at more than 65 law schools.

Kahan Family Research Professor of Law Professor Siegel teaches the basic course in intellectual property law. Before joining the Law School, he was a member of the Appellate Staff, Civil Division, of the U.S. Department of Justice. He has published articles in numerous law reviews and journals.

Professorial Lecturer in Law

Jack Barufka B.S., State University of New York at Binghampton; J.D., American University; LL.M., George Washington University Professorial Lecturer in Law Mr. Barufka is a partner at Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP and serves as head of the intellectual property counseling practice for the Northern Virginia office.

Ms. Cohn joined the USPTO in 1983 as a trademark examining attorney. In that time, she has served as both managing attorney and group director for the Trademark Law Offices. She is currently deputy commissioner for Trademark Operations, overseeing the trademark application, examination, and registration processes.

B.S., University of Pennsylvania; J.D., Southern Illinois University School of Law Ms. Etienne-Cummings is a partner in the law firm of McDermott Will & Emery LLP, where she concentrates on litigation as a member of the intellectual property, media, and technology department.

B.S.M.E., Clemson University; J.D., Catholic University of America Professorial Lecturer in Law Mr. Lever is a partner and head of the intellectual property department of the Washington, D.C., office of McDermott, Will & Emery. His practice concentrates on patent litigation and counseling, and he has represented major U.S. and foreign corporations in patent litigation matters before the federal district courts.

Sharon R. Marsh B.A., Duke University; J.D., Emory University Professorial Lecturer in Law Ms. Marsh is the deputy commissioner for trademark examination policy at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. She oversees the Trademark Legal and Policy Office, the Office of Trademark Quality and Training, and the Trademark Assistance Center.

Leslie Craig B.S., University of Pennsylvania; J.D., George Washington University Professorial Lecturer in Law Ms. Craig retired from full-time law practice in January 2005 and began teaching, writing, and speaking in the area of intellectual asset management, promoting the field and providing strategic counsel to a select group of clients.

Erick Lee, LL.M. ’08, pursued an outside placement in the Copyright Office, which is part of the Library of Congress (pictured).

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Roderick R. McKelvie

Ralph Oman

Michael S. Shapiro

B.A., Harvard University; J.D., University of Pennsylvania

B.A., Hamilton College; J.D., Georgetown University

Professorial Lecturer in Law

Pravel, Hewitt, Kimball and Kreiger Professorial Lecturer in Intellectual Property and Patent Law

B.A., Syracuse University; M.A., Ph.D., Brown University; J.D., George Washington University

Judge McKelvie is a partner practicing in intellectual property and commercial litigation at Covington & Burling. From 1992 to 2002, he served as a judge for the U.S. District Court for the District of Delaware. Prior to his appointment to the bench, Judge McKelvie practiced law as a commercial litigator.

Karen Lindsay Moore B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Colorado Professorial Lecturer in Law Ms. Moore is the president and CEO of KLM Incorporated, a consultancy with competencies in strategy, planning, branding, marketing, knowledge management, and intellectual capital.

With more than 28 years of international experience in patent, copyright, and trademark law, Mr. Oman is counsel for the intellectual property practice group of the firm Dechert, LLP. He served as register of copyrights of the United States for more than eight years and as chief counsel of the Senate Subcommittee on Patents, Copyrights, and Trademarks. He is one of three founding directors of the U.S. Committee for the World Intellectual Property Organization.

Richard L. Rainey B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; J.D., George Washington University

Gerald J. Mossinghoff

Professorial Lecturer in Law

B.S.E.E., St. Louis University; J.D., George Washington University

Mr. Rainey practices intellectual property law in the Washington, D.C., office of Covington & Burling, where he specializes in patent litigation at both the trial and appellate levels. He has argued before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit and has been involved with a number of patent infringement and intellectual property matters at the trial court level. He has also been involved in patent prosecution, licensing, and opinion work.

Armand and Irene Cifelli Professorial Lecturer in Law Mr. Mossinghoff was formerly commissioner of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, assistant secretary of commerce, and president of Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America. He is currently senior counsel to Oblon, Spivak, McClelland, Maier & Neustadt.

Jay Rosenthal B.A., M.A., The American University; J.D., Antioch School of Law; LL.M., Georgetown University Professorial Lecturer in Law Mr. Rosenthal is a partner at Berliner, Corcoran & Rowe, practicing in entertainment, copyright, and trademark law.

Michael N. Schlesinger B.A., Oberlin College; J.D., Columbia University

Professorial Lecturer in Law Mr. Shapiro is an attorney-advisor in the Office of International Relations, U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

Richard H. Stern B.A., Princeton University; J.D., M.A., Yale University; LL.M., New York University Professorial Lecturer in Law Mr. Stern is of counsel at Kellogg, Huber, Hansen, Todd, Evans & Figel, PLLC.

Rick Toering B.S.E.E., B.S., Michigan Technological University; M.S.E.E., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; J.D., George Washington University Professorial Lecturer in Law Mr. Toering is a partner in the Pillsbury law firm’s Northern Virginia office, practicing in the Intellectual Property Section.

International and Comparative Law

D. Michael Underhill B.S., Carnegie Mellon University; J.D., Duke University Professorial Lecturer in Law Mr. Underhill is a partner in the firm of Boies, Schiller & Flexner LLP, where he handles patent and trade secret cases and leads the Intellectual Property Practice.

Harold C. Wegner B.A., Northwestern University; J.D., Georgetown University Professorial Lecturer in Law Mr. Wegner is a partner in the international law firm of Foley & Lardner. He is the former director of GW’s Intellectual Property Law program.

Understanding international law and foreign law has never been more important. Lawyers representing governments, international organizations, businesses, and individuals must understand and anticipate the far-reaching consequences of their clients’ actions and relationships. GW Law’s international and comparative law faculty prepares students to succeed in a dynamic world.

★ www.law.gwu.edu/faculty

Professorial Lecturer in Law

The Honorable Randall R. Rader, J.D. ’ 78, delivers a lecture, “Trying Patent Cases: Reflections from a Federal Circuit Judge.”

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Mr. Schlesinger is of counsel to the law firm of Greenberg Traurig, LLP, where he specializes in international copyright law and trademark law.

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degree requirements LL.M. in International and Comparative Law Twenty-four credits, including the Thesis course and a minimum of 12 credits from the following courses, are required; if the thesis is waived, the 12 credits must include at least 2 credits graded on the basis of a research paper.

International Environmental Law • International Environmental Law • International Trade and Sustainable Development

Intellectual Property Law • International and Comparative Patent Law

Comparative Law International Business Law • International Business Transactions • International Business Transactions Seminar • International Commercial Law • International Trade Law • Advanced International Trade Law • International Banking • Foreign Direct Investment • International Taxation I • U.S. Export Control Law and Regulation

GW’s India Project is building bridges through legal education.

T

Public International Law

oday’s lawyers must be able to negotiate complex international contracts. Today’s advocates must be able to work with foreign counsel and should have an appreciation of the role of international tribunals. Issues in human rights, immigration, corporate governance and regulation, and environmental law continue to present global challenges. GW gives students the tools and resources to rise to the challenges of this demanding legal market. Armed with a firm grounding in international legal theory and doctrine, students learn how to put their knowledge to practical use. GW’s emphasis on the application of the law stems from the unique qualifications of its faculty members—who, in addition to being esteemed teachers and scholars, are at the forefront of shaping and implementing international law. GW Law’s experienced faculty consists of noted legal scholars, practitioners, jurists, and government officials, all of whom have devoted their professional lives to interna-

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tional law or comparative law in some form. The program also draws on a distinguished corps of adjunct faculty members, noted practitioners, and government officials, all of whom offer seminars and courses in their fields of specialization. GW Law students put their knowledge to good use while studying in Washington, D.C., one of the world’s leading legal communities. Four blocks from the White House and the State Department and across the street from the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund, the program takes full advantage of its location. From interning at the State Department or the U.S. Trade Representative

to representing individuals in the International Human Rights Clinic to counseling asylum seekers in the Immigration Clinic, students help shape and implement the law in tangible, meaningful ways. More than 40 courses in the field are offered every year, with special emphasis on public international law, international human rights, international commercial law and trade, and the law of international organizations. The student body is drawn from across the country and around the world, creating a cosmopolitan atmosphere for the study of international and comparative law. Student organizations are active in organizing lectures, conferences, and moot court and paper competitions. ★ www.law.gwu.edu/international

• International Law • Public International Law Seminar • International Organizations • U.S. Foreign Relations Law • National Security Law • Law of the Sea • Law of War • International Criminal Law • International Litigation

• Comparative Law • Law of the European Union • Islamic Law • Law of Japan • Chinese Business Law • Law of the People’s Republic of China • Traditional Jewish Civil Law • International Family Law • Comparative Law Seminar

International Negotiation and Arbitration • International Arbitration • International Negotiations

Human Rights • Human Rights Advocacy Seminar • International Law of Human Rights • Human Rights Lawyering • International Human Rights Clinic • Human Rights and the International Criminal Process* • Human Rights and Refugee Law* • Human Rights in the Marketplace* • International Rights of Women • Human Rights Advocacy and Dissemination* • Humanitarian Law and Populations at Risk* *Oxford-GW Summer Program courses

Students may attend the program either full or part time. Preference will be given to applicants who, in addition to outstanding academic qualifications, have special international experience or interests and a working knowledge of one or more non-English languages.

Immigration Law • Immigration Law I • Immigration Law II • Refugee and Asylum Law

summer study + clinics + centers Oxford–GW Summer Program in International Human Rights Law Enriching GW’s international culture and curriculum are special initiatives like the Oxford–GW Summer Program in International Human Rights Law, jointly developed and administered by the Law School and Oxford University and held at New College, Oxford, every summer. The program prepares students to contribute to the improvement of human rights conditions in their homelands and around the world by

offering courses on the history, doctrine, philosophy, and practice of international human rights law. Professor Ralph G. Steinhardt of the GW Law faculty is co-director of the program. During the program’s four-week session, an internationally recognized faculty offers courses that emphasize advocacy and dissemination skills, as well as a formal knowledge of human rights law, the means of its enforcement, and its status in a contentious world. Classes are conducted in small-group settings, giving students

the opportunity for close exchanges with the instructors and detailed classroom discussions. Students can earn up to five credit hours in the program, which may be applied toward the requirements for the LL.M. in international and comparative law. Munich Intellectual Property Summer Program As a complement to its leading intellectual property program in Washington, D.C., the Law School offers a four-week intellectual property law program in Munich,

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Nicoleta Bur l acu

Germany, a vibrant city less than an hour from the Alps, known as Europe’s intellectual property capital. The ABA-accredited program offers eight 1-credit courses, of which students can choose up to four, as well as special lectures and visits to local IP institutions such as the European Patent Office. Participants in the Munich Intellectual Property Summer Program, which is held in July, study current intellectual property issues with a focus on international law. Leading academics in the field offer courses in topics such as international patent law, copyright law, and Internet law. Professor Robert Brauneis of the Law School faculty directs the program. The International Human Rights Clinic The International Human Rights Clinic introduces students to the practice of law in the cross-cultural context of international human rights litigation and advocacy. The clinic combines regular classroom instruction in a broad range of skills with hands-on experience through work on cases before international tribunals and treaty bodies, primarily in the Inter-American and United Nations human rights system and in U.S. courts. Students learn to work with experienced

U.K. Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice Jack Straw spoke at GW Law in 2008.

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attorneys and with other institutions engaged in human rights activism, both in the United States and abroad. The Immigration Clinic Students in the Immigration Clinic handle immigration law matters under faculty supervision, determining whether benefits or forms of relief are available to their clients and, in appropriate circumstances, representing their clients in removal proceedings. Because the clinic’s clients come from all over the world, cultural sensitivity is essential and diverse language skills are welcome. The American Immigration Lawyers Association selected the clinic as the recipient of its 2000 Human Rights Award, making GW the first law school to receive this honor. Competition Law Center Founded in May 2008 and directed by Associate Professor Edward T. Swaine, the Competition Law Center sponsors research and promotes education in the field of competition law–also known as antitrust law– particularly relating to issues of international enforcement and the harmonization of national laws and policies. The Center aims to sponsor and conduct legal and empirical research into competition law, including its private enforcement; organize seminars, symposia, conferences, innovative courses, and public lectures for judges, executive officials, academics, practicing lawyers, and law students on topics relating to competition law and its private enforcement; serve as a resource for those seeking to promote private enforcement in competition laws in the United States and abroad; and enhance the skills of current and future private practitioners of competition law.

faculty Susan L. Karamanian

Arturo Carrillo

B.S., Auburn University; B.A., Oxford University; J.D., University of Texas

B.A., Princeton University; J.D., George Washington University; LL.M., Columbia University

Associate Dean for International and Comparative Legal Studies and Professorial Lecturer in Law

LL.M. ’06, International and Comparative Law Originally from the Republic of Moldova and having received her J.D. in Romania, Nicoleta Burlacu decided to pursue an LL.M. to expand her understanding of the U.S. legal system. She was drawn to GW Law by the prospect of pursuing international law at the field’s epicenter of practice and research and by her sense that GW was “actively involved in shaping its students’ lives and helping them find a place in the global legal environment.” Studying in D.C., Burlacu was fascinated to find herself in the middle of so much history being made; she cites among the most significant experiences of her GW years observing the nominating process of Justices Roberts and Alito to the U.S. Supreme Court firsthand— while studying the process in her constitutional law class. During her first semester, Burlacu began an internship at the major international law firm Greenberg Traurig LLP. Now an associate at that firm practicing international complex civil litigation, she also serves as pro bono legal counsel for FairFund NGO, continuing her long-standing commitment to international human rights and combating human trafficking.

Before joining GW Law in 2000, Dean Karamanian was a partner in Locke Lord Bissell & Liddell in Dallas, Texas, where she handled a variety of commercial litigation matters. She is president of the Washington Foreign Law Society, a member of the board of directors of the Center for American and International Law, Texas Appleseed, and Friends of the Law Library of Congress, and a member of the American Council on Germany and the American Bar Foundation.

Alberto M. Benítez B.A., J.D., State University of New York at Buffalo Professor of Clinical Law Professor Benítez directs the Immigration Law Clinic and teaches the course in immigration law. He has taught at the law schools of the Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México (ITAM) and the Universidad Panamericana in Mexico City. As a visitor at the Boyd School of Law of the University of Nevada at Las Vegas, he helped develop that school’s immigration clinic.

Francesca Bignami B.A., Harvard University; M.Sc., University of Oxford; J.D., Yale University Professor of Law Professor Bignami’s expertise is in the expanding field of European Union law. Her writings cover such topics as comparative privacy law, comparative administrative law, and rights and accountability in global governance.

Associate Professor of Clinical Law Professor Carrillo has directed the International Human Rights Clinic since 2005. He served as a senior advisor on human rights to the U.S. Agency on International Development (USAID) in Colombia.

Steve Charnovitz B.A., J.D., Yale University; M.P.P., Harvard University Associate Professor of Law From 1995 to 1999, Professor Charnovitz was the director of the Global Environment and Trade Study (GETS) at Yale University. He serves on the board of editors of the American Journal of International Law, the Journal of International Economic Law, the Journal of Environment & Development, and the World Trade Review and is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. A collection of his essays, Trade Law and Global Governance, was published by Cameron May.

Donald C. Clarke B.A., Princeton University; M.Sc., University of London; J.D., Harvard University Professor of Law Professor Clarke, a specialist in Chinese law, has published extensively in journals such as the China Quarterly and American Journal of Comparative Law on subjects ranging from Chinese criminal law and procedure to corporate governance. His recent research has focused on Chinese legal institutions and the legal issues presented by China’s economic reforms.

Robert J. Cottrol Karen B. Brown B.A., Princeton University; J.D., LL.M., New York University Donald Phillip Rothschild Research Professor of Law Professor Brown has co-authored a book on international tax transactions, co-edited a book on tax reform, and written numerous articles and book chapters and delivered many presentations on federal taxation. She is a member of the American Law Institute and the International Fiscal Association.

Universities of Santa Catarina and Rio Grande do Sul in Brazil and at the University of Buenos Aires and La Universidad del Museo Social in Argentina.

B.A., Ph.D., Yale University; J.D., Georgetown University Professor of Law, of History, and of Sociology; Harold Paul Green Research Professor of Law A specialist in American legal history, Professor Cottrol’s recent research contrasts the role of law in the development of systems of slavery and racial hierarchy in the United States and Latin America. He has lectured on American law at the Federal

ICJ judge and professor emeritus Thomas Buergenthal was honored with the Peter and Patricia Gruber Foundation 2008 Justice Prize at a ceremony at the Law School in 2008.

David Freestone LL.B., LL.D., University of Hull; LL.M., University of London Lobingier Visiting Professor of Comparative Law and Jurisprudence David Freestone has previously served as deputy general counsel and for eight years was chief counsel and head of the Environment and International Law Group at the World Bank. He has written widely on international environmental law and is the founding editor of the International Journal of Marine and Coastal Law and a member of the editorial boards of the British Yearbook of International Law, International Yearbook of Environmental Law, and European Yearbook of Environmental Law.

Michael J. Matheson B.A., LL.B., Stanford University Visiting Research Professor of Law Professor Matheson has published a book on the UN Security Council and numerous articles. He has served on the board of editors of the American Journal of International Law, the executive council of the American Society of International Law, the advisory committee on public international law of the U.S. State Department, and the Council on Foreign Relations.

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Ralph G. Steinhardt B.A., Bowdoin College; J.D., Harvard University Professor of Law and International Affairs; Arthur Selwyn Miller Research Professor of Law

Summer study in Oxford complements GW’s on-campus human rights offerings.

Sean D. Murphy B.A., Catholic University; J.D., Columbia University; LL.M., Cambridge University; S.J.D., University of Virginia Patricia Roberts Harris Research Professor of Law Before entering academia, Professor Murphy served as legal counselor at the U.S. Embassy in The Hague and in the U.S. Department of State, Office of the Legal Adviser. He recently co-authored a new edition of the first casebook in the field of foreign relations law, Foreign Relations Law and National Security, and is the author of Principles of International Law as well as numerous articles on international law.

Peter Raven-Hansen B.A., J.D., Harvard University Professor of Law; Glen Earl Weston Research Professor of Law Professor Raven-Hansen teaches National Security Law, Counterterrorism Law, and Civil Procedure and Evidence. He is a co-author of the casebooks National Security Law and Counterterrorism Law, National Security Law and the Power of the Purse, and First Use of Nuclear Weapons, as well as various articles on national security law.

Thomas J. Schoenbaum B.A., St. Joseph’s College; J.D., University of Michigan; D.E.S.S., University of Louvain; Ph.D., University of Cambridge Visiting Research Professor of Law

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Professor Schoenbaum specializes in international commercial and environmental law. He is the author of many articles and books, including International Business Transactions: Problems, Cases, and Materials; The World Trade Organization: Law, Policy and Practice; Admiralty and Maritime Law; and Environmental Policy Law.

Dinah L. Shelton B.A., J.D., University of California, Berkeley Manatt/Ahn Professor of International Law Professor Shelton is a leading authority on human rights law and the author or editor of three prize-winning books: Protecting Human Rights in the Americas (with Thomas Buergenthal), Remedies in International Human Rights Law, and the three-volume Encyclopedia of Genocide and Crimes against Humanity, among numerous other books and articles.

John Andrew Spanogle, Jr. B.S.E., Princeton University; J.D., University of Chicago Professor of Law; William Wallace Kirkpatrick Research Professor of Law Professor Spanogle is the co-author of International Business Transactions, the most widely used casebook in its field, and also a West Group treatise on the same subject. Professor Spanogle’s research on the commercial law of other nations has resulted in books and articles on many subjects in the field, ranging from Egyptian agricultural law to Chinese commercial dispute resolution.

Professor Steinhardt pioneered the application of international human rights law in U.S. courts and has served as counsel to several high-profile individuals alleging violations of international human rights law. He is the author of the casebook International Civil Litigation as well as a book on the Alien Tort Claims Act.

Joseph G. Straus LL.B., University of Ljubljana, Slovenia; Dr. jur., LudwigMaximilians-Universität, Germany Marshall Coyne Visiting Professor of International Law

Adjunct Faculty Stanimir Alexandrov B.A., Sofia University; J.D., Moscow Institute of International Relations; S.J.D., George Washington University Professorial Lecturer in Law Mr. Alexandrov is a partner at Sidley Austin LLP. Previously, he served as vice minister of foreign affairs of Bulgaria and as deputy chief of mission of the Embassy of Bulgaria in Washington, D.C.

Fathalla Al-Meswari LL.B., University of Cairo; M.C.J., Howard University; LL.M., S.J.D., George Washington University Professorial Lecturer in Law Mr. Al-Meswari is legal adviser to the Embassy of the United Arab Emirates in Washington, D.C.

Professor Straus has served as a professor of law at the Universities of Munich and Ljubljana and director of the Max Planck Institute for Intellectual Property, Competition, and Tax Law in Munich. He is author or co-author of numerous publications in the field of intellectual property law, with a particular focus on the protection of biological invention.

Eduardo Andres Bertoni

Edward T. Swaine

Professorial Lecturer in Law

B.A., Harvard University; J.D., Yale University

Mr. Calabrese has worked for 15 years in the field of export control law and regulation. He serves on two U.S. government advisory committees that provide advice to the State Department and the Bureau of Industry and Security on U.S. government export control policy.

Associate Professor of Law; Director of the Competition Law Center Before joining the GW faculty in 2006, Professor Swaine was an associate professor of legal studies and business ethics at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School. He has published works in the American Journal of International Law, Columbia Law Review, Duke Law Journal, Harvard International Law Journal, Stanford Law Review, University of Pennsylvania Law Review, Virginia Journal of International Law, William and Mary Law Review, and Yale Journal of International Law, among others.

B.A., Buenos Aires University; M.I.P.P., George Washington University Professorial Lecturer in Law Mr. Bertoni is the executive director of the Due Process of Law Foundation.

Bishop of Liverpool James Jones and Professor Dinah L. Shelton address the “Faith, Rights, and the Human Dimension of Climate Change” conference.

Nancy Chi Cantalupo

Richard J. Cummins

B.S., J.D., Georgetown University

B.A., Iona College; J.D., LL.M., M.A., New York University

Professorial Lecturer in Law Ms. Cantalupo is the assistant dean for clinical programs at Georgetown University Law Center.

Burrus M. Carnahan B.A., Drake University; J.D., Northwestern University; LL.M., University of Michigan

David Calabrese

Professorial Lecturer in Law

B.A., M.A., J.D., George Washington University

Mr. Carnahan is a foreign affairs officer in the Bureau of Nonproliferation of the U.S. Department of State. He was a private sector consultant on international arms control issues and served for 20 years as a lawyer in the U.S. Air Force.

Charles H. Camp B.S., Louisiana State University; J.D., Wake Forest University Law School; LL.M., George Washington University Professorial Lecturer in Law Having practiced with large international law firms for nearly 20 years, Mr. Camp opened his own law firm, which focuses on international dispute resolution. He is the immediate past president of the Washington Foreign Law Society.

Anna M. Coburn B.A., J.D., University of Maryland Professorial Lecturer in Law Ms. Coburn is an attorney-advisor for the U.S. Department of State. Her practice focuses on international family law.

John R. Crook B.A., Wabash College; J.D., Yale University Professorial Lecturer in Law A former lawyer with the U.S. Department of State, Mr. Crook is commissioner for the Eritrea-Ethiopia Claims Commission, where he is a party-appointed arbitrator. He is also a member of the board of editors of the American Journal of International Law.

Professorial Lecturer in Law Mr. Cummins has practiced international law for 30 years in New York, Paris, and Washington, D.C., and has taught Comparative Law, transactions courses, and seminars in Roman and Islamic law at the Law School since 1995.

Charles E. Di Leva B.S., University of Rhode Island; J.D., Vermont Law School Professorial Lecturer in Law Mr. Di Leva is lead counsel in the Office of General Counsel, Environmental and International Law Unit of the World Bank. His previous positions include trial attorney with the Department of Justice’s Environmental Enforcement Section and senior programme officer in the United Nations’ Environment Program Environmental Law Unit.

Joel Davidow B.A., Princeton University; J.D., Columbia University Professorial Lecturer in Law Mr. Davidow is a partner at Kile Goekjian Reed & McManus, PLLC, where he specializes in antitrust, patent, and international litigation as well as in antitrust counseling.

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Jonathan L. Greenblatt

Eliza Ruth Patterson

B.A., University of Connecticut; J.D., George Washington University

Diploma de Cultura Espanola, University of Madrid; B.A., University of Michigan; J.D., Harvard University

Professorial Lecturer in Law Mr. Greenblatt is a partner in the Litigation Group of Shearman & Sterling and has extensive experience in commercial and international litigation.

Professorial Lecturer in Law Ms. Patterson is senior counsel at Market Solutions, LLC, a consulting company specializing in international agricultural market analysis.

David Jonas B.A., Denison University; J.D., Wake Forest University; LL.M., Judge Advocate General’s School; LL.M., Georgetown University

Annie Petsonk

Professorial Lecturer in Law

Ms. Petsonk is international counsel for the Environmental Defense Fund.

Mr. Jonas is the general counsel of the National Nuclear Security Administration at the U.S. Department of Energy.

Scott Kenney B.A., Marquette University; J.D., University of Notre Dame Professorial Lecturer in Law Mr. Kenney is the admiralty counsel and deputy assistant judge advocate general of the Navy.

Nancy M. Lawrence B.A., Clark University; J.D., George Washington University Professorial Lecturer in Law Ms. Lawrence has practiced immigration law since 1978. She has a private practice in Fairfax, Virginia, and is of counsel to the law firm of Odin, Feldman & Pittleman, PC, also in Fairfax.

Michelle Morales B.S., Georgetown University; M.A., University of Texas; J.D., George Washington University

B.A., Colorado College; J.D., Harvard University Professorial Lecturer in Law

Phillip L. Robinson

The nearby World Bank serves as a source of faculty.

B.A., M.A., Whittier College; M.A., Cornell University; J.D., George Washington University

Melysa Sperber

Professorial Lecturer in Law

Professorial Lecturer in Law

Mr. Robinson is a member of the firm Ludwig & Robinson. He represents international financial institutions and corporations in transactions and litigation and advises clients on compliance with U.S. money laundering laws and in related investigations.

Ms. Sperber is the senior staff writer and editor for Vital Voices Global Partnership, an international women’s rights organization focused on political participation, economic entrepreneurship, and human rights.

Christopher Ryan

B.A., University of Vermont; J.D., Harvard University

B.A., Temple University; M.A., Villanova University; J.D., George Washington University Professorial Lecturer in Law Mr. Ryan is an associate in the litigation group at Shearman & Sterling LLP. His practice focuses on international dispute resolution.

B.S.F.S., M.P.P., J.D., Georgetown University

Litigation and Dispute Resolution

William Steinman

Professorial Lecturer in Law Mr. Steinman is a partner in the Washington, D.C., office of Powell Goldstein LLP, where he focuses on international anti-corruption matters.

Robert Youmans

Traditional trial advocacy skills are no longer sufficient tools in the contemporary advo­cacy landscape. Today’s litigator faces a growing array of alternative approaches, including mediation, arbitration, and other dispute resolution sys-

Gregory K. Smith

B.S.F.S., M.P.P., J.D., Georgetown University

Professorial Lecturer in Law

B.A., J.D., Georgetown University

Professorial Lecturer in Law

Ms. Morales is an appeals adjudication officer with the Department of Homeland Security in Washington, D.C.

Professorial Lecturer in Law

Mr. Youmans serves as associate general counsel for international law for the Missile Defense Agency at the U.S. Department of Defense.

GW Law’s LL.M. in litigation and dispute resolu-

★ www.law.gwu.edu/faculty

ing for contemporary practice, with a focus on

Mr. Smith is a partner in the Global Project and Infrastructure Finance Group of LeBoeuf, Lamb, Greene & MacRae LLP in Washington, D.C.

tems that have multiplied outside the courtroom. tion offers comprehensive and innovative trainnegotiation, settlement, mediation, and other dispute resolution skills in addition to trial advocacy.

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degree requirements LL.M. in Litigation and Dispute Resolution The 24 credit hours of study required for the LL.M. include the College of Trial Advocacy and seven other three-credit courses

GW Law students have unparalleled access to national and international institutions, enhancing classroom experience.

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en years ago, a lawyer asked to represent a client in a dispute-resolving forum expected to go to the state or federal courthouse. The skills he or she needed were primarily trial advocacy skills. Today, the same lawyer faces a growing array of alternative destinations, as mediation, arbitration, and other dispute resolution systems have multiplied outside the courtroom and, increasingly, even outside the United States.

Accommodating the Working Lawyer’s Schedule The program is designed to accommodate the working lawyer’s schedule. Each course (except the College of Trial Advocacy) meets in one three-hour session per week during the 13-week semester. Classes are held in the evening, and students may choose to complete the program in either one or two years.

Traditional trial advocacy skills are still necessary but are no longer sufficient for effective advocacy. Yet in-house or on-the-job training and even the course offerings in many law schools have proved inadequate for developing and enhancing the skills needed in contemporary litigation and dispute resolution.

Individualized Instruction Trial advocacy and dispute resolution skills can be mastered only through hours of training and practice. Individualized instruction is the most effective way to convey the full spectrum of trial advocacy and dispute resolution skills and is an absolute necessity to ensure that each student is making progress. To guarantee a high level of contact between faculty and students, enrollment is limited to a small number of graduate students.

The LL.M. program in Litigation and Dispute Resolution offers lawyers and other qualified law school graduates innovative and comprehensive skills training for contemporary practice. The program teaches trial advocacy, including pretrial practice and advanced evidence, but is built upon the rec-

ognition that trial advocacy is the beginning, rather than the end, of modern skills training. It therefore places equal emphasis on teaching negotiation, settlement, mediation, and other alternative dispute resolution skills, including international dispute resolution. The teaching in the program, like the skills taught, is responsive to the challenges of contemporary lawyering. Simulated exercises are modeled on real-world challenges; student performances are evaluated by experienced faculty members who practice what they teach; and evaluation is based on performance, not written examinations.

from the program curriculum. There is no thesis requirement. Students may choose to attend either full or part time; full-time students will usually complete the program

in one year, and part-time students typically take two years. Admission is permitted for either the fall or spring semester. Courses The courses below count toward the minimum 14 credit hours in litigation and dispute resolution courses required for the LL.M. in the field. • The College of Trial Advocacy • Advanced Trial Advocacy • Mediation and Alternative Dispute Resolution • Pre-Trial Practice in Civil Cases • Ethics in Adjudication and Settlement • Advanced Evidence • The American Jury • Negotiation and Conflict Management Systems Design • International Dispute Resolution • Pre-Trial Practice in Criminal Cases • Arbitration

★ www.law.gwu.edu/litigation

Practical training exercises as well as competitions are held in realistic courtrooms to better prepare students.

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Zol R ainey

LL.M. ’05, Litigation and Dispute Resolution Zol Rainey set out to earn his LL.M. with the goal of becoming an expert in litigation. He chose GW Law for its location and the strength of its litigation faculty. Now assistant attorney general for the District of Columbia, Rainey credits his GW Law experience with providing the connections, confidence, and credibility that led to his current position. In particular, he cites courses in advanced evidence, pre-trial civil practice, and trial advocacy as providing critical tools and perspectives relevant to his responsibilities preparing complex civil cases for litigation. As for the value of connections, he learned of the opening for his current position from a visiting lecturer at GW, who made an introductory call on Rainey’s behalf. While at GW Law, Rainey’s legal education was enhanced by instruction from top litigators, local and federal judges, and renowned legal scholars. The relationships he forged with his professors energized Rainey’s zeal for litigating and introduced him to the joy of teaching. Rainey returned to GW in spring 2008 as a member of the adjunct faculty, embracing a passion he hopes to continue even after retiring from the fulltime practice of law.

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faculty Stephen A. Saltzburg

Arthur D. Burger

B.A., Dickinson College; J.D., University of Pennsylvania

B.A., American University; J.D., George Washington University

Wallace and Beverley Woodbury University Professor of Law; Co-Director of the Litigation and Dispute Resolution Program

Professorial Lecturer in Law

Professor Saltzburg founded and began directing GW’s master’s program in litigation and dispute resolution in 1996. He has served as a special master in two class-action cases in the District of Columbia District Court and is currently a mediator for the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia. He has mediated a wide variety of disputes involving public agencies as well as private litigants; has served as a sole arbitrator, panel chair, and panel member in domestic arbitrations; and has been an arbitrator for the International Chamber of Commerce.

Alfreda Robinson B.A., M.A., University of Chicago; J.D., George Washington University Associate Dean for Trial Advocacy; Professorial Lecturer in Law; Co-Director of the Litigation and Dispute Resolution Program Prior to joining the Law School administration in 1989, Dean Robinson was in private practice while serving as a senior trial counsel and trial attorney for the Department of Justice, Civil Division, where she was in charge of litigation involving various commercial activities at the trial and appellate levels. Dean Robinson teaches pre-trial advocacy to J.D. and LL.M. students, and her scholarship focuses on civil procedure, evidence, reparations, and religion.

Adjunct Faculty David N. Bowen B.S., University of Maryland; J.D., College of William and Mary; LL.M., George Washington University; LL.M., University of Florida Professorial Lecturer in Law Mr. Bowen is a principal of Grant Thornton and is the firm’s national transfer pricing service-line leader.

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Mr. Burger is chair of the Professional Responsibility Practice Group of Jackson & Campbell, PC.

James H. Falk Sr. B.A., B.S., LL.B., University of Arizona Professorial Lecturer in Law Mr. Falk is president of the Falk Law Firm, where his representation involves federal and international issues.

Francis A. Gilligan B.A., Alfred University; J.D., SUNY Buffalo; LL.M., S.J.D., George Washington University

Program courses teach skills with the recognition that most cases are settled out of court.

Professorial Lecturer in Law Mr. Gilligan is director of training and counselor to the Military Commission Process at the U.S. Department of Defense. Formerly, he was the senior legal adviser to Judge Susan J. Crawford of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces and served as the chief trial judge for the U.S. Army.

Marian Blank Horn B.A., Barnard College; J.D., Fordham University; Judge, U.S. Court of Federal Claims; Professorial Lecturer in Law Judge Horn has been a judge of the U.S. Court of Federal Claims since 1986. Previously, she served as acting solicitor and principal deputy solicitor, associate solicitor for general law, and deputy associate solicitor for surface mining at the U.S. Department of the Interior.

John M. Mott B.A., Dartmouth College; J.D., Northeastern University Professorial Lecturer in Law Judge Mott is an associate judge of the Superior Court of the District of Columbia. Previously, he served as acting chief, deputy chief, and senior trial attorney at the Criminal Section of the Civil Rights Division at the U.S. Department of Justice.

Robert T. Rhoad B.A., University of Vermont; J.D., Vermont Law School; LL.M., George Washington University

National Security and U.S. Foreign Relations Law

Professorial Lecturer in Law Mr. Rhoad is a partner resident in the Washington, D.C., office of Crowell & Moring LLP and is active in the firm’s health care, government contracts, and antitrust groups.

James Schaller

The world’s legal landscape has changed dramatically since the attacks of September 11, 2001. With an expert faculty featuring some

B.A., King’s College; J.D., George Washington University

of the most influential scholars and leaders in

Professional Lecturer in Law

the field and one of the most expansive curricula

Mr. Schaller is a director with the firm Jackson & Campell. He has handled and tried cases in a variety of areas—from medical malpractice to real estate and commercial law to toxic and environmental litigation, in which he has largely specialized for the last decade and a half. ★

www.law.gwu.edu/faculty

of its kind, GW Law’s LL.M. in national security and U.S. foreign relations law exposes students to the latest thinking in national security, foreign relations, counterterrorism, surveillance, immigration, and the laws of war. Washington, D.C., the hub of thinking and activity in this critical area, is a perfect backdrop—and dynamic laboratory—for the study of these issues.

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degree requirements

Washington, D.C., is the center of policy and practice in national security and U.S. foreign relations law.

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his practice area, which has grown exponentially in the past decade, explores the nature and origins of the federal government’s foreign relations powers, U.S. law implementing international law, and U.S. law of national security and counterterrorism. National Security and U.S. Foreign Relations Law includes law on the use of the armed forces at home and abroad, intelligence operations abroad, counterterrorism, electronic surveillance and privacy, homeland security, crisis management and continuity of government, immigration, nonproliferation, treatment of detainees, congressional investigations and oversight, and classified information. Program strengths include an expert faculty, a comprehensive curriculum, and access to the extensive D.C. foreign relations and national security law community. While a number of U.S. law schools offer one or two courses in this field, few others approach the breadth of curriculum available at GW.

Faculty Full-time and adjunct faculty include authors of four current casebooks in the field, the U.S. Department of Justice’s leading counterterrorism expert and advocate, the first general counsel of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, one of the academy’s leading experts on computer crime and cyber law issues, one of the academy’s leading experts on privacy and surveillance, a draftsman of the Military Rules of Evidence (and a member of the ABA Task Force on Terrorism and the Law), the head of appellate litigation for the military commissions prosecution team, and the U.S. Department of Justice attorney who litigated Dames & Moore v. Regan and other leading foreign relations law cases.

Washington, D.C. Washington, D.C., is the core for study in this field. The capital is home to national security institutions ranging from the White House National Security Council and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to the U.S. Defense Nuclear Safety Board and the U.S. Institute of Peace. Among the dozens of research centers and think tanks that conduct research in the field are the Cato Institute, American Foreign Policy Institute, American Enterprise Institute, and Center for National Security Studies. GW’s own on-campus National Security Archive collects and publishes declassified documents pertaining to national security and foreign relations. On Capitol Hill, more than a dozen committees and subcommittees of the House and Senate explore national security issues. Legislative activities in the field not only afford opportunities for first-hand observation, but also increasingly engage GW Law faculty and their students in drafting initiatives and testimony.

LL.M. in National Security and U.S. Foreign Relations Law Twenty-four credit hours are required for the LL.M. in national security and U.S. foreign relations law, including Foreign Relations Law, National Security Law, Thesis, and a minimum of 10 credits from the list below; if the thesis is waived, an additional 4 credits in courses in the field, including 2 credits graded on the basis of a research paper, are required.

• Space Law • Law of War • U.S. Export Control Law and Regulation • International Criminal Law • Nuclear Nonproliferation Law

Courses

• Computer Crime • International Law of Territory and Territorial Disputes • Law of Privacy • Legislation • Litigation with the Federal Government • Nation Building and the Rule of Law • Communications Law • Telecommunications Law

• Comparative Military Law • Counterterrorism Law • Law of Separation of Powers • Homeland Security Law and Policy • Congressional Investigations Seminar • Information Privacy Law • International Law • International Law of Human Rights • Immigration Law I

Related Courses To supplement their programs of study, students may choose from the broad range of courses offered by the Law School. A list of suggested courses is given below. Course descriptions for all courses may be found in the Law School Bulletin.

clinic + competition International Human Rights (IHR) Clinic The IHR Clinic’s docket consists largely of human rights cases in U.S. courts under the Alien Tort Claims Act and other federal statutes or before the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, some of which may implicate U.S. foreign relations law. For instance, the IHR Clinic has worked on cases defending the rights of Guantanamo Bay detainees in both forums. By adopting this focus, the IHR Clinic seeks to promote the progressive integration of international human rights standards into U.S. domestic legal practice as well as to train a new generation of lawyers capable of using human rights to achieve increased levels of justice in the United States and abroad.

National Security Law Moot Court Competition GW’s Moot Court Board sponsors the National Security Law Moot Court Competition, an interscholastic competition held every other year in Washington, D.C. By competing in the nation’s capital, students are able to argue national security issues in front of a distinguished panel of recognized experts in the field. Past judges have included Lloyd Cutler, former White House counsel; William Webster, former director of the Central Intelligence Agency; and Judge David B. Sentelle of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. The final round of the competition has been covered in the past by C-SPAN.

R el ated Student Orga nizations

The National Security Law Association (NSLA) works to educate future lawyers about national security issues and provide a forum for discussion among students, practitioners, and faculty. NSLA regularly sponsors panel discussions, speakers, and career networking events. The Military Law Society promotes scholarly discussion of military law, counterterrorism, and related law topics and builds social ties between interested students, the Law School, and the local community to promote professional development. The International Law Society (ILS) presents guest speakers, sponsors social functions, and promotes career development activities such as lunches with practitioners. Each year, ILS hosts International Law Week, which features professional and social activities including visits to the State Department and D.C. law firms, a career fair with international public agencies, speakers and panel discussions, and an embassy reception.

★ www.law.gwu.edu/natsec

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faculty

University Resources Sean D. Murphy

Daniel J. Solove

B.A., Catholic University; J.D., Columbia University; LL.M., Cambridge University; S.J.D., University of Virginia

B.A., Washington University; J.D., Yale University

Patricia Roberts Harris Research Professor of Law Professor Murphy recently co-authored a new edition of the first casebook in the field, Foreign Relations Law and National Security, and writes frequently about U.S. use of force abroad and other issues of national security and foreign relations law.

Professor of Law Professor Solove is a leading authority on privacy. His writings include the casebook Information Privacy Law as well as four other books on information privacy in the digital age. He is a frequent panelist and speaker on national security law–related subjects, including electronic surveillance and data mining.

Ralph G. Steinhardt Jeffrey Rosen B.A., Harvard University; B.A., Oxford University; J.D., Yale University Professor of Law

Program faculty, including Orin Kerr (left), bring their expertise into the classroom.

Gregory E. Maggs

Arturo Carrillo

B.A., J.D., Harvard University

B.A., Princeton University; J.D., George Washington University; LL.M., Columbia University

Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs; Professor of Law; Co-Director, National Security and U.S. Foreign Relations Law Program

Associate Professor of Clinical Law

Dean Maggs has written extensively on constitutional law and counterterrorism law and is the author of the casebook Terrorism and the Law. He is also a reserve Army officer who serves as a military judge.

Director of GW’s International Human Rights Clinic, Professor Carrillo has served since 2005 as a senior advisor on human rights to the U.S. Agency on International Development (USAID) in Colombia. His clinic has been active in briefing issues about military detention.

Peter Raven-Hansen

Orin S. Kerr

B.A., J.D., Harvard University

B.S.E., Princeton University; M.S., Stanford University; J.D., Harvard University

Glen Earl Weston Research Professor of Law; Co-Director, National Security and U.S. Foreign Relations Law Program Professor Raven-Hansen is a co-author of the casebooks National Security Law and Counterterrorism Law, as well as National Security Law and the Power of the Purse, First Use of Nuclear Weapons, and various articles on national security law. He has been active in briefing and arguing pioneering civil damages actions under the Anti-Terrorism Act.

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Professor of Law Professor Kerr is the nation’s foremost authority on electronic surveillance and a recognized expert on the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA). He is the author of the leading casebook Computer Crime Law as well as Searching and Seizing Computers and Obtaining Electronic Evidence in Criminal Investigations. He posts regularly on national security and surveillance topics at the popular weblog The Volokh Conspiracy, available at http://volokh.com.

Professor Rosen is author of The Naked Crowd: Reclaiming Security and Freedom in an Anxious Age and The Unwanted Gaze: The Destruction of Privacy in America. He writes regularly on law topics for the New Republic and has been hailed by the L.A. Times as “the nation’s most widely read and influential legal commentator.”

B.A., Bowdoin College; J.D., Harvard University Professor of Law and International Affairs; Arthur Selwyn Miller Research Professor of Law

where he specialized in constitutional litigation, including matters involving foreign relations and national security.

In addition to the Elliott School of International Affairs, the University boasts a Center for Emergency Preparedness; the Institute for Crisis, Disaster, and Risk Management; the Response to Emergencies and Disasters Institute; the National Security Archives; the Cyber Security Research and Policy Institute; and the Homeland Security Policy Institute. These resources provide students with a wealth of opportunities for research and are a frequent source of panel discussions, lectures, presentations, and symposia.

Burrus Carnahan B.A., Drake University; J.D., Northwestern University; LL.M., University of Michigan Professorial Lecturer in Law Mr. Carnahan is a foreign affairs officer for the Bureau of Nonproliferation at the U.S. Department of State. He was previously a private sector consultant on international arms control issues and served for 20 years as a lawyer in the U.S. Air Force, where he specialized in the law of war.

Francis Gilligan B.A., Alfred University; J.D., SUNY Buffalo; LL.M., S.J.D., George Washington University

Stephen A. Saltzburg

Professor Steinhardt pioneered the application of international human rights law in U.S. courts and has served as counsel to several high-profile individuals alleging violations of international human rights law. He is the author of the casebook International Civil Litigation, as well as a book on the Alien Tort Claims Act.

B.A., Dickinson College; J.D., University of Pennsylvania

Jonathan Turley

Mr. Gilligan was the senior legal adviser to Judge Susan J. Crawford of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces and the chief trial judge for the U.S. Army before heading up appellate litigation for the military commission’s prosecution team.

Wallace and Beverley Woodbury University Professor of Law

B.A., University of Chicago; J.D., Northwestern University

Douglas Letter

One of the nation’s foremost experts and casebook authors on evidence, Professor Saltzburg helped draft the Military Rules of Evidence and is a co-author of The Military Rules of Evidence Manual. He is a long-serving member of the ABA Committee on Terrorism and the Law and a member of the board of the National Institute for Military Justice.

J. B. and Maurice Shapiro Professor of Public Interest Law

B.A., Columbia University; J.D., University of California at Berkeley

Professor Turley is a well-known practitioner in national security law, including prominent espionage prosecutions. He has written op-ed pieces and law review articles in the field and is a frequent media commentator. Also a nationally recognized legal commentator, he is ranked 38th among the top 100 most cited “public intellectuals” in a recent study by Judge Richard Posner and was found to be the second most cited law professor in the country.

Professorial Lecturer in Law

Mr. Whitley was appointed by the president as the United States Department of Homeland Security’s first general counsel, the highest-ranking legal position in the department. He is a shareholder with Greenberg Traurig.

Mr. Letter is the Justice Department’s leading expert on substantive

Dinah Shelton B.A., J.D., University of California, Berkeley Manatt/Ahn Professor of International Law Professor Shelton is a prominent authority on human rights law and author or editor of three prizewinning books: Protecting Human Rights in the Americas (with Thomas Buergenthal), Remedies in International Human Rights Law, and the threevolume Encyclopedia of Genocide and Crimes against Humanity, among numerous other books and articles.

Professorial Lecturer in Law

counterterrorism issues, briefing and arguing significant criminal cases for the U.S. government.

Joe D. Whitley B.A., J.D., University of Georgia Professorial Lecturer in Law

www.law.gwu.edu/faculty

Adjunct Faculty David J. Anderson B.A., Temple University; LL.B., University of Pennsylvania Professorial Lecturer in Law From 1966 to 2002, Mr. Anderson was a trial attorney, special litigation counsel, and branch director in the Civil Division of the U.S. Department of Justice,

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A Livable City Washington, D.C., is the nation’s capital, but it has also been called the most livable city on the East Coast. Each neighborhood has a unique character, and few cities can match D.C.’s urban energy, international flavor, and cultural offerings.

The M etro Travel to and from D.C. D.C. is also a hub for travel throughout the Eastern Seaboard. Philadelphia, New York, and Richmond are two, three, and one hour away by train, respectively. Boston is 90 minutes by air. The city is served by three international airports, making both international travel and exploration within the U.S. a breeze. Students seeking other climes for spring break frequent the Caribbean, Miami, and Las Vegas.

Foggy Bottom George Washington University was founded in 1821 and has made its home in Foggy Bottom since 1912. Named after the fog that used to settle in the area when the city was still swampy, the neighborhood is one of D.C.’s oldest.

D.C. at a Glance Though smaller in area than Rhode Island, Washington, D.C., is the eighth-largest metropolitan area in the United States. The headquarters of all three branches of the federal government, many other national and international organizations, and hundreds of embassies and think tanks, D.C. boasts a highly educated and multinational populace. As with any great international city, D.C. is home to world-class museums—many of which are free or offer student discounts—as well as bookstores, places of worship, theaters and concert halls, every

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imaginable cuisine, professional sports teams, coffee bars, ethnic neighborhoods, performance venues, seasonal festivals, and much more. The District is easily traversed via its outstanding public transit system, but many prefer to use their feet in getting around this pedestrian-friendly city. D.C. boasts several signature performance spaces, such as outdoor concert venue Wolf Trap, the Kennedy Center (home to the National Symphony Orchestra), and the historic Lincoln Theatre in the city’s vibrant U Street Corridor. The city also sports a lively

independent and international film scene, highlighted by a handful of annual festivals. Favorite venues include the E Street Cinema and the Smithsonian Freer and Sackler Galleries, which occasionally show free films. D.C. is a great city for raising a family. In addition to numerous strong public school systems in the area, there is a wide variety of kid-friendly activities (many of them free). Favorite sites include the National Zoo, the Air and Space Museum, the Museum of Natural History, and the monuments along the Mall.

Foggy Bottom is home to many government institutions that GW Law students find useful for research and internships. These include: • U.S. Department of State • The World Bank • The Federal Reserve Board • Organization of American States • International Monetary Fund

GW Law students can easily access almost any part of the D.C. metro area via Metrorail and Metrobus. From the Foggy Bottom-GWU stop, located on campus, students are only a short “Metro” ride away from internships on Capitol Hill, the Department of Justice, or the Patent and Trademark Office; an exhibit at the National Gallery; or their homes in Arlington, Cleveland Park, and other area neighborhoods. Reagan National Airport is convenient via the Blue Line from Foggy Bottom.

In addition, the neighborhood offers a number of cultural and recreational opportunities. The Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts is blocks away. Rock Creek Park, to the west of Foggy Bottom and more than twice the size of New York’s Central Park, features biking and jogging trails, concert facilities, and a nature center and planetarium. In the Vicinity Foggy Bottom and GW Law are close to several other D.C. areas that provide students and their families with a variety of diversions. Dupont Circle: One of D.C.’s most popular neighborhoods, Dupont Circle has a lively nightlife, as well as dozens of restaurants and coffee shops. It is also home to numerous foreign embassies, the Brookings Institution, and the Phillips Collection—the nation’s first museum of modern art.

Georgetown: The affluent Georgetown neighborhood is located to the northwest of Foggy Bottom. It features a variety of high-end shopping and dining. The Washington Harbour complex has outdoor bars and restaurants, and tour boats travel the historic Chesapeake and Ohio Canal. The canal’s banks also have jogging and biking trails. Downtown: Adjacent to GW Law, the downtown area is largely commercial, with the Penn Quarter home to numerous restaurants and theaters. There are also several public parks in the neighborhood, including President’s Park and Lafayette Square, which adjoin the White House. The National Mall: The Mall, a two-mile-long park in the heart

of D.C., is a five-block walk from Foggy Bottom. It features the most well-known Washington landmarks, including the Washington Monument, Lincoln Memorial, National World War II Memorial, and numerous museums, such as the Smithsonian Institution’s Natural History Museum, Freer Gallery of Art, and Air and Space Museum. The Mall is also a good place to jog, walk, picnic, relax in the sun, or simply people-watch. ★ www.law.gwu.edu/dc

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dc + gw

G

W Law’s location in the heart of D.C. gives students ready access to the incredible resources of the nation’s capital, often without having to walk more than a few blocks or travel

more than a few minutes on the Metro. Whatever their discipline or

Of General Interest

Government Procurement

1. The White House 2. U.S. Capitol and Congressional Offices 3. Library of Congress 4. U.S. Supreme Court 5. Department of Justice

8. U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit

6. Environmental Protection Agency 7. Department of Energy

the institutions, agencies, and offices that inform and shape their fields.

Off Map Department of the Interior

There is simply no better backdrop for the study of law.

10. Department of State 11. International Monetary Fund 12. The World Bank 13. U.S. Trade Representative 14. Organization of American States

Off Map Civilian Board of Contract Appeals Department of Defense

Environmental Law

area of focus, students are able to actively observe and participate in

International and Comparative Law

Intellectual Property

Off Map American Society of International Law EU Mission

2. U.S. Capitol; House and Senate Judiciary Committees 8. U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit 8. U.S. Court of Federal Claims 9. Copyright Office

Litigation and Dispute Resolution 4. U.S. Supreme Court 8. U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit 8. U.S. Court of Federal Claims 15. U  .S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit

Off Map The American Intellectual Property Law Association Patent and Trademark Office Civilian Board of Contract Appeals 0.7 miles  U Mission E 0.9 miles American Society of International Law 1.3 miles

4 3

GW Law

9 2 15 8 6

5

1 12

13 Department of the Interior 2.2 miles

11

7 14

10

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The American Intellectual Property Law Association 4.4 miles

Patent and Trademark Office 6.7 miles

Department of Defense 3.2 miles

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Beyond the Classroom

student resources

LL.M. students take advantage of the Law School’s many opportunities to complement their course work with experiential learning. As members of the GW community, they benefit from the resources of a large national university. Skills Boards Skills competitions simulate situations that students will face in the legal world, giving them the opportunity to put their knowledge of legal theory into action. Students work closely with each other and faculty to further develop counseling, advocacy, and dispute resolution skills. The Law School offers three skills boards: The Alternative Dispute Resolution Board promotes student interest in and development of dispute resolution skills, the Mock Trial Board is dedicated to trial advocacy, and the Moot Court Board promotes the development of oral and written advocacy skills, with a focus on oral appellate. Student Organizations Students at the Law School help increase the legal dialogue through more than 40 student organizations. These groups sponsor speakers, arrange panel discussions, and hold social events, all designed to both foster camaraderie within the legal sphere and increase the entire student body’s understanding of the law. The organizations encompass a wide range of legal, cultural, and recreational interests.

University Resources The George Washington University community includes more than 10,000 undergraduates and more than 13,000 graduate students. While the Law School is a distinct entity within the larger GW context, law students enjoy the benefits of their proximity to a large university. ★

•F  ederal Circuit Bar Journal • I nternational Law in Domestic Courts

Publications and Journals The law school’s student editorial boards publish six journals at the Law School:

Outside Placement Outside placements provide students with a wide variety of opportunities to earn academic credit for work in public interest, government, and nonprofit organizations. GW Law’s prime location in D.C. means students have no shortage of choices, and the school also draws on its pool of more than 150 alumni judges to find ideal opportunities for students.

•T  he George Washington Law Review •T  he George Washington International Law Review •T  he American Intellectual Property Law Association Quarterly Journal •P  ublic Contract Law Journal

Public Interest GW Law believes that participation in public interest activities is both a professional obligation and an enhancement to the enjoyment

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and meaning of law practice. A public interest career counselor helps students identify employment options. The student-faculty Public Interest Committee promotes volunteer legal activities and organizes events that bring students together with public service providers—such as the ACLU, D.C. Employment Justice Center, and Legal Aid Society of D.C.—and oversees the Pro Bono Program, which awards special commendation for completing pro bono work. A number of student organizations, such as Amnesty International Legal Support Group and the Environmental Law Association, focus on public interest projects. ★

www.law.gwu.edu/resources

www.gwu.edu

Career Development Office Staffed by 10 counselors, all of whom are formerly practicing attorneys in different specialties, the Career Development Office (CDO) provides a full range of services to students, including one-on-one counseling, employment market insight, and personal career counseling; recruitment programs, through which students meet with representatives from law firms, government agencies, and public interest organizations; legal career programs and panels; job announcements; and the CDO Resource Library. The CDO also oversees the Alumni Career Advisor Network, which puts current students in touch with alumni who can provide career advice. Thanks in part to the efforts of the CDO, GW Law has the seventh-highest placement rate of graduates in the top 250 law firms in the country. ★

www.law.gwu.edu/cdo

Housing Two University-sponsored housing options are available to graduate law students. Both are within blocks of the Law School and convenient to campus resources, including the Lerner Health and Wellness Center. The Hall on Virginia Avenue A residence for graduate and professional students located at 2601 Virginia Ave., NW, in Foggy Bottom, the Hall on Virginia Avenue (HOVA) offers an alternative to apartment living for those who prefer student housing that is in close proximity to campus. HOVA features furnished rooms with private baths. The Columbia Housing Program This program provides law students assistance in securing an apartment (by serving as a reference and guarantor) in a privately owned, multibuilding complex at 2400 Virginia Ave., NW, adjacent to GW’s Foggy Bottom campus. The complex offers spacious, unfurnished apartments with utilities included in the rent. Other Off-Campus Housing Prices for housing in D.C. vary considerably and generally match those in other major metropolitan areas. Though there is limited off-campus housing within walking distance of the Law School, many students

live in other parts of the city or in nearby suburbs and take advantage of D.C.’s excellent public transportation system (which includes a Metro station on the GW campus).

www.law.gwu.edu/housing

Health and Wellness Center Located at the corner of 23rd and G Streets, the 183,000-squarefoot Lerner Health and Wellness Center has two gyms with courts for basketball, volleyball, badminton, hockey, and indoor soccer; a three-lane suspended jogging track; a three-lane lap pool; and racquetball and squash courts. The fitness center includes large free weight, fitness, wellness, and cardiovascular fitness areas complete with sound and video systems. Aerobics, dance, martial arts, and other classes are offered, along with other amenities of a top-tier health club. ★

www.law.gwu.edu/wellness

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International Students

financial planning

Each year a select group of lawyers trained at law schools outside

Tuition and Fees

of the United States comes to GW Law to explore legal issues and legal research methods from a U.S. perspective. and Government Procurement Law, or Litigation and Dispute Resolution programs.

Professor Ralph G. Steinhardt discusses the law with LL.M. candidate Guojia Cheng of China.

International students at the Law School pursue the same course of study as their U.S. counterparts, studying side-by-side with U.S.trained LL.M. candidates. They also experience life at a major U.S. university in one of the most international and vibrant cities in the world. The Law School’s Graduate Programs Office, International Students Division, helps international students make the most of their experience, from application through graduation. International Student Profile International LL.M. candidates come to GW Law from a range of backgrounds, ages, and contexts and for a wide variety of reasons. The entering class includes judges, prosecutors, corporate counsel, attorneys, students, human rights activists, and government officials. Currently, 48 countries are represented in the LL.M. class. 46

Of the international LL.M. candidates in the 2008 entering class, 42 enrolled in the general program of study, 27 in the Intellectual Property Law program, and 27 in the International and Comparative Law program. The rest enrolled in the Environmental Law, International Environmental Law, Government Procurement Law, combined Environmental Law

After the LL.M. After completing the LL.M., some F-1 visa holders remain in the United States for up to one year of Optional Practical Training before returning to their home countries. Others return directly to work at the corporation, law firm, or post from which they had taken leave to pursue the degree. A few remain in the United States for longer than a year. Between 30 and 50 percent of the Law School’s international LL.M. recipients take a U.S. bar exam each year. GW graduates live and work in approximately 100 countries. A number of international alumni groups and events around the world help alumni to network abroad, support young graduates, and keep in touch with the Law School. Alumni have formed groups and associations in countries such as Japan and Korea, and the dean, associate deans, and various faculty members regularly host alumni dinners in a number of other countries, including England, France, Germany, China, Taiwan, Japan, Korea, Singapore, and India.

For the 2008-09 academic year, tuition for full-time students in the LL.M. program is $33,840. A tuition deposit of $500 is required from admitted LL.M. candidates and is due by the date stated in the letter of admission. The Law School Bulletin lists all other applicable fees. Tuition for students entering the S.J.D. program full time in the 2008–09 academic year is $40,100. The tuition fee is to be paid at the rate of $10,025 per semester for four successive semesters, exclusive of the summer term or terms. If the faculty should approve an extension of time, the student must maintain continuous enrollment. After the first two years from the date of matriculation, tuition will be charged by the credit hour for any additional courses taken by the degree candidate, either for credit or as an auditor. Tuition is expected to increase in subsequent years.

Estimated Living Expenses The minimum estimated living expenses for the 2008-09 nine-month academic year total $21,750. This estimate includes accommodations, transportation, books, food, health insurance, and personal expenses. Living costs, of course, will vary with individual lifestyles. These expenses are in addition to tuition charges. International students should plan for additional travel, living, and related costs.

Financial Aid A limited amount of financial aid determined by need is available. U.S. law school graduates should contact the Law School’s Financial Aid Office for further information on how to apply for need-based financial aid. Phone: 202.994.6592 E-mail: finaid@law.gwu.edu Applicants with a non-U.S. law degree seeking informa-

tion on the availability of financial aid should contact the Graduate Programs Office, International Students Division. Phone: 202.994.7242 E-mail: igpo@law.gwu.edu

Fellowships and Scholarships A number of fellowships and scholarships are available to graduate law students. Applicants who wish to be considered for any of these fellowships should submit a letter of interest at the time they apply. The application for admission as well as all supporting documents must be received by the relevant deadline for an applicant to be considered for a fellowship. Randolph C. Shaw Graduate Fellowship Randolph C. Shaw, LL.B. ’15, LL.M. ’23, established a fellowship for those pursuing an advanced degree in law. Supporting the recipient’s full tuition, the Shaw Fellowship is reserved for a student in the

Environmental Law program who will assist the program’s director on a part-time basis. Thomas Buergenthal Scholarships Thomas Buergenthal Scholarships, which cover full or partial tuition, are awarded on the basis of academic merit and financial need to nonU.S. law school graduates. The amount of the award is determined by the Graduate Programs Office, International Students Division. Momsen Leonardos Scholarship for Brazilian Law Graduates The Momsen Leonardos Scholarship provides tuition assistance to Brazilian graduate law students with a special interest in U.S. constitutional law or intellectual property law. The amount of the award is determined by the Graduate Programs Office, International Students Division. The Honorable Gerald J. Mossinghoff Fellowship for Graduate Research in Intellectual Property Law The Mossinghoff Fellowship is awarded annually to either an LL.M. or S.J.D. candidate. Preference will be given to a candidate who is specializing in the pharmaceutical field. ★ www.law.gwu.edu/finaid

★ www.law.gwu.edu/international

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admissions

gw law at a glance Doctor of Juridical Science Degree

U.S. Law School Graduates Applicants with a U.S. law degree must hold the Juris Doctor or equivalent degree from a school that is a member of the Association of American Law Schools or is approved by the American Bar Association. The applicant must have demonstrated a high level of academic excellence in earning the first law degree. Advanced standing is not granted for credit earned while a candidate for the first law degree or for credit earned at other law schools. U.S. law school graduates are usually admitted for the fall semester. Spring admission may be granted in special circumstances by the program director. U.S. law school graduates who wish to begin their studies in the spring should inquire with the Graduate Programs Office before applying. Non-U.S. Law School Graduates Non-U.S. law school graduates must have earned a law degree with high academic standing from a duly accredited law faculty of a non-U.S. university. Applicants must also demonstrate that they

have the requisite English language skills to undertake and complete their studies (see Language Test below). Advanced standing is not granted for credit earned while a candidate for the first law degree or for credit earned at other institutions. Non-U.S. law school graduates are admitted for the fall semester only. Language Test (TOEFL) Applicants who received their law degree from an institution where English is not the language of instruction must take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and must attain a score in the 600-point range (paperbased), the 250-point range (computer-based), or the 100-point range (Internetbased) to be considered for admission to the Law School. Applicants are responsible for making their own arrangements to take the test by visiting www.toefl.org. On the TOEFL application, the applicant should specify that the scores be sent to the Graduate Programs Office, International Students Division of The George Washington University Law School (institution code 5246; department code 03).

Non-U.S. Law School Graduates For S.J.D. applicants who earned their first law degree at a law school outside the United States, the following entrance requirements pertain: Applicants must have graduated with an excellent academic record from a non-U.S. law school known for high academic standards (such a determination will be made by the

The Law School has a total enrollment of about 1,975 students. Approximately 1,425 students are in the full-time day division for the J.D. and 260 are enrolled in the part-time evening division; approximately 200 students, many from abroad, are enrolled in graduate law degree programs.

Faculty 100 full-time, 288 part-time. Nine faculty members have clerked for Supreme Court justices. Twenty-eight faculty members have clerked for judges on the U.S. Court of Appeals, 11 in U.S. District Courts, 2 in state Supreme Courts, and 1 for a justice on Israel’s Supreme Court, including 19 sitting judges.

Graduate Degrees Offered • L  L.M. in Environmental Law, Government Procurement Law, Government Procurement and Environmental Law, International and Comparative Law, International Environmental Law, Intellectual Property Law, Litigation and Dispute Resolution, and National Security and U.S. Foreign Relations Law • G  eneral LL.M. • S  .J.D. in various fields

Application for Admission Detailed information on GW Law’s academic programs, as well as entrance and degree requirements for the Master of Laws (LL.M.) and Doctor of Juridical Science (S.J.D.) programs, is available at www.law.gwu.edu. From the website, prospective students may print application forms and/or request that printed application materials be mailed to them.

The George Washington University does not unlawfully discriminate against any person on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, veteran status, or sexual orientation. This policy covers all programs, services, policies, and procedures of the University, including admission to educational programs and employment. The University is subject to the District of Columbia Human Rights Law.

★ www.law.gwu.edu/admissions

NCSDO G13016 1/09

Master of Laws Degree

U.S. Law School Graduates For S.J.D. applicants who earned their first law degree from a U.S. law school, the following entrance requirements pertain: Applicants must hold a B.A. or equivalent degree from a regionally accredited college or university and a J.D. and an LL.M. or equivalent degrees, both earned with excellent records, from law schools that are members of the AALS or approved by the ABA. Applicants must submit copies of their master’s thesis or one or more papers or articles they have written. Applicants must include a research proposal and dissertation topic approved by a full-time member of the Law School faculty who has agreed to serve as the faculty adviser if the applicant is admitted.

Student Body

Graduate Programs Office, International Students Division, or by a qualified faculty member). As outlined at left for U.S. attorneys, additional requirements include an LL.M. (which may be waived in exceptional circumstances), copies of the master’s thesis or one or more papers or articles written by the applicant, and a research proposal and dissertation topic approved by a full-time member of the Law School faculty who has agreed to serve as the faculty adviser if the applicant is admitted. Consideration for admission requires proficiency in the English language, both oral and written, as determined by the Graduate Programs Office, International Students Division, or by a faculty member designated by the dean.

Inquiries concerning the application of this policy and federal laws and regulations concerning discrimination in education or employment programs and activities may be addressed to Susan B. Kaplan, Senior Counsel for Labor Relations and Compliance, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052, 202. 994.4433, or to the Assistant

Joint Degree Programs • L  L.M./M.P.H. • L  L.M./M.A. in History with a concentration in U.S. Legal History

LL.M. Requirements • C  ompletion of 24 credit hours, including the required curriculum in the specialized programs • A  ttendance for a residence period of a minimum of two consecutive semesters • A  chievement of a cumulative grade point average of 2.67 for U.S. law school graduates (and for non-U.S. law school graduates who previously earned an LL.M. from a U.S. law school) and 2.00 for non-U.S. law school graduates at the time all requirements are met • C  ompletion and acceptance of a thesis (except for candidates for the degree in litigation and dispute resolution) unless this requirement has been waived • F  or non-U.S. law school graduates, completion of Law 694, Fundamental Issues in U.S. Law

S.J.D. Requirements

Learn More

• A  ttendance for a residence period of not less than one academic year • C  ompletion of a course of study and research, designated by the dissertation committee, of no fewer than 8 credit hours • C  ompletion and acceptance of a dissertation Course work will normally be completed during the first two years of study. The dissertation must be submitted no later than three years from the date of admission to degree candidacy.

LL.M. and S.J.D. Admissions—U.S. law school graduates:

Alumni

LL.M. and S.J.D. Admissions—Non-U.S. law school graduates:

The GW Law community includes more than 23,000 alumni across the United States and more than 800 living and practicing overseas.

Costs and Financial Aid (2008-09) LL.M. full-time tuition: $33,840 GW Law offers comprehensive financial aid packages based on merit, need, and availability of funds. LL.M. part-time tuition: $1,410 per credit hour

Graduate Programs Office The George Washington University Law School 2000 H Street, NW Washington, DC 20052 Phone: 202.994.0715 Fax: 202.994.2831 E-mail: grad@law.gwu.edu Deadlines: June 1 for fall admission; November 1 for spring admission.

Graduate Programs Office, International Students Division The George Washington University Law School 2000 H Street, NW Washington, DC 20052 USA Phone: 202.994.7242 Fax: 202.994.2831 E-mail: igpo@law.gwu.edu Deadline: March 15 for fall admission; no spring admission.

Fees and Deposits Application fee: $80; $500 tuition deposit due by date specified in admission letter.

Secretary for Civil Rights of the U.S. Department of Education. As a founding member of the Association of American Law Schools, The George Washington University Law School subscribes to that Association’s bylaws, including the following statements: “A member school shall provide equality of opportunity in legal education for all persons, including faculty and employees with respect to hiring, continuation, promotion and tenure, applicants for admission, enrolled students, and graduates, without discrimination or segregation on the ground of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, age, handicap or disability, or sexual orientation. A member school shall seek to have a faculty, staff, and student body which are diverse with respect to race, color, and sex.”

To request disability accommodations, students should contact the Office of Disability Support Services, 202.994.8250 (TDD/ voice), and employees should contact the Office of Equal Employment Activities, 202. 994.9656 (voice) or 9650 (TDD). GW is committed to assisting all members of the GW community in providing for their own safety and security. The annual security compliance document is available on the UPD website at http:// gwired.gwu.edu/upd/compliance. If you would like to receive a booklet called “The Pride Brochure,” which contains this information, you can stop by the University Police Department at 2033 G. Street, NW, Woodhull House, Washington, DC, 20052, or you can request that a copy be mailed to you by calling 202.994.6948.

The website and booklet contain information regarding campus security and personal safety including topics such as crime prevention, University police law enforcement authority, crime reporting policies, disciplinary procedures, and other matters of importance related to security on campus. They also contain information about crime statistics for the three previous calendar years concerning reported crimes that occurred on campus; in certain off-campus buildings or property owned or controlled by GW; and on public property within, or immediately adjacent to and accessible from, the campus. This information is required by law and is provided by The George Washington University Police Department.

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The George Washington University Law School 2000 H Street, NW Washington, DC 20052 www.law.gwu.edu/admissions 202.994.7242


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Graduate Law Programs