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Index of Sheets Existing conditions/Base map..........................1 Analyses: Access and Circulation...................2 Analysis: Sun and Shade/ Microclimates.......3 Analysis: Slope...................................................4 Analysis: Views...................................................5 Analysis: Water...................................................6 Analysis: Existing Vegetation............................7 Analysis: Summary.............................................8 Project Goals and Summary Description.......9 Design Alternative 1 . ......................................10 Alternative 1 Description.................................11 Alternative 1 Description Cont.......................12 Design Alternative 2.........................................13 Alternative 2 Description.................................14 Cost Estimates and Phasing............................15

Matson Property

Matson Property Designer: Gareth Crosby

Hungry Gnome Gardenscapes May, 2011

“Empowering People To Grow Their Own Food�


Georgia Ave.

N

Clayton St.

Formal Entrance

House

Approximate highest point on the property

Main Entrance

Driveway/ parking area

Studio

An old well keeps sinking and is dangerous for people who don’t know of it.

Not for construction. This sheet is a graphic reproduction and is not based on a legal survey.

Carport

ft

Base Map

Matson Property Designer: Gareth Crosby

May, 2011

Hungry Gnome Gardenscapes “Empowering People To Grow Their Own Food” 1/15


N

Formal Entrance

House

Approximate highest point on the property

Pedestrian traffic Light pedestrian traffic Vehicle traffic Main Entrance

Light vehicle traffic

Driveway/ parking area

Studio

An old well keeps sinking and is dangerous for people who don’t know of it.

Not for construction. This sheet is a graphic reproduction and is not based on a legal survey.

Carport

ft

Access and Circulation: Analysis Matson Property Designer: Gareth Crosby

May, 2011

Hungry Gnome Gardenscapes “Empowering People To Grow Their Own Food” 2/15


N

Northwest winter winds

Formal Entrance

House

Approximate highest point on the property

Part Sun/shade Sunny areas Shady areas Main Entrance

Afternoon sun - hot

Driveway/ parking area

Studio

An old well keeps sinking and is dangerous for people who don’t know of it.

Not for construction. This sheet is a graphic reproduction and is not based on a legal survey.

Carport

ft

Sun/Shade/Microclimates: Analysis

Matson Property Designer: Gareth Crosby

May, 2011

Hungry Gnome Gardenscapes “Empowering People To Grow Their Own Food” 3/15


N

Formal Entrance

House

Approximate highest point on the property

0-3% slope 3-5% slope 5-10% slope Main Entrance

>10% slope

Driveway/ parking area

Studio

Not for construction. This sheet is a graphic reproduction and is not based on a legal survey.

An old well keeps sinking and is dangerous for people who don’t know of it.

Slope: Analysis

Matson Property Designer: Gareth Crosby

Carport

ft

May, 2011

Hungry Gnome Gardenscapes “Empowering People To Grow Their Own Food” 4/15


N

Formal Entrance

House

Approximate highest point on the property

Views from within the property out, and into the property from adjoining land Main Entrance

Driveway/ parking area

Studio

An old well keeps sinking and is dangerous for people who don’t know of it.

Not for construction. This sheet is a graphic reproduction and is not based on a legal survey.

Carport

ft

View/Privacy: Analysis

Matson Property Designer: Gareth Crosby

May, 2011

Hungry Gnome Gardenscapes “Empowering People To Grow Their Own Food” 5/15


N

Formal Entrance

House

Approximate highest point on the property

Gutter downspout Water pooling Area of erosion Main Entrance

Direction of erosion

Driveway/ parking area

Studio

An old well keeps sinking and is dangerous for people who don’t know of it.

Not for construction. This sheet is a graphic reproduction and is not based on a legal survey.

Carport

ft

Water: Analysis

Matson Property Designer: Gareth Crosby

May, 2011

Hungry Gnome Gardenscapes “Empowering People To Grow Their Own Food” 6/15


N

Holly Dogwood

Camellia

Oak

Formal Entrance Pecan

House

Approximate highest point on the property

Crape Myrtle

Main Entrance

Weeping birch

Japanese maple

Driveway/ parking area

Oak

Carport Studio

An old well keeps sinking and is dangerous for people who don’t know of it.

Not for construction. This sheet is a graphic reproduction and is not based on a legal survey.

Oak

Water Oak

ft

Dominant Vegetation: Analysis

Matson Property Designer: Gareth Crosby

May, 2011

Hungry Gnome Gardenscapes “Empowering People To Grow Their Own Food” 7/15


N

Northwest winter winds

Formal Entrance

House

Wet area

Approximate highest point on the property

Gutter downspout Under utilized area Hot spots

Main Entrance

Erosion problems Safety concern unwanted views

Driveway/ parking area

Carport Studio

Not for construction. This sheet is a graphic reproduction and is not based on a legal survey.

An old well keeps sinking and is dangerous for people who don’t know of it.

Exposed to northwest winter winds

ft

Summary: Analysis Matson Property Designer: Gareth Crosby

May, 2011

Hungry Gnome Gardenscapes “Empowering People To Grow Their Own Food” 8/15


Summary Analysis

Recommended Plants for the future

Current use patterns suggest that most of the property is under utilized with the majority of the southern half maintained as lawn. This under use happens for multiple reasons: 1. The property is exposed on 3 sides by roads, one of which is very busy. • Add evergreen plants or fencing to enclose the property 2. The relative lack of mature tree cover exposes the majority of the property to very hot temperatures except on the eastern border of the property. • Locate new shade trees in areas where coolth will improve the usability. 3. Hot Georgia summer temperatures make the lawns to the north, south and west of the house too hot to enjoy half of the year. • Locate new shade trees in areas where coolth will improve the usability. 4. To the east of the house is the coolest area on the property but it doesn’t have an access point from the house and water pools there creating unfavorable conditions for a patio. • Create intentional access to something in this area and plan for collection and better movement of water. 5. Neither front nor back porch is shaded during the summer causing both to be incredibly hot and useless during the summer. • Add shading structures and/or trees near the house to the south and west. 6. The 2 resident dogs are kept in the house due to the exposure of the property to three roads. • Fence in a certain amount of the property with field fence and decorative fencing or burry and electric fence. Metal or wood fencing will keep other animals like deer and dogs out as well. 7. The intersection of the driveway and Clayton Street is a dangerous location due to the level of traffic on the street, the steepness of the driveway and the presence of an old well and a telephone poll to the south of the driveway. Cars must back out of the property into traffic and this is a major safety concern. There is also significant erosion happening here and on the southern border of the property. • Relocate the driveway for guests or add some safer parking. • A permit must be obtained from the Georgia DOT before curb cuts or any other point of access is authorized on state-owned highway rights-of-way from abutting property. • Grade the driveway with less of a slope onto the road and create berms to direct water off the drive. Keep steep slopes planted with deep rooted plants.

Not for construction. This sheet is a graphic reproduction and is not based on a legal survey.

Client Goals and Wish List: • Locate a safe fenced in place for the dogs. Preferably with access from the house. In all zoning districts, no fence, wall, shrubbery, sign, or other obstruction to vision between the heights of 2.5 and 10 feet from the ground level is permitted within 20 feet of the intersection of the right of way lines of two streets or of curb cuts or driveways. • Locate veggie garden with room to expand • Locate plants/structures to attract wildlife (birds, butterflies, chipmunks • Locate future chicken yard/coop • Relocate driveway • Locate restful/entertaining areas • Cool the house with shade • Improve privacy from neighbors/street • Greywater system

Summary Analysis/ Wish list/ Plant list Matson Property Designer: Gareth Crosby

May, 2011

Bird Attractants Bugbane As Bottlebrush buckeye Ap Lady’s mantle Am Shadbush, juneberry Ac Amsonia ‘Willow Blue Star’ Amt Astilbe ‘Red Sentinel’ Aa Birch ‘Young’s Weeping Birch’ Bp Mountain bluet Cem Dwarf hinoki falsecypress Cho Bunchberry Cc Kousa dogwood ‘Radiant Rose’ Ck Redosier dogwood Cs Cosmos Css Foxglove ‘Strawberry’ D Inkberry ‘Shamrock’ Ig Coral honeysuckle Ls Snowberry - white Sa Lilac Sp Dwarf pomegagranite Pg Pink Muhley grass ‘Regal Mist’ Mc Mainden grass ‘Gracillimus’ MsG

Actea simplex ‘brunette’ Aesculus parviflora Alchemilla mollis Amelanchier canadensis Amsonia tabernaemontana Astilbe x arendsii Betchula pendula Youngii Centaurea montana Chamaecyparis obtusa Cornus canadensis Cornus kousa Cornus stolonifera Cosmos sulphureus Digitalis spp. Ilex glabra Lonicera sempervirens Symphoricarpos albus Syringa sp. Punica granatum nana Muhlenbergia capilaris Miscanthus sinensis

N

Butterfly Attractants Bugbane Butterfly weed Ostrich plume astilbe Butterflybush ‘Miss Ruby’ Feather reed grass Fringe tree - white Tufted hair grass Purple coneflower Coneflower ‘Orange Meadowbrite’ Globe thistle Beebalm Evening primrose American plum Plum agen x grand duke Black-eyed Susan Meadow rue Liatris Columbine Baptisia Lantana ‘Mozelle lantana’ Delphinium Yarrow Phlox

As At Asf B Caa Cv Df Ep

Actea simplex ‘brunette’ Asclepias tuberosa Astilbe straussenfeder Buddleja spp. Calamagrostis x acutiflora Chionanthus virginicus Deschampsia flexuosa Echinacea purpurea

Eo Er Md Oe Pa Pdg Rf Tr Lsp Aca Ba Lant Del Al Ph

Echinacea spp. on the property Echinops ritro Monarda didyma Oenothera biennis Prunus americana Prunus domestica Rudbeckia fulgida var.sullivantii Thalictrum rochebrunianum Liatris spicata Aquilegia chrysantha Baptisia sp. Lantana sp. Delphinium elatum Achillea millefolium Phlox sp.

Co Em L Ma Mg Pt Prc Prd Pyp Sc Sr So

Cydonia oblonga Eleagnus multiflora Lindera benzoin Malus sp. Mespilus germanica Prunus tomentosa Prunus cerasifera Prunus x domestica Pyrus pyrifolia Sambucus canadensis Stropharia rugosoannulata Symphytum officinale

Ed Ip Is Lc

Eupetorium spp. Iris prismatica Iris setosa Lobelia cardinales

Nn Ny Sag Sch T

Nelumbo nucifera Nymphaea. spp Sagittaria sagittifolia Schoenoplectus lacustris Typhus sp.

Adp Aqc Art Arc Bm Cal Di Habb Habi Jd LcBm LcBv Mv Pd Pf Ps Sang Tc Tl Ug

Adiantum pedatum Aquilegia canadensis Ariseama triphyllum Asarum splendens Brunnera macrophylla Calycanthus floridus Dicentra formosa Hosta spp. Hosta spp. Jeffersonia diphylla Lonicera caerulea var. edulis Lonicera caerulea var. edulis Mertensia virginica Phlox divericata Polygonatum florum Pulmonaria saccharata Sanguinaria canadensis Tiarella cordifolia var. collina Trillium luteum Uvularia grandiflora

Approximate highest point

Food Forest Quince ‘Aromatnaya’ Goumi ‘Sweet Scarlet’ Spicebush Apple Meldar ‘Marron’ Nanking cherry Plum ‘Hollywood’ Plum ‘Brooks’ Asian pear ‘Chojuro’ Elderberry ‘Adam’s No. 1’ Wine-cap strafaria Comfrey

Water Garden Joe-pye weed - dwarf Iris ‘Eric the red’ Iris - ‘Caesar’s Brother’ Cardinal flower Water lotus ‘Mrs. Perry D. Slocum’ Water lily Arrowhead Common bull-rush Cat-tail

Secret Garden Maidenhair fern Columbine Jack-in-the-pulpit Wild ginger Brunnera ‘Jackfrost’ Sweetshrub ‘Venus’ Bleeding heart Hosta ‘Abba Showtime’ Hosta ‘Abiqua Kalidascope’ Twinleaf Honeyberry ‘Blue moon’ Honeyberry ‘Blue velvet’ Virginia bluebells Wild phlox Solomon’s seal Lungwort ‘Mrs Moon’ Bloodroot Foamflower Trillium Great merry-bells

Hungry Gnome Gardenscapes “Empowering People To Grow Their Own Food” 9/15


Georgia Ave.

Not for construction. This sheet is a graphic reproduction and is not based on a legal survey.

Clayton St.

N

Design Alternative 1 Matson Property Designer: Gareth Crosby

May, 2011

Hungry Gnome Gardenscapes “Empowering People To Grow Their Own Food� 10/15


Design alternative 1 keeps high use patterns close to the house

Not for construction. This sheet is a graphic reproduction and is not based on a legal survey.

• The driveway (1) is expanded to the northwest to allow cars a turn-around before leaving the property. There is minimal space taken for the extra turn-around, no new curb cuts and minimal added gravel surface on the property. • To combat the hot openness of the driveway, a mulberry is planted (2) to the south for shade and food for the chickens, located to the south of the garage. • Food sources are placed all over the property.

• Annual food production (3) is located to the west of the house, north of the driveway in full sun under the power lines. This will make it easy to check on the plants every day while walking into the house or collecting the mail and also make the best use of the space under the power lines. • Taking advantage of the heat of the driveway, figs (4) are planted to provide a source of food, a 3-season privacy screen, and partial shade for the driveway. • Just south of the driveway, blueberries and goumies create an edible windbreak (5) for the food forest (6) to the south. This structure will protect the fruiting trees from harsh winter winds that could damage spring buds with violent storms. • Bordering the food forest is a hedge of blackberries and raspberries (7) that take advantage of the fence line for trellising. • Recommended species for the food forest include apple, plum, and Nanking cherry. • In the southeast corner of the property, an Asian persimmon shades a secret garden (8) for birds and quiet contemplation. Here colorful flowers such as butterfly bush, echinacea, daylily, coreopsis, salvia, and trumpet vine attract birds and butterflies. Edible bushes such as red current, hardy rhubarb and sochan provide food in partially shaded areas. A taller fence of 6 feet or more encloses the secret garden on all for sides leaving the western corner open to enter through. The walls can be planted with creeping vines to further enclose the space. Outside the walls, within the property, elderberry and redbuds buffer the secret garden (9) from the rest of the property and provide food as well as nitrogen for the soil. Adding a few bird feeders here will help attract birds. • Walking back up the northeast side of the property, a pawpaw grove (10) is planted along the fence line for privacy as well as food. As the old oak above is slowly taken down, the trees will have more light for producing fruit. This is perfect for pawpaw because in their first 3-4 years they need shade. After 4 years they need at least 4 hours of full sun in order to produce fruit. • Between the garage and the fence, honeyberry (11) will partially screen the neighbors’ property for three seasons. These plants prefer partial shade and need more than one variety to produce fruit. • The chickens (12) are located to the south of the garage and are accessed from the back of the coup. It is easily accessible from the house but not too close to break up the current use patterns. This structure could be combined with a tool shed. • A hedge of eastern hemlocks (13) is planted for a 4-season visual screen from the adjacent property. Hemlock is an understory species adapted to growing in the understory. It has a feathery, soft branching structure and is great habitat for woodland bird species. • Hazelnuts (14) are planted at the northern corner of the property near the pecan that is currently growing just to the south. • At the edge of the dog fence, 2 serviceberries (15) are planted, one on either side of the gate at this, the north end of the fenced in area. Serviceberries produce fruit in partial shade and they taste very similar to blueberries and fruit about a month before blueberry.

Alternative 1 Description MatsonProperty Property Matson Designer:Gareth GarethCrosby Crosby Designer:

April, 2011 May, 2011

N 14. 16.

15.

Approximate highest point on the property

13.

3. 1.

4.

11.

12.

2.

5. 10. 6. 9. 7. 0

10

20

8.

30 ft

Hungry Gnome Gardenscapes “Empowering People To Grow Their Own Food” 11/15


Design alternative 1 Continued... • A mixed hedge of pineapple guava and tea camellia (16) creates an edible evergreen screen from the roads to the north and west until it ends just before the mailbox.

• The weeping birch (17) is moved to the western corner of the house to provide shade for the front porch in the summer. • Two redbuds and another dogwood (18) are added to the formal entry to the house for symmetry and shade in the summer. Redbuds are nitrogen-fixing trees and you can eat the purple flowers in the spring as an addition to your salad. • The space between the garage and the house is transformed by a pergola, into an outdoor patio (19) shaded by hardy kiwi, muscadine grape, roses and the current Japanese maple that is relocated just 5 feet south of its current location. • A greywater system (20) is designed to take water from the kitchen and possibly the washing machine. The system needs to be designed to filter the water before it enters the large fishpond. The pond is partially shaded so fish can be grown here for food. A properly designed greywater system can feed your groundwater as well as the pond. This system will need much more research before installation can begin. There are other ways to use the greywater from your house and these projects can be taken on later. If you use biocompatible cleaners, any of your greywater can be used in the garden including sink, shower and washing machine. Toilet water is not considered greywater. It is called black water. It is better and easy to compost this material. • The pond (21)will grow perennial vegetables such as arrowhead, cattail, and water lotus. It will attract frogs and other amphibians as well as birds. The rock wall surrounding the pond and greywater system will provide habitat for small animals like chipmunks. Keeping fish in the pond will minimize the biting flies and provide nitrogen for the plants. • Water harvesting (22) continues outside where rainwater is collected from the gutters in 275 gallon totes. These are located near your annual vegetable gardens to help irrigate these plants. There is also room for another double stack of rainwater totes to the south of the garage. These totes will collect water from the roof of the garage and store it for irrigating berries along the fence line and the food forest. • The dog fence (23 follow the arrows) incorporates more than half of the open space on the property. The entire southern portion of the property beyond the driveway is fenced in as well as the patio and behind the house to the end of the house where it meets the formal front porch. Most of the fence will be welded wire field fencing which will be masked by the blackberry, raspberry, blueberry, honeyberry, pawpaw, hemlock and hazelnut. A decorative woven wire fence will encompass the patio and around the garage. The veggie garden is left outside the fence to keep the dogs out. Deer could be a problem so if this is the case the decorative fence should be extended around the veggie garden. 5 gates access the enclosed property.

N

18. 17.

d

House

22. 20.

22. Main Entrance

c

19.

a

23. Carport

21.

b

24.

Studio

Not for construction. This sheet is a graphic reproduction and is not based on a legal survey.

23. 23.

• The gate located to the south of the driveway is a 6-foot gate (24) to accommodate large deliveries of compost or wood chips for the forest garden. • The gates to the north and west of the garage, (a,b,c,d) from the patio into the veggie garden and to the north of the house are 4-foot gates.

Alternative 1 Description cont. MatsonProperty Property Matson Designer:Gareth GarethCrosby Crosby Designer:

April, 2011 May, 2011

0

10

20

ft 30ft

Hungry Gnome Gardenscapes “Empowering People To Grow Their Own Food” 12/15


Georgia Ave.

Not for construction. This sheet is a graphic reproduction and is not based on a legal survey.

Clayton St.

N

Design Alternative 2 Matson Property Designer: Gareth Crosby

May, 2011

Hungry Gnome Gardenscapes “Empowering People To Grow Their Own Food� 13/15


Design alternative 2 expands the driveway to allow for safer access. May things are similar in design 2 and below I will describe the differences. • The greatest difference is the driveway (1) which is expanded to allow for the safest and easiest access and exit of the property. Cars can drive into the driveway from both directions and exit in both directions as well as turn around in the existing driveway. • The vegetable garden (2) is moved to the southern half of the property taking advantage of the full sun exposure. Even though the garden is farther from the house, the property is not so large to make this a great problem for maintenance. Permaculture principals strongly recommend keeping the annual vegetable garden in the zone 1 or use patterns but I believe that your family has the dedication to make this design work. • The layout of the secret garden (3) is changed somewhat but the plant pallet is similar. • Two Asian pears (4) are added to the wind block, one just south of the driveway and the other just northeast of the garage. Make sure to select 2 blight resistant varieties of Asian pear for pollination and productivity. • A pecan tree is planted to the south of the house (5) to provide shade to the back porch and the garage as well as food. The variety should be selected for optimal production. • The patio (6) is located in the shade of the house to the northeast. A door will need to be made in the living room to access the patio. This patio will improve the use of the space on this side of the house. The one caveat might be mosquitoes. • The Japanese maple is moved (7) to shade the mailbox.

6.

1. 5.

7.

4.

Not for construction. This sheet is a graphic reproduction and is not based on a legal survey.

4.

2. 3. 0

Alternative 2 Description /Cost Estimate MatsonProperty Property Matson Designer:Gareth GarethCrosby Crosby Designer:

April, 2011 May, 2011

10

20

30 ft

Hungry Gnome Gardenscapes “Empowering People To Grow Their Own Food” 14/15


Cost estimates:

Range

Fence installation

300’ field fence (materials= $1,500) $3,500–5,000 100’ woven wire (materials= $900) $1,500–2,000

Pond installation

Material Installation

Plant materials

Trees Perennials

Labor

Planting Brick wall around secret garden Flagstone setting

Secret Garden

Flagstone 100sqft Brick walls

Patio

Flagstone 100sqft Patio footing Pergola

$2,000–4,000 $1,000–2,000

$500–1,000 $500–1,000

Woven wire fencing

Field fencing

$750–1,050 $300–700 $100–200

$200–400 $450–600

$200–400 $400–800 $2,000–10,000

Greywater pond

Water totes for rainwater harvesting Totes- delivered only Totes delivered and installed

$150 each $450 each

Driveway

Materials (pervious surfaces) Grass/Gravel Pavers: Grass and gravel pavers can range in the price bracket starting at around $1.50 and up to about $5.75, per square foot of installed pavement. Porous Concrete: Porous concrete can cost anything from $2.00 up to about $6.50, per square foot of installed pavement.

Pergola for the patio

Interlocking Concrete Paver Blocks: Interlocking concrete pavers range in price from $5.00 to about $10.00 per square foot of installed pavement. Materials: Labor

$750–5,000 $1,000–3,000

A secret garden

Decorative brick wall for the secret garden

Not for construction. This sheet is a graphic reproduction and is not based on a legal survey.

Phasing Phase 1: Dog fence Phase 2: Driveway Phase 3: Perennial and annual gardens Phase 4: Patio-pergola Phase 5: Pond/Greywater Phase 6: Secret garden/chicken house

Grass and gravel pervious paving.

Matson Property Designer: Gareth Crosby

May, 2011

Hungry Gnome Gardenscapes “Empowering People To Grow Their Own Food” 15/15


Matson Whole Site Design