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Clay County Life

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Clay County Life

Clay County Life

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Clay County Life

Table of

contents

Welcome from the Chamber President 7 Welcome from the Governor 9

Getting to know Clay County 10

Clay County: A road less traveled 10 Where is Clay County? 12 Government and safety 13 Important numbers 15 A history of the county’s forestry industry 16

Clay County giving 18

Volunteer County of Alabama 18 Volunteering opportunities 19 A church home for everyone 20 Healthy living 21

Children are our future 22

Education: The key to a bright future 22 Schools at a glance 23 School construction underway 24 Higher education 26 Private schools offer diversity 26

Doing & Touring Clay County 30

Top 10 things do to 30 Vet shares dream with county 33 Clay County’s scenic route 34 The end of a tradition 36 Youth sports registration information 36 A growing arts community 38 2011 events 40

Business in Clay County 42

A fine place for business 42 Local business spotlight 43 Industry thrives in rural Alabama 44 What the chamber does for you 46 Chamber membership directory 48 Index to advertisers 52

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Publisher Mary Patchunka-Smith 256.396.2828 claychamber@centurytel.net Layout and Design/Photography John Denney 256.794.4774 john_denney@att.net Copy Editor/Writer Gwen Bishop 256.750.5209 gwenbishop1@gmail.com Advertising Sales Micah Kreil 256.276.1242 micahkreil@gmail.com Shauna Denney Don East

Contributors Doug Foster

Terry Johnson Don Steele

Chamber of Commerce Marketing Committee Richard Arnold Brad Strother Lisa Runyan Micah Kreil Special thanks to Sharon Arnold

Clay County Chamber of Commerce 88855 Hwy. 9, P.O. Box 85, Lineville, Al 36266 256.396.2828 Satellite office located at Clay County Courthouse www.claycochamber.com claychamber@centurytel.net Clay County Life is an annual publication produced by the Clay County Chamber of Commerce. No content in this publication may be reproduced or republished in any platform without the express written consent of the publisher. To the publisher’s knowledge, all furnished materials are true and correct.

The cover photo was taken by John Denney in the fall of 2010.

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Clay County Life

Welcome from the Chamber President Hello Everyone, It is with great pleasure that the Clay County Chamber of Commerce presents to you the second edition of the Clay County Life Magazine. Clay County Life ... is there anything better? From the lazy, hazy tranquility we enjoy, the hunting, fishing, camping, boating, hiking and sight seeing, to the hustle and bustle of our everyday work life, school, sports competitions, church life and many other exciting activities ... we say again ... is there anything better? In this edition we hope to capture the true unique treasure we call Clay County. You’ve heard the saying “God’s country”? Well, folks, that’s what we have right here. If you live here you know what we’re saying. If you are visiting you will leave here wanting to come back again and again. So, please take the time to sit back and enjoy this edition from cover to cover and discover what Clay County (God’s country) is really all about. Be sure to check out all upcoming events for the year! We have a lot to offer right here in this great county! A special thank you to all the sponsors of the magazine as well as all those who have chosen to be Clay County Chamber members. The success of the chamber begins and ends with you. Our Board of Directors is humbled by the outpouring support and interest you have shown. Also, welcome home Governor Bob and Patsy! Sincerely, Kathy Pinkston President Clay County Chamber of Commerce The 2011 Clay County Chamber Board of Directors: Top row, left to right, Stan Gaither, Kathy Pinkston, Mary Patchunka-Smith, Sharon McNatt and Billy Robertson; bottom row, left to right: Mike Coleman, Lisa Runyan, Janette Carroll, Debbie McKinney and Brad Strother.

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Getting to Know Clay County 10

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Clay County:

A road less traveled When Robert Frost wrote “A Road Less Traveled”, he must have just visited Clay County. He must have hiked to the top of Mt. Cheaha, then rode his horse down what is now Highway 49. Surely, he spoke with old-timers about the tranquility and beauty that help make Clay County one of the most special places to live in Alabama. Located in east central Alabama, Clay County is just far enough away from big-city life - yet centrally located between Atlanta, Gadsden and Birmingham - to bring back those wonderful memories of porch swings and ice cold sweet tea. Things are a bit slower and neighbors actually know each other. People here say “Welcome,” and they really mean it when they say “Stay awhile.” Residents consider relaxation one of their specialties. Clay County is home to some of the state’s most inspiring natural beauty. Lakes so unspoiled that you can see to the bottom, majestic mountain terrain, trees that stand tall through generations of growth. Living here tends to put people at peace. From lifelong residents to newbies, there are plenty of reasons folks choose to live here. Although Marie Gasser and her family aren’t quite “newbies” to the area anymore, they did choose Clay County because it is rural. “We knew we wanted to raise our three children in a rural setting, when we drove through it, we knew this is where God wanted us to be,” Marie said. “People here are friendly, and they allow you to just be yourself.” Her husband, Jim, a full-time potter felt the same way about Clay County. “We took out a map of the Southeast and drew a 60 mile radius circles around all the large cities because we didn’t want to live near one. There was precious little left,” he said. “Clay County was on a very short list of places to see and when we travelled through we fell in love with the quiet, friendly place.” And it’s not just the natural beauty of the area. Nor is it just the friendly neighbors. Clay County has a proud heritage of education, industry and a cando attitude that has helped the area not only survive sometimes tough economic times, but also thrive. “Having lived and worked in other areas, I can attest what sets Clay County apart is the quality of life in this quaint setting,” Clay County Chamber of Commerce President Kathy Pinkston said, “along with free enterprise and a strong work ethic.” Industry comes to the area and stays. The dedicated workforce and can-do attitude make for a friendly place to plant a business. The belief that education

is important makes for an educated workforce that is not found in many rural areas. From pre-school to higher education, Clay County believes in well-rounded educational opportunities. Arts are still considered important in education. And in the county’s two private schools, religion is still considered important. The neighborly spirit extends into the real world. Volunteer fire departments that provide homeowners with excellent insurance ratings. Volunteer organizations, civic groups and churches that lend helping hands and open their hearts to all have a solid home here. The county’s health care providers cover all the basics from birth to homehealth care with highly-trained professionals with a compassionate touch. Your doctor is your neighbor in Clay County. The rural, wooded setting of Clay County begs the outdoorsman to visit and fills him with a desire to stay. The seasons are kind in Clay County. The climate is great year round. Temperatures reach the 70′s in the spring and fall, climb into the 90′s in the summer and rarely dip below freezing in the winter. Outdoor adventures abound in Clay County and the surrounding area. The county is home to parts of Cheaha State Park in the Talladega National Forest and Lake Wedowee on the eastern boundary. The Pinhoti Trail system weaves its way through the Talladega National Forest to Mt. Cheaha, the highest point in Alabama. Hikers along the trail may spy some of the local wildlife, including whitetail deer, wild turkey and the rare bald eagle. One of only two private motorized parks in the nation to ever be awarded the National Recreation Trail designation, Doc Hilt Trails for Off-Highway Vehicles, is a popular hang-out for both locals and visitors. When you’re ready to enjoy life the way it was meant to be, Clay County has what you’re looking for - friendly neighbors, peace and quiet, outdoor fun and a simplicity not found anywhere.

History and beauty surrounds you in Clay County. From the historic downtowns to miles of trails, there is something to see and do around every corner.

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Where is Clay County?

Clay County is located in the heart of East Central Alabama, and according to the 2006 census, consists of 605 square miles. The county is centrally located between Cleburne County to the north, Randolph County to the east, Tallapoosa County to the south, Coosa County to the southwest and Talladega County to the west. This makes Clay County convenient to metropolitan areas of Birmingham (90 minutes), Montgomery (one hour) and Atlanta (two hours). While no major United States highways run through Clay County, four state roads and two railroads make it convenient for both travelers and industry. Highways 9, 48, 49 and 77 crisscross the county making rural travel convenient. According to the Center of Business and Economic Research, the 2006 estimated population for the county is 13,829. The largest town is Lineville with 2,374 residents while the county seat, Ashland, is second with 1,885. The majority of residents work in the county with the major industries consisting of furniture and related product manufacturing, health care, construction, agriculture and educational services. There are numerous cabinet manufacturers in the county which started when Wellborn Cabinets, Ashland, opened its doors in 1961. Wellborn has traditionally been one of the county’s largest employers.

Ashland

Ashland is home to Clay County High School as well as several industries including poultry processor Koch Foods and numerous small businesses. The Historic Ashland Square is a thriving retail district with restaurants, an art gallery, the renovated Ashland Theatre and other retail shops and antique stores. The town is governed by Mayor Larry Fetner and city council members Zeola Echols, Bobbie Steed, Gail Thompson, Becky Boddie and Mike Beale. The council meets the first and third Mondays of every month at 5 p.m. The city has its own police department with Benny Davis as the police chief. The city also has a volunteer fire department. Ashland’s City Park offers a skateboard park, recreation equipment for children and tennis courts. The well-lit walking trail offers a peaceful setting for an afternoon or early evening walk in the park. The park also offers a wonderful setting for reunions, weddings, birthdays and other community gatherings. Ashland also boasts a senior center and city library.

Many of the city’s famous sons and daughters have been honored with street names, sports fields, a military memorial park as well as putting accomplishments into a time capsule to be opened in 2020. The city is governed by Mayor Roy Adamson and council members Carolyn Smith, David Proctor, Marnmie Turman, Matt Benefield and Johnny Appleby. The council meets the first and third Mondays of every month at 5 p.m. The City of Lineville believes in its future generations and invested its resources into the Lineville Recreational Park where Lineville High School plays its baseball games and the area youth play recreational baseball and softball in the spring, which is enjoyed by numerous citizens and visitors. The park is included in the Alabama Passport to Fitness campaign, which is a walking guide to 85 Alabama trails, tracks and historic town tours. The city also has a library, senior center and is protected by its own police department.

Lineville

Other communities in the county include Cragford, Mellow Valley, Delta, Barfield, Shinbone Valley, Mountain, Bluff Springs, Pine Grove and Millerville. Each smaller community has a distinct personality, but all have the same friendly, neighborly quality found throughout Clay County.

The City of Lineville is a small city with unique qualities and a rich history. The city’s largest employer is Lineville Nursing Facility with an estimated 126 employees. 12

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Government and safety Clay County government is handled in two locations, the historic Clay Courthouse and the Clay County Annex located south of Ashland on Highway 77. The residents of the county are represented by five county commissioners elected by their respective districts. The commission, which operates under the unit system of government, meets the first Monday of every month at 4 p.m. with a planning session held the Thursday prior. The commissioners are elected to four year terms. The current commissioners are District 1, Wayne Watts; District 2, Roy Johnson; District 3, Terry Meek; District 4, Kevin Kiser and District 5, Rickey Burney. Ashland and Lineville are also governed by a city council.

Sheriff’s Department

The Clay County Sheriff’s Department, led by Ray Latham, provides law enforcement protection to the citizens of the county and is responsible for answering emergency calls, conducting criminal investigations, civil process service, courtroom security, prisoner transports, patrol and other designated duties. They also maintain the jail which is located in Ashland on Hwy. 77.

Clay County Emergency Management Agency

The Clay County Emergency Management Agency exists to serve and provide a coordinated center for preparation and the handling of disasters. Theresa Daugherty is the director and the office is located between Lineville and Ashland at the Clay County Farmer’s Market building.

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Important numbers Police Departments

Emergency................................. 911 Ashland...................... 256-354-2122 Lineville..................... 256-396-2633 Sheriff........................ 256-354-2176

Fire Departments

Emergency................................. 911 Ashland.......................256-354-7111 Lineville..................... 256-396-2581 Clay County EMA..... 256-396-5886 Barfield....................... 256-396-5504 Cheaha Limited...........256-488-5111 Coppermine................ 256-354-3288 Cragford..................... 256-276-0982 Delta........................... 256-488-5449 Hollins........................ 256-249-4014 Millerville.................. 256-354-5501 Mountain.................... 256-354-7713 Pine Grove................. 256-396-2627 Tri-County (Goodwater) ................................... 256-839-6030

City Government

Ashland City Hall...... 256-354-2121 Lineville City Hall..... 256-936-2581

Media

Clay-Times Journal.... 256-396-5760 Lake Wedowee Life... 256-276-7959 The Randolph Leader.256-863-2918 WACQ 1130 AM........ 256-252-0266 WAXC Alexander City ................................... 256-234-6464 WCKF 100.7 FM....... 256-354-1444 WCIQ PBS Mt. Cheaha ................................... 800-239-5233 WTXO 98.3 FM......... 256-354-4600 WVOK 97.9 FM........ 256-835-1580

Schools

Clay County Board of Education ................................... 256-354-5414 Ashland Elementary... 256-354-2566 Ashland Primary........ 256-354-7804 Clay County High...... 256-354-7510 First Assembly Christian ................................... 256-354-4090 Lineville Elementary.. 256-396-5320 Lineville High............ 256-396-2466 Mellow Valley Christian ................................... 256-354-7778

Post Offices

County Government

Alabama Cooperative Extension Service........................ 256-354-5976 Appraisal Office......... 256-354-4833 Board of Registrars.... 256-354-7815 Circuit Clerk............... 256-354-7926 Circuit Judge.............. 256-354-2242 Commission Office.... 256-354-7888 County Engineer....... 256-396-9393 Department of Human Resources ................................... 256-396-6800 District Attorney......... 256-354-3578 District Judge............. 256-354-7633 Driver’s License......... 256-354-3685 Emergency Management Agency ................................... 256-396-5886 Health Department .... 256-396-6421 Human Resources Department ................................... 256-396-6421 Revenue Commissioner ................................... 256-354-2454

Housing Authorities

Ashland...................... 256-354-2661 Lineville..................... 256-396-5421

Libraries

Ashland...................... 256-354-3427 Lineville..................... 256-396-5162

Hospital

Ashland ..................... 256-354-2245 Cragford .................... 256-354-5778 Delta . ........................ 256-488-5848 Lineville..................... 256-396-2095 Millerville.................. 256-354-3417

Utilities Power

Alabama Power Company ................................... 800-245-2244 Coosa Valley Electric Cooperative ................................... 800-273-7210 Tallapoosa River Electric Cooperative................ 800-332-8732

Gas, Natural

East Central Alabama Gas District ................................... 256-354-2194

Gas, Propane

Blossman Gas............ 256-357-2805 Dowdle Gas................ 256-357-2774 Hall’s Propane............ 256-234-6683 Superior Gas, Ashland ................................... 256-354-2150 Superior Gas, Lineville ................................... 256-396-2428

Telephone

CenturyTel............... 1-800-483-4000

Cable/Internet

CenturyTel............... 1-800-483-4000 Charter........................ 888-438-2427 Montview Cable......... 256-354-3600

Clay County Hospital.256-354-2131

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A history of the county’s forestry industry Editor’s note: This is a shortened version of an article written by Don East. The original can be found on www.claycochamber.com.

were replaced by steam, and later combustion engine power, some of them continued to grind grain (mainly corn) up until the 1960s and beyond. Examples of these water-powered mills exist today at the Butler mill in Randolph County and the Kymulga mill in Talladega County. Agriculture, and specifically the cash row crop farming of By the 1870s, steam engines were perfected and put into sercorn and cotton, prevailed as the primary economy of Clay vice by the forestry industry in the new County of Clay. These County from the 1850s until the early 1960s. Interspersed were mills, using the new circular saw blades, allowed significantly brief periods where gold, graphite and other types of mingreater lumber production and greater flexibility in selecting ing shored up the weak farming economy. During this entire the locations for the saw mills. period, the forest industry also provided some degree of ecoWhen the combustion engine arrived on the scene around nomic relief to the work force. At one time or another, most the turn of the century, the “Peckerwood sawmill” era began. Clay County residents have relied upon the forest industry for The portable sawmills also were also known in some areas at least a portion of their livelihoods. as “Doodlebug, Groundhog or Whippoorwill” mills. With the In the 1960s, the forest industry resurfaced to claim the top combustion engine powering the mill, a site for the equipment spot in the county’s economy due to a new crop of trees resultcould be selected more for the lay of the land and access to a ing from a reforestation boom in the South. From this time public road than for a source of water. By the 1930s, small gasforward, the forest industry has remained the county’s top oline engine powered mills were the norm. The larger of these economic sector. Peckerwood sawThe first use of mills could produce forestry products in in excess of 10,000 the area were the board feet of lumber notched logs and per day. wood shingles used The numbers of to build the crude peckerwood sawfrontier log cabins of mills in the county the earliest pioneer rose steadily from settlers in the 1830s the early 1900s, and 40s. Then, as peaked in the 1930s civilization slowly and 1940s, and then advanced, the next began a slow decline forestry operauntil their demise in tions in what would the 1960s. At their become Clay County height, it is estimated were the two-man that over 20 peckerpit saw operations. wood sawmills were In this operation in operation in Clay two men used a long County. saw with handles on Lineville, 1917. This store is where the present library stands. Ben Haynes in door, left to During World each end. One man right, George Linton, Dr. Cicero Rudd, Billy Haynes (Ben’s father), and War II there was worked in a deep pit Mr. Griffin (police). a labor shortage below the log and because of most the second one on a able-bodied men were in the armed forces. The United States wood platform above the log in a push-pull sequence to saw the government recognized this problem and provided cheap labor rough boards. Using this technique, a team could produce only from German prisoners of war as laborers for some of the about 100 board feet of rough lumber per day. Peckerwood operations. These German POWs were housed at From there, the industrialization of timber production a camp near Dadeville for the Clay County area and brought by increased throughout the decades by employing more advanced bus to the mill site each day, accompanied by a guard. and faster ways of producing timber. The early Clay County In addition to the small and portable peckerwood sawmills, pioneers from the 1830-40s soon learned to harness the power there were six larger sawmills operating at fixed sites in Clay of the numerous fast-flowing streams in the region. They built County at the end of World War Two, four in Lineville, and two numerous water-powered combination mills. The East family in Ashland. There were also several consolidation yards and/or of millwrights built the majority of these combination mills in kiln dry/planer mills in the county. what would become Clay County. The repeal of the Southern Homestead Act of 1876 opened These mills could produce approximately 2,500 board feet of up an orgy of public land sales in the South. Timberland could lumber during a 12-hour day. As time passed, those mills with be purchased from the United States government for $1.25 per sufficient water flow were upgraded to multiple vertical saw acre. blades, usually two to four blades, which increased the producTaking advantage of this exploding need for lumber, espetion rate significantly. cially for the superior long leaf pine lumber, John L. Kaul of Although the vast majority of these water powered mills

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St. Marys, Pennsylvania came south on a tour of the lumber timber giants such as Kaul harvested timber on a tract, they industry in 1888. While on this tour, he invested in the Sample simply left the land in a barren, ugly mess for Mother Nature Lumber Company of Hollins in southwestern Clay County. to reforest over time. However, this type of “natural” reforesHe and his father, Andrew Kaul, bought out the other stock tation is usually not efficient, resulting in mostly low grade, holders and formed the Kaul Lumber Company. Soon, the less desirable types of trees. Kaul Lumber Company became one of the largest producers The advent of government and state cost share assistance of lumber in the state. The company established a series of programs made it possible for even low income private land narrow-gauge railroads with an owners to become involved in extensive company system of reforestation. With a strong over 75 miles of track. timber market and the efficient The building of several reforestation movement, the paper mills in the state caused price of Clay County forest a rising demand for what we land began a dramatic rise in know as pulpwood. the early 1970s. In 1974, Clay These operators cut the trees County reforested more acres with chain saws and manuthan any county in Alabama. ally loaded the 5-foot sticks Today, Clay County forests onto various size pulpwood have volume and density levels trucks. Later, the invention of above even the pre-pioneer the boom loaders somewhat days. eased the very difficult manual Clay County has always labor of the pulp wooders. had “sawdust in its blood”. Everyone, from the farmer Although there have been with a small wood lot to large Railroad tracks under construction economic boosts from mining multiple-crew producers, got into operations in the past, and in the pulp wood action in Clay spite of the current significant economic gain from the cattle County and remained active until the early 2000s. and chicken industries, the one persistent economic mainstay The advent of the pulp wood boom also brought on another is now, and always has been, the beautiful and productive new aspect of forestry to Clay County – the idea of reforestaforests. tion. Up until the 1950s, when the peckerwood sawmills and

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Clay County Gives

Volunteer county of Alabama

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such as CNN News. In 1990, at the onset In the 1980’s, Alabama Rep. Richard of the Gulf War, Lineville’s National Laird (D) of the 37th District declared Clay Guard 1208th Quartermaster Company County as Volunteer County of Alabama was mobilized for active duty along with because of the spirit of giving he saw in the Ashland’s 127th Medical Group. These residents of the county. units received a rousing send-off as county To this day, the spirit of giving and residents lined helping is one of Clay Highway 9 when the County’s greatest troops pulled out. strengths. The area Gulf War There are 28 veterans received volunteer fire -Volunteer firefighter Shane Phillips a similar patriotic departments in welcome when they Clay County with returned in 1991. residents taking it upon themselves to This spirit of giving is what makes the ensure the communities have top-notch fire people of Clay County such a tight-knit protection. The Clay County Rescue Squad family. is also comprised of volunteers who help “Folks here in Clay County never think provide first aid and ambulance service to twice when a fellow Clay Countian is in the residents of the county. This spirit of need. They’d give you the shirt right off giving also gives residents peace of mind their back,” Mary Patchunka-Smith, Clay and a much lower homeowner’s insurance County Chamber of Commerce Executive premium. Director, said. When Shane Phillips was about 16, he There are numerous clubs and said he began working with a volunteer organizations devoted to service including department. Now, Shane is the assistant the Exchange Club which helps promote chief at Millerville’s station. the prevention of “Any firefighter is child abuse; Clay in it to protect people County Relay for Life and to give back,” which raises funds for he said. “I wanted the American Cancer to start helping the Society; and Autism community, that’s Awareness Day, why I do it.” which was originally Shane grew up on organized by a high a farm and one of -Karen Meek on volunteering for school student. their barns caught Relay for Life Long-time fire. Watching the volunteer Karen firemen as a child Meek has been involved with the local trying to help save the family’s barn is Relay for Life campaign for “eight or nine what prompted his love of helping his years,” she said. community. “I volunteer because I like to give back. During the Gulf War, national and I don’t have a lot of money, so I invest my statewide media personnel descended time,” Karen said. “I like to do things for upon Clay County because the number worthy causes and make someone’s life of enlisted personnel was one of the better.” highest per capita in the country. Feature Although Karen’s priority is Relay for articles were written in newspapers such Life, she also volunteers for the chamber, as USA Today, in Newsweek magazine, local festivals and other events. and were shown on television programs

“A firefighter is in it to protect people.”

“When you have cancer, you’re tired and worn out. I’ll be danged if I’m going to be!”

Volunteering opportunities 20th Century Club    Sue Luker 256-354-2121 Angel Food Ministries Lineville Baptist Church 256-396-2567 Ashland Boy Scout Troop 4210 Billy Walker 256-354-2235 Bereavement Outreach Group Belinda Catchings 256-276-4094 Clay County Arts League 256-396-6143 Clay County Cattleman’s Assoc. Donny A. Daugherty 256-488-5392 Clay County Children’s Policy Lisa Runyan 256-354-9021 Clay County Exchange Club David Franklin 256-396-2717

Pine Grove is the county’s oldest volunteer fire department. The department began in the building, top, and now resides in the more modern facility. There are many volunteer opportunities in Clay County, including the Clay County Arts League, which promotes and organizes different cultural events throughout the year. Many of the local churches also have strong groups which help residents with a variety of needs. Individuals around the county donate of their time in different ways, depending on their skills and interests. Although there are too many to mention here, the Clay County Chamber of Commerce can help you get in touch with these individuals if you’re interested in helping. Civic groups and organizations also have volunteer opportunities. Many of these groups hold annual events and there are always volunteer positions waiting to be filled.

“The Clay County Chamber hosts a music and arts festival the third Saturday in May as a way for businesses in Clay County to give back through sponsorships. The festival is free for everyone. One of our members from Jacksonville sets up a children’s section with amusement rides for the children,” Mary said. “If it weren’t for our volunteers, events such as these wouldn’t be possible.” The volunteer opportunities are endless. Residents are encouraged to look for a need, and then to fill it. This is what makes Clay County special and different from other areas. It’s also why Rep. Laird gave the heart-felt title “Volunteer County of Alabama” to people who really do care about their neighbors.

Clay County Garden Club Dee Perkins 256-354-0028 Clay County Relay for Life Lineville Health and Rehab 256-396-2104 Clay County Treasure Forest/ Forestry Planning Committee 256-396-2441 Girl Scouts Clay and Randolph Counties Rhonda Ashworth 800-734-4541 x1901 Lineville Boy Scout Troop 4222 New Fellowship Baptist Church 256-283-7680 Inter Se Ruth Carmichael 256-396-2928 Modern Cultural Club   Mary Worthy 256-354-2121 Clay County Life

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A church home for everyone Ashland Church of Christ 39815 Hwy. 77, Ashland 256-354-2202 Ashland Church of God 85079 Hwy. 9, Ashland 256-354-3097 Barfield Baptist Church Rev. John Howell 74 East Mill Rd, Lineville 256-396-5316

Bethel Missionary Baptist Church 460 High Pine Road, Ashland 256-354-7873 Bethel Christian Church Goodwater Hwy, Ashland 256-354-2125 Bethlehem United Methodist Church 188 Oak Grove Road, Lineville 354-396-2581 Big Springs Baptist Church Rev. Wayne Johnson 3805 High Pine Road, Ashland 256-449-2087 Carey Baptist Association 181 2nd Ave S, Ashland 256-354-5073 Carey and Clay County Baptist Center 60084 Hwy 49, Lineville 256-396-2461

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New Life Christian Center 240 Howard Ballard Dr, Ashland 256-354-2738

County Line Baptist Church David Rush, Deacon 233 County Line Road, Cragford 256-354-5836 Cragford Community Church 10957 Cragford Rd, Cragford 256-396-2033

Olive Branch Baptist Church Rev. Wayne Adams 155 Olive Brand Rd, Ashland 256-396-9014

Eldred Street Church of Christ 174 McLain, Lineville 256-396-6208

Open Door Baptist Church Delta 256-488-5130

First Assembly of God* Pastor Keith Jones 85621 Alabama 9, Ashland 256-354-4090

Pleasant Grove United Methodist 41324 Hwy 77, Ashland 256-354-3716

First Baptist of Ashland* 83558 Hwy 9, Ashland 256-354-7958

Kingdom Hall of Jehovah’s Witnesses 30 4th St, Ashland 256-354-3619

First United Methodist Church, Ashland* 219 E 1st Ave, Ashland 256-354-2267

Lineville Baptist Church* Rev. Jerry Colquett 60515 Hwy 49, Lineville 256-396-2567

First United Methodist Church, Lineville 256-396-5945

Lineville Church of Christ 90269 Hwy 9, Lineville 256-396-2219

Good Hope Baptist Church Rev. Pat Hurst 9408 County Road 31, Lineville

Lystra Baptist Church Rev. Josh Barkley 677 McKay Road, Lineville 256-354-4205 Mellow Valley Church 1016 School Rd, Cragford 256-354-2292 Millerville Baptist Church Rev. Kenneth Neeley 1855 6th Street Extension, Alex City 256-354-5431 Mt. Zion Missionary Baptist Church 325 Mt Zion Church Rd, Ashland 256-354-3190 New Hope Baptist Church 405 Black Chapel Rd, Delta 256-396-2548

Pleasant Hill Baptist Church 3752 County Rd 113, Lineville 256-396-2130

Springhill Baptist Church 264 Oak Grove Rd, Lineville 256-396-2293 Union Baptist Church Rev. Noel Vickers 24 Vickers Lane, Ashland Vineyard Worship Center 241 Talladega St, Lineville 256-396-5089 *Chamber of Commerce members.

Healthy living From prenatal to long-term nursing, health care in Clay County is important to the medical community. The importance is so great, health care providers are among the largest employers in the county. With well over 20 separate medical offices including chiropractic care, dentistry, pediatrics, and other specialites, families can keep everyone healthy and happy with the abundance of high quality medical services in Clay County. Clay County Hospital, located centrally in Ashland, provides many of the same services found in larger cities’ hospitals including: a variety of radiology services, physical and occupational therapy, emergency room, hospice, cardiology clinic and a sleep lab. Below are several important numbers: Clay County Nursing Home 83825 Hwy 9, Ashland 256-354-1202 Clay County Health & Wellness Center 57 Floyd Springs Rd, Ashland 256-354-1260

Clay County Health Department 86892 Hwy 9, Lineville 256-396-6421

Lineville Clinic 60026 Highway 49, Lineville 256-396-2143

Clay County Hospital www.claycountyhospital.com 83825 Hwy 9, Ashland 256-354-2131

Lineville Health and Rehabilitation 88073 Highway 9, Lineville 256-396-2104

Clay County Hospital Home Care (operated by LHC Group) 83825 Highway 9, Ashland 256-354-0077

Twin Oaks Assisted Living Facility 51 Wesobugla St, Lineville 256-396-6221

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Clay County Life

Education: The key to a bright future If there’s a group of folks anywhere that understands the importance of education, it would have to be the residents of Clay County. Out of this rural area, many notable figures have made individual impact on the nation. And there is no way any of them could have done so without a strong education. There’s Hugo Black (1886-1971), born in Harlan, served as an associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court from 1937 until 1971; LaFayette L. Patterson (1888-1987), born near Delta, served three terms in the U.S. Congress from 1928 to 1933; Byron Lavoy Cockrell (1935-2007), born in Lineville, rocket scientist and engineer; and Bob Riley (b. 1944), Alabama’s 52nd governor, native of Ashland. There are also several other notable Clay County residents: NFL All-Pro Howard Ballard, Auburn Basketball stand-out Lance Weems, six-time AHSAA Coach of Year Danny Horn, Joe Frank Edwards, Jr., American astronaut and NFL football player Jonathan Carter.

With all of this talent coming from one small place, there has to be a driving force behind it. Of course, there is drive and talent, but the educational system has to be strong enough to back such stand-outs. “The by-line of the Clay County Children’s Policy Council is ‘Children are our future, let us invest wisely in their foundation’,” Clay County Children’s Policy Council Executive Director Lisa Runyan said. “I think this sums up what our responsibility is to our children.” In 2009, US News and World Report recognized Lineville High School in its second annual report on America’s Best High Schools. The school earned the bronze distinction which is one of four levels of recognition in the report. According to it’s website, US News and World Report rewards the bronze distinction to a school that has demonstrated commendable performance on state tests. This is an impressive award for a school system with only four main schools.

Schools at a glance Clay County Board of Education 62 Court Sq, Ashland 256-354-5414 Gary Reynolds, superintendent www.claycoboe.org Ashland Elementary School (Grades 2-6) 223 Third Street SW, Ashland 256-354-2566 Nina Hobdy, principal

“There is one thing almost all of us can agree on,” Lisa said. “The education of our children is one of the most important challenges that we, both as parents and teachers, face. We need to prepare our children to compete in a global economy that has become much more complex and challenging. “We meet our responsibilities as parents by properly equipping them to successfully meet and overcome the obstacles they will surely face,” she said. Clay County Board of Education governs the schools, which serves approximately 2,100 students. There are currently two high schools, Clay County High School in Ashland and Lineville High School. A new campus is currently under construction located between Ashland and Lineville that will replace the two schools. Clay County High School serves grades 7-12 and holds six state football championships since 1994. Two of their students have held National Junior Beta Club officer positions, and four have held State Junior Beta Club officer positions since 2000. Lineville High School serves grades 7-12. Lineville and CCHS participate in the ACCESS Distance Learning program which enables schools to offer more classes with fewer teachers. Classes such as Spanish are conducted through this program. Other programs and classes offered

at the high schools include drama, art, band (marching, concert and jazz), as well as multiple clubs and social organizations such as Scholar’s Bowl, Students Against Destructive Decisions and Student Government Association. The Arts League plays a big role in supporting the arts programs at the schools. Sports offered include football, girls and boys basketball, baseball, softball, cheerleading and golf. Ashland Elementary Main Campus serves grades K-1 at the primary school location on Alabama Highway 77. Lineville Elementary School serves grades K-6 grades, and the Washington Street campus also houses the alternative school for the Clay County school system. The faculty at Lineville Elementary is one of the most educated in the state, according to the Alabama Department of Education. More than 10 percent of the faculty have Class AA certification, six years through doctorate of post-graduate education and 51 percent have a master’s degree. Many may say they believe in education, but the teachers at Lineville Elementary have the statistics to prove it. The greatest proof that education is important to the future of Clay County’s children, is that everyone pulls together to make it happen. From the art league to community fundraisers, it indeed takes a village to raise a child.

Ashland Primary School (Grades K-1) 41375 Highway 77, Ashland 256-354-7804 Nina Hobdy, principal Clay County High School (Grades 7-12) 220 3rd St SW, Ashland 256-354-7510 Billy Walker, principal First Assembly Christian School (Grades K-12) 85621 Highway 9, Ashland 256-354-4090 Bradley Strother, principal www.facslions.com Lineville Elementary School (Grades K-6) 88584 Highway 9, Lineville 256-396-5320 Tim Pilkington, principal Lineville High School (Grades 7-12) 18 West Main Street, Lineville 256-396-2466 Demita Parson, principal Mellow Valley Christian Academy (Grades K3-12) 1085 School Road, Cragford 256-354-7778 Richard Hodges, principal www.mvca.us Clay County Life

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School construction underway Other than the obvious plus of building a new school, comIn 2012 a major change will occur in Clay County. Clay County and Lineville high schools will become one bining the two schools will have other positive changes. school, located centrally between Ashland and Lineville. Several “When we want to do something for the schools, we have to years in the works, this major change will bring about positive do it for both,” Reynolds said. “This way anything we do, any educational growth for the county. money we collect, can now go to one school.” After the opening of the new school, the Lineville High buildReynolds used their yearbooks for an example: ing will be renovated to become the new “Whenever they sell ads, businesses Lineville Elementary, which will house will usually buy two smaller ads beK-6 grades. Ashland Elementary School cause they will try to buy one for each will be renovated and additional classschool,” he said. rooms added. The elementary school Although it’s not guaranteed, changes are expected to be completed by Reynolds believes down the road the the beginning of the 2013 school year, consolidation could allow for more Clay County Board of Education Superprograms to be offered. intendent Gary Reynolds said. The school won’t gain any extra “We will be able to vacate the two teachers or support staff, Reynolds worst buildings - Clay County High and -Gary Reynolds, Clay County Superintendent said, but the consolidation will make Lineville Elementary,” he said. for easier management of their resourc“We’re hoping the elementary schools es, including teachers. to be finished for 2013,” he said. “With Lineville High empty, “Everybody will be in one place,” he said. “I believe we’ll that will be easy, but we’ll be building additional classrooms at Ashland Elementary.” be able to manage what we have more efficiently.”

“We will be able to make better use of the resources we have.”

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Higher education There are a number of post-secondary schools in Alabama within a 60-mile radius of Clay County offering a wide variety of degree opportunities for students wishing to continue their education after high school. For qualifications, admissions and programs, contact each school for more information. s Alabama State University Montgomery s Amridge University Montgomery s Auburn University s Auburn University at Montgomery s Birmingham-Southern College s Central Alabama Community College - Alexander City and Childersburg s Chattahoochee Valley Community College - Phenix City s Faulkner University Montgomery s Gadsden State Community College s Huntingdon College Montgomery s Jefferson State Community College - Birmingham s Lawson State Community College - Birmingham s Miles College - Birmingham s Samford University Birmingham s Southeastern Bible College Birmingham s Southern Union State Community College - Wadley and Opelika s Talladega College s Trenholm State Technical College - Montgomery s Tuskegee University s Troy University Montgomery and Phenix City s University of Alabama at Birmingham 26

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Private schools offer diversity Parents looking for alternatives to public schools can find it in Clay County. Clay County is home to two highquality Christian schools and a large, supportive community of parents who home school their children. First Assembly Christian School, located in Ashland, was founded in 1997 by Keith Jones, after much prayer and research. The vision Jones was given was to create a Christ-centered, Bible-based academic institution for Christian families who have committed to “training up their children in the way they should go”, according to scriptures. First year enrollment totaled 45 students in grades K-8, and today, the enrollment is almost 200. Their objective has remained the same: to provide an affordable, academic excellence alternative education based on the values and standards of the Word of God. “We put the emphasis on wholesome values that families cling to as part of our underlying foundation,” principal Bradley Strother said. “And all of our curriculum is considered advanced.” A unique event the school hosts is their spelling bee. Last year, a student from FACS placed 12th in the state, Strother said. For more information, find them online at www.facslions.com. Mellow Valley Christian Academy Administrator Richard Hodges said another benefit of private schools is a smaller class size. “Smaller class sizes allow for more individual attention to the students,” he said. “It’s easier to obtain measurable outcome as well, and we do use that as a means to determine if we’re successful.” MVCA is a K3-12 school and offers standard academic classes as well as a variety of sports. One of the major differences is that the school is able to offer more clubs than many public schools. “If there’s an interest among three or four students, we try to find a way to make it happen,” Hodges said. The school offers diverse academic clubs such as robotics, astronomy, drama and an intercom/public address group. The robotics club participates in competitions with other private schools at Auburn University and the intercom group is responsible for morning “shows” each day during homeroom. The school offers a photography class and many computer courses, which are not always available at public schools. MVCA is building its sports program and has a state-of-the-art on-site sports complex that includes basketball gym, baseball and softball field, football, soccer and track fields - all of which is a convenience for families.

MVCA has a working relationship with Southern Union State Community College. Many high school seniors take advantage of dual enrollment options which allow them to get a head start on their college careers. Still a young school, MVCA opened its doors for fall in 2003. MVCA’s mission began to lovingly nurture life-long Christian servants through a personal relationship with Jesus Christ; to develop a biblical worldview and godly character through immersion in the King James version of the Holy Bible; personal and professional excellence through an enriched academic program, which is biblically sound and academically challenging. To this day, the administration continues to follow this mission. MVCA also strives to be an extension of the Christian family, to assist and support parents and guardians in their quest for the best Christian education possible.

MVCA is a member of the Alabama Christian Education Association, ACEA, and it has a church affiliation with more than six churches in Clay County. For more information, find them online at www.mvca.us. Both schools offer affordable rates, as well as have student leadership organizations, sports and arts offerings. For those who decide to home school, Alabama has a large network and many cooperatives to help parents teach their children at home. Between the quality public and private schools, there are many fine options for education in Clay County, many parents still find they prefer a home-setting. Home schooling offers the ability to control many outside influences, and once state standards are met, home schooled children can focus on other academic areas that may interest them. There are many websites to help get interested parents started.

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Doing & Touring Clay County 30

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Top 10 things to do With all of Clay County’s natural beauty and charming rural atmosphere, narrowing down all there is to see and do is a tough assignment. From petting farms to local parks, fishing tournaments to a woodsy wedding chapel, there are definitely too many things to

do and see in just one day. For more details and other fun things to do, visit the chamber’s website at www.claycochamber.com. In no particular order, here are Clay County’s Top 10 things to do and see:

Cheaha Mountain

Besides being the highest point in Alabama, Cheaha Mountain (part of the protected Talladega Forest), is a great place to hike, picnic, swim, vacation, camp, or just about anything else you can think of to do for outdoor fun. And it doesn’t hurt that it’s also one of the most scenic places to visit in the state.

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Patriot Riding Stables and Retreat

This brand new retreat is something to behold. Beautiful horses, cabins and woodsy riding trails, a huge pond, a modern lodge - all nestled in the natural beauty of rural Clay County. A great place to visit for a day or stay for a week.

Tsalagi Trails

There’s no better way to see the beauty of Clay County than by the Tsalagi Trail system. With four separate trails, some for cars and some for offroad vehicles, the trails are a great way to spend a few days.

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Alabama Birding Trail

There are a total of eight trails in the state of Alabama. Clay County is part of the Piedmont Plateau Birding Trail which consist of nine counties. Clay County has six approved birding sites.

Heritage Day

Celebrating history and the people that made up Lineville’s past - that’s Heritage Day. Fun for the entire family, this annual event, set for Nov. 5, has a little of everything.

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Summer Sizzle

Summer Sizzle has been entertaining Clay County with free outdoor concerts on Thursdays in July since 2004. The music ranges from gospel and big band swing to local mariachi and country. Fireworks are provided after the program closest to July 4th.

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Mountain View Plantation

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Bird hunting has never been more fun than at Mountain View Plantation, located in Delta. Guided trips offer a great time for hunters whether they use a gun or bow. Beautiful, wooded surroundings makes any event held there extra special.

Clay County Music & Arts Festival

A day of music and arts in the spring is not such a bad way to spend time with your family or friends. Coming up on it’s fifth year, the Music & Arts Festival boasts local music talent and artisans of all genres and is set for May 21.

Clay County Car Show/ Swap Meet

Doc-Hilt Trails

Doc-Hilt Trails is a fun outdoor excursion that shows off the beauty of Clay County. Professionally maintained, the trails are great for off-road riding adventures.

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One of the largest “swap meets” in Alabama, this long running car show (24 years) is a family-fun annual event scheduled this year for Nov. 6.

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The highest point in Alabama, Cheaha Mountain is a must-see for anyone who loves nature. The mountain is located in Cheaha State Park and spans across several counties. Visitors can enjoy the views, take long hikes, enjoy the lake and camp or stay in one of the hillside lodges. There is also a restaurant on site and many events are held there throughout the year. For more information, visit www.alapark.com/CheahaResort. Lakes and other outdoor settings give nature lovers plenty to do. 32

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Vet shares dream with county Tucked away in quiet Delta, Patriot Riding Stables and Retreat, LLC, is a sparkling gem for Clay County. Founder Marc C. Frandsen had a vision and decided to do something about it. “I had a dream, very vivid, of helping disabled veterans,” Marc, a veteran himself, said. He said the dream included flash backs and they were very graphic and grim. “This dream led me to divesting all my New Orleans assets and building here. I saw the lodge in my dream and scribbled it down for ‘Little John the Marine’ to build just as I saw it,” he said. Marc was in the Army for over 14 years on active duty, including serving in Desert Storm. He started as a private at Ft. McClellan in Anniston, continuing to be promoted to other positions, advancing up to major. He ended up with a medical discharge. Although Marc and his crew aren’t completely finished with construction, the main “cabin,” riding trails, small lake, etc., are finished and the retreat has already had its open house. Well over 100 people showed up for -Marc Frandsen the day-long festivities held in November of last year. “My goal for the retreat is to break even while providing jobs for good folks, providing a sanctuary/retreat for wounded warriors and their families every third week of each month and using any profit to help church groups and special needs children come to the camp for free,” he said. “We are planning events for special needs kids in local schools right now.” They are currently doing site prep now for a six-suite cabin along the lake. The cabin will have four small rooms and two big ones and is set to be completed early March. “I’m wide open and just following the road the good Lord puts in front of me,” Marc said.

“I had a very vivid dream of helping veterans.”

Marc and several chamber representatives at the Grand Opening in November 2010. Clay County Life

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Clay County’s scenic route Clay County’s trail system, Tsalagi Trails, is one of the most unique ways to see a county - almost in it’s entirety. Tsalagi Trails (pronounced ja-la-gee means Cherokee) is a set of four unique trails that take you through the back roads of Clay County and, for some, to places you have only dreamed about. This trail system is so impressive, it was featured in the November 2006 issue of Southern Living Magazine. Any one of the four Tsalagi Trails will provide a great day trip from Birmingham, Montgomery, Columbus, LaGrange, or Atlanta. Many who have already experienced the Tsalagi Trails call them the “best kept secret in Alabama.” All of the trails offer interesting scenery, plenty of photo opportunities and adventures to share with family and friends. Each of the routes not only takes visitors into different areas of Clay County, but they are for different purposes. The WI Trail is a great motorcycle trail with 242 curves in its 76.5 mile course, with off-shoots to Cheaha Mountain, a gold mine and camping. This is a very popular trail. The NO TSI Trail is why folks long for a convertible sports car. Take the top down and enjoy curves, hills, beautiful scenery, Ashland’s Historic Court House, and numerous antique shops. The WA LO SI Trail is a laid back, easy trail that takes you back in time. Visit Lake Wedowee and Harris Dam, Flat Rock Park, historic Cragford and Patterson’s Flats, where the Cherokee camped out on their way to the Battle of Horseshoe Bend, which is located in neighboring Tallapoosa County. The GANA Trail is a 58-mile, mostly dirt road trail that allows you to ford two creeks and there’s an optional third creek. See a Treasure Forest, a waterfall and some of the prettiest mountain scenery in Alabama. To make your trail tour simple, log on to www.claycochamber.com, go to the Clay County tab, then recreation, then Tsalagi. You can review each trail’s route with turn-by-turn directions by clicking on the trail name. The chamber also offers a full-color map that shows all four trail routes and the surrounding area for only $3. To order yours, contact the Clay County Chamber of Commerce at 256-396-2828 or send a check or money order for $3 to The Clay County Chamber of Commerce, PO Box 85, Lineville, AL, 36266. Specify Tsalagi Trail Map. 34

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The end of a tradition

This past football season marked an amazing tradition - and also gave Clay County a reminder that this tradition is close to its end. The 100th Clay Bowl - the annual football rivalry between Clay County High School and Lineville High School - was held this past fall at Lineville High School. This famous high school rivalry, sometimes compared to the Iron Bowl, will officially end in 2011 when the final game will be held at Clay County High School. Although residents are excited that the two schools will receive a new campus in 2012, the thought of this tradition ending is still a sad note for many. “We’re losing something that Clay County is identified with,” Lineville Head Coach Steve Giddens said. “The Clay Bowl is important to the people of the county.” Coach Giddens also played football at Clay County High School and coached there for a year before transferring to Lineville. “It’s bittersweet,” Clay County High School Head Coach Kris Herron said. “This is the longest running high school rivalry in the state. Herron has been at Clay County High for 22 years - he is originally from Shelby County. “Both sides have taken a lot of pride in the game over the years,” he said. “This is the last game before play offs. Whoever wins feels good until football season starts over.” Native Mark Griffin said although the rivalry has always been strong, there were a lot of positives about the relationship. “There’s a great respect between the coaches,” Griffin said. “It’s a good indicator of what they think about the rivalry.” Sports Illustrated and USA Today have named the Clay Bowl

one of the Top 10 rivalries in the United States, Herron said. One of Coach Herron’s favorite memories is from 1996. Although the two school are only five miles apart, they played in different divisions, making them both eligible to play in the state championship. And they did. At Legion Field. “There was something special about all of us getting to play on that huge field where bigger games had been played,” Herron said. The whole of Clay County made their way to Birmingham to watch this historic game. “The closer it gets, the sadder it gets. Now we see something tangible,” Giddens said of the current construction of the new school, “and we know we only have one more game.” It may take time, but Griffin cited several schools that could possibly become a rivalry for the new consolidated high school. “Everybody already knows about our reputation for football,” he said. “But the positives of combining the high schools still outweighs any short term negatives. Those we’ll overcome.”

Youth sports registration information Ashland Youth Baseball and Softball Summer League Chuck Freeman 256-354-2121 Ages 5-12, sign up last Tuesday of January and first two Tuesdays in February Lineville Youth Baseball and Softball Summer League 256-396-5299 after 5 p.m. Girls 5-16; Boys 5-15, sign up Feb. 7, 14 and 21, 2011, Lineville Elementary 36

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Lineville Youth Football/ Cheerleading Leon Morrow 256-282-3515 Ages 5-13, sign up in August Upward Basketball Lineville Baptist Church 256-396-2567 Youth Soccer First Assembly Christian School 254-354-4090

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A growing arts community The perception that art goes on the back burner in rural Alabama is completely discounted in Clay County. From the Clay County Arts League to other local artists, plus a gallery, and two restored theatres, art is blossoming in east central Alabama. The Clay County Arts League brings a variety of programs to the culturally underserved area including visual arts shows, music, plays and programs for children. In 1971, the county saw its first art shows when the league formed, as well as the opening of a gallery in Ashland. The foundation was laid to encourage and support the county’s artists. “Through the Artist’s Eyes” has been showcasing local artists for the past five years, with exhibits at the Clay County Health and Wellness Center. The visual artists create works in different mediums - painting, pottery, photography, wood working and glass sculpting. For 20 years, the organization has produced plays, musicals and other shows for Clay County residents including “A Christmas Carol”, “Peter Pan”, “South Pacific”, “Grease” and “A Mid-Summer Night’s Dream”. Additionally, the Seasoned Performers, a senior adult theater group from Birmingham, has performed for the past two years at the historic Ashland Theatre. Summer Sizzle has been entertaining Clay County with free outdoor concerts on Thursdays in July since 2004. The music ranges from gospel to big band swing to local mariachi and country. In 2008, the Arts League joined with the Clay County Chorus to bring mixed choral music to the forefront of Clay County. Over the past few years, the choral groups have performed beautiful Christmas shows. Since 1995, the Arts League has hosted a variety of arts programs for children and teens throughout the year. Some of the classes that have been offered are singing, drama, music, pottery, drawing, painting and even cooking. Murals completed by local artists and the children have been created and left behind as gifts to local schools. Many children attend Arts Camp each year on scholarship. The Arts League has also partnered with the school system on several occasions to bring theatre and visual artists into the county’s schools. Outside of the Arts League, many local artists have been able 38

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to turn their talent and passion into a career, such as Jim Gasser, owner of Earthfire Studios (see related story, page 42). Others, like country music singer/songwriter Johnathan East (photo, bottom left page), have moved away to pursue their artistic endeavors, but come home to Clay County as often as possible. “Whenever there is something going on, somebody will call me,” Johnathan said. “I love Clay County, it’s my home.” Johnathan has released three CDs to date, and as a self-taught guitarist, declares he really enjoys the songwriting process. “I like singing and playing,” he said, “but I really like writing.” Johnathan recently signed on an agent to handle that portion of his career, and although he hasn’t sold anything yet, he’s hopeful he can become a successful songwriter. Find Johnathan and his band’s schedule, CD’s and more at www.johnathaneast.com. The Steele family has also turned their passion for arts into a business by buying a historic building on the square in Ashland, restoring it, and opening it as Ashland Theatre. The beautifully restored building is host to several productions a year, including a radio play performed this past December. Members of the family are also involved in passing along their love for theatre by teaching children the art. Another hub of artistic activity can be found in Marble City Gallery, also located on the Ashland square. The gallery includes a beautiful variety of paintings from talented artists around the county. They also conduct adult and children’s art classes.

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2011 events

26th Annual Indian Artifact Show

Saturday, March 26, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Lineville National Guard Armory 256.396.2393 Sponsored by The Hillabee Archeological Society, Alabama’s longest running artifact show is fun and educational for the whole family. Bring personal artifacts for professional examination. Admission is free.

Spring Beauty Pageant

www.thecityoflineville.com For 20 years, the Lineville Recreation Park Board has sponsored the Miss Spring Beauty Pageant for girls from birth to 19. The proceeds from the event benefit the Lineville Recreation Park. Awards are given to winners in different age categories.

Clay County Skeet Shoot

Saturday, April 2 Mountain View Plantation, Delta www.claycochamber.com Test your shooting skills at the Clay County Chamber of Commerce’s annual Skeet Shoot. For more information or to sign up your team, go to www.claycochamber.com.

Second Saturdays on the Square

Second Saturday each month from April-October The Ashland Square Businesses in Ashland have joined together to promote a once-a-month return to downtown activities. Check local media for events planned for 2011.

Paddlin’ 4 Paws Cardboard Boat Regatta Race

Saturday, May 14 Lake Wedowee www.highairs.com Join lake lovers and boat lovers at Lake Wedowee for the annual Cardboard Boat Regatta Race benefitting the Randolph County Animal Shelter. The fun is in building your own boat and seeing just how far it will go! For more information and other events, visit their website.

Clay County Music and Arts Festival

Saturday, May 21, 10 a.m.-until Lineville Park www.claycochamber.com For the best in family fun, don’t miss the annual Clay County Music and Arts Festival in Lineville featuring local music acts and headliner John Stone, local artists and craftsmen, as well as food and activities. Vendors should contact the chamber for sign up information. 40

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Spirit Of The Wolf Pow Wow

May 27-29 Enitachopco Ceremonial Grounds, Ashland www.defendthewolves.org/blog Enjoy a variety of Native American activities at the Third Annual Spirit of the Wolf Pow Wow. Gates open at 10 a.m. Friday and Saturday, 9 a.m. on Sunday; gourd dance at 1 p.m. on Friday and Saturday. Grand entry is at 5 p.m. on Friday and Saturday and 3 p.m. on Sunday. Admission is $5 person, children six and under are free.

Clay County Arts Camp

June 13-17, 8 a.m.-1 p.m. www.claycochamber.com The Clay County Arts League sponsors this annual event for local youth ages 5 to fifth grade. Enjoy a week-long camp with other artists participating in hands-on challenges including painting, drawing, music, drama, pottery, dance, cooking and storytelling. Tuition is $60, scholarships available. Call 256276-0015 or 256-354-4225.

Summer Sizzle

Thursdays, July 7, 14, 21, 28 Lineville Recreation Park www.claycochamber.com Sponsored by the Clay County Arts League, the 8th annual concert series introduces spectators to great music at a great price - FREE! Bring your lawn chairs and enjoy a fun family evening of music under the stars. From 7-9:30 p.m. each Thursday.

Lineville Merchants Association Heritage Day Festival

Saturday, November 5 Downtown Lineville www.linevillemerchants.com Enjoy an entire day of activities beginning bright and early with breakfast! The Exchange Club Pancake Breakfast kicks off the day at 6 a.m. Other activities are scheduled throughout the day from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. including shows, contests, vendors and music. Call 256-396-9121 for more information.

Clay County Car Show/Swap Meet

Sunday, November 6 Lineville Recreation Park www.claycochamber.com The 25th annual Clay County Car Show is one of the largest collections of show cars anywhere in central Alabama - it’s also a huge swap meet! Admission is $2 per person, children under 12 are free. Clay County Life

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A fine place for business Clay County offers everything business and industry look for in a location to call home. From people who believe in community and education, to plenty of acreage to accomodate most any size industry, Clay County offers a firm foundation for businesses. For industry, there are four state highways criss-crossing the county, two railways and an airport. Clay County is centrally located between Birmingham, Montgomery and Atlanta. Recently the Ashland/Lineville Airport was granted more than $750,000 for rehabilitation of their runway, increasing efforts to attract more industry. Both CSX Transportation and Norfolk Southern Railway continue to run through the county. The county has industrial parks that have been created by a joint effort of the county and the towns of Ashland and Lineville. A park is located in each of the two towns. Industries such as Wellborn Cabinet, Tru-Wood Cabinets and Koch Foods have found a successful home in Clay County by utilizing the above amenities. Small business owners with unique ideas are quite successful in the county as well. Locally owned businesses do well by offering all the basic services, and there are plenty of opportunities to expand by offering new shopping experiences to residents. One of the reasons small business owner Angela Suggs opened her boutique in downtown Ashland is because she understood that more business is good for the area. “If there’s only one shop on the square, then people might not think to shop in Ashland,” she said. “But if there are 10, they’ll come because they know if they can’t find something in one place, they might be able to find it somewhere else. “Business growth in a small town isn’t competition - it helps all of us.”

Local business spotlight Earthfire Studios

Jim Gasser, his wife Marie and their three sons moved to Clay County in 1993 and never looked back. Jim, a full-time self-taught potter, and owner of Earthfire Studios, has a growing business and is currently working on building a larger studio to accommodate classes. “Our current building project is to build a studio with room to teach,” he said. “I love to share my interest in

is how Almost Heaven Wedding Chapel came to be. A few years ago Shelby Osbourn felt like she was called to provide a beautiful sanctuary for not only couples to wed, but a place in a natural, outdoorsy setting for people to come together in celebration. The chapel took several years to construct and was built completely by hand by the family. Beautifully decorated, the building also houses a full kitchen, a large “porch” and several other amenities perfect for any size gathering. The property is located just outside of Ashland, so it’s close to town for convenience, but in a peaceful, country setting. For more information on booking and pricing, call 256-354-5355 or email them at shelbyosbourn@yahoo.com.

potting through the art shows where I sell most of my work, local children’s art camps in Clay and Talladega counties and having people visit my studio, but there is no room for students there.” Jim’s work is high fired, reduction glazed and unglazed stoneware, producing beautiful hues and textures. His work is individually decorated with engobes (liquid colored clay), designs in sgraffito (surface carving), painted oxides, or glazed using a variety of reduction glazes. Each piece is signed and dated. His studio is located at 921 Pinehole Rd, Lineville, or you can reach him at 256-396-5599 or email them at earthfire@centurytel.net

Almost Heaven Wedding Chapel

When you receive a calling from a higher power, you have to listen. This

girls, girls accessories, and other children’s items, make Britches & Bows a fun place to shop. After 10 years with the now-closed Movie Gallery, owner Angela Suggs knew she wanted to do something in retail and also to be able to spend time with her new grand-daughter. These desires gave birth to the boutique-style shop she decided to open. “There was no place to buy boutiquetype outfits locally,” she said. “A big thing for our community is that everytime a new business opens on the square, it helps all of us.” Along with clothing, some handmade, Britches & Bows offers shoes, diaper bags, shower gifts and gift certificates. The shop is open Tuesday-Friday 10 a.m.-6 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. The number is 256-354-2700.

Garden Terrace Cafe

Britches & Bows

Located on the square in historic Ashland, Britches & Bows is a cute shop perfect for the little one in your life. Unique clothing for both boys and

In the heart of Ashland on the historic square, a new gem has arrived to brighten residents’ lives and to fill their stomachs with tasty fare. Experienced restaurant owners Bob and Donna Roberts recently opened this new eatery featuring wholesome, homecooked breakfast and lunch items. From homemade breakfast burritos to warm and satisfying Cuban sandwiches, their unique menu will have customers coming back for more. The cafe also offers wi-fi, outdoor seating, and a beautifully appointed interior. Garden Terrace is a great place to bring friends and family and just enjoy the relaxing surroundings. For more information and hours, call 256-354-3113. Clay County Life

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Industry thrives in rural Alabama Several major industries call Clay County home, as well as many smaller ones. Koch Foods, a national company, has a facility in the county. Other businesses that got their start in Clay County, such as Tru-Wood and Wellborn Cabinet, are still headquartered here. John-Co. Truss, a smaller operation, still manages to perform their services around the state. Koch Foods is located in Ashland and they also maintain several chicken farms in the area. The company, headquartered in Illinois, began in 1985 in a single facility with only 13 employees. Today, they are ranked among the country’s largest integrated poultry processors and manufacturers of value-added quality food products. A unique aspect of Koch Foods is they are actually providing the product to other manufacturers using that company’s packaging. They also supply many of the country’s top chain restaurants. From the cutting edge facilities that ensure unmatched food safety, to innovative production technology designed to reduce cost and increase efficiency, the company is fully committed to the ethical and humane treatment of live poultry, responsible use and treatment of resources, and safety of the food products. Founded in 1990, Tru-Wood® Cabinets, Inc. specializes in the manufacture of fine, handcrafted cabinetry. With manufacturing facilities located in Ashland and Lineville, as well as a distribution center in Longwood, Florida, Tru-Wood® is committed to quality. As an industry leader, Tru-Wood® has joined Kitchen Cabinet Manufacturers Association in their Environmental Stewardship Program. The forests not only provide outstanding environmental benefits, but also provide an array of 44

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renewable wood products and derivatives that are widely used in paper, packaging, building, furnishings, and a host of other applications. Tru-Wood® fully supports responsible forest management practices that promote sustainability resulting in long-term economic and environmental benefits. For more information on sustainability, go to www.greencabinetsource.org.

Tru-Wood® Cabinets creates kitchen cabinets and cabinet accessories, and closet and garage organizers. After 20 years in business, John-Co Truss Company is still going strong. Opening their doors in 1990, John-Co Truss has built a sold reputation as a construction company that builds quality, dependable trusses for most any building construction.

Located in Lineville, John-Co Truss has grown their business under the leadership of Barbara DeCoursey. A solid business with a great product, the company produces trusses for virtually any use. From storage buildings to commercial warehouse buildings to custom homes, each project is handled with care, using top-notch materials, equipment and a highly-trained staff. Project managers feel safe knowing that John-Co Truss is constructing some of the most important parts of any building. Call Mrs. Barbara at 256-396-5006 for more information and a quote.

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How your chamber works for you

By Mary Patchunka-Smith Clay County Chamber Director Welcome to Clay County, Alabama, from the Clay County Chamber of Commerce. We hope you find our magazine, Clay County Life, interesting and informative. Within these pages you’ll find a wealth of information about our beautiful county, its people, our business community and life in general in Clay County. Whether you’re already a resident of Clay County, considering our county as your new home or seeking a great place to start a new business, Clay County Life will entertain you and provide you with lots of great information. Folks who already call Clay County home will find many interesting articles, all gathered into one easy-to-read magazine. Enjoy our offering and we look forward to hearing your comments. Our goal is to improve the magazine every year, and your input is necessary to truly make this a magazine for everyone in Clay County. The Clay County Chamber of Commerce is here to help newcomers and long-term residents alike. We welcome businesses and individuals as members in our association and we have been working for a better Clay County area since 1990. Membership in the Chamber of Commerce entitles businesses and individuals to numerous benefits and services, including advertising and publicity, workshops and seminars, membership directory, business referrals, marketing and research, business and political contacts, monthly newsletter, website and social media, Annual Prayer Breakfast, Annual Meeting, Town Hall meetings, meet and greets and much more. We have a great online presence. Between Facebook and our website, we work hard to keep everyone informed of happenings around the county. We also add

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chamber member pages to our Facebook favorites, so let us know you have one! Our website features a business directory with our active chamber members, contact information, blogs, history and a calendar of events. Our website is updated daily. The Clay County Music & Arts Festival began in 2007 to help bring our community closer together and bring more tourism to the county. The festival is the third Saturday in May every year. The festival will be in the Lineville this year with Nashville artist John Stone headlining with other talented musicians from Clay County. There will be many arts/crafts, food vendor booths, as well as livestock, forestry, art and many more exhibits. At the Chamber Annual Meeting, the Chamber gives the State of the Chamber Address for the year, presents awards for Business of the Year, Business Person of the Year and Volunteer of the Year, all nominated by fellow members, and we have a keynote speaker. The meeting is held in October. The Annual Prayer Breakfast brings

together local organizations, schools, and business and civic leaders to have breakfast with a guest speaker who shares his/ her testimony. The Prayer Breakfast is held in late February or early March. Once a quarter the chamber hosts a Town Hall Meeting with the mayors from Ashland and Lineville, the Clay County Commission Chairman and the Clay County School Superintendent. The Town Hall Meeting is open to everyone. At this meeting, each representative has the opportunity to give a five-minute speech about current happenings in their respective districts. Youth Entrepreneurship Club and Yard Sale was created two years ago with the idea of teaching our youth to become business men or women. The Club and Yard Sale is a great way to teach youth how to manage money, be a salesperson, and marketing and merchandising their products. The parents love the club as it gets the youth to clean out their rooms, closets and garage. The Yard Sale is held at the Clay County Farmer’s Market in March. Business After Hours is held the second Tuesday of each month at various member business locations. This is a great networking event for fellow chamber members to get to know each other better, discuss what is going on at their business, swap ideas and swap business cards. Enjoy our offering and we look forward to hearing your comments. Our goal is to improve the magazine every year, and your input is necessary to truly make this a magazine for everyone in Clay County. For more information about joining the chamber visit our website at www.claycochamber.com or call us at 256.396.2828. We have members from Gadsden to Orlando, Florida. There’s never been a better time to join!

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Chamber membership directory 2011 828 Designs 256-276-7230 rivers828@gmail.com 85621 Hwy 9, Ashland, AL 36251

Benefield Funeral Home 256-396-2888 sbenefield@benefieldfh.com 300 E Main St, Lineville, AL 36266

Cheaha State Park 256-488-5649 http://www.alapark.com/cheaharesort 2141 Bunker Lp, Delta, AL 36258

Clay County Hospital Home Care/ LHC Group 256-354-0077 www.lhcgroup.com 83745 Hwy 9, Ashland, AL 36251

A-G-L Solid Waste Disposal Authority 256-354-5803 40717 Hwy 77, Ashland, AL 36251

Benefield Monument Company 256-396-5839 benefield@centurytel.net PO Box 509, Lineville, AL 36266

City Auto Parts 256-396-5418 barton2398@cs.com 88890 Hwy 9, Lineville, AL 36266

Clay County Industrial Development Council P.O. Box 400, Lineville, AL 36266

Blue Moon Events 256-565-2458 www.bluemoonconcerts.net 1203 Vestavia Dr, Decatur, AL 35603

City of Ashland 256-354-2121 www.cityofashland.net P.O. Box 849, Ashland, AL 36251

Bolton Service Company 256-236-8330 lugrad87@cableone.net 109 East L St., Oxford, AL 36205

City of Lineville 256-396-2581 www.cityoflineville.net P.O. Box 247, Lineville, AL 36266

Bonner Heating and Air 256-396-9093 59774 Hwy 49, Lineville, AL 36266

Clay-Coosa Community Services, Inc. 256-354-5711 83066 Hwy 9, Ashland, AL 36251

Boy Scouts of America 256-452-5135 tritch@1bsa.org 516 Liberty Pkwy, Bham, AL 35242

Clay Automotive 256-396-2155 www.goclayauto.com 86635 Hwy 9, Lineville, AL 36266

Brannons Office City 256-362- 6104 cathe@brannons.biz 144 East St. N, Talladega, AL 35161

Clay County Tire & Retreading 256-354-2515 lfetner@centurytel.net P.O. Box 532, Ashland, AL 36251

Britches and Bows 256-354-2700 suggs32@aol.com 1759 Sardis Rd, Ashland, AL 36251

Clay County Arts League 256-396-6143 kimmcrist@yahoo.com P.O. Box 696, Ashland, AL 36251

Business Systems, Inc. 256-236-1501 chris@bsiworkshere.com 1108 Moore Ave, Anniston, AL 36201

Clay County Cattleman’s Association 256-488-5392 dad_wiretwisters@netzero.net 853 Fernway Dr, Delta, AL 36258

Carolyn’s Beauty Shop 256-396-2010 carolyn@acs-isp.com 59885 Hwy 49, Lineville, AL 36266

Clay County Children’s Policy Council 256-354-9021 lrunyan@mindspring.com PO Box 990, Ashland, AL 36251

Carr Logging, LLC 256-354-3825 675 Mines Rd, Ashland, AL 36251

Clay County Commission 256-354-7888 PO Box 87, Ashland, AL 36251

Cathy’s Western Wear 256-395-2202 cathygortney@yahoo.com 415 Gortney Rd, Ashland, AL 36251

Clay County Dept of Human Resources 256-396-6800 www.dhr.state.al.us 86930 Hwy. 9, Ashland, AL 36251

Century Link 256-354-7125 www.centurytel.myway.com 40218 Hwy 77 S, Ashland, AL 36251

Clay County E-911 256-396-6911 clayco911@centurytel.net 86838 Hwy 9, Lineville, AL 36266

Charlene Phillips 456 Phillips St, Ashland, AL 36251

Clay County EMA 256-396-5886 PO Box 427, Ashland, AL 36251

Donald Hamlin, Attorney 256-354-3356 hamlinlawoffice@aol.com P.O. Box 657, Ashland, AL 36251

Clay County Farmer’s Federation 256-396-0566 ldewberry@centurytel.net P.O. Box 429, Lineville, AL 36266

Donna’s Auto Parts 256-396-2362 donnasautoparts@yahoo.com 90248 Hwy 9, Lineville, AL 36266

Cheaha Regional Head Start 256-396-6975 sjacobs@cheahaheadstart.org 925 North St., Talladega, AL 35160

Clay County Healthcare Authority 256-354-2131 lujordan@clayhosp.org 83825 Hwy 9, Ashland, AL 36251

Duke’s Jewelry, Inc. 256-396-2566 Hwy 49 S, Lineville, AL 36266

Cheaha Regional Mental Health, Inc. 256-245-1340 catkinson@cheahamentalhealth.com 351 W 3rd St, Sylacauga, AL 35150

Clay County Historical Society 256-354-2481 highpoints@acs-isp.com P.O. Box 998, Ashland, AL 36251

Alabama 100.7 256-354-1444 alabama1007@aol.com P.O. Box 10, Ashland, AL 36251 Alabama Air Comfort Control 256-488-9391 68328 Hwy 49, Lineville, AL 36266 Alabama Power Company 800-888-2726 www.alabamapower.com 85571 Hwy. 9, Ashland, AL 36251 Alabama Publishing Group 256-442-6620 www.apgpages.com 3049 Steele Station Road, Rainbow City Almost Heaven Wedding Chapel 256-354-5355 shelbyosbourn@yahoo.com 1032 Big Springs Rd, Ashland AL 36251 Andy Prince of Party Rentals 256-310-1680 aprince1968@yahoo.com 363 Gunnells Rd, Jacksonville AL 36265 Ann’s Flowers & Gifts 256-354-2613 P.O. Box 758, Ashland, AL 36251 Ann Saxon 35 Rosewood Ln, Ashland, AL 36251 Ashland FUMC 256-354-2267 ashlandfumc@gmail.com PO. Box 305, Ashland, AL 36251 Ashland Housing Authority 256-354-2661 aha@centurytel.net 128 1st Street N, Ashland, AL 36251 Ashland Pharmacy, Inc. 256-354-2166 ashland012@centurytel.net P.O. Box 487, Ashland, AL 36251 Ashland Printing/Image Makers 256-354-7177 robbie-lett@excite.com 40486 Hwy 77, Ashland, AL 36266 Ashland Tax & Business Services 256-354-3166 taxpros@ashlandtax.com 82948 Hwy 9, Ashland, AL 36251 B & J Builders 256-488-0071 benniemorrison@centurytel.net 3653 McKay Rd, Delta, AL 36258 BB&T 256-396-5435 www.bbt.com 89071 Hwy 9, Lineville, AL 36266

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Cheaha Realty 256-396-2717 billy@cheaharealty.com 118 E Main St, Lineville, AL 36266

Clay County Saddle Club 256-618-2565 claycosaddleclub@yahoo.com 80 Arena Rd, Ashland, AL 36251 Clay Service & Electronic 256-473-1990 brian@clayservice.com 111 Airport Rd, Ashland, AL 36251 CommuniComm Services 334-863-7080 ttetreault@jamescable.com PO Box 900, Ste 9, Roanoke, AL 36274 Country Aire Veterinary Clinic 256-354-7604 ccountry001@centurytel.net 43 Ratley Rd., Ashland, AL 36251 Creekside Signs 256-396-0610 creeksidesigns@centurytel.net 149 Greenvalley Rd, Lineville, AL 36266 D & W Kettle Corn D & W Loader & Mulching Service 256-354-5895 dwlandclearing@yahoo.com 505 Airport Rd, Ashland, AL 36251 Deja Blue 256-354-4631 rstrickland001@centurytel.net 47450 Hwy 77 N, Ashland, AL 36251 Dewrell Horizontal Road Boaring 256-488-5451 bdewrell@centurytel.net 72341 Hwy 49, Delta, AL 36258 Doc Hilt Trails/Just Trails, LLC 770-241-3182 www.dochilttrails.com 4190 Morningside Dr, Cumming GA 30041 Don East 256-396-2694 creekstreefarms2@yahoo.com 981 Co Rd 2811, Lineville, AL 36266 Don Fulbright 256-354-7405 dfulbright@centurytel.net 428 Armory Dr, Ashland, AL 36251

East Central Alabama Teen Challenge Crisis Center 256-354-2644 www.alabamateenchallenge.org P.O. Box 3447, Oxford, AL 36203

Eagle 102.3 334-863- 4139 6855 Hwy 431, Roanoke, AL 36274 Earth Fire Studios 256-396-5599 earthfire@centurytel.net 921 Pinehole Rd, Lineville, AL 36266 East Alabama Portables, Inc. 256-236-6830 www.eastalabamaportables.com 2680 Bynum Leatherwood Rd, Anniston East Central Ala. Gas District 256-354-2194 east001@centurytel.net 40717 Hwy 77, Ashland, AL 36251 Edward Jones 256-835-5694 www.edwardjones.com 240 Oxford Exchange Blvd, Oxford Envirogrind, LLC 256-354-3635 khj1195@aol.com 2230 Clairmont Springs Rd, Talladega First Assembly Christian School 256-354-4090 www.facslions.com 85621 Hwy 9, Ashland, AL 36251 First Assembly of God 256-354-4090 phyllis@facslions.com PO Box 697, Ashland, AL 36251 First Baptist Church of Ashland 256-354-7958 P.O. Box 577, Ashland, AL 36251 First Capital Insurance Co. 256-396-2131 firstcapital@centurytel.net PO Box 568, Lineville, AL 36266

First State Bank 256-396-2187 www.firststatedirect.com P.O. Box 547, Lineville, AL 36266

Heart’s Desire Photography 256-354-3278 www.shaunasworksofheart.com 1101 Big Springs Rd, Ashland, AL 36251

J Media 334-401-9160 www.jmediaonline.com 503 Freeman Rd, Dadeville, AL 36853

FRED’S #1950 256-396-0901 district45@fredsinc.com 50 Talladega St, Lineville, AL 36266

Higgins Sewing and Manufacturing 256-396-2704 www.higginsembroidery.com 88891 Hwy. 9, Lineville, AL 36266

Jeanette Carroll 256-354-5858 jcarroll513@aol.com PO Box 845, Ashland, AL 36251

Gaither’s Laundry 256-354-3463 www.stevegaithermusic.com 3496 Cragford Rd, Ashland, AL 36251

High Points Coffee & Books 256-354-2841 highpoints@acs-isp.com P.O. Box 1552, Ashland, AL 36251

JKM Consulting, Inc. 256-405-0613 jkmoses@jkmconsultinginc.com PO Box 3250, Oxford, AL 36203

Gallet-A Terracon Company 256-354-1457 jhgreen@terracon.com 80 Ali Way, Oxford, AL 36203

His Place Christian Resources 256-396-1201 www.hisplacecr.com PO Box 1040, Lineville, AL 36266

John-Co Truss, Inc. 256-396-5006 johnco12@centurytel.net 116 Reeves Rd, Lineville, AL 36266

Garden Terrace Cafe 256-354-3113 rbr@shopcity.com PO Box 156, Ashland, AL 36251

Holiday Inn Express & Suites 256-362-7780 talladegahotel@gmail.com 240 Haynes St, Talladega, AL 35160

Garing Business Machines 256-362-2538 www.garing.com P.O. Box 916, Talladega, AL 35161

Holmestead Farms 256-404-4316 bobbyrayholmes@yahoo.com 6582 Co Rd 7, Talladega, AL 35160

Gerald Dial 256-396-5626 gerald_dial@yahoo.com PO Box 248, Lineville, AL 36266

Hometown One Stop 256-396-5176 sandysims7482@yahoo.com 64710 Hwy 49, Lineville, AL 36266

Judge George C. Simpson gcsimpson@usa.net P.O. Box 880, Ashland, AL 36251

Gregory Varner, Attorney 256-354-5464 www.govarner.com P.O. Box 338, Ashland, AL 36251

Hudgins Towing and Recovery 256-488-5648 hudginstowing@centurylink.net 59613 Hwy 49 S, Lineville, AL 36266

Key Concept Services, Inc. 256-276-9389 www.keyconcept.net P.O. Box 5, Millerville, AL 36267

Harris Plumbing & Electric 256-354-5600 harrisplumbingelectric@gmail.com 75 2nd St W, Ashland, AL 36251

Hurst Construction, LLC 256-488-5427 renee@hurst-construction.com 5 Hammock Dr, Lineville, AL 36266

Kim’s Klosets, LLC 256-276-0015 kimmcrist@yahoo.com P.O. Box 44, Ashland, AL 36251

John Keith Warren, Attorney 256-354-5711 lawoffice007@centurytel.net 83066 Hwy 9, Ashland, AL 36251 Johnathan East 770-714-7493 classiccountrygirl@hotmail.com PO Box 236, Wedowee, AL 36278

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Koch Foods of Ashland, LLC 256-354-2155 www.kochfoods.com 516 Tyson Rd., Ashland, AL 36251

Lineville Emporium 256-396-9121 lvlemporium@yahoo.com 88839 Hwy 9, Lineville, AL 36266

Millerville Volunteer Fire Dept. 256-354-2420 kacistarr@hotmail.com 40 School House Rd, Millerville

Laminack Electric Company 256-463-3222 mark@laminackelectric.com 3576 Hwy 78, Heflin, AL 36264

Lineville Food Shop 256-396-5674 bahill@bellsouth.net PO Box 135, Goodwater, AL 35072

Momma’s Candles 256-396-9094 satidwell@centurytel.net 1430 Pinehole Rd, Lineville, AL 36266

Lett’s Do Cars, Inc. 256-396-5305 55 6th Ave, Lineville, AL 36266

Lineville Health & Rehabilitation 256-396-2104 www.northporthealth.com 88073 Hwy 9, Lineville, AL 36266

Monte Alban 256-396-9288 89570 Hwy 9, Lineville, AL 36266

Planter’s Hardware 256-354-2311 planters@centurytel.net PO. Box 124, Ashland, AL 36251

Liberty National Life Insurance 256-365-8856 trobb@hughes.net P.O. Box 788, Ashland, AL 36251

Lineville Merchant’s Association 256-396-9121 www.linevillemerchants.com P.O. Box 425, Lineville, AL 36266

Mountain Streams Realty 256-396-0555 www.mountainstreamsrealty.com 89520 Hwy 9, Lineville, AL 36266

Pursang Custom Home Design/Build 256-343-9261 kingramhorn@yahoo.com PO. Box 570, Lineville, AL 36266

Liberty National Life Insurance 256-234-2556 bm015@libnat.com 124 Aliant Pkwy, Alex City, AL 35010

Mark Bowen 256-396-2953 bowenmark@centurytel.net 1346 Barfield FD Rd, Lineville AL 36266

Mountain View Plantation 256-488-5393 richardsprayberry@tri-venturemarketing.com 488 Haynes Mtn Rd, Delta, AL 35628

RA-LIN and Associates, Inc. 770-834-4884 jay.grubbs@ra-lin.com 101 Parkwood Cir, Carrollton, GA 30117

N.E. Alabama Community Development Corp. 205-541-9839 www.northeastalabamacdc.org P.O, Box 1325, Ashland, AL 36251

RBC Bank 256-354-2163 sharon.mcvay@rbc.com P.O. Box 37, Ashland, AL 36251

Lineville Baptist Church 256-396-2567 jkcbama@aol.com P.O. Box 356, Lineville, AL 36266

Marsha Moorehead 256-396-5859 moorems@aces.edu 93 Smith St, Lineville, AL 36266

Lineville Building Supply 256-396-0241 424 Industrial Blvd, Lineville, AL 36266

Matt Hooten 256-546-2717 matt36117@gmail.com PO Box 8, Lineville, AL 36266

Lineville Clinic 256-396-2143 amandagrant@centurytel.net P.O. Box 98, Lineville, AL 36266

Megan Eva Miller, Attorny 256-396-2182 meganmiller@centurytel.net PO Box 747, Lineville, AL 36266

Lineville Dental Office 256-396-2928 lamar43@centurytel.net 454 Denson Dr, Lineville, AL 36266

Mellow Valley Christian Academy 256-354-7778 www.mvca.us 37993 Hwy 77, Ashland, AL 36251

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Partners BBQ 256-396-9061 beachbum022461@yahoo.com 89663 Hwy. 9, Lineville, AL 36266 Patroit Riding Stables & Retreat, LLC 256-618-1896 marc1@patriotsolutions.us 2840 Fosters Rd, Delta, AL 36258 Perryland Foods 256-396-5663 P.O, Box 95, Lineville, AL 36266

Piggly Wiggly - Ashland 256-354-2184 P.O. Box 988, Ashland, AL 36251 Piggly Wiggly - Lineville 256-396-2224 pigl@echosat.net P.O. Box 456, Lineville, AL 36266

Red’s Catfish Cabin 256-354-7705 info1@redscatfish.com 488 Bluff Valley Rd, Cragford, AL 36255 Red Rock Saddle Company 256-276-0956 redrocksaddleco@yahoo.com 303 Dbl Bridges Trl, Ashland, AL 36251 Rental Car Momma 407-396-4152 ryan@rentalcarmomma.com 1801 E Irlo Bronson Mem, St Cloud, FL

Representative Richard Laird 334-863-7938 rjlsrdo@teleclipse.net 341 Bonner Dr, Roanoke, AL 36274

Son Up Real Estate 256-396-6160 www.sonuprealestate.com 91478 Hwy 9, Lineville, AL 36266

Talladega Appraisal Service 256-362-1800 www.tal-app.com 406 Court St N., Talladega, AL 36161

The Lovely Janet 256-276-8599 janet@thelovelyjanet.com 5186 Co Rd 5, Ashland, AL 36251

Robertson’s Garage 256-396-5550 lrgarage@yahoo.com 11320 Cragford Rd, Cragford, AL 36255

Southern Union State Community College 256-395-2211 www.suscc.edu P.O. Box 1000, Wadley, AL 36276

Talladega Career Center 256-480-2109 www.AlabamaJobLink.com 235 Haynes St, Talladega, AL 35160

Tru-Wood Cabinets, Inc 256-354-3378 www.truwood.com P.O. Box 640, Ashland, AL 36251

Royster Enterprises 256-354-5900 80048 Hwy 9 S, Ashland, AL 36251

STARRZ Performing Arts Center 205-338-1725 www.starrzpac.com P.O. Box 56, Pell City, AL 35125

Talladega Cycle Sales 256-362-6370 www.talladegacyclesales.com 35288 Al Hwy 21, Talladega, AL 35160

Safehouse of Shelby County, Inc. PO. Box 620, Columbiana, AL 35051 Service Printing & Office Supply 256-234-6307 sriley@sposinc.com 275 Church St, Alex City, AL 35010 SERVPRO 256-245-1631 www.servpro.com 99 Hagan Ave, Childersburg, AL 35044 Shop City, Inc 256-354-3113 editor@bestinashland.com 150 Court Sq, Ashland, AL 36251 Show Place Rental 256-354-7616 1314A Talladega Hwy Sylacauga, AL 35150 Sims Masonry 256-396-9146 jsimsmasonry@gmail.com 64758 Hwy 49, Lineville, AL 36266

State Farm Insurance 256-354-2272 www.youneedmike.com PO. Box 545, Lineville, AL 36266

Tallapoosa River Electric Coop 334-864-9331 http://trec.coop P.O. Drawer 675, Lafayette, AL 36862

Steel-N-Foam Docks 256-396-2742 166 Co Rd 8023, Lineville, AL 36266

Teapots, Laces and Roses Bed & Breakfast 256-354-0173 www.teapotsbandb.com 40888 Hwy 77 W, Ashland, AL 36251

Steele Chiropractic Life Center 256-396-2058 www.steelechiropracticlifecenter.com 89485 Hwy 9 N, Lineville, AL 36266

The Ashland Theatre 256-396-2058 www.theashlandtheatre.com P.O. Box 218, Ashland, AL 36251

Subway of Lineville 256-396-1065 kdwhiteside@centurytel.net P.O. Box 818, Lineville, AL 36266

The Drug Store 256-354-3784 83871 Hwy 9, Ashland, AL 36266

Superior Gas Company 256-396-2428 P.O. Box 484, Lineville, AL 36266

The East Alabama Advertiser 256-568-5958 advertiserstuff@bellsouth.net PO Box 298, Ranburne, AL 36273

Superior Pest Control, Inc. 256-396-5016 www.superiorpestcontrol.org PO. Box 134, Ashland, AL 36251

The Ivy Cottage 256-354-7810 frankie@asc-isp.com 30 Court Sq, Ashland, AL 36251

Twin Creeks Veterinary Services 256-354-7032 taylordvm@bellsouth.net 85774 Hwy 9, Ashland, AL 36251 VFIS of Alabama 256-396-2055 www.vfis.com P.O. Box 280, Lineville, AL 36266 Wellborn Cabinets, Inc. 256-354-7151 www.wellborn.com 38669 Hwy 77 S, Ashland, AL 36251 Wells Fargo 256-396-2191 www.wellsfargo.com 2054 Prarie Creek Rd, Lineville Wright-Sprayberry Insurance 256-354-4100 www.wrightsprayberry.com 120 Court Sq, Ashland, AL 36251 Young’s Drug Store 256-396-5632 youngsdrugstore@yahoo.com 88960 Hwy 9, Lineville, AL 36266 Young’s Farm Supply & Feed LLC 256-354-3543 2265 Taylor Rd, Ashland, AL 36251 This directory is reflective of paid chamber membership as of 02/09/11.

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Index to advertisers 828 Design..................................................................................... 41 Adamson Insurance Agency.......................................................... 41 AGL Solid Waste........................................................................... 40 Alabama Power................................................................................ 8 Ann’s Flowers................................................................................ 49 Ashland Housing Authority........................................................... 49 Ashland Pharmacy & Gifts............................................................ 13 Benefield Funeral Homes.............................................................. 27 Boy Scouts of America.................................................................. 50 Britches & Bows............................................................................ 40 CenturyLink................................................................................... 37 Cheaha Realty Services, LLC........................................................ 17 Cheaha Regional Mental Health Center........................................ 21 City Auto Parts & Electronics......................................................... 6 City of Ashland................................................................................ 4 City of Lineville............................................................................. 55 Clay County Arts League.............................................................. 15 Clay County Automotive............................................................... 56 Clay County Commission.............................................................. 14 Clay County EMA......................................................................... 13 Clay County Industrial Development Council.............................. 53 Clay Service and Electric.............................................................. 49 CommuniComm............................................................................. 46 Earthfire Studios............................................................................ 40 East Central Alabama Gas............................................................. 40 EnviroGrind................................................................................... 45 First Assembly Christian School................................................... 25

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First Assembly Church.................................................................. 25 First Capital Insurance................................................................... 15 First State Bank.............................................................................. 35 Garden Terrace Cafe...................................................................... 50 Heart’s Desire Photography........................................................... 39 High Points Coffee and Books...................................................... 40 Key Concept Services, Inc............................................................. 41 Koch Foods of Ashland, LLC........................................................ 45 Lineville Health and Rehabilitation................................................. 2 M2 Connections............................................................................. 47 Megan Eva Miller.......................................................................... 15 Mountain Streams Realty................................................................ 6 Mountain View Plantation............................................................. 52 Patriot Riding Stables & Retreat..................................................... 3 Perryland Foods............................................................................. 15 RA-LIN............................................................................................ 5 State Farm........................................................................................ 6 Steele Chiropractic Life Center..................................................... 20 Steele-N-Foam Docks.................................................................... 27 Superior Gas Company.................................................................. 46 The Historic Ashland Theatre.......................................................... 5 The Ivy Cottage............................................................................... 6 Tru-Wood Cabinets........................................................................ 51 Twin Creeks Veterinary Services................................................... 27 Wellborn Cabinets.................................................................... 28, 29 Young’s Drug Store, LLC.............................................................. 51

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In wilderness is the preservation of the world.

- Henry David Thoreau

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Clay County Life 2011