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GUNAWAN WIBISONO PORTFOLIO (2009 - 2011)


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Content

Intersecting Paths

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Venice Dispersal Park

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Shingeki Ramen : Slow Food Dining Event

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Interposed Palimpsest

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Venice School of Circus

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Intersecting Paths Studio I - Scale/Structure/Circulation Fall 2009


4 The assignment was to create a spatial experience along two intersecting paths. The paths are generated from infinite arrangements of a given figure.The conceptual strategy is to apply contrasting experiences into each path systems. The differences are found on the basic arrangement of the given figure, the different movement patterns. Without losing their characters, two paths intersect, allowing possibilities of switching direction. Each path leads to different areas, makes all of datum areas accessible.

Given Figure

Path 1

Path 2

Intersection

Movement Pattern 1

Movement Pattern 2


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Plan @ 107.00


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Front Elevation

Section A


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Section B

Section C


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Venice Dispersal Park Studio II - Landscape/Furniture Spring 2010


14 Situated in between Venice Canal and Venice Beach, the site holds great potentials as a communal space, as well as a connection between the canal and the beach. Currently it serves as a parking lot to accommodate beach visitors; hence it is highly contaminated by the chemical substances from the asphalt and the vehicles. Venice Dispersal Parks aims to address these problems. To connect the beach and the canal, the project adapts an organic flowing surface that refers to the urban grids. Pedestrians can easily enters the park from every direction. Visitors from the canal can also ride their boats to access the park. To create a dynamic urban experience, this park has a total of six gathering areas - three of them are right facing the street, and another three are blended in between the greenery and the canal water. The selection of the vegetation was based on the plants’ natural regeneration process. Four types of plants on the project use the help of natural forces - wind (anemochory) and water (hydrochory) to disperse their seeds. Because of this feature, the project will create unpredicted pattern, not only inside the park, but also on the surrounding area.

The park functions as a conection between the canal and the beach.

The vegetations dispersal allows many possibilties of new and unpredicted ecosystems.


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Study Model on Flowing Surface


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Topographic Plan


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Southeast

Southwest

Northwest

Northeast


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Plan Material


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Seasonal Color Changing

Spring

Material Color Schedule

Summer

Fall

Winter


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Material List Square Paving Stones

Nassela Tenuisima (Mexican Feather Grass)

Iris Pseudacorus (Yellow Flag)

Pervious Concrete

Tipuana Tipu (Tipu Tree)

Acorus Calamus (Sweet Flag)

Hydrochory (Water Dispersal)

Anemochory (Wind Dispersal)

Canal Water


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Section D

Section C

Section B

Section A


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24 Ergonomic

Size Relationship


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Shingeki Ramen

slow food dining event

Studio III - Interior/Display/Exchange Fall 2010


28 In a culture centered around technology, a fast paced and somewhat artificial lifestyle has taken over some of the more traditional aspects of culture. The art of Japanese ramen is such an example, overshadowed by its artificial counterpart instant ramen. This project aims to bring forth this hidden Japanese jewel with the forms of modern architecture. Unlike the traditional ramen store, where food preparation is being hidden from guests as much as possible. Shingeki Ramen makes it the main attraction, allowing customers to see the artistry involved in food preparation. Greeted with a unique layout upon entry, customers walk through a corridor where silhouettes of the chefs can be seen through flickering perforated metal screen. This theatrical view gives a grand impression within a small space as if watching a teaser of a theatrical performance. As they turn the corner they’re greeted with the warm blast of Japanese hospitality. Guests are invited to sit in front of the chefs who will then put on a grand show for them. As they enjoy ramen in a modern architecture, they also witness centuries of tradition in the preparation of their food.

Space Organization

Customer’s Movement

Site Plan

2654 Main St. Santa Monica, CA 90405


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The form making mimics the traditional noodle making process - a series of strectching and folding to create new layer.


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Legend Floor Plan

Corridor i Food Preparation Area ii Dining Area iii


31 Interior Axonometric Drawing

Counter Detail

Stair Detail

Seat Detail


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Section AA


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View #2


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Section BB


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View #3


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Section CC

Section DD


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Storefront

View #1


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Plexi Glass

Wood

Stainless Steel

Porous Aluminum, Red Anodized

Metal Rod

Dry Wall

Concrete

Food Preparation


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Ventilation System 1. Smoke from the grill goes through the porous aluminum. 2. Smoke is conducted toward the chimney. 3. Fans draw the smoke out of the restaurant.

Porous aluminum allows smoke from the grill to pass through.

A layer of plexi glass allows the smoke to be conducted out of the restaurant.

Porous aluminum allows interior light to pass through.


Interposed Palimpsest Studio IV - Private/Interior Architecture Spring 2011


42 Within the heart of Los Angeles lies downtown, an urban crowded city where work and personal lives intertwine. The concept of this project is to transform the 1920’s abandoned building’s top two levels into modern spacious apartments with both personal and professional elements. The unusually high ceiling on the original 7th floor gives the opportunity to create a new division to form the 8th floor. This strategy gives room to sandwich a working space or office between the living areas. Eight opaque glass tubes are interposed through the levels, serving several purposes. First, to distinguish the areas of living and working for the individual. Second, to provide visual aesthetic contrast of an old architectural element against this newly introduced modern feature -- this ensures that the corridor is no longer a neglected spacial element, but a visually appealing interior. Large windows have been added to each unit, allowing residents to take in the breathtaking views of downtown Los Angeles. In addition, the large windows are a good source of light for residents. The original columns were removed and replaced with structural walls that have the ability to function as furniture too. This maximizes the space constraints of an apartment unit, providing sufficient room for residents, as well as functionality. Ultimately, the key idea is to transform a historic 20th century building in downtown Los Angeles into a modern, spacious, and practical apartment space for urban professionals. Allowing residents to escape the cramped lifestyle of urban living into a peaceful oasis.

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Site Plan

St

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St .

Corridor

S. Sp rin g

S. Br oa dw ay

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808 S. Broadway, Los Angeles, CA 90014

Interlocking Units Configuration


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8th Floor Plan - Multi Units

7th Floor Plan - Multi Units Legend: 1. Office 2. Living Room 3. Kitchen 4. Bedroom 5. Bathroom

6th Floor Plan - Multi Units


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Exterior View from S. Broadway


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8th Floor Plan - Unit 1

Mezzanine Level - Unit 1

7th Floor Plan - Unit 1


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Rendered 8th Floor Plan - Unit 1

Rendered 7th Floor Plan - Unit 1


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Section AA - Unit 1

Section BB - Unit 1


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Rendered Section AA - Unit 1


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View #1 - Corridor


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View #2 - Office


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View #3 - Office


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View #4 - Mezzanine

View #5 - Mezzanine


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View #6 - Living Room


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View #7 - Kitchen


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View #8 - Bedroom


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View #9 - Bathroom


Venice School of Circus Studio V - Public/Urban Architecture Fall 2011


60 Windward Avenue was once very appealing for Angelenos. Nowadays, it seems like it has lost its mantra, where multiple buildings have been converted into residential building or into a parking lot such as the site. The aim of the project is to revitalize the lively characteristics of the avenue. With respect to the contextual massing condition, the volume of the project is divided in two. Each volume is assigned its own specific program that joins at certain points, creating a flexible mix use of programs for both public and private sectors. The academic facade has a conventional appearance as it relates to the southwest building, whereas, the commercial facade responds to the northeast building in a expressive manner. With this unique facade strategy, the project creates a synergy between within the urban block.

Programs Configuration

Programs Analysis

Site Plan


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Study Model on Contextuality

Class Study Models in Order


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5th Floor +40’

4th Floor +30’


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3rd Floor +20’

2nd Floor +10’


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1st Floor 0’

Typical Parking Level


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Section AA

Section BB


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