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THE SURVEYOR THE SURVEYOR Vol. XIII No. 6

George Washington 1776 Lodge #337 F&AM Trestle Board

October/November 2012

A New Brother Begins the Journey By Chuck Carroll WHITEFISH BAY, WI “Is this a lodge or the Love Boat?” I found myself asking as newly initiated Br. Adam Roder, in open lodge, stood in the East and publicly proclaimed his intentions, and asked his future father-in-law, Br. Mike Plumley visiting from Bethany Lodge No. 821 of Black River, New York, for his daughter’s hand in marriage. With a Bachelor’s Degree in Architectural Engineering from MSOE, Br. Roder is currently pursuing a Masters Degree in Science and Structural Engineering, also at MSOE, while working as a Building Inspector for the City of Milwaukee. Br. Roder is also a member of the Triangle Fraternity whose membership includes our Junior Deacon, Br. Joe Fahrenkopf and our beloved Past Master, Br. Andy Paradowski. When asked why he wanted to become a Mason, Br. Roder replied, “I would like to become a Mason to become a part of a Brotherhood of men that I may come to know, trust and serve.”

In the Surveyor

Br. Roder “proposes” to his future fatherin-law.

From the East . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 2012 Committees . . . . . . . . . 2 Master’s Calendar . . . . . . . . 3 From the West . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Masonic Education . . . . . . . . 4 Book Review . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 The Role of Secretary . . . . . 4-5 Duties of Officers . . . . . . . . 6-8 My Cousin George . . . . . . . . 9 Noteworthy News . . . . . . 10-11 2012 Officers Directory . . . 12

(A New Brother Continued page 11)

Jerry Thompson Honored for 60 Years On Thursday, September 20, Brothers Joe Fahrenkopf, Junior Deacon; Otto Tesch, PM, Chaplain; and Chuck Carroll, Worshipful Master, descended on the home of Brother Jerry Thompson to deliver a certificate and pin from the Grand Lodge of Wisconsin, honoring his 60th year of membership in the Fraternity. Br. Jerry was stationed near Lompoc, California in 1952 when he got his EA degree at Santa Ynez Lodge No. 262, and was then transferred to San Luis Obispo where he received his FC degree at King David’s Lodge No. 209. Later that year he was raised at Southern Pines Lodge No. 484 in his hometown of Southern Pines, North Carolina. While stationed in Germany, Jerry got a chance to tour Lucerne, Switzerland where he met his future wife, Isabel, who was touring with her mother and sister. Needless to say, he followed her back to Wisconsin and he has been here ever since! Jerry joined the Brown Deer Lodge which eventually consolidated with GW1776.


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Vol. XIII No. 6 George Washington 1776 Lodge #337 F&AM Trestle Board October/November 2012

Message from the East Worshipful Master Chuck Carroll

Special Election Edition This issue of the Surveyor includes an excerpt from George Washington's Farewell Address where he discusses the danger of political parties to the democratic process. Looking at the current state of politics, we can see that some of his warnings were prophetic. Seeing the madness that seems to get worse every four years, it is comforting to know that this sort of foolishness is not part of our annual elections of officers. As Free and Accepted Masons, we recognize how important is our right as individuals, to be able to vote our conscience, free from electioneering and the dissension of warring factions. I have appointed our Senior Deacon, Br. Tyler Kristopeit, to assist Br. Keith Sargeant in the Nominating Committee. Br. Keith has been working diligently to provide the lodge with a list of qualified and interested nominees for the various offices that are up for election, as well as those who are interested in appointed offices. In this issue of the Surveyor, you will find an article that divulges the various duties and responsibilities of the different offices, also the second part of an article about the Lodge Secretary, and an interesting article about voting methods, all of which make this a Special Election Edition of the Surveyor. What a year this has been! It has been absolutely fantastic! We set a lot of goals, and even though we didn't achieve them all, (most being the kinds of projects that take more than a year to develop) we still made amazing strides. Our work with the youth in the community was a new thing in our lodge and continues with an opportunity for our lodge to become active in DeMolay in the upcoming years through Br. Dave Bowen's efforts. I had a very active and fun group of officers to work with this year and a lot of support all year long. Sure there was some resistance, but when you are working with men of such high caliber as our lodge members, "resistance is futile!" I remember an old saying, "All through life my brother, if you'd be a happy soul, keep your eye upon the donut, and not upon the hole!" GW1776 is only 12 years old. That is a very young lodge. According to the historical documents that I have had a chance to peruse over the past few years, there were some very big birth pains and we're still experiencing some growing pains, but that is to be expected. I have every confidence in the young men coming up in this lodge and while I definitely had doubts and fears when I first joined this "older gentleman's" lodge

seven years ago, those worries have long since passed. I have gotten to know the young men that have since been raised and who will be our future leaders and I know it will be alright. I know that there are a lot of members who have not been at many meetings this year but I encourage you to come on election night. No Mason is required to attend meetings, but on election night you have a chance to exercise the most important and meaningful right of being a Mason. Your right to vote is more than a privilege; it is a sacred duty. Your vote determines the direction the lodge will take in the upcoming year. Will we continue to move forward? Will we take a step backward? Will we remain stagnant? How important is your vote? Last year, I was elected by a two-vote margin. It is not for me to tell you how to vote. Under the Trial Code, Chapter 101 of the Wisconsin Masonic Code Annotations, it lists as unmasonic conduct, among other things: To try in any manner to influence the vote of another either for or against any person for a Masonic office... No, it's not up to me to tell you how to vote, but what I can tell you is that if you don't come to vote for the men who will lead the lodge into the future, then you have no stake in the future of the lodge.

2012 Lodge Committee* Chairs Lodge Projects Co-Chairs: Jim Roberts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 414-332-8247 tiler@gw1776.org William Hutchins . . 262-309-3500 seniorsteward@gw1776.org Education, Entertainment & Social Events Co-Chairs: Otto Tesch . . . . . . . . . . . 414-445-3537 chaplain@gw1776.org Joe Fahrenkopf . . . . 920-296-3171 juniordeacon@gw1776.org Community Relations Co-Chairs: Frank Nuernberger . 414-357-8141 seniorwarden@gw1776.org Keith Sargeant . . . . . . . 414-881-7060 juniorwarden@1776.org Publicity & Member Outreach Co-Chairs: Tyler Kristopeit . . . 608-346-0066 seniordeacon@gw1776.org Seth Swanson . . . . . . 408-315-9601 sswanson@digitaliris.com *Not sure which committee to join? That’s easy. It’s been decided for you. All members of GW1776 are members of each and every committee!

Lodge Phone Number (414) 979-1776


Vol. XIII No. 6 George Washington 1776 Lodge #337 F&AM Trestle Board October/November 2012

The Master’s Calendar 2012 November 2012

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October Highlights

November Highlights

October 2, Tuesday, 7:00 p.m. Stated Meeting FC Degree for Brother Adam Roder 6:00 p.m. Light Supper

November 6, Tuesday, 7:30 p.m. Stated Meeting Election Night at the Lodge 6:30 p.m. Light Supper

October 16, Tuesday, 7:30 p.m. Stated Meeting 6:30 p.m. Light Supper No Reservations Necessary

November 11, Sunday, Veterans Day November 15, Thursday, Stein Club at Sprecher

October 18, Thursday, Stein Club at Sprecher November 16, Friday, Surveyor Deadline October 29, Monday, 7:00 p.m. District 12 Meeting at Henry L. Palmer Lodge, Light Supper at 6:00 p.m. This is a mandatory meeting for lodge officers, all Master Masons are invited and encouraged to attend.

November 20, Tuesday, 7:30 p.m. Stated Meeting. 6:30 p.m. Light Supper November 22, Thursday, Thanksgiving

Masonic Haunted Cinema Night

October 30, Tuesday, Join us for a Special Evening of Tricks & Treats as we present Mel Brooks’ Classic Horror/Comedy, “Young Frankenstein!” October 31, Wednesday, Halloween

From the West (Wing of the Hospital) Brother Senior Warden, Frank Nuernberger was recently admitted to St. Mary’s Hospital after experiencing a stroke. The day after he was admitted to the ICU, Barb and I went to see him. He was in good spirits, and I even witnessed a couple of belly laughs from him! I chided him for not meeting the Surveyor deadline for his Message from the West, and then offered to take dictation for any message he would like to pass on to the brethren. Here is his Message From the West. –ed.

Elections are coming up. Vote for the party of your choice, but regardless of the outcome, have a party! Right now, I can’t think straight. When things like this happen you find out you have more friends than you realize.

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Vol. XIII No. 6 George Washington 1776 Lodge #337 F&AM Trestle Board October/November 2012

John J. Robinson’s

Masonic Education

A Pilgrim’s Path

by Richard D. Marcus, PM

One Man’s Road to the Masonic Temple

Voting Methods

by Barb Carroll Henry Martyn Robert

Elections and electioneering have been going on in Wisconsin extensively of late, but the fall is the time when lodges meet to vote on new officers. I would like to comment on the types of voting methods used, and why our methods are different for officers, new members, and voting on ordinary motions in Lodge. Masonic lodges operate their meetings within the basic framework Robert's Rules of Order; it is therefore instructive to look there for voting methods. You might be surprised, but Robert's Rules has Milwaukee heritage. During the severe winter of 1874 in Milwaukee, Major Henry Martyn Robert of the Army engineering services wrote his Pocket Manual of Rules of Order for Deliberative Assemblies here. It was first published in Milwaukee in 1876 and then in Chicago. Later rising to the rank of Brigadier General, Henry Robert's intention was to promote orderly discussion by any group or business not just rules for legislative bodies. Voting methods are usually classed into voice, show of hands, taking a rising vote, written ballots, secret ballots, and electronic voting. Each has its advantages and disadvantages. A voice vote (viva voce) is used in many small meetings, but is subject to the interpretation of the chair as to whether yes or no predominates. Hence, a show of hands (or as we say, "vote as a Mason") has the advantage of being recorded in minutes and being open to all to see. For most ordinary matters, voting as a Mason is sufficient. Unless the issue is for bylaw changes in a Lodge or votes in Grand Lodge requiring super-majorities of 2/3, we use majority rules. But some issues are deemed to be special. Voting for officers is done on a written ballot with tellers reporting the outcome. This has the advantage of giving anonymity in their vote. The primary problem with paper ballots, collection, and verification is the extra time it takes. Majority rule is used in these sorts of elections. We have one election that is particularly Masonic, and that is the election of new members using a ballot box with each member voting with anonymity. New member voting is intended to require unanimous consent. Clearly, bringing new members into the lodge is important for a lodge to survive over time, but all must see the new members to be worthy brothers for a lodge to prosper. It is therefore the single issue over which we need unanimous consent. The time and care given to our voting methods shows the seriousness we place on the decisions we make.

A Pilgrim's Path – One Man's Road to the Masonic Temple by John J. Robinson provides intriguing answers to the puzzling misinformation, confusion and outright lies spread about Masons and Masonry. Robinson writes as a non-Mason who is never-the-less an expert on the history and background of Masonry. He relates how an incomplete understanding of the Craft can lead even Masons to engage in odd behavior, such as extreme secrecy which prevents men from encouraging their sons to join DeMolay or a Masonic lodge, and can, in some cases even threatens family life and marriage. Sometimes the misinformation is deliberate, as in the case of a unscrupulous fraud who tried to get in the good graces of the Roman Catholic Church by forging a document he claimed was written by Albert Pike, an intellectual Freemason, member of Southern Jurisdiction Scottish Rite, prolific writer and Confederate general. Even though Leo Taxil admitted to the forgery, and bragged about it, it was taken as absolute truth by the Catholic Church and other anti-Masons. Robinson also asserts that Masons have for too long "hidden their light under a bushel" much to their detriment. He suggests ideas for making public the good that they do in their communities in the fo r m o f scho lar ship s, reading comprehension programs, children's hospitals and myriad other beneficial services. This is a fascinating read which can help Masons understand why they sometimes seem to be under attack and helps to provide appropriate answers to those attacks. Immediately following the publication of A Pilgrim's Path, John J. Robinson joined a Masonic lodge.

THE ROLE OF THE SECRETARY: PART II The Secretary’s Responsibilities as they relate to the Worshipful Master and the Grand Lodge By Tyler Kristopeit This is the fourth in a series of articles on topics that were discussed at the 2012 Statewide Secretary’s Seminar, attended by our Senior Deacon and Assistant Secretary. –Ed.


Vol. XIII No. 6 George Washington 1776 Lodge #337 F&AM Trestle Board October/November 2012 “It is your duty to observe the will and pleasure of the Worshipful Master in recording the proceedings of the lodge; transmit a copy thereof to the Grand Lodge when requested; to receive all monies paid into the lodge and pay them over to the Treasurer, taking his receipt therefor. Your good inclination to Freemasonry and this lodge will induce you to discharge the duties of your office with fidelity, and by so doing you will merit the esteem of your brethren.” As you may have gathered from part one of this article, the Secretary’s role is one that is better described in long lists than an interesting composition. Nevertheless, I shall attempt in part two to describe the Role of the Secretary as it relates to the Worshipful Master. To begin: what qualities should a Worshipful Master realistically expect from the Secretary his brothers have elected? The Grand Lodge of Tennessee suggested, in 1997, that the ideal Secretary possess the following qualities: 1.

Quick comprehension.

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Prompt attention to business.

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Good penmanship.

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Neatness in the manner of keeping his books.

5. Sterling integrity in his financial dealings with the Lodge and its members. These all seem blatantly obvious to me, with the exception of point number three. As someone who is notorious for his bad handwriting, I may be biased – but I feel, in this decade, number three should be substituted with “Computer Proficiency.” A Secretary should be expected to communicate “on the level” with all brethren. If the brother uses the phone – the Secretary should call him. If he uses email – the Secretary should be able to email him. Fortunately for the script-challenged, such as myself, computer technology has allowed for every brother – regardless of ability – to create legible, uniform records that are viewable by all. Knowing these qualities, what duties does the qualified Secretary have to the Worshipful Master? Undoubtedly, first and foremost on this list can be quoted from the Installation: “To observe the will and pleasure of the Worshipful Master…”. This observance should not just be done merely for recording the proceedings of the Lodge, but in all aspects of the Lodge’s operation (in accordance with Masonic Code). Think of the Lodge as having a corporate structure: the Worshipful Master is the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) and the Secretary the Chief Operations Officer (COO). The Secretary should be free to make decisions regarding the operation of the Lodge, as essentially the head of operations, until the Worshipful Master – as the Executive – directs him otherwise. When the Secretary and Worshipful Master are of differing opinions, the Worshipful Master must always prevail except in the case of breaches of the Masonic Code. If the Secretary is the COO, then the Treasurer is without question the Chief Financial Officer (CFO). Masonry has evolved these positions into having ‘checks and balances’ over each other – to increase accountability. This becomes the second duty the

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Secretary has to the Worshipful Master: alerting him to any financial misconduct or malfeasance on the part of the Treasurer (just as the Treasurer has the same supervisory responsibility over the Secretary). Speaking with Secretaries from around the state at the seminar, it is amazing how often this responsibility is overlooked – and it makes me happy that our Lodge has not been forced to endure these sorts of problems like other lodges have. As the Chief Operations Officer of the Lodge, there are numerous reports and communication responsibilities that are part of the Secretary’s job. The Secretary must be willing and able to constantly communicate with, and on behalf of, the Worshipful Master. The Worshipful Master should always be informed of important events in the Lodge, reports due to the Grand Lodge, and any important events that are happening in the lives of our brothers. The Secretary should be the one to initiate regular communication, not just wait to hear from the Master. Finally, the Secretary has a duty to work with, to never undermine, and to do everything in his power to help each successive Worshipful Master. Worshipful Masters ideally change every year. On the other hand, the Secretary is often seen as a pillar of permanency and stability in the Lodge and, thereby, brothers often choose to retain a Secretary over many years. In fact, it is not unheard of throughout the state for a lodge Secretary to serve in excess of 50 years (there are a number of them out there today, believe it or not). Add the expertise a Secretary generates over years of service with the fact that a Secretary has often times served as a Worshipful Master, and you can easily see why the craft often expects a longer term of service from its Secretary. While this more often than not can be advantageous, the Lodge must always be wary of the understandable and seemingly natural inclination on the part of Secretary to become “the power behind the throne” or the real decision maker of the Lodge. It was communicated at the Secretary’s Seminar that this, unfortunately, happens at many Lodges around the State – and is thoroughly un-Masonic. Ideally, based on what the Grand Secretary said in his address this January, is that the effective Secretary must be able to compensate for the varied abilities (and lack-thereof) of every Worshipful Master the lodge elects. The effective Secretary, drawing from his experience and wisdom, must provide good counsel to the Master; must aid in his decision process, advising him against bad decisions and ideas; must also make up for any inabilities the Master might have; and, finally, must never publicly disagree with the Worshipful Master. If the Secretary chooses to voice his dissent it should be only in private conversation with the Worshipful Master. Following these simple steps has always, historically, insured the integrity of the Lodge’s leadership structure – and also will allow each successive Master the fair shake and full support they deserve as the Lodge’s leader for the Masonic year. In closing, the pen (or, rather, the quill) may be the symbol of the Secretary’s office, as the Secretary records the proceedings of the Lodge. But, if ever there was a search for a new symbol for the Secretary’s office, I would suggest the ‘rubber band’. This ‘new symbol’ would be appropriate in so many ways, given that the Secretary must be uniquely flexible year-in and year-out while completing the work that, in more ways than one, binds our Lodge together over the often lengthy years of his service.


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Vol. XIII No. 6 George Washington 1776 Lodge #337 F&AM Trestle Board October/November 2012

Duties and Responsibilities of Lodge Officers by Chuck Carroll Over the years I have often found myself having conversations about the duties and responsibilities of the various officers of the lodge. Sometimes it begins with criticism, other times from sheer curiosity, but mostly from misunderstanding and misinformation. There are many sources from which to learn what it is the officers are supposed to do, and the first place to look is the most obvious and well known: in the ritual of opening a lodge. The Deacons According to the ritual, the Junior Deacon sits just to the right and in front of the Senior Warden and is required to answer the door and pass messages between the Senior and Junior Wardens as well as to others in the lodge when directed to do so. It is the Junior Deacon who introduces a new candidate to the lodge, and prepares him for the rites of degrees. The Senior Deacon, who sits at the right of the Worshipful Master, answers a different door and delivers orders from the Worshipful Master to the Senior Warden or to anyone, anywhere when the Master tells him to do so. The Senior Deacon introduces visitors and leads candidates around the lodge. There is a unique relationship that develops between the Deacons and the candidate, as they are the ones who have the most contact with the candidate during the degree rites. It is they who answer for the candidate and in so doing, give the candidate his first impression of the ritual of Masonry. It is therefore most important that the Deacons know their parts and take their responsibilities seriously. The Secretary & Treasurer The ritual of the lodge describes the Secretary as one whose primary function is to accomplish whatever the Worshipful Master intends and desires. The Secretary records the minutes of the meetings and makes copies available to the Grand Lodge. He takes money for the lodge and gives it to the Treasurer, who provides a receipt as part of the checks and balances of financial transactions to avoid even the appearance of misappropriation. The Secretary sits to the left of the Worshipful Master. The Treasurer, whose position is to the right of the Worshipful Master, though in our lodge, like so many others, the Treasurer sits next to the Secretary, keeps a true account of lodge finances, takes money from the Secretary and makes any payments that the lodge has agreed to when the Worshipful Master tells him to do so. There is also consideration in the ritual to allow for a single position of Secretary-Treasurer. In most cases, the combined position is usually due to decreasing numbers of members or decreasing interest and activity by members. The two positions must coordinate their efforts in order to succeed in their endeavors. The Wardens and Worshipful Master The Junior Warden is in charge of refreshments and is to keep an eye out for anyone who would over-indulge, thus

What non-Masons think Masons do.

preventing drunkenness and gluttony. His duty includes announcing the refreshments and returning the members to the business of the lodge for the good of all, when told to do so by the Worshipful Master. The Senior Warden helps the Worshipful Master open and close the lodge and keeps the peace, exhorting brothers, when necessary, to avoid strife in the lodge. The Worshipful Master opens and presides over the lodge, gives the members work to do, and sees that all are given the instructions needed to complete their tasks. The Worshipful Master, Senior and Junior Wardens constitute what is known as the Three Principal Officers of the lodge and are all that is necessary for opening a lodge of Master Masons and conducting the business of the lodge. But just because they can run a lodge without participation from any other officer or member, doesn’t mean that they should have to do that. Regardless of the amount of authority any lodge officer wields, the true power in a Masonic lodge comes from the members themselves. These duties as laid out in our ritual, recited in flowery, archaic English, during the opening and closing of lodge meetings, give only a basic and rudimentary description of what the officer positions entail, and only for seven officer positions. The Senior and Junior Stewards, Chaplain, Counselor, Tiler, Soloist, Organist, are only mentioned in passing or in directions of certain actions throughout the rituals of the three degrees. So, where do we look for these? Where do we find more detailed information about all of the lodge officers? There are many sources, and there are many variations. The Chaplain, for example, was not originally a lodge officer in American Masonry. Albert Mackey, in his Encyclopedia of Masonry informs us that the office of Chaplain:


Vol. XIII No. 6 George Washington 1776 Lodge #337 F&AM Trestle Board October/November 2012 is one which is not recognized in the ritual of the United States of America, although often conferred by courtesy. The Master of a Lodge in general performs the duties of a Chaplain. Of course, eventually Chaplains were appointed in American lodges. In Wisconsin, the Chaplain did not even have an assigned seat in the lodge until late in the 20th Century. Even now, in District 12 there is a lodge that seats its Chaplain, not in the Southeast, but in the North. The duties and rituals of the Chaplain also vary from lodge to lodge, although there has been an effort by the Grand Lodge of Wisconsin to bring order and continuity to this position. The Chaplain’s duties, once performed by the Worshipful Master, primarily have to do with reciting prayers and scripture. But his duties have been expanded to include presiding over memorial services at Masonic funerals, visiting sick and distressed brothers, their widows, and orphans, and generally being the spiritual conscience of the lodge. In 2009, the Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of Wisconsin produced The Lodge Chaplain’s Handbook. This eighteen page manual is essential to a Chaplain’s success. It can be downloaded from the Publications section of the Grand Lodge website: http://www.wisc-freemasonry.org There are also publications available at the Grand Lodge site for the Lodge Counselor, and for the Senior Warden. Further details of duties and responsibilities can be found in the Masonic Code and in our own lodge By-laws. Traditions passed down from generation to generation also help define the roles that officers play. For example, in our lodge, it is traditional for the Junior Warden to provide meals before or after stated meetings, as well as for any special events or dinners that are planned by the lodge. The Stewards are expected to assist the Junior Warden in setting up and cleaning up afterwards. In other jurisdictions, the Junior Warden merely supervises the Stewards, who are responsible, not only for set-up and clean-up, but also for providing the meal. Before delving into the nebulous realm of traditions, let’s look at what we have available to us, aside from just the directions given in the lodge rituals, starting with the Code. Chapter 56 of the Wisconsin Masonic Code deals specifically with the duties of the Master. It basically describes the Master as having “absolute” power with some restrictions. As for the duties of the other elected and appointed officers, the code says this: 57.03 Duties. The duties of an officer of a lodge are those which pertain to his office and which are prescribed by the ancient usages of Free Masonry. To find the ancient usages, we can refer back to the ritual work as well as to Rev. James Anderson’s Constitutions and The Ancient Landmarks as expounded by Roscoe Pound and Albert Mackey. Having already listed the duties according to our ritual, we look at what Rev. Anderson has to say about the subject in Chapter V. Of the Management of the Craft in Working: The most expert of the Fellowcraftsmen shall be chosen or appointed the Master, or Overseer of the Lord’s Work; who is to be call’d Master by those that work under him. The Craftsmen are to avoid all ill Language, and to call each other by no disobliging Name, but Brother or Fellow; and to behave themselves courteously within and without the Lodge.

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When a Fellowcraftsman is chosen Warden of the Work under the Master, he shall be true both to Master and Fellows, shall carefully oversee the Work in the Master’s Absence to the Lord’s Profit; and his Brethren shall obey him. All Masons employ’d shall meekly receive their Wages without Murmuring or Mutiny, and not desert the Master til the Work is finish’d. While the Ancient Landmarks have not been officially adopted, as such, by the Grand Lodge of Wisconsin which is the supreme Masonic authority in the state, the Grand Lodge does say it is “subject only to the Ancient Landmarks.” These Landmarks do not spell out the duties of Lodge officers, but do discuss the necessity of a lodge being governed by a Master and two Wardens. However, the eleventh Landmark actually goes into great detail to describe the duties of the Tiler of the Lodge in guarding the door from eavesdroppers. From a study of the various sources discussed thus far, what I have come to realize is that officer duties and responsibilities can vary from lodge to lodge based on traditions passed down in each lodge. One of the best sources for anyone who is considering taking on the responsibility of an office in the Lodge is actually the charges given to the officers, by the Installing Master, during their public installation: TILER Brother Tiler, the sword is placed in the hand of the Tiler to enable him to guard against the approach of cowans and eavesdroppers, and allow none to pass or re-pass except such as are duly qualified. Your duty is purely traditional and largely symbolic; dating back to a time when Masons met in secrecy out of necessity to avoid death or persecution. Masonic principles teach men to be square with each other, and thus we despise deceit and eavesdropping. Since the business conducted in a Masonic meeting today carries no such grave consequences, you are charged with the responsibility of simply preventing those who are unqualified from entering or observing. Your early and punctual attendance will afford the best proof of your zeal for the institution and its heralded traditions. COUNSELOR Brother Counselor, as Counselor, your responsibilities include working with the candidates of the lodge who have been elected for or received degrees. Your goals are to increase the knowledge and understanding of the younger craftsmen in Masonry by teaching the Posting Examinations, Wisconsin Program, and other materials. You are further charged to take a leadership role in the general Masonic educational activities of the lodge. Your diligence and dedication to your expected tasks will be measured through the growth of the lodge and the increased Masonic understanding of its members. STEWARDS Brother Stewards, your duties are generally to assist the Deacons and other Officers in performing their duties. Additionally, you are to see that the tables are properly furnished at the hour of refreshment, and that every brother is suitably provided for. Your regular and early attendance will afford the best proof of your devotion and attachment to the lodge. Your eagerness and steady progress advancing to the Deacons’ chairs will confirm to the


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Vol. XIII No. 6 George Washington 1776 Lodge #337 F&AM Trestle Board October/November 2012

brethren that you are qualified and committed to becoming the next officers. DEACONS Brother Deacons it is your province to attend on the Master and Wardens and to act as their proxies in the active duties of the lodge, such as in the reception of candidates into the degrees of Freemasonry, the introduction and accommodation of visitors, and in the immediate practice of our ritual. Few stations within the lodge have as strong an impact upon its success as the Deacons. New candidates will frame their impressions about your lodge based on the quality of your execution. Your faithful attendance at each meeting is necessary to prepare you for the responsibilities of directing the lodge in the future, as well as to refine and perfect the ritual that is so much a part of your stations and so vital to the future of the lodge. CHAPLAIN Brother Chaplain it is your duty to perform those solemn services, which remind us of our Creator whose spirit is refining our souls, strengthening our virtues, and purifying our minds, that we might fulfill our lives in service to Him, as we serve others in Freemasonry and all people throughout the world. Yours is a most-important office. Since this fraternity shapes and creates the bonds of brotherhood; those lasting friendships which are more family-like than casual, it is your responsibility to console those family members upon the passing of a departed brother, and to lead the Lodge as we pay our respects in honoring him with a Masonic Memorial Service. You also bear the responsibility of keeping all the brethren focused on the Sacred Law which is our Masonic Trestle board; steering and counseling them when their actions, prejudices, and desires infringe upon others; reminding them of their higher duty to the peaceful and harmonious service of God and man. SECRETARY Brother Secretary, it is the Secretary’s duty to observe the will and pleasure of the Worshipful Master in recording the proceedings of the lodge; transmit a copy thereof to the Grand Lodge when requested; to receive all monies paid into the lodge and pay them over to the Treasurer, taking his receipt therefore. Your good inclination to Freemasonry and this lodge will induce you to discharge the duties of your office with fidelity, and by so doing you will merit the esteem of your brethren. TREASURER Brother Treasurer, it is the Treasurer’s duty to receive money paid into the lodge from the hands of the Secretary, keep a just and true account thereof, and pay them out by order of the Worshipful Master and consent of the Lodge. At every meeting you are to report on the income and disbursements of the lodge and a copy of your report shall be submitted to the secretary to be included in the minutes of each meeting. I trust your regard for the Fraternity will prompt you to the faithful discharge of the duties of your office. JUNIOR WARDEN Brother Junior Warden, your jewel is the Plumb, which admonishes us to walk uprightly in our several stations before God and man, to hold the scale of justice in equal balance, to observe

the just medium between intemperance and pleasure, and to make our passions and prejudices coincide with the line of our duty. To you is committed the superintendence of the Craft during the hours of refreshment. You shall act as liaison between the lodge and any related youth groups and shall make periodic reports to the Junior Grand Warden and to your Worshipful Master. Your regular and punctual attendance is particularly requested and I have no doubt you will faithfully perform the duties which pertain to your station. Look well to the South. SENIOR WARDEN Brother Senior Warden, your jewel is the Level which demonstrates that we are to seek the common ground. We use the level to illustrate the compromises necessary to work together and to agree; and, though distinctions among men are necessary, no high station should make us forget that we are brethren. Your regular attendance at our stated communications is essential. In the absence of the Master you are to govern the lodge; in his presence, you are to assist him in the government of it. I firmly rely on your knowledge of Masonry and attachment to the lodge for the faithful discharge of the duties of this important trust. Look well to the West. WORSHIPFUL MASTER The installation of the Worshipful Master takes a different approach. The Installing Master first declares his own opinion of the elected Master: I find him to be of good morals and great skill, true and trusty and as he is a lover of the fraternity wheresoever dispersed over the face of the earth, I am sure he will discharge his duty with fidelity. Then an oath is administered in the form of a series of questions designed to sum up the most obvious responsibilities of the Master and answered in the affirmative. The oath involves agreeing to conform to moral law as well as the laws of the nation; to be courteous and faithful, respect genuine brethren and reject imposters; not admit strangers without credentials, or make a Mason without due inquiry into his character; conform to the Constitution, By-Laws and Edicts of the Lodge and Grand Lodge; approve minutes; attend committees and communications regularly; observe the landmarks; and not recognize an irregular lodge or Mason. The Masonic Code dedicates an entire chapter to listing the duties and responsibilities of the Worshipful Master, while relegating the duties of all other officers into a single short paragraph. The Master is the one who is praised when things go well, and blamed when they go awry. It is understandable in that light, that so much attention should be paid to the duties of the Master of the Lodge. In the May/June 2012 issue of the Surveyor, you will find an excellent article on pages 7-8 about the Lodge Trustees. Part One of the article about the Lodge Secretary is to be found on page 4 in the Summer Issue. If you really want to understand a particular lodge officer’s duties and responsibilities, find a brother who is or has been in that office, and ask him. In other words, “To be one, ask one.”


Vol. XIII No. 6 George Washington 1776 Lodge #337 F&AM Trestle Board October/November 2012

My Cousin, George by Chuck Carroll

George Washington and Political Parties In his Farewell Address, Washington took time to establish his opinion of the role of political parties in the election process. As you will see in the following transcripts of pages 16-18, he was not a fan of the Party system of government. -ed.

“I have already intimated to you the danger of Parties in the State, with particular reference to the founding of them on Geographical discriminations. Let me now take a more comprehensive view, & warn you in the most solemn manner against the baneful effects of the Spirit of Party, generally. “This Spirit, unfortunately, is inseperable from our nature, having its root in the strongest passions of the human Mind. It exists under different shapes in all Governments, more or less stifled, controuled, or repressed; but in those of the popular form it is seen in its greatest rankness and is truly their worst enemy. “The alternate domination of one faction over another, sharpened by the spirit of revenge natural to party dissention, which in different ages & countries has perpetrated the most horrid enormities, is itself a frightful despotism. But this leads at length to a more formal and permanent despotism. The disorders & miseries, which result, gradually incline the minds of men to seek security & repose in the absolute power of an Individual: and sooner or later the chief of some prevailing faction more able or more fortunate than his competitors, turns this disposition to the purposes of his own elevation, on the ruins of Public Liberty. “Without looking forward to an extremity of this kind (which nevertheless ought not to be entirely out of sight) the common & continual mischiefs of the spirit of Party are sufficient to make it the interest and the duty of a wise People to discourage and restrain it. “It serves always to distract the Public Councils and enfeeble the Public Administration. It agitates the Community with ill founded Jealousies and false alarms, kindles the animosity of one part against another, foments occasionally riot & insurrection. It opens the door to foreign influence & corruption, which find a facilitated access to the government itself through the channels of party passions. Thus the policy and the will of one country, are subjected to the policy and –George Washington will of another.” Thanks to the University of Virginia Press for the transcription and document images of George Washington’s Farewell Address. The Papers of George Washington Digital Edition, ed. Theodore J. Crackel, et al, Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, Rotunda, 2007-.

Washington’s Original Farewell Address, pages 16 (above) and 18 (below)

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Vol. XIII No. 6 George Washington 1776 Lodge #337 F&AM Trestle Board October/November 2012

Noteworthy News in and About the Lodge Ashlar Awards Given Out The first ever Ashlar Award presentation at GW1776 Lodge was made by Br. Otto Tesch, PM to Worshipful Master Chuck Carroll and Senior Steward William Hutchins at the Stated Meeting held September 18th. The award recognizes a senior and a junior member of the lodge who are responsible for being mentors to a new brother, guiding him through all three degrees and culminating with his Master Mason posting. The award consists of a certificate and a pin that represents the Perfect Ashlar. The candidate, in this case, Br. Seth Swanson, does not receive a pin, but is encouraged to take up the task of guiding a new brother through the process.

MM Posting Cards Dealt in Lodge Brothers William Hutchins, Seth Swanson, and Wiley Gladney were presented with their Master Mason Posting Cards at the September 18th Stated Meeting. The Masonic Code stipulates that all brothers who have posted in the MM degree are entitled to a Certificate of Proficiency. However, these certificates have not been in use for some time. Early this year, our Lodge Counselor, Br. Walt Smith, PM, suggested that our lodge come up with a card to give out to those who have posted. Br. Smith received such a card from the Michigan Lodge where he was raised. He had asked Br. Seth, who is a wiz at computer art design, to help him design a card, but coincidentally, the Grand Master had the same idea and came up with a card from the Grand Lodge to be distributed to those who post in the MM degree, along with an edict that prevents Wisconsin Freemasons from joining appendant Masonic bodies without first obtaining their MM posting card. These were the first cards to be presented at GW1776 Lodge since the June edict.

Mason of the Year Brother Walt Smith, PM, Counselor, was unanimously proclaimed Mason of the Year at GW1776 at the September 18th Stated Meeting. Brother Walt, a recent recipient of the Ritual Posting Card, has shown great dedication to the Lodge this year. As Lodge Counselor, he faithfully attacked his responsibilities with a determination that is unequaled by all others, taking an active role in the progress of every candidate for the degrees in the lodge.

The first Ashlar Awards for GW1776

Gw1776 Masons Get up to Code Worshipful Master Chuck Carroll was awarded a Diploma of Achievement for Successful Completion of the Masonic Code Correspondence Course, May 15, 2012, along with a pin displaying the course initials with square and compasses. Senior Deacon Tyler Kristopeit has also taken the course and is awaiting the results. Now that they’ve become proficient in the Masonic Code, their next step is to take the Masonic Education Correspondence Course, which is based on the Wisconsin Masonic Handbook, (Green Book). According to the instructions at the beginning of the course: It is the desire of the Grand Lodge that this correspondence course has helped you understand your fraternity better and allowed you to become familiar with the Wisconsin Masonic Handbook. It is further hoped that you will study and research numerous topics in your efforts to become more knowledgeable of the vast and colorful history of our Order. If you would like to learn more about the Masonic Code, log onto the Grand Lodge web site, click on the publications tab and take the course! As King Solomon said, How much better is it to get wisdom than gold! and to get understanding rather to be chosen than silver! --Proverbs 16:16


Vol. XIII No. 6 George Washington 1776 Lodge #337 F&AM Trestle Board October/November 2012

A New Brother (continued from page 1)

Brother Roder is not to be deterred in his quest for Masonic light. On October 2, he came before the brethren of the lodge to post his EA degree and his eloquent answers to the age-old questions put before him made it seem like he was a guest lecturer giving a talk on the meanings of Masonic symbols. Everyone in the lodge was impressed with his performance and it was my honor to confer the FC degree upon him that night. Thus far, Br. Roder has proven to be a feather in the cap of his chief mentor, Br. Joe Fahrenkopf, and has even impressed our worthy counselor, Br. Walt Smith. I look forward to his future progress in the lodge.

Lodge Visitations? We have only visited a fourth of all the lodges in our District since June, which means that we still have 11 more to go in order to achieve the Traveling Lodge award, and only seven months left in which to do it. Any brothers who would like to continue the District 12 journey that we started in July should notify WM Chuck Carroll and let him know that you are interested.

Brother Adam Roder, a new Fellowcraft at GW1776

THE SURVEYOR

THE SURVEYOR

Visit Your Brothers “Charity begins at home,” and this is no less true for us as Masons. Our first duty is to our fellow brothers and we should be visiting our brothers who live in the area but cannot attend lodge for whatever reason. The Committee that overseas visitations is headed by Brothers Frank Nuernberger and Keith Sargeant. Ironically, Brother Frank is one of those who is in need of our visits. If you have an interest in joining others who are making the rounds, call Br. Keith.

More Awards to Give Out We have more awards to hand out to brothers who have been Masons for 25 years and longer. Those who live out of the area will have their awards mailed to them, but those who live nearby, like Jerry Thompson (see story page 1) deserve at least to have a delegation visit them at home and make the proper presentation. If you would like to be one of those who represents our lodge in recognizing our brothers’ service to Masonry, please contact the Worshipful Master.

Vol. XIII No.6 ©2012 George Washington 1776 Lodge #337 F&AM Trestle Board A Bi-Monthly Periodical Established July, 2000 Chuck Carroll, Editor in Chief Barb Carroll, Proof Reader Contributors: Chuck Carroll; Richard Marcus, PM; Frank Nuernberger, PM; Tyler Kristopeit; Barb Carroll Photographers: Chuck Carroll; Tyler Kristopeit; The Surveyor is printed & mailed by Central File Inc., Br. Dan Chaudoir, President. Payment for printing is donated directly to the George Washington Masonic Fund. Silver Spring Masonic Center 517 E. Beaumont Avenue Whitefish Bay, WI 53217

Deadline for submissions for the next issue of The Surveyor: Friday, November 9, 2012

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Vol. XIII No. 6 George Washington 1776 Lodge #337 F&AM Trestle Board October/November 2012

2012 Lodge Officers

Trustees For Information about the Mandatory Monthly Trustee Meetings Contact: One of these trustees

Trustee '12 Chuck Roeder 262-238-0163

Trustee '13 Bob Batchelder 414-678-8785

Trustee '14 David Haase 414-964-4080

George Burgess 414-332-5723

Mark Truesdell 262-332-9444

Walt Smith 414-906-1695

Worshipful Master Charles Carroll 414-336-4252 worshipfulmaster@gw1776.org

Junior Deacon Joseph Fahrenkopf 920-296-3171 juniordeacon@gw1776.org

Senior Warden Frank Nuernberger, PM 414-357-8141 seniorwarden@gw1776.org

Chaplain Otto Tesch, PM 414-445-3537 chaplain@gw1776.org

Junior Warden Keith Sargeant 414-881-7060 juniorwarden@1776.org

Jim Roberts 414-332-8247

November 3 is Election Day at the Lodge Come for the apples, stay for the voting!

Treasurer Charles Roeder, PM 262-238-0162 treasurer@gw1776.org

Senior Steward William Hutchins 262-309-3500 seniorsteward@gw1776.org Junior Steward Brian Bromberek 414-467-8377 juniorsteward@gw1776.org

Secretary Dave Haase, PM 414-964-4080 secretary@gw1776.org

Counselor Walt Smith, PM 414-906-1695 counselor@gw1776.org

Senior Deacon Tyler Kristopeit 608-346-0066 seniordeacon@gw1776.org

Tiler James Roberts, PM 414-332-8247 tiler@gw1776.org

Lodge Web Site: WWW.GW1776.ORG Lodge Phone Number: 414-979-1776

"The Surveyor": October/November 2012  

"The Surveyor" is the official Publication/Trestleboard of George Washington 1776 Lodge #337 Free and Accepted Masons in Whitefish Bay, Wisc...

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