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Music

Left: Tim Crawford riffs (photo by Simon Bond); Right: Harold Lear passes the microphone to Norbert Morvan (photo by Doug Stuber)

Harold Lear’s Swan Song

H

arold Lear and his band, Dr. Bob and the Disco Beaver, played their last show ever at Speakeasy on March 6. It was packed like sardines, which was appropriate since many were initiated as “Honorary Newfoundlanders” by “kissing the fish” and slamming an insane Canadian whisky named “Screech,” at the end of the night. Also onstage was the G-Jay band, with a recently revamped lineup of Tim Crawford (saxophone), Norbert Morvan (vocals and MC “Royale”), Tony Boyd (bass), Gordon MacKay (guitar), Caleb MacIvor (keys, vocals, songwriter, originator, bandleader, task master and booking agent), Ed McEntee (drums), and Carlos Gentile (percussion). The packed bar had barely enough room for dancers to improvise. Couples were spotted doing the Mashed Potato, the Bus Stop, and the dance that has made Speakeasy famous, the “your-place-or-mine?” And who could resist a swing around the dance floor with the blues-driven, hard-driving guitar riffs of Harold Lear and his accomplished band? You could see the emotion of playing his last gig in Korea on Harold’s face, but he scored a tenured professorship in New Brunswick, Canada, and could

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Gwangju News April 2010

not resist teaching sociology, though his PhD is in Eastern Philosophy. “My master’s degree is in sociology, so it’s not a big stretch,” he said with his characteristic smile. His music and merry-making will be much missed. He named the night “Saturday Mayhem,” and it was not shocking that many who knew him from his latest stint in Suncheon made the trek to bid him adieu. Not to be outdone (except notably on drums and guitar) the G-Jay band also got our feet moving, as Norbert toasted the crowd, and the band played funk, reggae and rock numbers from the 60s, 70s, 80s and 90s, as well as Caleb’s soulful originals. You couldn’t be faulted for thinking this band was formed at a catholic church, what with the Macs and Mcs, but it turns out bassist Tony Boyd hails from Scotland itself, thus not one of the millions that are part of the Irish and Scottish diaspora. As a music critic, I’d pick Tim Crawford as the undisputed star of the G-Jay band. His sax riffs began halfway through the Disco Beaver’s first set (he was upstairs at the time). His runs, more Charlie Parker than Eric Dolphy, kept going non-stop, except for a

Profile for Gwangju International Center

(EN) Gwangju News April 2010 #98  

Featured articles: - Seunim Beop Jeong's Funeral at Songgwangsa - 'My Life in Gwangju' Art Class Builds Community - Living Tips: Getting a K...

(EN) Gwangju News April 2010 #98  

Featured articles: - Seunim Beop Jeong's Funeral at Songgwangsa - 'My Life in Gwangju' Art Class Builds Community - Living Tips: Getting a K...

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