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Inside

October

in every issue 6 GVParent.com

On the Web in October

8 Editor’s Note

Vol.18 Number 10

SPECIAL TWEEN & TEEN FOCUS Many of our articles this month have a special tween and teen focus. Find this seal on feature stories and department pieces that highlight information about raising tweens and teens.

12 Short Takes

Reviews & News

28 Book Nook Farm Fun

30 Parenting –

TEENS & TWEENS

32 Parenting –

TEENS & TWEENS

Oh, That Tangled Web Teens Weave Bulb Fiction: The Truth About Teens & Tanning Beds

34 Your Family –

HEALTH

Tips for Back-to-School Nutrition

36 Your Family –

ACTIVITIES

Make a Date! Fun Activities for Parents to Do With Their Teens

38 Dear Dave

Sibling Rivalries

40 Try This!

Extreme Couponing

42 Parent to Parent

Head-Wound Hayden

46 Calendar of Events • • • • •

Family-Friendly Events Support Groups & Clubs Ongoing Events & Exhibits Halloween Events Autumn & Fall Fun Events

62 Out & About

Take a Hike! Stony Brook State Park

feature articles

12 Totally Tween

TIPS FOR DEALING WITH YOUR IN-BETWEENER

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Modern Families Part II – Modern Fathering

22 A Story of Survival A LOCAL BREAST CANCER SURVIVOR SHARES HER STORY

24

New Faces at the Rochester Children’s Book Festival

on the cover Totally Tween 12 A Story of Survival 22 Modern Fathering 16 Awesome Autumn Fun 28, 44-59, 62 New Faces at the Rochester Children’s Book Festival 24 Teens & Tanning Beds 32 Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • October 2011

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[ what’s online ]

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Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • October 2011

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[ editor’s note]

By Jillian Melnyk

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hile I love the summer, in the recent years, autumn has been making a play to take the lead as my favorite season. It has so much going for it! It's not too hot and not too cold, there are fresh apples and pumpkins ripe for the picking, crisp leaves, football, events and activities, and tons of delicious food. Really, what more could you ask for?

This month our calendar of events is loaded up with great autumn events and activities to keep your family busy before the blustery winter days roll in. Go out and visit a local farm, take a hike at a local park and check out the fall foliage, or stroll along the canal‌ savor it while you can because we all know how quickly winter approaches! October has always been our unofficial teen and tween issue, keeping with tradition this month we have many great articles that offer a teen and tween focus to help you raise your older kids. Whether it's taking them out on a "date" to spend quality time together or navigating tricky social issues, I hope our information guides you towards success. I'm also pleased to welcome a new column to our magazine – one penned by yours truly – in which I act as your guinea pig and try out new things all in the sake of research. Last month I took a stab at couponing. See how I fared and learn how to serve me up a challenge by checking out our newest column "Try This!" on page 40. As always, if there's something you would like to see featured in an upcoming issue of our magazine, I would love to hear from you! Send me an email to Editor@GVParent.com.

See you next month!

Jillian WHAT’S ON YOUR MIND? I WOULD LOVE TO HEAR FROM YOU! SEND ME AN EMAIL TO EDITOR@GVPARENT.COM

Tweet! Tweet! Tweet! Genesee Valley Parent is on Twitter! Follow us at

www.twitter.com/GVParentMag

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PUBLISHER Barbara Melnyk mail@gvparent.com EDITOR Jillian Melnyk editor@gvparent.com GENERAL MANAGER Carol Harvey Caro@gvparent.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Cynthia Goldberg, Carol Harvey, Natalee Kiesling MAGAZINE LAYOUT & DESIGN Jillian Melnyk graphics@gvparent.com CALENDAR EDITOR calendar@gvparent.com OFFICE ADMIN Danielle Street office@gvparent.com WEB DESIGN SUPPORT Matt Peltier CONTRIBUTING WRITERS John Boccacino Hayden Freeman Myra Beth Haskell Karen Higman Malia Jacobson Dave Latona Sinea Pies Vicki Shultz

Have a safe and happy Halloween!



Staff

Basic subscription rate: $25/year. Send subscription inquiries and changes to address below. Copyright 2011, by GVP, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. Distribution of this magazine does not necessarily constitute an endorsement or necessarily reflect the opinions of this publication.

Genesee Valley Parent Magazine 266 Alexander Street, Rochester, NY 14607 p: 585-287-5330 f: 585-287-5344 www.gvparent.com

MEMBER OF PARENTING MEDIA ASSOCIATION


Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • October 2011

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[short takes ] treat time The candy aisle is not your only option for serving up decadent delights this holiday. Whip up this ghoulish graveyard goody for the kids (or the kids at heart) in your house.

On SATURDAY, OCTOBER 8 from 8am-12pm, Highland Breast Imaging, in conjunction with the Breast Cancer Coalition of Rochester and the Cancer Services Program of Monroe County, are celebrating Breast Cancer Awareness month by offering FREE MAMMOGRAMS TO WOMEN 40 AND OLDER who do not have health insurance or their health insurance does not cover mammograms. Thanks to a generous donation from the Breast Cancer Coalition of Rochester, a Nurse Practitioner will be available to perform clinical breast exams for women who have not had one during the past year. Call Highland Breast Imaging at 487-3300 to make an appointment in advance. Women who cannot make the screening day can be scheduled for a different day. Highland Breast Imaging is located at 500 Red Creek Drive, Suite 130, Rochester, NY 14623.

Find additional Halloween tips & activity ideas online at GVParent.com

Spooky Graveyard Pie

Makes 8 servings

• 3 cups (about 32 cookies) finely ground chocolate sandwich cookie crumbs, divided • 3 tablespoons melted butter • 1 can (12 fl. oz.) Nestlé Carnation Evaporated Milk • 2 large egg yolks • 2 tablespoons cornstarch • 1 3/4 cups (11.5-oz. pkg.) Nestlé Toll House Milk Chocolate Morsels • 8 chocolate filled vanilla wafer cookies • Black and purple decorator writing gels • Wonka SweeTARTS Spooky Gummies Candy (found in bags of Wonka Haunted Mix), Wonka SweeTARTS Skulls & Bones, or other assorted spooky Halloween candies • Nestlé Butterfinger and Nestlé Crunch candy bars, crumbled • COMBINE 1 1/2 cups cookie crumbs and butter in 9-inch deep-dish pie plate. Press crumb mixture onto bottom and upsides of pie plate. Set aside remaining 1 1/2 cups crumbs for dirt topping. • WHISK together evaporated milk, egg yolks and cornstarch in medium saucepan. Heat over medium-low heat, stirring constantly, until mixture is very hot and thickens slightly; do not boil. Remove from heat; stir in morsels until completely melted and mixture is smooth. • POUR into crust. Sprinkle with remaining 1 1/2 cups cookie crumbs. Press crumbs down gently. Refrigerate for 3 hours or until set. • DECORATE cookie tombstones (wafer cookies) as desired with writing gels. Sprinkle crumbled candy bar topping over the top of the pie. Insert tombstones around edge of pie. With spoon, mound cookie crumbs to form "fresh graves." Decorate graves with gummies and Skulls & Bones to make the pie as spooky as you want it to be!

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free screening

know a great family-run business? The Emmy Award-winning television series Biz Kid$ is on the hunt for an outstanding family-run business. The winning family will be profiled on an upcoming episode on the show. Businesses must have been in operation for at least one year and be a family enterprise. At least one of the kids involved in the business must be 22 years old or younger and play an active role in the company. Corporations, sole proprietorships, partnerships, co-ops or franchise models are all acceptable forms of businesses. Businesses will be judged by the uniqueness of their stories, visual appeal, how kids are involved with the business, and how well their story fits into the episode, 'All In The Family'. Application deadline: October 14, 2011 Learn more at http://bizkids.com/contest


turn it down! The National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders of the National Institutes of Health estimates that approximately 15 PERCENT OF AMERICANS BETWEEN THE AGES OF 20 AND 69 HAVE HIGH-FREQUENCY HEARING LOSS due to exposure to loud sounds or noise at work or in leisure activities. Additionally, the incidence of hearing loss among adolescents has increased in recent years, due largely to the use of earbuds with personal listening devices and video games. Sound levels in earbuds can exceed 120 decibels – well beyond the maximum safe level of 85 decibels. According to a study published last year in the Journal of the American Medical Association, ALMOST 20% OF CHILDREN AGES 12 TO 19 HAVE SUFFERED SIGNIFICANT HEARING LOSS, putting them at risk for social and academic problems. Rochester Hearing & Speech Center (RHSC) recently announced a new public service campaign, Too Loud? Not Allowed, to educate people about the issue. The campaign includes public service messages by spokespersons Monroe County Sheriff Patrick O'Flynn and former alpine skier and Olympic medallist Dianna Roffe, as well as free noise awareness brochures and educational materials (like the one featured above.) Parents can protect their kids' hearing by swapping their old earbuds for safer versions. RHSC's HearTech Center offers a range of hearing protection devices including Kidzsafe™ earbuds for safe use of personal music and game systems. To learn more visit www.rhsc.org

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • October 2011

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y l l a t to tween tips for dealing with your in-betweener By Karen Higman

T

here is no specific age at which a child becomes a teenager. Is it age thirteen? Is it when your child can drive a car or enters high school? There is now a term for the transition period between childhood and being a teenager: tween. The generally accepted age range is about age 9 to 13 (that in-between time after childhood but before the teenage years). The important thing for parents to know is not if their child is officially a tween, but how to handle the behaviors and situations that will arise during this transitional time – especially nowadays when the issues they face are complex and sometimes frightening.

Put Yourself in Their Shoes SPECIAL TWEEN & TEEN FOCUS 12

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Even if it has been many years since you were your child's age, you can undoubtedly still sympathize with his or her feelings. Don't feel that just because technology has changed since you were a tween that the pressures are any different. The difference is that these pressures come earlier than they did when you were in middle school. For example, your son or daughter may be struggling to fit at the school lunch table at age 9 or 10 years old rather


growing up too fast? Do you feel like 10-year-olds are now looking like 16year-olds? You aren't alone. So who is to blame for the premature leap into adulthood that we see with so many tweens? Many experts believe that it is driven by commercial marketing since tweens today have over $50 billion in spending power. Psychotherapist and Today Show contributor Dr. Robi Ludwig says that media images certainly push kids into adult roles and influence what they think is "normal." With all the money they have to spend marketing items to our kids and the face time they get with them through television and the Internet, can parents compete with this messaging? "Definitely," declares Dr. Ludwig. "Parents need to understand that they still have the biggest role and use that power to help set guidelines and boast the self-esteem of their child. Your child may not always act like it, but they still care a lot about what you say."

than at 13 or 14. However, the underlying feelings and emotions are still the same and may include embarrassment, selfconsciousness, fear, or loneliness. Try to remember what it was like when you were walking down the hall at school and a group of girls started whispering about you and laughing. Now translate it to your daughter who may log on her Facebook page and see a classmate making fun of the outfit she wore to school. The vehicles that kids use may have changed – Facebook, cell phones, texting – but the emotions are the same. Remember that when you are talking to your child and tap into those feelings.

Being a Tween in 2011 Although the emotions are the same, the fact is that our children are growing up in a different world than we did, and the differences must be acknowledged and addressed. Adolescents have always been greatly influenced by their friends, but today our kids have the ability to be in 24/7 contact with their friends. It's a world of continual and instant communication for your child (think CNN for news-junkie adults) and it is up to you to set the limits. It was certainly easier for our moms and dads to restrict the use of the home phone when it was attached to the wall in the kitchen. But today's parents should not be afraid to tell their children that cell phones need to be turned off by 9 pm or, if needed, to take their phones away until the morning. The same can be said about computers and the Internet. Remember these are only tools and parents should not be intimidated by them or the distraction and threat they could pose to their children. As a parent you need to be proactive and learn everything you can about every technology that is available to your son or daughter. You cannot effectively work on your child's behalf and properly guide your tween's behavior if you don't know what they are doing. If you do not know about Facebook, texting, and Twitter then educate yourCONTINUED >>> Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • October 2011

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self on how they are used and the various parental guards and controls that you can activate and install, both for your child's safety and to be more informed about their life. Beyond the controls that a parent can utilize, it is critical to work with your tween and try to secure permission from them to get more involved in their cyber life. Tell your child that they must "friend" you on Facebook so that you can check their page periodically to see what they are saying or what types of pictures they are posting. Don't abuse the privilege and be aware that some behavior that you think is "sweet" or "helpful" may be embarrassing to a tween. For example, you can read their Facebook page, but talk to your child personally rather than posting a message or answering a text that they receive from a friend. While they might have enjoyed a public display of affection from you a year or two earlier, even a positive act – like congratulating them on a good game on their Facebook Wall – may now be viewed by your son or daughter as embarrassing. In order to establish trust, it is important not to react to everything you see or hear. If you see a negative pattern of behavior or something is threatening, then you need to act, but most situations call for a "watch and wait" approach.

Forming a Bond & Getting Involved Whether your child is 9 or 14, nothing takes the place of spending time with your child and knowing what is important to them. During the tween years, your child will probably want to spend less time with you and with their family. This is an age-appropriate behavior and is part of establishing independence. Although your son or daughter may not want to participate in family game night anymore, there are still opportunities to form a bond and be a part of your child's life. One excellent opportunity might be when you are driving your child to school or an activity or sports practice. In the confines of a car, you may discover the quiet time you need to reconnect with your child. According to nationally-known psychotherapist Dr. Robi Ludwig, "When you talk to your child, don't make them feel wrong all of the time. They actually do want you to be proud of them, and it's still important to validate their positive behavior and explain why bad choices will put them in a negative light at school or in the community." If kids look like 18-years old, then Dr. Ludwig says that they might be treated by others that way, even though they aren't emotionally ready for that kind of pressure.

You are In Control Although it will sometimes seem like your tween child is calling all of the shots, it is very important that you remember that YOU are the person who is in control of every situation. As the parent in the household, it is up to you to act like an adult no matter how crazy or volatile things become. Try to keep your voice at a normal level even if your son or daughter is yelling. If your argument is getting out of hand, it is okay to tell your child that you each need to stop for a moment and take a deep breath. Try to stabilize the situation before moving forward. It is up to you to set the right example as both a parent and a grown-up. That includes using appropriate language and curbing or eliminating any personal behaviors that do not show you in a good light to your child, or are harmful (drinking, smoking). That is not to say that you can't be a good role model and parent if you have a glass of wine with dinner or

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use a harsh word if you stub your toe in front of your kids. However, you must understand that actions speak louder than words – especially to a judgmental and impressionable tween – so choose your actions wisely.



Karen Higman is a contributing writer to Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine. She is a fund-raising consultant for non-profit organizations who lives in the Rochester, NY area.

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • October 2011

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modern fathering

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{

PART 2 OF 3 Find the next installment of “Modern Family” in the November issue

By John Boccacino

}

meet the illustrator

W

hen it comes to raising a family in America, most recent generations have experienced sweeping changes involving the role of the parent in child-rearing. Back in the 1950s, when "Leave it to Beaver" typified mainstream American society, the role of primary caregiver for a child predominantly fell to the mother, who was almost automatically expected, based on societal norms, to handle the duties of changing diapers, cooking the meals and cleaning up after the children. While mom was home raising the family, the father was bearing the responsibility of being the primary bread-winner, providing food, shelter and income for his family. Fast forward to the decades of the 1980s and 1990s, a time when more and more children were being raised in single-parent households, thanks to a spike in the number of couples getting divorced. But even in two-parent families not affected by divorce, it was still predominantly the mother who would embrace the role as primary caregiver for the children. Yes, more and more wives were holding down jobs, but the husband was still expected to be the primary job-holder while the wife dealt with the parenting. Not anymore, according to some interesting national data pertaining to modern day parenting. The trend over the last decade shows that more and more fathers are embracing their roles as caregivers, to the point that the sheer number of stay-at-home fathers – dad's whose primary responsibility is to ensure the proper upbringing of his children – has grown by as much as 60 percent since 2004, according to research conducted by NBC News in 2008. The latest US Census figures, from 2010, reflect there are roughly 154,000 stay-at-home dads living in America. But that census figure can be misleading, since the survey characterizes a father as being of the stay-at-home variety only if he "hasn't earned any income or looked for work" in the last year. To reflect a more accurate statistic, the national advocacy group Daddyshome, Inc., a non-profit corporation that according to its website (daddyshome.org) aims to "provide support, education and advocacy for fathers who are the primary caregivers of their children," recalculated the number of stay-at-home fathers. According to the 2010 Census report on childcare arrangements, roughly 25 percent of the 11.3 million American children under the age of five receive their care from their father while the mother

CONTINUED >>>

Not only does the illustration that accompanies this article capture some of the essence of fathering, but it was created by local single dad and cartoonist Matt Smeltzer. The illustration is part of Matt's newest line of comics, 'Daddy's Girl.' Matt, a Webster resident, shares some of the inspiration behind his comic and his experiences being a single dad:

How did you come up with the name 'Daddy's Girl'? I like to

think of names for my comics that readers will remember. And a name that captures the essence of the comic is always a plus.

Where do you get your inspiration for your comics? Do you

draw from real life experiences? I absolutely draw from real life. Creating this comic was one of those turning lemons into lemonade moments. Being a single dad brought many difficult situations. Some of those struggles were so ridiculous, they just made me laugh. As I shared the experiences with others, I found that it made them laugh too. Humor has a great way of healing difficult situations.

Are the characters based on you and your daughter? The two

main characters (Curtis and Riley) are based on us. Rayna (who is 13) loves the comic and often gives me funny scenarios to draw. She has a great sense of humor.

Can you share a story that led to inspiration for one of your comics? One of my favorite examples is how Rayna and I shop together. We often look at the clock in the car before we go into Wegmans so that we can time ourselves racing

through the store to get what we need. Shopping has never been so much fun. But those darn free samples always slow me down. They're kind of like my kryptonite.

How long have you been illustrating?

Being a cartoonist has been a dream of mine since I was in grade school. I use to go door to door trying to sell my comics. As I grew, the passion for cartooning grew with me. So I guess the answer would be…all my life.

What do you like to do when you're not drawing? I really love to

teach. Be it after school animation classes, art lessons, or Rayna's Sunday school class. I also like playing basketball and eating burritos.

What's your favorite part about drawing?

Definitely designing characters is my favorite part. I love capturing expressions and exaggerating features.

Any words of wisdom for other dads?

1. Lead by example. 2. Treat each moment with your children as a treasure. Matt is currently looking to syndicate his comic and readers can also find additional illustrations from Matt in future issues of Genesee Valley Parent.

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • October 2011

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THE TUMMINELLI FAMILY – DEBBIE, CHRIS & LANDON

Babies’ brains won’t grow by themselves.

Sing to your baby.

Talk to your baby. Play with your baby.

earns a living. Operating under the assumption that each of those stay-at-home dads is caring for an average of two children, based on statistics about the average number of children in an American family, the group projects roughly 1.5 million American fathers are of the stay-at-home variety. One main statistic continues to carry significant weight when discussing the rise in stay-at-home fathers: according to the 2010 Census figures, the number of men electing stay-at-home fatherhood over holding down a full-time occupation has spiked by roughly 60 percent from 2004-2008, the most-recent figures used by the Census. The Census' stance that stay-at-home fathers are those who haven't earned income or looked for work in the past year might be the purest way to define a stay-at-home father, but with the challenging economic times of today, it isn't the fairest way to characterize a stay-at-home father, says Chris Tumminelli, who along with several other Rochester fathers started a support group called D.A.D.S. (Dads Appreciating Down Syndrome) to offer support and assistance for area fathers raising children with Down's Syndrome.

Having a father who is active and involved will benefit the child now and when they are older; and as for me, I'm a better person for being a stay-at-home father. I have more patience, more love and more respect for life. I just want to give everything I have to Landon; he's my number one priority!" — Chris Tumminelli

Call 292-BABY SUPPORT FOR YOU

AND YOUR BABY.

Space donated to the Ad Council as a public service of this publication. ©2011 Ad Council Rochester. All rights reserved.

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With families feeling the pinch of this difficult economy, both Tumminelli and his wife, Debbie, hold down steady employment, but it is Chris who would be classified as the primary care-giver, since he takes care of his son Landon during the day before heading off to his job as an engineering technician with Harris Corp. When Chris heads off to work, Debbie,


who works as a radiologic technician for Borg & Ide Imaging, takes over watching and caring for Landon, 4, who was diagnosed as having Down's Syndrome when he was born. While this situation has caused some issues for the Tumminelli's ("my wife and I rarely see each other during the week, maybe 10-15 minutes a day Monday through Thursday," says Chris), it has also served as a blessing when it comes to bringing up Landon. Thanks to some creative scheduling, there is always a parent around to care for Landon, and both Chris and Debbie have off Friday through Sunday. "It's not the 1950s and the days of the 'Leave it to Beaver', where the mother would stay at home and provide care for her children while the husband earned a living are long gone," says Chris, whose family resides in Webster. "Men have to play a bigger role in raising a child," Chris adds. "My wife and I work opposite schedules, but I'm home during the day and she's home in the afternoon so it works out great. For four days, we sacrifice and my wife and I don't get to see each other much, but then Friday rolls around and we have the best weekends ever. We have plenty of time to do some great stuff together as a family, and it's really reassuring to know that every day our child has both parents taking on an active role in his upbringing."

“

It was terrifying at times, but once my son arrived and I held him in my arms I had no doubts about the decision my wife and I had made. Being a stay-at-home dad is not something I'm doing until something better comes along; I am a stay-at-home dad. It's what I am and what I do." — Scott Morgan When he was growing up, Chris remembers his mother handling the bulk of the child-rearing duties, and said he couldn't recall his father ever changing one of his diapers. Now whenever Chris and Landon head out for one of their favorite activities, an afternoon at the Seneca Park Zoo, in addition to checking out the latest animal exhibits, Chris and his father counterparts can be seen changing their children's diapers in the zoo's bathrooms. "The role of fathers has definitely changed, especially from when I was a child," says the 40-year-old Chris. "Back in that day it wasn't uncommon for the father to not even be present in the delivery room, and the mother was literally doing everything while the father worked and provided for his family," he adds. "Having a father who is active and involved will benefit the child now and when they are older; and as for me, I'm a better person for being a stay-at-home father. I have more patience, more love and more respect for life. I just want to give everything I have to Landon; he's my number one priority!" Scott Morgan is another of the growing number of men who classify themselves as a stay-at-home father. Scott and his wife, Julie, have two boys, Brady, 6, and Chase, 1, and while Scott definitely envisions a day when he rejoins the workforce, he is currently more than satisfied with the stay-at-home dad title. When Julie became pregnant, Scott planned on staying home during the day when Julie was working, and then Julie would watch Brady while Scott was at night classes for his graduCONTINUED >>> Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • October 2011

19


ate program. However, within a year of Brady's arrival, Morgan quit graduate school, "not because I was giving up anything, but because in being a stay-at-home dad, I was happy for the first time in many years," says Scott, whose family resides in Fairport. "Although I had many doubts about my ability to be a good father, it was a relief to be headed down a completely different road," he says. "It was terrifying at times, but once my son arrived and I held him in my arms I had no doubts about the decision my wife and I had made. Being a stay-at-home dad is not something I'm doing until something better comes along; I am a stay-at-home dad. It's what I am and what I do." Being a stay-at-home father, like holding down a full-time job, does have its share of challenges and trying times. Scott says he has grown frustrated over the lack of support groups in Rochester for stay-at-home fathers. While Scott and his wife feel comfortable relying on each other for their various parenting questions/concerns, he wishes there was a support group consisting of area stay-at-home fathers, a place where these dads could gather, swap parenting stories and help each other through the assorted challenges they face. "I knew that I'd be in the minority as a stay-at-home dad, but I don't think I would ever have thought back then that it would have been this difficult to find support," says Scott, who expects a continued spike in the number of stay-at-home dads in the future as more and more men realize that raising a child can be a rewarding full-time occupation, not just something temporary until a better "real" job comes along. "Being a stay-at-home dad is literally the most difficult thing I have ever done in my life, but it is without question also the most rewarding, and there's nothing I'd rather be doing than raising our son." For more information on D.A.D.S, (Dads Appreciating Down Syndrome), or to get involved, visit www.dadsroc.com. Chris says the group currently has 40 fathers enrolled and is always looking for more dedicated fathers. The group provides support and friendship through group outings and guest speakers to fathers dealing with raising a special needs child, and belongs to a national organization called DADSnational, located in Indianapolis, IN.



John Boccacino is a freelance writer living in Webster, NY who reported on sports and local news for more than 6 1/2 years with the Democrat and Chronicle newspaper. Boccacino is a Brighton native who enjoys reporting on a wide variety of topics. To comment on this story email our Editor at Editor@GVParent.com with subject line “Modern Dads.�

find part 3 of “modern families� in the november issues of GVP! Featuring... Same-sex couples & adoptive famillies To contribute to this upcoming story, email our editor at Editor@GVParent.com 20

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Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • October 2011

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a story of

survival october is breast cancer awareness month

By Jillian Melnyk

A

ccording to Breastcancer.org, a non-profit organization dedicated to providing information and support for those touched by the disease, approximately 1 in 8 women in the United States will develop breast cancer in her lifetime. And as of 2010, there were 2.5 million breast cancer survivors in the United States. Linda Ross of Fairport is one of those women.

Linda, now 52, was diagnosed 19 years ago. At the time she was five months pregnant. "I found the lump myself," she says. She went to her doctor with concerns and because of her pregnancy her doctor believed that the lump was most likely a blocked milk duct. Linda knew that wasn't the case, however. "My mother and sister already were breast cancer survivors," Linda says. "I just knew it was cancer." Linda's intuition was backed up by facts. According to Breastcancer.org, a woman's risk of breast cancer approximately doubles if she has a first-degree relative – a mother, sister, or daughter – who has been diagnosed with breast cancer; and 20-30% of women diagnosed with breast cancer have a family history of breast cancer. Once a biopsy confirmed breast cancer, Linda's doctor advised her to terminate her pregnancy (because her baby would not survive chemotherapy treatments), have surgery and begin chemo. "I knew this was not an option," Linda says. Her first pregnancy had ended with a stillborn baby at five months and she was determined to give her now 9month-old son a sibling. Instead, Linda chose to have the mastectomy surgery while she was five months pregnant and carry her baby full term. "I have a healthy daughter

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According to Breastcancer.org, a woman's risk of breast cancer approximately doubles if she has a firstdegree relative – a mother, sister, or daughter – who has been diagnosed with breast cancer.

because I was an advocate of what care was best for me," she says. She delivered a healthy baby girl (Kristi, who is now 19 years old), was able to nurse her daughter for a month, and then began chemotherapy treatments. Linda says that during the difficult times during her pregnancy she relied on support. "My husband, Stan, was my rock that gave strength and my son and unborn child gave me the courage," she says. Beginning chemotherapy treatments only a month after giving birth was a challenge as well. "Having a newborn and a 14 month while undergoing chemo was exhausting!" Linda admits. During those days she relied on the support of family and friends. "I was able to calculate when my lowest days would be for my white blood cell count which would also be my weakest day. Family and friends were a help and I realized it was okay to ask for assistance." Linda says being a cancer survivor has influenced how she views motherhood. "I felt it was unfair to go through this with such young children," she says of undergoing the exhausting treatments. "But my children made me realize it was all worth it

at the same time." Linda says the experience has made her realize how important life is and she has done her best to enjoy each moment. "I tried to have my children experience many opportunities and to teach them to become strong independent individuals." Both of her children are now grown and attending college in Florida. Today, Linda is an advocate for breast cancer survivors and shares her story in hopes of inspiring others. For the past three years she has been a committee member for the Fairport Relay for Life, an event for the American Cancer Society that celebrates those who have survived cancer, remembers those who have lost their fight, and raises money for the cause. Linda spoke at last year's event where she shared her story with the group. She says if it were not for early detection she wouldn't be here today. "Self examinations and early detection is so important to being a survivor," she says. "I am now a 19 year breast cancer survivor and it is because of early detection." Linda stresses that it's important to be your own advocate and know your body. Her words of advice to other women who are facing cancer? "It is okay to say 'This stinks!' Then you find the strength within yourself and from friends and family and you do it because you can!"



Jillian Melnyk is the Editor of Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine. To comment on this story email her at Editor@GVParent.com

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • October 2011

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new faces at the rochester children’s

book festival

AUTHOR MICHELLE KNUDSEN WITH A YOUNG READER

S

oon after the Rochester area bids goodbye to brilliant fall foliage, and watches the last southbound migration of summer birds, a brief but bright migration comes to the Genesee Valley. The Rochester Children's Book Festival (RCBF) attracts well-known writers and illustrators of children’s books from as far away as California. Children attending the festival get a chance to talk with the authors and illustrators of their favorite books. This is a two-way street, because the professionals enjoy the rare treat of having conversations with their readers. 24

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Each year, the RCBF organizers invite a select group of children's book creators from outside the area to introduce Rochester readers to new faces. This year, the list includes some exciting new names, known not only for the high quality of their books, but also for their reputations as dynamic speakers.

Brooklyn author/illustrators, TED AND BETSY LEWIN, are the only husband and wife to each win a Caldecott Honor for separate books, and each has had a book on the NY Times 10 Best Illustrated list. Their love and enthusiasm for wildlife and world travel is so contagious, that a trip through one of their collaborative picture books transports the reader to faraway places. It took the Lewins two trips to India to develop the story of Balarama; A Royal Elephant. When the Lewins read about the legendary child jockeys – some as young as seven – who race horses in the Mongolian summer festival, they had to go to Mongolia to see for themselves. That resulted in another exciting collaboration, Horse Song; The Naadam of Mongolia. When you listen to Ted and Betsy tell about what they've seen in their travels, you'll want to book a flight for yourself.

PHOTO BY EVERARD WILLIAMS JR.

California poet, HOPE ANITA SMITH, started off with a bang by winning the Coretta Scott King New Talent Award with her first book, The Way a Door Closes. She also received the Claudia Lewis Award from Bank Street College. All three of her books have received the Myra Cohn Livingston Award for a distinguished book of poetry. But the awards aren't the most important things about Hope's books. It's the way she can connect with the heart of the reader through experiences that are personal and universal at the same time. Don't miss the chance to hear this warm and exciting speaker.

For the older readers in the area, RCBF is bringing in Massachusettts author, ELLEN WITTLINGER. Ellen has received a Printz Honor award from the American Library Association, a Lambda Literary Award, and several state book awards. Her novel, Hard Love, was named by YALSA as one of the 100 Best of the Best YA books for the 21st century. Ellen explores tough teen issues with skill and sensitivity in books such as Love and Lies, Parrotfish, and Sandpiper. Ellen will be talking about her new book, This Means War, which is set against the background of the 1962 Cuban Missile crisis.

The Rochester Children's Book Festival is Saturday, November 5th from 10am-4pm at Monroe Community College

Young readers who are fans of the enormously popular Biscuit series will be thrilled to find ALYSSA SATIN CAPUCILLI at the Rochester Children's Book Festival this year. That adorable puppy came from Alyssa's imagination, inspired partly by her own dog, Huckleberry. Alyssa says she gets many ideas from the long morning walks she and Huckleberry take in the woods. Alyssa will be reading Katy Duck is a Caterpillar from her series about Katy, the dancing duck.

CONTINUED >>>

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • October 2011

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MARY DOWNING HAHN

AUTHOR-ILLUSTRATOR DAVID SOMAN AUTOGRAPHS A COPY OF LADYBUG GIRL.

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Maryland author, MARY DOWNING HAHN, is a master at writing compelling mysteries and ghost stories that make readers want to keep turning the pages, even though they're afraid of what's coming next. Many of her books are steeped in wellresearched history, which brings the past alive for even the most reluctant readers. Mary has won the Mystery Writers of America Edgar Award, The Scott O'Dell Award for Historical Fiction, and state reading awards in 25 states. She'll be speaking about her ghostly protagonists in “Ghosts: From Helen to Sophia.� Award-winning Missouri author/illustrator, CHERYL HARNESS, gets kids excited about history with her picture books. The historical characters in her intricate illustrations seemingly burst off the page, eager to tell their stories. Cheryl has a book with local Rochester connections – The Amazing, Impossible Erie Canal – which details the construction and workings of this remarkable waterway. Another Missouri resident, poet and picture book author DAVID L. HARRISON has a long list of awards, including many Children's Choice and state reading awards. David Harrison's poetry books are meant to be read aloud. And when you read a Harrison poem to a child, it's impossible to keep your foot from tapping. The rollicking rhythms and perfect rhymes give kids an appreciation for the way excellent poetry should sound. They don't even know they're learning something, because it's funny and fun. But as kids know, fun is the best way to learn. In addition to these new faces, some of the popular authors who will be returning to the festival this year are Jane Yolen, James Howe, Cynthia DeFelice, Bruce Coville, Suzanne Bloom, and Tedd Arnold. Festival attendees will also find nationally-published Rochester authors, Vivian Vande Velde, Robin Pulver, Mary Jane and Herm Auch, Marsha Hayles, and Will Hubbell. For a complete list of festival authors and illustrators, please visit www.rochesterchildrensbookfestival.org




Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • October 2011

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[ book nook ]

By Jillian Melnyk

Fun on the Farm Autumn is the perfect time for a trip to the farm. But while you are picking apples and selecting your pumpkin, don't forget to say hello to some of your favorite animal friends like the chickens, cows, and goats. These books celebrate farm fun and will have your little ones mooing and clucking in no time.

Animal Crackers Fly the Coop

Chicken Big By Keith Graves Chronicle Books, 2010, $16.99, hardcover Ages 5-8

By Kevin O'Malley Walker & Company, 2010, $16.99, hardcover Ages 4-8

It all starts with a teeny-tiny egg‌ which turns into a big, humongous chick. But the sight of a humorously large chick confuses the chickens in the coop who are certain his enormous size means he must be anything but a chicken - an elephant, umbrella or sweater, perhaps? Hilariously funny and with spot-on dialog between the not-so-bright chickens, this book is ideal for reading aloud. The illustrations are vibrant and add extra oomph to an already comical story.

Hogwash! Written by Karma Wilson & Illustrated by Jim McMullan Little, Brown and Company, 2011, $16.99, hardcover Ages 4-7 Hen would rather be a stand up comedi-hen than end up as Friday's dinner, which is where she's destined to be since she hasn't been laying any eggs of late. To save her feathers Hen decides to fly the coop. On the road she meets up with a band of other aspiring comedians (Dog, Cat, and Cow) in this reimagining of "The Brementown Musicians," a Grimm Brothers' fairytale. Full of one-liners and zingers, this book is full of amusement and a marvelous contemporary take on the classic.

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It's cleaning day on the farm and all the farmer has left are the hogs. No problem, right? Of course the feisty hogs don't want to be washed, so they board up their pen, stomp through the mud, and refuse to let the farmer in. But he'll stop at nothing to get the job done, even if it means dressing up as the pizza man in an attempt to fool the pigs or filling his crop dust plane with shampoo. Told in rhyme, the story is quick-paced and sure to induce laughs.

Little Pink Pup By Johanna Kerby G.P. Putnam's Sons, 2010, $16.99, hardcover Ages 3-5 Meet Pink – she's different from her friends and her foster mom because unlike them, she's not a Dachshund, she's a pig. Pink was born as the runt of the litter and bullied by her siblings, so she was brought inside the farm house where she was immediately adopted by the family dog, Tink, who "licked him and fed him and tucked him in close." This charming true story tells Pink's tale with real photographs as accompaniment.


MORE READS The Loopy Coop Hens By Janet Morgan Stoeke Dutton Children's Books, 2011, $16.99, hardcover Ages 3-5 Hens, Midge, Pip, and Dot, live on Loopy Coop Farm and want nothing more than to learn how to fly. They try hard but attempts at flying always end in Midge, Pip, and Dot face-down in the dirt. They know flying is possible because Rooster Sam does it. How else could he get up to the top of the barn to crow each morning? But the ladies are in for a big surprise after they decide to spy on Sam. Illustrations are clean, colorful, and engaging and complement the simple text that is perfect for young readers who are learning to read on their own.

My Farm Friends

Check out these other best-sellers, award-winners, and classics featuring fun on the farm: Big Red Barn By Margaret Wise Brown & Illustrated by Felicia Bond Biscuit's Day at the Farm By Alyssa Satin Capucilli Farm By Elisha Cooper Click, Clack, Moo: Cows That Type By Doreen Cronin & Illustrated by Betsy Lewin Barnyard Banter By Denise Fleming

By Wendell Minor G.P. Putnam's Sons, 2011, $16.99, hardcover Ages 3-5 Welcome to the farm, where you can find goats, pigs, cows, and much more. Farm animals are fascinating, and this book celebrates the uniqueness of each animal with a simple poem that highlights its distinctive traits. With warm, inviting illustrations, children will be prepared for their first farm visit and be eager to meet every animal. The back of the book includes additional facts about each farm animal for further learning.

Otis By Loren Long George Washington's Cows By David Small Farmer Duck By Martin Waddell & Illustrated by Helen Oxenbury FOR OLDER READERS:

COMING NEXT MONTH... Artistic Books

Charlotte's Web By E.B. White

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • October 2011

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[ parenting teens & tweens ]

By Myrna Beth Haskell

SPECIAL TWEEN & TEEN FOCUS

Oh, That Tangled Web Teens Weave HOW TO HANDLE YOUR TEEN WHEN HE LIES

D

id you ever lie to your parents when you were a teenager? Be honest with yourself. Not even a teeny, tiny lie? Here is a typical scenario: You started out studying with Mary, but you wound up at John's party afterward. It really wasn't in the game plan, but you conveniently left the latter part out when you arrived home and your mom asked why you were late. Fact: Kids aren't perfect and lying is common in adolescence. Fiction: "Good" kids don't lie.

Telling Tall Tales Parents may unintentionally serve as role models. Adults often use "white lies" to spare hurt feelings or embarrassment. For instance, you might tell a friend her haircut is adorable after discussing in your child's presence that you would never use that salon. R. Andrew Harper, MD, medical director of the University of Texas Harris County Psychiatric Center and associate professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Texas Medical School at Houston, says, "Many parents teach children that social or 'white' lies are acceptable. For example, most parents tell their children to express thanks and pleasure for gifts, even if the gift is something the child does not want. Parents also teach children that some thoughts, while honest, do not always need to be related to others when they might cause hurt feelings or discomfort." By adolescence, however, teens understand the difference between lying to spare feelings and lying to get one's own way. Teens lie for a variety of reasons, such as trying to avoid getting into trouble or seeking more freedom than parents are allowing. If a teen has learned that bending the truth will help him get his way, lying may seem like a good option. Loren Buckner, LCSW, a psychotherapist and the author of ParentWise: The Emotional Challenges of Family Life and How to Deal with Them, explains, "Pleasing their friends becomes more important than following the rules. When teenagers have to

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“

When teenagers have to choose between lying to parents and disappointing a friend, parents often lose that coin

toss. Pleasing their friends becomes more important than following the rules." — Loren Buckner, LCSW, psychotherapist and the author of ParentWise: The Emotional Challenges of Family Life and How to Deal with Them

choose between lying to parents and disappointing a friend, parents often lose that coin toss."

Be a Lie Detective How does a parent recognize his teen is lying? Is subtle body language a good indicator, or should parents look for other things, such as conspicuous changes to a story? "There are behaviors that may indicate your teen is lying such as avoiding eye contact, subtle facial expressions, and changes in vocal pitch," says Dr. Harper. "However, many parents have learned through experience when to be suspicious of what their teen is telling them. Explanations that are inconsistent or seem to shift on retelling may be clues." He warns, "Many teens learn to lie to their parents without being detected, particularly if the lie is well planned in advance." Buckner suggests that parents look for patterns. Teens who stick to curfew, do

their school work, and show up when and where they're supposed to can generally be trusted.

Choosing Consequences Teens don't tend to think about consequences ahead of time. Parents should discuss various scenarios with their teen to illustrate what can happen when a lie leads to putting oneself and others in danger. If parents don't know their teen's whereabouts and something bad happens, they are unable to help when help is most needed. Teens should be told that lies, no matter how big or small, can lead to more complicated problems with more severe consequences. Harper points out, "Some lies have consequences that flow naturally and help teach important life lessons. For instance, a teen who lies about completing homework will lose points or get a lower grade. However, lies that place someone at risk should call for more serious consequences from parents." Harper believes it's wise to have a system in place for dealing with lying that teens are aware of. "Parents should consider negotiating with their teens when choosing consequences," he adds. "This is an opportunity to teach them about problem solving and collaboration in difficult situations." Parents should be concerned if lying becomes more frequent. This can be a sign of a more serious problem. However, belittling or shaming a teen can make matters worse. "Teens need to know they're loved, even when they get into trouble," says Buckner.



WANT TO SHARE YOUR IDEAS?

UPCOMING TOPIC: Content Ratings (movie, TV, music, game) – Do you strictly follow or find them useless? Send your full name, address, & brief comments to: myrnahaskell@gmail.com Or visit: www.myrnahaskell.com


Coming in November Our Annual Education Guide and Resources Section

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • October 2011

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[ your family health ]

By Malia Jacobson

SPECIAL TWEEN & TEEN FOCUS

Bulb Fiction

THE TRUTH ABOUT TEENS & TANNING BEDS

N

ow that summer is over, your teen might be longing for the time she spent outdoors. And as days shorten and winter approaches, your teen may be looking for ways to relive those warm summer afternoons – and keep up her tan. According to one study, 24% of teens have visited a tanning bed at least once; many are frequent customers. Another study reports tanning bed use in children as young as 11. "In many areas there are more tanning salons than there are McDonald's and Starbucks," says pediatrician Sophie J. Balk, MD, lead author for the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) 2011 policy statement on the risks of ultraviolet radiation to children and adolescents. Balk is one of many health experts working to raise awareness of the hazards of teenage tanning. The World Health Organization, the American Medical Association, and the American Academy of Dermatology support legislation banning minors from tanning, and 60% of US states already regulate the practice. “Many parents simply aren't aware of the risks,” says Balk. "If most parents knew that going tanning at a young age raises their child's risk of developing skin cancer later on, they would not allow it."

Safe Tanning: Myth and Reality Many habitual tanners believe the tanning industry's claim that artificial rays are a safe alternative to the sun. Not true, says the AAP. Their 2011 report states that UV radiation produced by artificial tanning beds can be 10 to 15 times stronger than the midday sun. “UV radiation is a known carcinogen, like arsenic, asbestos, and cigarette smoke,” says Balk. The rates of melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, have been on the rise for the past 30 years, with rapid increases in recent years in white women aged 20-29. According to the AAP report, tanning beds are partly to blame. The statistics are sobering.

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Melanomas represent only five percent of skin cancers, but they cause three times more deaths than nonmelanoma skin cancers. Early detection is key, because melanomas that have metastasized (spread) have no good treatment options. The five year survival rate for metastic melanoma is only 20%. This deadly cancer is now striking teens. "I have a patient who developed a melanoma at 18," says Neera Agarwal-Antal, MD, director of pediatric dermatology for Akron Children's Hospital. "She started tanning at age 14." Like Balk, Agarwal-Antal compares indoor tanning to smoking. "There are no benefits to using a tanning bed. It's not OK, even in moderation," she says. Tanning bed users can suffer from other maladies, including early cataracts, rashes, and prescription drug interactions. "You can get all sorts of infections in tanning beds – herpes, warts, molescum, viral disease, fungus. They're not exactly bastions of cleanliness," notes Agarwal-Antal. Early aging, wrinkles, and sagging skin add to the list of unsightly effects.

Addicted to Tanning? Even when faced with disturbing evidence, many teens are undeterred in their quest for sun-kissed skin. Why is it such a difficult habit to break? Are some teens truly

My patients tell me that they're addicted to how

they look when they tan. They feel social pressure to be tan. That needs to change." — Neera Agarwal-Antal, M.D., director of pediatric dermatology for Akron Children's Hospital

addicted to tanning? Possibly, asserts Agarwal-Antal. "My patients tell me that they're addicted to how they look when they tan," she says. "They feel social pressure to be tan. That needs to change." One step is promoting a new beauty ideal. The fashion industry is doing its part; some fashion magazines, including


VITAMIN D: BOTTLED SUNSHINE “When kids and teens are protected from the sun, they need to add vitamin D to their diet,� says Charles Shubin, M.D., director of pediatrics at Mercy FamilyCare. Vitamin D is essential to bone health and plays a role in cell growth and immune function. There's a connection between sun safety and a need for vitamin D supplementation; the body's vitamin D production is triggered when UV radiation hits the skin and triggers vitamin D synthesis. Kids who are properly protected from the sun won't make enough on their own, says Shubin. Pediatricians recommend that babies, children, and teens take 400 IU of additional vitamin D daily – the amount available in many children's multivitamins. Food sources include salmon, sardines, liver, egg yolks, and fortified milk and orange juice, but it's difficult to get enough from food alone. To get their daily dose of D, kids would have to consume 10-15 eggs per day. That's one big omelette.

Cosmopolitan, are working to change cultural messaging that promotes indoor tanning. Surprisingly, Hollywood is helping, too. Many of today's biggest stars are living proof that pale is pretty. "It Girls" Amanda Seyfried, Scarlett Johansson, Taylor Swift, and Kristin Stewart are glamorous examples of young celebrities who stay out of the sun.

Toward Safer Sun “The best tan is no tan at all,â€? says Agarwal-Antal. Parents and teens need to regard tanning the same way they see recreational drug use, smoking, or sex: a risky behavior that can have longlasting heath consequences, she says. "We need to teach our kids to be wary of the sun." The safest sun is shade, agrees Charles Shubin, MD, director of pediatrics at Mercy FamilyCare. Even with sunscreen, there's no safe way to bake in the sun or in a tanning bed. He notes “Sunscreens aren't foolproof; they wear off, and most people don't use enough.â€? To safeguard skin health, experts recommend avoiding sun exposure during peak hours between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.; wearing hats with a three-inch brim; choosing clothing with built-in sun protection; and always using protective sunscreen (apply one ounce per application – that's Âź of a four-ounce bottle). Agarwal-Antal advises patients to choose an SPF of at least 50 for the body and 70 for the face.

True Colors Moms can wield great influence over their tanning teens by embracing their natural complexions. “Don't show your kids that you need a tan to feel good or attractive,� says AgarwalAntal. Accept your own natural skin tone, and you'll encourage teens to do the same. The payoff: a healthier, more beautiful future for you, and your teen.



Malia Jacobson is a freelance writer and mom of two. She frequently covers health topics for parenting publications. Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • October 2011

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[ your family health ]

Tips for Back-to-School Nutrition HOW TO PACK A HEALTHY LUNCH

A

s kids have settled into the school routines, nutrition remains in the forefront of parents' minds. According to Catherine McPhee, M.D., a board-certified family medicine practitioner with Lifetime Health Medical Group in Rochester, eating well is important to help kids maintain a strong immune system through the cold and flu months and also to prevent excessive weight gain. Among the most important and effective things parents can do is to emphasize healthy eating at home. "If children eat pizza and chicken nuggets every day at home, that's what they'll choose at school, too," she says. "They have to know what healthy choices are by the time they get into the cafeteria." To encourage healthy choices, McPhee recommends that parents: • Start with a healthy breakfast and keep

tabs on what their children are eating throughout the day. • Explain how a healthy lunch helps maintain energy for the rest of the day. • Go over the cafeteria menu together. Ask which items are their favorites, and talk about what a healthy lunch includes. • Find out what kinds of foods are available, especially if unhealthy snacks, like chips, ice cream or soda are available to buy.

More health tips for parents are available on the American Academy of Pediatrics Web site at www.aap.org. Tips and lessons on reading nutrition labels are available on www.kidshealth.org, or www.teenhealth.org, depending on the age group. Packing a lunch whenever possible, McPhee notes, provides parents greater control over their children's diets. She offers the following tips for easily preparing nutritious lunches: • Try packing a few of the following healthier options: cold cut rollups with whole wheat tortillas; cracker sandwiches with whole grain crackers filled with lowfat cream cheese or peanut butter and jelly; veggie sticks with low-fat dip or dressing; celery sticks with peanut butter; and a healthier dessert (if you choose to include one), such as low-fat pudding or fresh fruit. • Buy fruits, vegetables and other nutritious foods in bulk and then immediately create single-serving portions to just grab and go when packing lunch – or even snacking at home. Cleaning, cutting and sorting fruits and vegetables into smaller packets are jobs older children can help tackle. (And, be wary of canned fruit that's mostly syrup and sugar.) • Similarly, if you send in desserts or treats, learn how to read nutrition labels so you can make your own 100-calorie packs to send along (the pre-packaged ones are considerably more expensive compared to doing it yourself). • Choose water over juice or other sweetened drinks and avoid soda altogether. "We've somehow forgotten as a society that not everything we drink has to have a flavor, and water is the healthiest, cheapest and most readily-available drink out there," says McPhee. She encourages

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parents to use flavored water only if their children won't drink plain water. According to the America Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), drinking just one can of soda a day increases a child's risk of obesity by 60%. • Look to leftovers for quick and easy lunch options, but remember not all schools have a means for children to reheat, so choose foods that are good cold or will stay hot in a thermos if reheated in the morning just before school. One of the most important components of a healthy diet is not what you pack, but how many of those food calories a child will burn in a day. According to McPhee, a child's lunch can contain a higher amount of fat or calories (such as bologna instead of turkey) if the child will be very active throughout the day. A child who comes home and plays in the yard or participates in an organized sport can use the extra calories more efficiently than a child who will spend the day playing video games. "Lunch is never going to be perfect, but the goal is to do the best we can and then make sure children get that extra serving of fruits or vegetables at home that they may have missed during the day at school," she says. "And, I always recommend fresh food over food that comes from a jar or box. If parents follow that at home, it makes a slightly less-healthy school lunch not as detrimental to the child's overall nutrition."



Lifetime Health Medical Group provides primary care for children and adults at seven locations throughout the Rochester area. More information is available online, www.lifetimehealth.org.

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • October 2011

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[ your family activities]

SPECIAL TWEEN & TEEN FOCUS

By Sinea Pies

Make a Date!

FUN ACTIVITIES FOR PARENTS TO DO WITH THEIR TEENS

I

t was so much easier, once upon a time, to do things with your children. You could get out the coloring book and crayons and spend hours of preschool fun with them. But what do you do when they hit the teen & tweenage years? Is it still possible to spend meaningful time together? Yes, it is but you'll have to give it more thought and actually schedule it in. You're not the only one who's busy now – teens have schedules too!

will get him started. Don't be in a rush. Window shopping is part of the adventure. Carve out time for the two of you to work on your first project together. Are their some simple home repairs that need to be done? Loose door handles to tighten, shaky chairs to strengthen with glue, squeaky hinges that need lubricating, window sills that can use a touch of paint? Be creative. But don't let this first event be the only attempt at working together. Schedule in bigger jobs, like building a bird feeder or making a doll house for little sister's dolls – whatever the two of you will enjoy making together.

Mother and Daughter

GO NATURAL – TAKE YOUR TEEN ON A HIKE OR CAMPING TRIP!

Do your homework. Check the X newspapers and online sources for places to go and things to do with your

teenager. Be mindful of his or her interests and try to pick something you will both enjoy. Not all activities cost money, but many do. If you are living on a tight budget, plan ahead and save so that you can freely enjoy the event without many restrictions.

Next, have several dates available to choose from on your cal-

Y endar before starting the discussion.

Nothing is more frustrating than suggesting an outing that can't possibly be done.

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Now, invite your child to go Z out with you and get it on the books. If you have more than one child, be

prepared to set up separate dates with each of them sometime in the future; but let this one be special for just the two of you. HERE ARE SOME GREAT IDEAS TO GET YOU GOING:

Father and Son

TOOL TIME: Plan a handy man project and start out with tool shopping. Every boy needs his own tools and a project where he can use them. Even if you aren't all that handy yourself, together you can investigate the how-to's and learn. Take your son to the hardware store and get him a sturdy tool kit plus the basics that

PAMPERING DAY: Schedule a "beautifying day" for just the two of you -- hair, nails, pedicure, facial, the works! You can go out on the town for your special celebration or plan for a spa day at home. Go shopping together to pick out your supplies including glittery nail polish and trinkets for your hair. Have the right snack foods on hand like the makings for a seriously delicious ice cream sundae and a great "chick flick" to watch while your nails dry. If you don't live alone, make arrangements for the rest of the family to skedaddle out of there so that you can have the house to yourselves. When you're all done, take pictures of your beautiful new selves!

Father and Daughter NIGHT OUT ON THE TOWN: Daddy, take your little girl out on her first date. Dress nice and wash the car. Ask her to help you pick out just the right restaurant and movie to see. Open doors for her and carry her popcorn. Be a gentleman. This is a very special time for two of you. Want to do it up really big? Bring her a flower and have someone take your picture together as a keepsake. Plan a trip to the ice cream parlor to top off the evening.


Mother and Son ATTEND A SPECIAL EVENT: Moms like guy-things. They really do! Go with your son to a sporting event or take him to a special happening that features things that he likes, such as the Air Show or an Auto Show. Don't understand the game? Your son can help you understand the finer things about what you're seeing; boys love to show off what they know. Schedule in a great meal out and you'll have an event that you both will cherish for years to come. These are just a few of the many types of activities that parents and teenage children can do together. Other suggestions might be camping or fishing, renting go-carts, scrapbooking, seeing a ballet or theater production that's in town, clothes shopping, gardening, or going to the zoo. Being together is the important thing. Have fun and make some great memories. Oh yes, and turn off the cell phone. Three's a crowd!



Sinea Pies is a contributing writer to Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine & a freelance writer for HubPages. Visit her on her website Ducks 'n a Row: www.ducksnarow.com

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • October 2011

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[ dear dave – advice from a dad ]

By Dave Latona

Sibling Rivalries

A

re sibling rivalries alive and well in your house? Well, they are in mine! My oldest is sure to squash any parental compliments aimed toward his younger siblings, trying to ensure his place as the biggest, strongest, fastest and best, while my other two children battle for a spot at second place. This has been going on since they were small. My children are still young at 4, 6 and 7, but I am sure many of you dads out there with teenaged children can attest to more intense battles for top dog in the house. I have heard plenty of stories from friends of mine where this age-old struggle has made for a house so tense that it makes the back of your neck hurt. On so many occasions I see the battle begin as I am talking to one of my children, and for a moment this one child has my undivided attention. I may be reading to my daughter when all of a sudden one of her older brothers feels compelled to jerk the Barbie right out of her hand, or even worse, spill the imaginary tea while we're in the middle of a party at the princess' castle. Well certainly, THIS MEANS WAR! Before I can stop her she

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has bolted out of my lap and is chasing him down the hall, swinging her precious plastic doll at him. (Note for new dads: a Barbie can serve as a comforting toy for little girls to dress up, or as a club meant for demolishing the "evil one" (her brother) who dares invade the land!) It seems to resurface, this issue of "individual time." My fondest memories of childhood were the times I spent with my parents. It wasn't always the big vacations or trips to the fancy restaurant, but it was that Tuesday afternoon in the backyard with my dad building a cage to contain my pet turtles. Or maybe it was the time my mom let me lick the cake batter off the mixer beaters. I remember them as being times when there was no competition for my parents' attention.

Recently my wife and I spent an afternoon with other couples, and the subject of sibling rivalries came up. Some couples shared their experiences as parents and others their own conflicts with brothers and sisters. Much of the conversation covered competition for their parents' attention. I found it strangely awakening‌


the vivid detail in their recollections of events in which their parents spent time with them. It was great to hear that they treasured this time in their childhood; however, many cited their current sibling rivalries stemmed from the competition for affection from mom and dad in childhood. I am not naĂŻve enough to think that if my children do not have to compete for my attention then all their conflict will miraculously disappear, but I surely don't want it to be the reason for their battles. I never want my attention, or lack thereof, to be the reason for any bitterness they may have for one another, both now or adulthood. What I do know, and what I am 100% sure of, is that sibling rivalries will happen. There is nothing that my wife and I can do to totally eliminate this phenomenon; however we will constantly remind them of the incredible value of their relationships with one another. It is our hope that the competitive nature of our precious little children will bring them together and also prepare them for the world.



Keep that competitive spirit alive, Dave

MEET DAVE LATONA: HE'S A DAD, AND HE'S READY TO SHARE HIS PARENTING ADVICE & EXPERIENCES WITH YOU! To ask Dave's advice, submit your questions to our Editor at Editor@GVParent.com with subject line "Dear Dave." Find Dave’s column each month in print or online at www.GVParent.com FOLLOW DAVE ON TWITTER: @dear_dave If you want to keep up with Dave or send him your fatherly experience, you can "like" him on facebook at Dave Latona. He wants to hear from you!

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • October 2011

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[ try this! ]

By Jillian Melnyk

Extreme Couponing

A COUPON NEWBIE AIMS FOR SAVINGS

C

oupons… I remember cutting them out of the newspaper as a kid, thinking that if I snipped out a coupon for cookies maybe that would inspire my parents to buy them for me. Miraculously, sometimes it worked. But it's been a good 15 years since I took a look at a coupon.

Well, that's not entirely true. I'm very loyal to Michael's coupons and sometimes I pick up the Sunday newspaper just to snag that coveted 40 percent off deal. Not to mention, there is no point in walking into a Bed, Bath & Beyond without a 20 percent off coupon in your grips. But those are different. Those are one shot, biggie coupons. We're talking about saving $40 on a KitchenAid mixer here, folks. Over the past 15 years I have overlooked the little guys. Twenty-five cents off Cheerios? Come on, that's peanuts. That doesn't come close to my KitchenAid savings. Until that TV show hit the airwaves. You know the one I'm talking about, Extreme Couponing. These people were hitting the register with $900 worth of groceries and walking away paying less than a hundred. Viewers – myself included – were floored. So I decided to try it out. I'll be honest, I was not going to be extreme. But I was going to see if I could actually save some cash on things my household needed. I started with a little research. I talked to friends who, after some prodding, admitted to

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being couponers themselves. They directed me to a few blogs to help me out. Even with my childhood cookie coupon cutting experience, I was a coupon newbie. I asked questions like: "Does Target take coupons?" (The answer is yes.) "Can you print coupons online?" (Yes, definitely!) "What is a circular?" (The flyer stores put out to advertise their specials and sales.) And, "Can you use more than one coupon at once?" (Depends on the store and coupon, but sometimes yes, and when it is a yes, that's great!) After doing some preliminary research for a whole week, on Sunday morning I hit the supermarket bright-eyed and bushy-tailed to buy my Sunday paper. The clerk smiled at me. I smiled back. I was abuzz with excitement. I went home and pulled out my scissors. But when I opened the paper, what did I find? No coupons. No coupons?! My first reaction was embarrassment. Maybe I dropped them on the way into the house. I scampered towards the door to check, but they weren't there. Or maybe I purchased a faulty paper? My next reaction: anger. Someone stole the coupons out of my paper! I briefly considered my options. I could a) attempt to return my newspaper and exchange it for one bulging with coupons, b) go down the street to a different store and buy another newspaper, or c) pout and wait a week to start my coupon cutting project. I decided on none of these options and hit the internet to see if the whole "coupons stolen out of the paper" thing was a common occurrence.

Helpful websites & places where you can score coupons online:

hip2save.com fabulesslyfrugal.com couponsenseblog.com thekrazycouponlady.com moneysavingmom.com coupongeek.net frugalcouponliving.com couponsherpa.com coupons.target.com coupons.com redplum.com smartsource.com It was a good thing I chose to internet search because I learned my first important coupon lesson: they do not have coupons in the Sunday paper before Labor Day! It was not my fault, nor a malicious couponer. I breathed a sigh of relief but also laughed at my rookie mistake. I was glad to have Mistake Number One out of the way so I could plow onward toward success. In the weeks since that first misadventure, I have indeed saved some money using coupons. I scored free cat treats at Target, knocked three dollars off of cat litter, and drastically reduced the price of things like body wash, soap, toilet paper, and laundry detergent. So far, I have found that the secret is patience. It's easy to want to take my "fifty cents off" coupon and run to the store and use it, but if I just plan a little and wait a few weeks, that coupon might line up with a sale, or another coupon. (That's how I got the free cat treats. It was a regular price item for $2 that was on sale for $1 and I had a $1 off coupon.) Wait for things like that to line up in your favor. There are loads of websites out there like hip2save.com that do a lot of the hard work for you and line up the deals so you can maximize your savings. I'll be honest, the extreme couponers


on TV scare me. Their stockpiles make me dizzy and overwhelmed. I can't help but wonder how many of the products they buy they actually need and use. That's the other thing I kept focused on. Each time I clipped a coupon I made sure to ask myself, "Will someone in my house actually use this or eat this?" If the answer was "no," I didn't clip, it was that simple. If you're not going to use the product, don't clip out the coupon. Otherwise you'll end up wasting money on products you don't need or want "just because they were a good deal."

Here are a few more tips you might find handy: • It's easy to get obsessive and find yourself going to the extreme. There are A LOT of coupons out there and you can spend hours scouring the internet for them. Set yourself a limit. Budget a few hours for internet searching, otherwise you could find that you've wasted a whole day hunting for deals. • Get the kids involved. Couponing is a great opportunity for a math lesson. It can also teach them about nutrition as they pick out foods. (Ask questions like, "What food group would Cheerios go under?") • Stay organized. I use a folder, but find what works best for you‌ maybe it's a binder or a bunch of different folders. Either way, organization will make things easier in the long run. • Do your research. Each store has a different policy when it comes to coupons, check their websites. Some stores double coupons (meaning that if a manufacturer offers a "fifty cents off" coupon the store might double that to give you a dollar off.) If I've learned anything it's that you don't have to go to the extreme, you can make couponing work for you and your family. Plus, there are tons of great resources out there to help you out and keep you sane. Couponers are thrifty with cash but generous with help and support. If you have a question, don't be shy about posting a comment on a blog or forum, I'm sure someone will be happy to answer and help you out! Happy savings!



Jillian Melnyk is the Editor for Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine. She, obviously, likes to try new things. To offer her a challenge for a future edition of “Try This!� email Jillian at Editor@GVParent.com.

Do you have something you've been dying to try but you haven't been able to muster the energy? Or you just don't know where to start? Don't fret! Let our editor try it out for you! Each month our editor, Jillian, will accept a challenge‌ whether it's going vegetarian or staying on budget‌ and then she'll report back with her findings and share how your family can do it too. She's ready and willing to be your guinea pig, all you need to do is offer her a challenge (within reason!) and she'll try it out and dig up as much helpful info as she can to get your family started on the path towards success.

Still Looking for After School & Weekend Activity Program Options?

To offer up a challenge send Jillian an email to Editor@GVParent.com with subject line "Try This!" Liked this edition of "Try This!"? Each month you'll be able to find this column in print here in GVP or online at www.GVParent.com

Just a Click Away! Available 24/7 Online Parenting Resources

www.GVParent.com Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • October 2011

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[ parent to parent ]

By Vicki Schultz

Head-Wound Hayden

I

am most at peace when snuggling my sweet, somewhat mischievous, fiveyear-old Hayden. Wrapped in my arms, I know he's safe. When I set him loose, that's when things‌ happen.

Hayden was born smaller than average. Except for his head. His ninetieth-percentile noggin gave new meaning to the word crowning. I ignored the pain while my preemie and I clung to each other. Now, five years later, we are just as inseparable, but his head still causes me discomfort -mostly the emotional kind. Imagine a bobble-head with the spirit of Evel Knievel but the coordination of, well, a bobble-head. My adventurous but top-heavy tot has earned his moniker "Head-Wound Hayden" on dozens of occasions. Split lips, black eyes, cartoonish lumps; Hayden's head is drawn to the ground. As a toddler, everything in our home was hazardous to Hayden's health – furniture, floors, and walls. Yes, walls. Doorframes seemed to side-step in front of him, claw-footed tables never failed to trip him up, and chair spindles became prison bars, entrapping his limbs. Undeterred, Hayden climbed to higher ground. The kitchen tabletop became his favorite perch, overlooking a sea of skullshattering blue tile, so I lured him outside to play in the sand and grass. Hayden wasn't interested in soft stuff. He darted toward the play set, intent on its slides. I

“

hovered beneath him, ready to catch, letting out my breath when he made it to the top safely. Then he tipped over and smacked his face on the platform, sending his teeth through his lips for the first of many times. I cried along with him, feeling like the worst mom in the world. Hayden recovered first and took off toward the slides again. I wiped my tears and assumed my position, arms outstretched like a net beneath him. Hayden has not been the only victim of his concussive cranium. I have suffered many a head-butt to my mouth or nose

As a toddler, everything in our home was hazardous to Hayden's health – furniture, floors, and walls. Yes, walls.

Doorframes seemed to side-step in front of him, claw-footed tables never failed to trip him up, and chair spindles became prison bars, entrapping his limbs.�

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while holding him on my lap. When he runs headlong into my husband or me, his head is – you guessed it – crotch-high. But it's not the physical pain that bothers me most; it's the heart-scarring fear when he falls. Hayden's head contains precious cargo, all the things about him I could not live without, but I refuse to stunt his learning or stifle his spirit by holding him back. He would not be the same child if I did. My husband jokes that Hayden's skull is now super-strong because his injuries have calcified over. I think he's right. Our son seems unfazed by his frequent falls, just brushes them off and keeps running. His intellect has not been impacted; he tests at the head of his class. What he lacks in coordination, Hayden makes up for in personality, making us laugh every day. He is a happy, healthy child – perhaps tougher than most. I feel myself toughening, too. When Hayden fell as he ran toward his last swimming lesson, I cradled him on the tile, watching the lump rise on his forehead as his screams pummeled me. "You don't have to go to your lesson if you don't want to." Hayden looked toward the pool, then back at me. He got up and joined his friends in the water, his tears getting lost in the spray from paddling limbs. Silly me for thinking a little blunt-force trauma would get in the way of his fun. As I watched him swim with a grin on his face, I felt the latest bruise to my heart calcify over. A shiny new plate of emotional armor. How many more until I'm superstrong like Hayden?



Vicki Schultz lives with her husband and two young sons in West Henrietta, NY. She is a member of Rochester Area Children's Writers and Illustrators.


Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • October 2011

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www.RochesterWomensExpo.com 44

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Here is just a sampling of some of the new and returning things to see and do: • Visit the Tops Friendly Markets Pavilion to watch demonstrations, get holiday food ideas, pick up valuable coupons and sample a selection of food products. Let the Tops experts help you plan your holiday feasts. • Learn how to set up your Blue Tooth and Navigation, Q and A for buying and servicing your vehicle, and check out aftermarket accessories...remote starters, heated seats, navigation, back up camera and meet with the staff of Hoselton Auto Mall. • Get your beauty on! • Talk to health experts • Stop by the Wilmorite booths (Eastview, Marketplace and Mall at Greece Ridge Center) for fashion tips and great coupons • BRING LOTS OF CANNED GOODS FOR OUR 4TH ANNUAL FOODLINK FOOD DRIVE. OUR GOAL IS TO DOUBLE THE COLLECTION WITH 5,000 POUNDS AND YOU GET A CHANCE TO WIN ONE OF THREE FANTASTIC PACKAGESVisit our website at

www.RochesterWomensExpo.com for the latest news or join us on Facebook. Also pre-register at our website and you will be eligible for some great pre-registration prizes!

Limited space still available - Call 585-287-5330 to learn more about being an exhibitor Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • October 2011

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Calendar october events Activities • Exhibits • Theater • Storytelling • Shows • Family Fun • Outdoor Adventures Parenting Programs • and lots more for families to do in & around Rochester!

ZooBoo October 15, 16, 22 & 23 T

rick-or-treat at the Seneca Park Zoo! Kids can go in costume and collect candy from different stations, play games, win prizes and enjoy activities such as coloring and scavenger hunts. The entire event is animal themed, and of course the regular zoo is still open if you want to see the animals. The popular "Zoo-Mazing Maze" will be brought back, and each child will receive a present at the exit. Trick-or-Treating tickets are only for kids who want treats and activities. So adults, seniors and kids who are members and are not participating in Trick-or-Treating are, of course, admitted free. Where: Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul Street, Rochester, 14621 When: October 15th, 16th, 22nd and 23rd, 10am-4pm Cost: $7 plus regular zoo admission fee. For More Info: Call 336-7200 or visit www.senecaparkzoo.org

SAT

SUN

FRI

11 & 12 Literature Live:

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Beloved literary characters jump off the pages of favorite books at this weekend series that pairs storybook character appearances with readings. Meet Olivia the little piglet! 1-5pm., National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 263-2700, www.thestrong.org

This family-friendly event is appropriate for even the youngest ghosts and goblins. Enjoy Halloween games, crafts, and treats and celebrate the holiday in a safe, fun environment. The highlight of the event is a special magic show by Rob and Carol Allen at 6:30pm. 5:30-8pm., $8 child, $2 adult, Herschell Carrousel Factory Museum, 180 Thompson St., Tonawanda, 716-693-1885, www.carrouselmuseum.org

Olivia

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Halloween Spooktacular

SUN

30

RPO Presents: Runaway Bunny

The Runaway Bunny by Margaret Wise Brown is one of the most beloved children's books of all time. This concert features the musical adaptation of Brown's book, with a narrator and orchestra taking audiences on a journey with the adorable bunny. PLUS – in honor of Halloween, be sure to come in your costume! 2pm., $10-$15, Performance Hall at Hochstein, 50 North Plymouth Ave., Rochester, 454-2100, www.rpo.org


calendar of events • local family-friendly activities MORE CALENDAR Halloween Events . . . . . . . . 50 Library Activities . . . . . . . . 52 Support Groups . . . . . . . . . . 54 November. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Ongoing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58

01 * Saturday AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY FAIR & EXPOSITION. The Village host activities that hearken back to an earlier time, judged competitions from poultry to pies. Livestock exhibits, food and crafts and farmers market. 10am-5pm. Free with admission. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd., Mumford. 538-6822. www.gcv.org CIVIL WAR ENCAMPMENT AT GRANGER HOMESTEAD. 1860’s camp life with cannons, period costumes, infantry drills & hands-on activities. 9am4:30pm. $2-$6. Granger Homestead & Carriage House, 295 N. Main St., Canandaigua. 394-1472. www.grangerhomestead.org FREE * HILTON APPLE FEST. Crafts, Food, Music fun for the entire family. No pets. 10am-5pm. Hilton Apple Fest West Ave and Heinz St, Hilton, 234-3378. www.hiltonapplefest.org MOONLIGHT MAZE FOOD DRIVE. Bring in a non-perishable food item to support Food link and receive $1 off your admission. 5-9pm. Long Acre Farms, 1342 Eddy Rd., Macedon, 315-986-4202. www.longacrefarms.com RIOULET DANCE. Performance reflects the sensual, articulate, and exquisitely musical works of Pascal Rioult. 8pm. $45-$60. Nazareth College Arts Center,4245 East Avenue, Rochester, 389-2170. www.boxoffice.naz.edu SENSORY FRIENDLY FILMS. Autism Society have teamed up to bring families affected by autism and other disabilities a special opportunity to enjoy their favorite films in a safe and accepting environment. This month’s movie: A Dolphin Tale. 10am. $5. AMC Webster 12, 2190 Empire, Webster. wwwamctheatres.com

02 * Sunday AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY FAIR & EXPOSITION. 10am-5pm. Free with admission. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd., Mumford. 538-6822. www.gcv.org FREE * COMMUNITY GARAGE SALE. Take advantage of values on treasures that have made their way to market from other people’s basements, attics & garages. 8am-2pm. Rochester Public Market, 280 N. Union St. 428-6907. www.cityofrochester.gov FREE • FALL FESTIVAL AT BRISTOL MOUNTAIN. Family activities, music, food, sky rides and much more. 12-5pm. Bristol Mountain & Winter Resort, 5662 Route 64, Bristol, 374-6000. www.bristolmountain.com FALL FOLLIAGE BY TROLLEY. Enjoy the beauty of Autumn in western New York State from the window of an authentic 80-year-old electric trolley car. Trolleys depart every half-hour no reservations are required. 11:30am. $5-$7. New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 East River Road, Rush, 533-1113. www.nymtmuseum.org FREE • HILTON APPLE FEST. See Oct 01. 10am5pm. Hilton Apple Fest West Ave and Heinz St. Hilton, 234-3378. www.hiltonapplefest.org

FREE • HISPANIC-LLATINO FAMILY HERITAGE DAY. Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month with art activities, tours, storytelling, and music and dance performances. 12-5pm. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave, Rochester 276-8900. www.mag.rochester.edu MAKING STRIDES AGAINST BREAST CANCER. Raise awareness about the disease, and help save lives. With every step you take, you’ll be giving people facing breast cancer more birthdays to celebrate. 10am. Frontier Field, VIP Parking Lot, One Morrie Silver Way, Rochester, 800-227-2345. www.cancer.org/stridesonline TIMBER SPORTS COMPETITION. College woodsman teams test their skills at axe throwing, logrolling, crosscut sawing, and more. 9am-4pm. $3. RMSC Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd., Naples,14512. 374-5425. www.rmsc.org

03 * Monday TODDLER BOOK CLUB AT THE STRONG. Readings of classic children’s tales followed by music and movement activities. 10:30am, 11:30am, & 12:30pm. Free with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 263-2700, www.thestrong.org UNYFEAT ANNUAL FALL CONFERENCE. Guest speaker Chantal Sicile-Kira will speak about meeting the needs of ASD students, transitions, communications and preparing for real life. 8am-4pm. $40-$75. Burgundy Basin Inn, 1361 Marsh Rd, Pittsford. Unyfeat 248-9011. www.unyfeat.org

04 * Tuesday PLAY AS YOU GROW. An opportunity for supervised play using a variety of equipment in an open gym format that is non-instructional. Every Tuesday and Thursday. 10-11am. $3. Ages: 18mon-5yrs. Pieters Family Life Center, 1025 Commons Way, Rochester, 487-3500. www.pietersfamilylifecenter.org

05 * Wednesday BALLOONS AROUND THE WORLD. Watch as local balloon artists create a large balloon sculpture to help celebrate the 12th annual Balloons Around the World event. 11am-4pm. Free with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 263-2700. www.thestrong.org

06 * Thursday FREE • MOUNT HOPE CEMETERY HISTORY. Mt. Hope was more than a graveyard. It served as an important cultural institution in 19th century Rochester, a ‘must see’ destination for visitors, and functioned as the city’s first large-scale park. Registration required. 7pm-8:30pm. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7093. www.hpl.org PLAY AS YOU GROW. See Oct 04. 10-11am. $3. Ages: 18mon-5yrs. Pieters Family Life Center, 1025 Commons Way, Rochester, 487-3500, www.pietersfamilylifecenter.org

08 * Saturday AUTUMN LEAVES: HOT JAZZ/COOL TAP. See Oct 07. 7:30pm. $10-$20. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. 232-1366. www.gevatheatre.org

October 10 Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Clowns National Museum of Play at The Strong One Manhattan Sq., Rochester www.thestrong.org GENESEE TRAIL DAY. Members of the Seneca Nation of the Iroquois belong to one of eight clans, each named for an animal that is believed to have special magical or spiritual attributes. Stations will be set up at the zoo where visitors can learn about these animals 10am-4pm. Free with admission. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St. 336-7123. www.senecaparkzoo.org LITERATURE LIVE: OLIVIA. Each Literature Live weekend offers the opportunity to meet, greet, and pose for photos with some of the most popular storybook characters of all time and enjoy related story readings. Meet Olivia the little piglet. 11am5pm. Free with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 263-2700. www.thestrong.org

09 * Sunday FREE • COMMUNITY GARAGE SALE. 8am-2pm. Rochester Public Market, 280 N. Union St. 428-6907, www.cityofrochester.gov FALL FOLLIAGE BY TROLLEY. See Oct 02. 11:30am. $5-$7. New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 East River Road, Rush, 533-1113. www.nymtmuseum.org FREE • FIRE DEPARTMENT OPEN HOUSE. Each Open House, teams the Fire Department with local health organizations who provide glucose testing, blood pressure checks, nutritional information and anti-drug literature as well as other topical information relevant to the community. 1pm-4pm. Barnard Fire Department, 3084 Dewey Ave, Rochester, 663-1113. www.cityofrochester.gov

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calendar of events • local family-friendly activities

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calendar of events • local family-friendly activities LITERATURE LIVE: OLIVIA. See Oct 08. 1pm-5pm. Free with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 2632700. www.thestrong.org WILDLIFE DEFENDERS PRESENTATION. Wildlife Defenders, meet them with their animal ambassadors as they discuss wildlife conservation and share their personal injury and rehabilitation stories. 1pm4pm. $1 in addition to admission. RMSC Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd., Naples, 374-5425. www.rmsc.org

10 * Monday RINGLING BROS. AND BARNUM & BAILEY® CLOWNS. Clown around at special performances by Ringling Brother’s clowns and receive a free clown nose. 1:30pm, 2:30pm and 3:30pm. Free with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 263-2700. www.thestrong.org SPORTING SCIENCE. 12pm-4pm. Free with admission. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave. 271-1880. www.rmsc.org TODDLER BOOK CLUB AT THE STRONG. 10:30am, 11:30am, & 12:30pm. Free with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 263-2700. www.thestrong.org

October 2, 9, 16, 23 & 30 • Fall Foliage by Trolley NY Museum of Transportation 6393 East River Rd., Rush www.nymtmuseum.org

TYKES PRESENTS: A DAY OF JOY! Kids will rehearse with TYKE’S professional director and music experts during the day, and perform a concert in the theater that same evening. Ages: 6yrs and up. Hart Theater at the JCC, 1200 Edgewood Avenue, Rochester, 723-6080. www.tykestheatre.org

11 * Tuesday WINTER WONDERLAND WEEKEND. Join the “woodland animals” in The Mitten, a humorous Ukrainian tale. Enjoy holiday displays and crafts, drop off hand- knitted or new mittens, gloves, scarves, hats and socks to benefit Hillside Children’s Center’s Special Santa Program. noon-5pm. Free with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 263-2700. www.thestrong.org

12 * Wednesday MAKING AMERICAN MUSIC. Feel the rhythms as Afro-Cuban dance music meets jazz improvisation. From rumba to cha-cha to salsa and beyond, mambo kings put their own blistering Latin twist on songs. 7:30pm. $16-$19. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 263-2700. www.thestrong.org

15 * Saturday FREE • ANNUAL HARVEST FESTIVAL AND AUCTION. Attic Treasures, farmers market, country store, silent auction, kids’ games and food. Live auction starts at 6pm. 11:30am-8pm. East Palmyra Christiam School, 2023 East Palmyra-Port Gibson Rd, Palmyra, 315-597-4400. www.eastpalmyrachristianschool.com BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION FOR KUMANG. Help celebrate a birthday for one of the Bornean orangutans, Kumang! The celebration will be in the Main Building. 2pm. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St. 336-7123. www.senecaparkzoo.org FREE • FALL INTO CANANDAIGUA FESTIVAL. Live entertainment, wagon rides, and several craft, merchant and vendor booths will line the sidewalks. Children’s activities located next to the Chamber of Commerce. 10am-4pm. Main St. Canandaigua, 396-0300. www.downtowncanandaigua.com

JR LEAGUE OF ROCHESTER-H HOLIDAY MARKET. Over 100 artists offering a wide array of handcrafted art, jewelry, ceramics, apparel, gourmet treats, holiday decorations, and much more. 10am-5pm. $5, under 12 free. Fair & Expo Center, 2695 E. Henrietta Rd, Henrietta, 385-8590, www.jlroch.org PURPLE PONY BENEFIT. Swap and shop flea market, tack, tools, crafts, food, drinks and baked goods. 10am - 2pm. $1. High Quest Acres, 679 Bangs Road, Churchville. 14428. 293-3163. www.purpleponyth.org. SUPERHEROS WEEKEND. Meet DC Comics official dark knight - Batman. Pose for pictures with PBS’s WordGirl and Super Why. See the work of comic book artists and writers. Make a cape or clothespin action figure with Alfred University’s Art Force Five. 10am-8pm. Free with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 263-2700. www.thestrong.org

16 * Sunday FREE • COMMUNITY GARAGE SALE & FLEA MARKET. See Oct 02. 8am-2pm. Rochester Public Market, 280 N. Union St. 428-6907. www.cityofrochester.gov FALL FOLLIAGE BY TROLLEY. See Oct 02. 11:30am. $5-$7. New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 East River Road, Rush, 533-1113. www.nymtmuseum.org JR LEAGUE OF ROCHESTER-H HOLIDAY MARKET. 10am-4pm. $5, under 12 free. Fair & Expo Center, 2695 E. Henrietta Rd, Henrietta, 385-8590. www.jlroch.org MAKING STRIDES AGAINST BREAST CANCER. Raise awareness about the disease, and help save lives. With every step you take, you’ll be giving people facing breast cancer more birthdays to celebrate. Register at 8am. 9am. Watt Farms, 3121 Oak Orchard Rd., Route 98, Albion. 800,227,2345. www.cancer.org/stridesonline

17 * Monday TODDLER BOOK CLUB AT THE STRONG. 10:30am, 11:30am, & 12:30pm. Free with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 263-2700. www.thestrong.org

23 * Sunday FALL FOLIAGE BY TROLLEY. 11:30am. $5-$7. New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 East River Road, Rush, 533-1113. www.nymtmuseum.org FREE • WALK FOR EPILEPSY AWARENESS. Join the Epilepsy Foundation at the Al Sigl Community of Agencies Walk About for a stroll around Marketplace Mall on a beautiful fall Sunday morning. Register at 8:30am. 9:30am Marketplace Mall, Henrietta, 442-4430. www.epilepsyuny.org

24 * Monday TODDLER BOOK CLUB AT THE STRONG. 10:30am, 11:30am, & 12:30pm. Free with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 263-2700. www.thestrong.org

28 * Friday A TREE’S LIFE. Hike through the forest for a close up look at trees, why they have lost their leaves, and what is going on inside the trees this autumn. Make a creative with a tree craft. 10am,1pm. $7. Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 Route 89, Savannah, 13146, 315-365-3588 www.ny.audubon.org/montezuma.htm

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*

Spook-tacular

Tinker Nature Park Annual Halloween Event Photo: TinkerNature

15 * Saturday

SPIRITS OF THE PAST GHOSTLY TOURS. Channel the Halloween spirits and enjoy some of the most macabre and ghostly stories from the 1800’s. The tours will reveal frightening scenes of terror, superstition. Reservations required. 6pm. Ages: 12yrs+. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd., Mumford. 538-6822. www.gcv.org ZOOBOO. Children dressed in costume can enjoy a non-scary Halloween atmosphere as they trick-ortreat in safety at “Zoo Boo”, which is scheduled during daylight hours. Games, crafts activities for all ages. 10am-4pm. $7. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St., Rochester, 336-712, www.senecaparkzoo.org

16 * Sunday ZOOBOO. Children dressed in costume can enjoy a non-scary Halloween atmosphere as they trick-ortreat in safety at “Zoo Boo”, which is scheduled during daylight hours. Games, crafts activities for all ages. 10am-4pm. $7. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St., Rochester, 336-712, www.senecaparkzoo.org MAKE A SCARECROW. Make your own scarecrow, bring old clothes and a pillow case for its headstuffing is provided. 1-3pm., Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd., Naples, 374-6160, www.rmsc.org

October 22 A guided walk through the woods, a haunted barn, and a tour through the Tinker Homestead. 7-9pm. Tinker Nature Park 1525 Calkins Road, Henrietta. 359-7044. www.henrietta.org

01 * Saturday FREE * FALL HARVEST CELEBRATION. Large Country Craft Show featuring wood crafts, dolls, fall items, bears, baskets, wreaths, and much more. Games for the Kids. Every weekend thru Oct. 3O. 10am-5pm. Brown’s Berry Patch, 14264 Roosevelt Highway (Route 18), Waterport, 682-5569. www.brownsberrypatch.com GRO-M MOORE FARMS WEEKEND ACTIVITIES. Enjoy train rides, a super slide, mini golf, and pumpkin painting, followed by homemade candy, caramel apples, fresh baked pies and cider. Every Saturday & Sunday through Oct 30. 10am-5pm. $10. Gro-Moore Farms, 2811 East Henrietta Rd, Rochester, 359-3310. www.gromoore.com FREE * PAINTED PUMPKIN AUCTION AND DISPLAY. Bid on beautifully hand painted pumpkins by local artists. Proceeds benefit Breast Cancer Coalition of Rochester. Long Acre Farms, 1342 Eddy Rd., Macedon, 315-986-4202, www.longacrefarms.com

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FREE • PUMPKIN HOLLOW. Pick the perfect pumpkin and enjoy a wide variety of games, crafts and other activities. Through Oct. 30. 8am-6pm Saturdays & Sundays. 8am-6:30pm. Gro-Moore Farms, 2811 East Henrietta Rd, Rochester, 359-3310. www.gromoore.com

02 * Sunday FREE • GIANT PUMPKIN WEIGH OFF. Activities include 6+ acre corn maze, ducky derby, pony rides, farm animals, story land, corn cannon, cow train, craft etc. Pumpkin weigh-off at noon. 9am7pm. Pumpkinville, 4844 Sugartown Road, Great Valley, 716-699-2205. www.pumpkinville.com

14 * Friday SPIRITS OF THE PAST GHOSTLY TOURS. Channel the Halloween spirits and enjoy some of the most macabre and ghostly stories from the 1800’s. The tours will reveal frightening scenes of terror, superstition. Reservations required. 6pm. Ages: 12yrs+. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd., Mumford. 538-6822. www.gcv.org

17 * Monday FREE • CRAFTERNOON. Enjoy crafting, as you make A fun Halloween Craft. 4pm. Ages: K-6. Irondequoit Public Library-Evans Branch, 45 Cooper Rd., Rochester, 336-6062. www.libraryweb.org/irondequoit/

21 * Friday HALLOWEEN SPOOKTACULAR. This family-friendly event is appropriate for even the youngest ghosts and goblins. Join us for Halloween games, crafts, and treats to celebrate the holiday in a safe, fun environment. 5:30-8pm. $8:child, $2: adult. Herschell Carrousel Factory Museum, 180 Thompson St. North Tonawanda, 716-693-1885, www.carrouselmuseum.org SPIRITS OF THE PAST GHOSTLY TOURS. Channel the Halloween spirits and enjoy some of the most macabre and ghostly stories from the 1800’s. The tours will reveal frightening scenes of terror, superstition. Reservations required. 6pm. Ages: 12yrs+. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd., Mumford. 538-6822. www.gcv.org

22 * Saturday SPIRITS OF THE PAST GHOSTLY TOURS. Channel the Halloween spirits and enjoy some of the most macabre and ghostly stories from the 1800’s. The tours will reveal frightening scenes of terror, superstition. Reservations required. 6pm. Ages: 12yrs+. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd., Mumford. 538-6822. www.gcv.org


calendar of events • local family-friendly activities

Halloween Events

FREE • TINKER NATURE PARK ANNUAL HALLOWEEN EVENT. A guided walk through the woods, a haunted barn, and a tour through the Tinker Homestead. 7-9pm. Tinker Nature Park 1525 Calkins Road, Henrietta. 359-7044. www.henrietta.org ZOOBOO. Children dressed in costume can enjoy a non-scary Halloween atmosphere as they trick-ortreat in safety at “Zoo Boo”, which is scheduled during daylight hours. Games, crafts activities for all ages. 10am-4pm. $7. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St., Rochester, 336-712, www.senecaparkzoo.org

23 * Sunday AL SIGL COMMUNITY WALKABOUT. Indoor walk route features free Halloween candy and giveaways, complimentary face painting, live entertainment and the good feeling that comes with helping others. 9:30am Donation. Marketplace Mall, Miracle Mile Dr, Rochester, www.alsiglcenter.org MAKE A SCARECROW. Make your own scarecrow, bring old clothes and a pillow case for its headstuffing is provided. 1-3pm., Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd., Naples, 374-6160, www.rmsc.org ZOOBOO. Children dressed in costume can enjoy a non-scary Halloween atmosphere as they trick-ortreat in safety at “Zoo Boo”, which is scheduled during daylight hours. Games, crafts activities for all ages. 10am-4pm. $7. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St., Rochester, 336-712, www.senecaparkzoo.org

25 * Tuesday GRAND TORCH LIGHT TOURS. The finale to the tour season with a special tour path lighted by torches. Learn about local history, horticulture, symbolism and more. 6pm. $7-$10. Mt. Hope Cemetery, 1133 Mount Hope Ave, Rochester, 461-3494. www.fomh.org

27 * Thursday FREE • HALLOWEEN’S HISTORY. A presentation on the history of Halloween, it’s Celtic roots, connection with Hallow tide, and how it emigrated to North America to become one of the most beloved holidays. Registration required. 7pm. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7093. www.hpl.org

28 * Friday

FALL HARVEST PARTY. Each child will decorate a pumpkin, trick or treat around the town offices, enjoy a hay ride, cider and doughnuts . Costumes encouraged. Every child receives a prize. 10am11:30am. Charlie Maier Lodge, 964-7222. www.hamlinny.org HALLOWEEN FUN WITH FLASHLIGHTS. Come dressed in costume, and into the Star Theater to vanquish the darkness. Bring a flashlight or purchase one with your ticket. 4:30pm. $8-$10. Strasenburgh Planetarium, 657 East Ave, 271-4320. www.rmsc.org HAUNTINGLY GOOD HALLOWEEN STORIES. Master storyteller William Briggs returns this year to tell hair-raising stories of city-village ghost who have traveled through time from Rochester to Charlotte. Will one of them make an appearance this evening? 6pm-9pm. The Charlotte-Genesee Lighthouse, 70 Lighthouse St., 621-6179, www.geneseelighthouse.org SCHOOL OF SCREAMS. Walk through the Haunted Town Hall for spooky thrills and chills. 7-9pm., $3 per person, bring a canned good to save $1, Hamlin Recreation, 1658 Lake Rd., Hamlin, 964-7222, www.hamlinny.org SPIRITS OF THE PAST GHOSTLY TOURS. Channel the Halloween spirits and enjoy some of the most macabre and ghostly stories from the 1800’s. The tours will reveal frightening scenes of terror, superstition. Reservations required. 6pm. Ages: 12yrs+. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd., Mumford. 538-6822. www.gcv.org THE HAUNTED JAIL AND CELL BLOCK TERROR. Who is hiding around the corner - a mannequin or a real monster? Come through the haunted jail and see for yourself. Free cider and donuts. 6-9pm., $5, Museum of Wayne County History, 21 Butternut St., Lyons, 315-946-4943, www.waynehistory.org FREE • TRICK-O OR-TTREAT. Children can show off their costumes and trick-or-treat throughout the mall. 5pm-7pm. The Mall at Greece Ridge, 271 Greece Ridge Center Drive, 225-0430. www.themallatgreeceridge.com

29 * Saturday BILL GORMANT’S WORLD OF MAGIC. Magic, illusion and fun of “Halloween of Booville”. 12, 1:30, 3pm. Free with admission. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave. 271-1880. www.rmsc.org

FREE • MONSTER BASH. Celebrate Halloween at the library with a costume contest, spooky crafts, activities and a showing of It’s the Great Pumpkin Charlie Brown. 6:30pm. Irondequoit Public LibraryEvans Branch, 45 Cooper Rd., Rochester, 336-6062. www.libraryweb.org/irondequoit/

FREE • EASTVIEW MALL HALLOWEEN PARTY. A fun, safe party at the Bon-Ton Court! Free cider, donuts, trick or treat bags and live music! Kids are welcome to trick or treat at participating mall stores. 11am-1pm. Eastview Mall; Bon Ton Court, 7979 Pittsford-Victor Road. 223-4420. www.eastviewmall.com

FREE • SCARY STORIES TOLD IN THE DARK. Are you ready for some hair-raising tales and a program of bone chilling stories? Come in costume. Treats will be given to those who don’t try to trick the teller! 7-7:45pm. Wood Library, 134 North Main St., Canandaigua, 394-1381. www.woodlibrary.org/

FAMILY HALLOWEEN PARTY. Come in costume and trick-or-treat with favorite storybook characters, dance to Halloween tunes, play games, and more. 10am-8pm. Free with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 263-2700. www.thestrong.org

FREE • HALLOWEEN PARTY AT THE LIBRARY. Give your costume a trail run and come for games and fun. 11am-noon. Ages: 12yrs and under. Charlotte Branch Library, 3557 Lake Ave., Rochester, 428-8216. www.libraryweb.org PUMPKINS IN THE PARK. Celebrate fitness with your family and friends while supporting city youth sports. 5K race begins at 9am. Youth race starts at 9:45am. Registration 7:30am. 7:30-10:30am. $15-$20. Cobb’s Hill Lake Riley Lodge, Norris Dr., Rochester, www.yellowjacketracing.com

SCHOOL OF SCREAMS. Walk through the Haunted Town Hall for spooky thrills and chills. 7-9pm., $3 per person, bring a canned good to save $1, Hamlin Recreation, 1658 Lake Rd., Hamlin, 964-7222, www.hamlinny.org FREE • SOMETHING SPOOKY. It’s time for some spooky fun! This story and craft program is for children in kindergarten - 2nd grades. Sign up to come and be sure to wear your costume. 11am-12pm. Wood Library, 134 North Main St., Canandaigua, 394-1381. www.woodlibrary.org SPIRITS OF THE PAST GHOSTLY TOURS. Channel the Halloween spirits and enjoy some of the most macabre and ghostly stories from the 1800’s. The tours will reveal frightening scenes of terror, superstition. Reservations required. 6pm. Ages: 12yrs+. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd., Mumford. 538-6822. www.gcv.org THE HAUNTED JAIL AND CELL BLOCK TERROR. Who is hiding around the corner - a mannequin or a real monster? Come through the haunted jail and see for yourself. Free cider and donuts. 6-9pm., $5, Museum of Wayne County History, 21 Butternut St., Lyons, 315-946-4943, www.waynehistory.org TRICK OR TREATING IN THE VILLAGE. Don your Halloween costume and beg for treats from the townspeople in the safety of the historic village. Warm yourself by the campfire, hear spooky stories and enjoy other family-fun activities on a colorful autumn afternoon. 12-5pm. $5kids, adults free. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd., Mumford. 538-6822. www.gcv.org

30 * Sunday FAMILY HALLOWEEN PARTY. Come in costume and trick-or-treat with favorite storybook characters, dance to Halloween tunes, play games, and more. 10am-8pm. Free with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 263-2700. www.thestrong.org TRICK OR TREATING IN THE VILLAGE. See Oct 29. 12-5pm.

31 * Monday TODDLER HALLOWEEN PARTY. Halloween activities and goodies for the littlest trick-or-treaters. 10am2pm. Free with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 263-2700. www.thestrong.org

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Library Events & Activities 03 * Monday

12 * Wednesday

25 * Tuesday

MONDAY KICKS FOR AGES 2 TO 6. Playful learning activities designed for 2- to 6-year-olds, one Monday a month. This month: Winter Wonder. 10am-2pm. Free with admission. Ages: 2-6. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 263-2700. www.thestrong.org

FREE • BOOKS & BITES TEEN BOOK DISCUSSION. Enjoy pizza and discuss the books you’d like to talk about! Refreshments provided. Registration required. 6:30-7:30pm. Ages: 12yrs+. Great Northern Pizza, 640 Jefferson Rd., Henrietta, Call HPL, 359-7093. www.hpl.org

FREE • CRAFTS WITH MISS EMILY. See Oct 11th. 4:30pm. Charlotte Branch Library, 3557 Lake Ave., Rochester, 428-8216. www.libraryweb.org

MONDAY-B BABY STORYTIME. Help your child build a foundation for literacy with 20 minutes of stories, puppets, action rhymes, nursery rhymes, flannel stories and songs. 11:15am. Ages: 0-2yrs. Irondequoit Public Library-Evans Branch, 45 Cooper Rd., Rochester, 336-6062. www.libraryweb.org/irondequoit/

13 * Thursday

TODDLER STORYTIME. See Oct 04. 10:30-11am. Ages: 2yrs+. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7093. www.hpl.org

26 * Wednesday

BOOKWORMS. A book club for the youngest book lovers. Read and discuss a picture book, have a snack, and make a craft. Registration Required. 3:45-4:30pm. Ages: K-2yrs. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7093. www.hpl.org

FREE • FAMILY MOVIE NIGHT AT THE LIBRARY. See Oct 5th. 5pm. Charlotte Branch Library, 3557 Lake Ave., Rochester, 428-8248. www3.libraryweb.org

04 * Tuesday

15 * Saturday

TEEN ADVISORY BOARD. Come and be a part of the Teen Advisory Board. Grades 7-12. No registration. 6-7pm. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7093. www.hpl.org

TODDLER DANCE PARTY. Come and dance your sillies out. Toddlers and their caregivers will have a blast listening and dancing along to some of their favorite tunes. No registration. 10:15am-10:45am. Ages: 18mo-3yrs. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7093. www.hpl.org

LEGO CLUB. The library will provide the bricks and challenge participants to be as creative as possible. Registration required. 4-4:45pm. Ages: 6-12yrs. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7093. www.hpl.org

TUESDAY-TTODDLER STORYTIME. Build a foundation for literacy with 20 minutes of stories, puppets, action rhymes, nursery rhymes, flannel stories and songs. 10:15am. Ages: 2-3yrs. Irondequoit Public Library-Evans Branch, 45 Cooper Rd., Rochester, 336-6062. www.libraryweb.org/irondequoit/

05 * Wednesday COMIC BOOK CLUB. Each month read and discuss a different comic book. Write and illustrate your own comic book. Registration required. 3:454:30pm. Ages: 7-12yrs. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7093. www.hpl.org FAMILY MOVIE NIGHT. Bring your pillow and blanket and we will have the popcorn. Every Wednesday night through Dec. 14. 5pm. East Rochester Public Library, 111 West Elm St., East Rochester, 428-8248. www.libraryweb.org/erochester/

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20 * Thursday FREE • CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP FOR ADULTS. See Oct. 18. 6:30pm-8:30pm. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7093. www.hpl.org DANCE PARTY. Come to the Charlotte Children’s room and get your groove on. Listen to some of your favorite kids’ music, enjoy a snack and dance. 12:45-1:45pm. Charlotte Branch Library, 3557 Lake Ave., Rochester, 428-8216. www3.libraryweb.org

FREE • PRESCHOOL STORYTIME. See Oct 05. 10:30-11am Ages: 3-5yrs. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7093. www.hpl.org TEEN GAME NIGHT. Come and hang out with your friends at HPL’s monthly Teen Game Night. No registration. 6:30-8pm. Ages: 12yrs+. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7093. www.hpl.org

27 * Thursday FREE • BABY STORYTIME. See Oct 13. 10:30am11am. Ages: 0-23mos. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7093. www.hpl.org

28 * Friday FREE • FALL STORY TIMES. See Oct 7th. 1:30pm2:30pm. Ages: 2yrs-4yrs Charlotte Branch Library, 3557 Lake Ave., Rochester, 428-8216. www.libraryweb.org


calendar of events • local family-friendly activities 31 * Monday FAMILY PAJAMA STORYTIME. See Oct. 03. 77:30pm. Ages: 2-8yrs. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7093. www.hpl.org

November 01 * Tuesday EVERY TUESDAY-TTODDLER STORYTIME. Build a foundation for literacy with 20 minutes of stories, puppets, action rhymes, nursery rhymes, flannel stories and songs. 10:15am. Ages: 23yrs. Irondequoit Public Library-Evans Branch, 45 Cooper Rd., Rochester, 336-6062. www.libraryweb.org/irondequoit/ TEEN ADVISORY BOARD. Come and be a part of the Teen Advisory Board. Grades 7-12. No registration. 6-7pm. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7093. www.hpl.org

02 * Wednesday COMIC BOOK CLUB. Each month read and discuss a different comic book. Write and illustrate your own comic book. Registration required. 3:45-4:30pm. Ages: 7-12yrs. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7093. www.hpl.org

October 1 • Civil War Encampment Granger Homestead, 295 N. Main St., Canandaigua www.grangerhomestead.org

03 * Thursday FAMILY MOVIE NIGHT. Bring your pillow and blanket and we will have the popcorn. Every Wednesday night through Dec. 14. 5pm. East Rochester Public Library, 111 West Elm St., East Rochester, 428-8248. www.libraryweb.org/erochester/

07 * Monday EVERY MONDAY-B BABY STORYTIME. Help your child build a foundation for literacy with 20 minutes of stories, puppets, action rhymes, nursery rhymes, flannel stories and songs. 11:15am. Ages: 0-2yrs. Irondequoit Public Library-Evans Branch, 45 Cooper Rd., Rochester, 336-6062. www.libraryweb.org/irondequoit/ EVERY MONDAY-TTODDLER STORYTIME. Help your child build a foundation for literacy with 20 minutes of stories, puppets, action rhymes, nursery rhymes, flannel stories and songs. 10:15am. Ages: 2-3yrs. Irondequoit Public Library-Evans Branch, 45 Cooper Rd., Rochester, 336-6062. www.libraryweb.org/irondequoit/

For lots more Fall Fun activities,

Sunday,

October 23, 2011

events,

recipes and

season fun,

check out our special section at www.GVParent.com

For more Library events visit our Website at www.GVParent.com or the local libraries at: Monroe County Libraries www3.libraryweb.org Ontario County Libraries www.owwl.org Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • October 2011

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calendar of events • local family-friendly activities

Meet Up Club & Support Groups 03 * Monday MOMMIES GONE WILD PLAYGROUP. An active playgroup with events at least 5 times a week. For moms who stay-at-home or have flexible work-at-home schedules. Visit website for the time and location. www.meetup.com/Mommies-Gone-Wild/ STROLLER STRIDES. A total fitness program that moms can do with their babies. Currently meetings are Monday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday. 9-10am. Contact emilylewis@strollerstrides.net for location.

06 * Thursday CANANDAIGUA MOPS GROUP. Support group for moms in the Canandaigua area. Meetings held every Thursday morning. Childcare is provided free of charge. 9:30am-11am. Good Shepard Lutheran Church, 320 South Pearl St, Rochester. www.canandaiguamops.wordpress.com

07 * Friday MOCHA MAMAS OF ROCHESTER. A group for Caucasian families that have adopted African/African American children. Generally meets the first Friday of every month, mothers only. Email mochamamasrochester@gmail.com for time and location.

08 * Saturday ADOPTION SUPPORT GROUP. For parents of adopted children (pre-adopt too). Meets second Saturday of the month. Child care is provided. Reservations required. Noon-2pm. Adoption Support And Preservation, 100 Metro Park, Rochester, 350-2529 or 752-9947.

10 * Monday BETTER DAYS AHEAD: PARENTS OF TEENS SUPPORT GROUP. Parents of Teens is a great place to meet, talk, share resources, listen and learn about issues and feelings, that are involved in raising a challenging Teenager. Meetings held the 2nd and 4th Mondays of every month through Dec. 12. 5:30pm- 7pm. Mental Health Association/Better Days Ahead, 320 N. Goodman St.,, Ste. 202, Rochester, Call 325-3145 ext 137 to register. www.mharochester.org HOLISTIC MOMS ROCHESTER. Meetings are generally held the second Monday of each month. Children are welcome. 6:30pm. Christ Episcopal Church, 36 S. Main St., Pittsford. www.holisticmomsrochester.blogspot.com

14 * Friday EXTRAORDINARY MOMS OUT. Moms with multiple special needs and/or are medically fragile. On face book under MEMO- Meeting Extraordinary Moms Out. Meets the second Friday of the month. 7pm. Location TBA. Contact Erin at erinbeyers@gmail.com

20 * Thursday GREATER ROCHESTER MOTHER OF TWINS CLUB. Offers a vital support system for mothers and mothersto-be of multiples. September -June GRMOTC meets on the third Thursday of each month. 7pm. Laurelton United Presbyterian Church, 334 Helendale Road, Rochester. www.grmotc.com

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AREA MOMS CLUB MEETINGS 03 * Monday

19 * Wednesday

MOMS CLUB-N NEWARK-PPALMYRA. Meetings are generally held the first Monday of the month. 9am. For location and further information visit the website. www.newpalmoms.org

MOMS CLUB OF HENRIETTA WEST. Mothers and their children who live in East Henrietta, Rush, within the Roth middle school boundary. Meets the second Thursday of the month. 10am. Call 234-MOMS x5 or email henreittawestmomsclub@gmail.com for location.

05 * Wednesday MOMS CLUB OF FAIRPORT. At-home mothers and their children who reside in the Fairport School District. Call for location. 10-11:30am 234-4MOM (Mailbox 7). www.fairportmomsclub.wikispaces.com MOMS CLUB OF IRONDEQUOIT. Offers support and social opportunities for at home moms and their families. Meets the first Wednesday of the Month. 9:30am. Check web site or email momsclubofirondequoit@yahoo.com www.momsclubofirondequoit.blogspot.com MOMS CLUB OF VICTOR/FARMINGTON. For mothers and their children who live in the Victor/Farmington area. Meetings are held the first Wednesday of the month. Farmington United Methodist Church, 5925 County Rd. 41, Farmington. Email victorfarmingtonmoms@hotmail.com for details.

11 * Tuesday MOMS CLUB OF PENFIELD/ EAST ROCHESTER/ BRIGHTON. Offers support and socialization for at-home moms and their children. Meetings are held the second Tuesday of every month. 10am11:30am. Email penfieldmoms@yahoo.com for locations and details.

12 * Wednesday MOMS CLUB OF BROCKPORT. Visitors and children are welcome. Meetings are held the second Wednesday of the month. 10am. Call 210-2543 or email momsclubofbrockportny@yahoo.com or visit www.brockportmoms.stormpages.com

13 * Thursday MOMS CLUB OF HENRIETTA EAST. Mothers and their children who live in East Henrietta, Rush, within the Roth middle school boundary. Meets the second Thursday of the month. 10am. Call 234-MOMS x5 for email henreittawestmomsclub@gmail.com for location.

MOMS CLUB OF WEBSTER.ONTARIO. Support group for stay home moms that offer a variety of activities for moms and their children. Children are invited to wear Halloween costumes and join in for crafts/story time. 10am. For location email: momsclubofwebsterandontario@yahoo.com.

27 * Thursday MOMS CLUB OF CHILI. Visitors and children are welcome. Meetings are held the third Thursday of the month. 9:30am. Chili Presbyterian Church, 3600 Chili Avenue, Contact 234-moms x4, momsclubofchili@yahoo.com

November 02 * Wednesday MOMS CLUB OF IRONDEQUOIT. Offers support and social opportunities for at home moms and their families. Meets the first Wednesday of the Month. 9:30am. Check web site or email momsclubofirondequoit@yahoo.com www.momsclubofirondequoit.blogspot.com MOMS CLUB OF VICTOR/FARMINGTON. For mothers and their children who live in the Victor/Farmington area. Meetings are held the first Wednesday of the month. Farmington United Methodist Church, 5925 County Rd. 41, Farmington. Email for the time and location. victorfarmingtonmoms@hotmail.com

07 * Monday MOMS CLUB-N NEWARK-PPALMYRA. Meetings are generally held the first Monday of the month. For location visit the website. 11am www.newpalmoms.org

09 * Wednesday MOMS CLUB OF BROCKPORT. Visitors and children are welcome. Meetings are held the second Wednesday of the month. 10am. Call 2102543 or email momsclubofbrockportny@yahoo.com or visit website for location. www.brockportmoms.storm-

WANT YOUR SUPPORT GROUP LISTED IN THIS SECTION? Send information by the 10th of the month prior to the event date to calendar@gvparent.com


calendar of events • local family-friendly activities NATIONAL ACROBATS OF CHINA. Acrobats perform tricks such as aerial ballet and flying trapeze acts. 8pm. $55-$70. Nazareth College Arts Center,4245 East Avenue. 389-2170. www.boxoffice.naz.edu

31 * Monday

29 * Saturday

TODDLER BOOK CLUB AT THE STRONG. See Oct 03. 10:30am, 11:30am, & 12:30pm. Free with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 263-2700. www.thestrong.org

LITTLE BUDDIES MOVIE SERIES. The MVP Little Buddies Series is a family-friendly film series sponsored by MVP and Genesee Valley Parent. This month’s feature is Bedknobs and Broomsticks. 10am. $5. The Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. 2580400. www.thelittle.org RINGLING BROS. AND BARNUM & BAILEY CIRCUS. The mystery of magic and the mastery of skill will leave you spellbound in this mind-blowing circus spectacular. 7pm. $15-$75. Blue Cross Arena, 1 War Memorial Square, Rochester, 1-800-7453000. www.Ringling.com, or www.ticketmaster.com for times and tickets.

30 * Sunday FALL FOLLIAGE BY TROLLEY. See Oct 02. 11:30am. $5-$7. New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 East River Road, Rush, 5331113. www.nymtmuseum.org RPO ORKIDSTRA: RUNAWAY BUNNY. Featuring a musical adaptation and orchestra taking audiences on a journey with the adorable bunny. In honor of Halloween, be sure to come in your costume. 2pm. $10-$15. Performance Hall at Hochstein, 50 North Plymouth Ave., 454-2100. www.rpo.org

Have a Safe & Happy Halloween!

November 01 * Tuesday PLAY AS YOU GROW. An opportunity for supervised play using a variety of equipment in an open gym format that is non-instructional. Every Tuesday and Thursday. 10-11am. $3. Pieters Family Life Center, 1025 Commons Way, Rochester, 4873500. www.pietersfamilylifecenter.org

03 * Thursday PLAY AS YOU GROW. See Nov 01. 10-11am. $3. Pieters Family Life Center, 1025 Commons Way, Rochester, 487-3500. www.pietersfamilylifecenter.org

October 9 Wildlife Defenders Presentation RMSC, Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd., Naples www.rmsc.org

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • October 2011

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WANT TO SEE YOUR EVENT

IN PRINT & ONLINE? To submit an event to our calendar e-mail: calendar@gvparent.com or mail to: GVP Calendar 266 Alexander Street Rochester, NY 14607

All entries must be received by the 10th of the month prior to publication in order to be considered. (November events must be submitted by October 10th.) Events printed as space permits.

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calendar of events • local family-friendly activities 05 * Saturday eGAMEREVOLUTION WEEKEND. Electronic gamerelated activities in conjunction with the eGameRevolution exhibit. Explore the history of video games and their impact on the way we play, learn, and relate to each other. 10am-8pm. Free with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 263-2700. www.thestrong.org EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS. Join RMSC in saying “thank you” to those who put themselves in danger to keep the rest of us safe. Meet real- life first responders-explore how they do their important and sometimes dangerous jobs. 11am-4pm. Free with admission. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave. 271-1880. www.rmsc.org FREE • GREATER ROCHESTER WOMEN’S EXPO. The 9th Annual Greater Rochester Women’s’ Expo—the ultimate Moms’ day out! Over 140 exhibitors, entertainment, shopping, samples, presentations, information sharing, networking, door prizes, discount coupons, and much more. Time for you! 10am-4pm. Fair & Expo Center, 2695 E. Henrietta Rd., Call 287-5330 for more information. www.rochesterwomensexpo.com MUFARO’S BEAUTIFUL DAUGHTERS. An African folktale of two very different sisters, that explores sibling rivalry and the importance of character. 2pm-4pm. $14-$17. Nazareth College Arts Center,4245 East Avenue, Rochester, 389-2170. www.boxoffice.naz.edu FREE • ROCHESTER CHILDREN’S BOOK FESTIVAL. Hundreds of titles and 40+ authors and illustrators will be on hand at this Rochester Area Children’s’ Writers and Illustrators Society event. Workshops, picture book readings, and programs for young readers of all ages will be presented. 10am-4pm. R. Thomas Flynn Campus Center (MCC Brighton Campus), 1000 E. Henrietta Rd. www.rochesterchildrensbookfestival.org

06 * Sunday eGAMEREVOLUTION WEEKEND. See Nov 05. 125pm. Free with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 263-2700. www.thestrong.org GO GREEN! RECYCLE RALLY. Help your Zoo by bringing inkjet and toner cartridges for recycling. Bring them to the Zoo to be recycled. Held in the parking lot. 10am-3pm. $2 per pound to recycle batteries. Everything else is free of charge. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St. 336-7123. www.senecaparkzoo.org VIDEO GAME MANIA. To mark the first anniversary of the eGameRevolution exhibit, the museum galleries will be overloaded with video games that challenge and entertain every age. noon-5pm. Free with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 263-2700. www.thestrong.org

November 5 • Greater Rochester Women’s Expo 10 am - 4 pm The Dome Center, Henrietta www.RochesterWomensExpo.com

10 * Thursday NATIONAL TOY HALL OF FAME INDUCTION. The 2011 toy honorees are revealed at a public ceremony that takes place in the National Toy Hall of Fame. 10am. Free with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 263-2700. www.thestrong.org

11 * Friday FREE • CANANDAIGUA TREATY DAY. The 1794 signing of the Canandaigua Treaty is commemorated annually by Native and non-Native peoples alike at the boulder by the original Canandaigua Signing location. 10am-6pm. 96 W. Gibson Street, Canandaigua. Contact Ganondagn Historic Site, 742-1690. www.ganondagan.org CHALLENGER LEARNING CENTER MISSION. See Nov 11th. 10:30am-12:30pm. $13-$16. Ages: 7yrs+. RMSC Strasenburgh Planetarium, 657 East Ave. 271-1880. www.rmsc.org FREE • HANDEL’S MESSIAH. The Nazareth College Chamber Singers present Handel’s beloved oratorio. Conducted by Mark Ziegler. 7:30pm. Linehan Chapel, Nazareth College, 4245 East Ave., Rochester, 389-2700. www.go.naz.edu/music-events

07 * Monday

12 * Saturday

TODDLER BOOK CLUB AT THE STRONG. Readings of classic children’s tales followed by music and movement activities. This month: Sports of All Sorts. 10:30am, 11:30am, & 12:30pm. Free with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 263-2700. www.thestrong.org

SERENDIPITY WALK. Bring a lunch and sturdy footwear for this guided walk through areas of the nature center that most people never see! Be prepared for varied terrain—up and down, wet and dry. 11am-2pm. $3. RMSC Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd., Naples, 374-6160. www.rmsc.org

09 * Wednesday SENIOR SOJOURN. See Oct 12th. 11am-noon. $3. Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Road, Naples, 374-6160. www.rmsc.org

13 * Sunday HOCHSTEIN YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. A beautiful symphony conducted by John Fetter. 7pm. $5. Hochstein School of Music & Dance, 50 N. Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. www.hochstein.org NATIONAL TOY HALL OF FAME CELEBRATION. A weekend of toy-filled revelry in conjunction with the induction of the 2011 class into the hall. See yo-yo tricks from Duncan Crew USA. noon-5pm Free with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 2632700. www.thestrong.org STORIES BY RAFE MARTIN. In this family event, internationally-known storyteller, Rafe Martin, brings alive a sense of the wisdom and wonder of traditional stories. 1pm-3pm. $5-$15. Temple Emanu-El, 2956 Saint Paul Blvd, Rochester, 3857643. www.emanuelrochester.org

14 * Monday MONDAY KICKS FOR AGES 2 TO 6. Playful learning activities designed for 2- to 6-year olds. Meetings held one Monday a month. This month: The Big Game. 10am-2pm. Free with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 263-2700. www.thestrong.org TODDLER BOOK CLUB AT THE STRONG. See Nov 07. 10:30am, 11:30am, & 12:30pm. Free with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 263-2700. www.thestrong.org

TYKES PRESENTS: WILLY WONKA. Hilarious puppets join a full cast of live actors in Roald Dahl’s timeless story of the world famous candy man and his quest to find an heir. Through Nov. 20th. $16. Hart Theater at the JCC, 1200 Edgewood Avenue, Rochester, 723-6080. www.tykestheatre.org

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • October 2011

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calendar of events • local family-friendly activities

Ongoing Events & Exhibits CURRENTLY AT THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF PLAY AT THE STRONG Football: The Exhibit evokes all of the excitement and experience of the sport while exploring the science and technology that makes it all possible. Giant airbrushed paintings of players in action lead the way into game zones. Learn key concepts including collisions, peripheral vision, reaction times, trajectories, and balance. Photograph the kids as they stand behind one of the giant painted cut-out boards of players in action. Free with admission. One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 263-2700, www.thestrong.org

STRASENBURGH PLANTERIUM 657 East Ave., Rochester 14607, 271-1880, www.rmsc.org/StrasenburghPlanetarium/ Check website or call for prices and hours DOLPHINS. Experience a rare and close-up view into the world of our favorite ocean animal. Narrated by Pierce Brosnan, music by Sting. $8$10. MUMMIES-SSECRETS OF THE PHARAOHS. Follow researchers and explorers as they piece together the archeological and genetic clues of Egyptian mummies. Experience the wonders of Mummies and enjoy a cinematic adventure 3,000 years in the making. $8-$10. MY PLANETS. For children ages 3-5 and the adults with them. Especially for young children, this friendly introduction to the planetarium features worlds in our solar system as they appear in the sky and through a telescope. Saturdays at 10am. $8. Ages: 3-5yrs. SATURDAY NIGHT LASER SHOW. Intensely colored beams from argon and krypton lasers fill the planetarium dome with dazzling color patterns that spontaneously dance to classic rock music. Shows change monthly. 9:30pm. $9-$10. Ages: 5+. FREE * SATURDAY NIGHT TELESCOPE VIEWING. Climb 60 steps at the back of the planetarium to view the heavens through a 12.5-inch diameter reflecting telescope operated by knowledgeable volunteers from the Astronomy Section of the Rochester Academy of Science. 7:30-10pm. SATURDAY SUN, MOON AND STARS. This relaxed, enjoyable family show presents prominent constellations and takes the audience on a quick trip to the moon. See what Earth looks like from a quarter million miles away, and return home in time for sunrise. Show Times (subject to change- confirm at rmsc.org)11am. $8-$10.

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ROCHESTER MUSEUM & SCIENCE CENTER 657 East Ave., Rochester 14607 271-1880, www.rmsc.org Check website or call for prices and hours ADVENTURE ZONE Dive to the bottom of Lake Ontario in the Deep Submergence Vehicle simulator. Test your strength on the Genesee Gorge climbing wall. Explore Rochester weather. Experiment with wind currents, stream erosion, and more. A GLOBAL MOMENT EXHIBITION. A memorial exhibition that explores the personal and historical significance of the tragic events of that horrific day, The exhibition honors the never-forgotten victims, brave survivors, courageous responders and their families who made September 11, 2001 a global moment in time. Continues through Nov. 27. AT THE WESTERN DOOR. The hundreds of objects displayed show the Seneca’s and Haudenosaunee’s creative response to new technologies and materials introduced following European Contact. Clan and family continue to bind communities together and define who the Seneca and Haudenosaunee are. DISCOVER OUR WEATHER. Make a cloud, measure the wind, and marvel at the power of lightning! Become a TV weather personality, record your own forecast, and then email it home to yourself! ENERGIZE IT: EXHIBIT. The exhibit features various types of energy in a fully interactive setting. In a multi-sensory, highly physical experience. Throughout the 3,500-square-foot exhibit, various energizing elements combine to create an allencompassing experience that’s felt, seen and heard. EXPEDITION EARTH. Explore your connections to the natural world in this spectacular, interactive natural science exhibition. See how our region’s landscape and life forms have changed over hundreds of millions of years. Regular museum hours.

FLIGHT TO FREEDOM. Rochester’s Underground Railroad. Explore stories of courageous African Americans who traveled through Rochester on their way from slavery to freedom. Find out about local people who helped them. HOW THINGS WORK. Discover the science behind everyday devices. Through fun, hands-on investigation, find out how mechanisms such as light switches, thermostats, and traffic signals work. K’NEX. Be an engineer! Build trucks, towers-anything you can imagine-with this colorful construction toy. LIGHT HERE-LLIGHT NOW. Rochester is optics! Have hands-on fun with light, color, and optics with mirrors, lenses, and lasers. Presented by Bausch & Lomb. RACEWAYS. Discover the principles of moving objects. Experiment with momentum, friction, gravity, and acceleration as you send wooden balls looping and racing over ramps. THE ROCHESTER BUSINESS HALL OF FAME. This interactive exhibit celebrates exemplary Rochester leaders who have made outstanding, enduring contributions to business and community in the greater Rochester region.

NATIONAL MUSEUM OF PLAY AT THE STRONG One Manhattan Square, Rochester 14607 263-2700 or TDD 423-0746, www.the strong.org Check website or call for prices and hours AMERICAN COMIC BOOK HEROES: THE BATTLE OF GOOD VS. EVIL. This exhibit lets the kid in each of us tap into our superpowers! Climb up the side of a building, make your own cape, test your superhero skills, pose for pictures with Spiderman and learn more about your favorite comic book hero. BERENSTAIN BEARS: DOWN A SUNNY DIRT ROAD. Check out this original, permanent exhibit straight from the pages of the beloved books. Step into the playful world of the Berenstain Bears including Main Street, Bear Country School, Farmer Ben’s Farm, Brother and Sister Bear’s Club Houses, and the Family Tree House. CAN YOU TELL ME HOW TO GET TO SESAME STREET? Step onto Sesame Street and go hands-on with activities you see on television. Enter Elmo’s crayon-colored television world. Experience the famous brownstone facade of 123 Sesame Street. See yourself on TV with the Muppets, drive Elmo around Sesame Street in a big yellow taxicab, sell movie tickets at the Circle in the Square Cinema ticket booth, and more. CELEBRATING AMERICA’S FAVORITE DOLL. A fabulously fashionable display of Barbie dolls from the original teenage fashion model to modern astronaut and scores of other careers. The display features more than 500 examples of Barbie and her friends—plus an array of Barbie accessories including houses, cases, clothing, horses, cars, yachts, and other toys.


calendar of events • local family-friendly activities DANCING WINGS BUTTERFLY GARDEN®. The Dancing Wings Butterfly Garden team at the National Museum of Play has raised the bar by introducing a variety of birds and animals into the butterfly garden to create a lively ecosystem that they have dubbed “butterfly garden 2.0.” The new, improved Dancing Wings Butterfly Garden is teeming with colorful wildlife among its dense tropical foliage and cascading waterfall.

CULTURES FOR KIDS. Curious about how children live in other parts of the world? Use Cultures for Lids to explore different countries. You can learn about languages, clothing, music and more, finding similarities as well as differences alpng the way. $5. Explore & More children’s museum, 300 Gleed Ave., East Aurora, 716-655-5131, www.exploreandmore.org

EGAMEREVOLUTION. An original, highly interactive exhibit that explores the history of video games and their impact on the way we play, learn, and relate to each other. Or visit one of several emulator stations around the gallery and challenge yourself to more than 40 classic and contemporary PC and console games.Daily.

GEVA PRESENTS: DRACULA THRU NOV 13. The Count journeys from his gloomy Transylvanian castle to the bustling streets of London, leaving death and destruction in his seductive wake. Sink your teeth into this darkly passionate and hauntingly lush adaptation of Bram Stoker’s 1897 novel.Visit website. Ages: 15+. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. 232-4382, www.gevatheatre.org

NATIONAL TOY HALL OF FAME. Each November, the National Toy Hall of Fame at The Strong inducts toys that have achieved longevity and national significance in the world of play and imagination. The prestigious hall features historic examples of current toy inductees and play stations where you can race a slinky, build with Lego bricks, swivel a hula hoop, and play with blocks and puzzels. Free with admission. ONE HISTORY PLACE. Amid original artifacts and reproductions, children explore mini-environments and get a taste of life as it was a century ago. Play dress-up in the attic, plink piano keys in the parlor, pump water in the kitchen, and pretend to travel across the country at the train station. READING ADVENTURELAND. Step into a lifesized pop-up book and follow the Yellow Brick Road into five literary landscapes from children’s books: Adventure Island, Mystery Mansion, Fairy Tale Forest, Upside-Down nonsense House, and the Wizard’s Workshop. SUPER KIDS MARKET. Cruise the aisles and fill your cart with a selection of colorful produce that looks so real, you can almost taste it. Deli, Meat, Seafood, and Bakery departments are filled with highly interactive stations for dramatic role-playing. Make a brick oven pizza; run the bakery; scan bar-coded products at six working check-out counters; and much more! Kids produce their own commercials and cooking shows in the WKID-TV station. WHIMSICAL ART TRAIL CONTINUES THROUGH NOVEMBER. Balloon art, faerie creatures, teeny tiny dolls, and fantastical pupputs. Those are some of the delightful pieces of art that will greet museum guests as they follow the trail. The series of displays offers fresh original works by contemporary artists.

OTHER AREA ATTRACTIONS BRISTOL MOUNTAIN FALL SKY RIDES THRU OCT 30. Bristol Mountain will be hosting the Bristol Mountain Fall Sky Rides on the weekends and on Columbus Day Monday, October 11. Enjoy the most spectacular fall foliage in the Finger Lakes. The Comet Express carries up to four passengers per chair on a tranquil one mile ride up 1,200 vertical feet to the mountain summit.12-4pm. Bristol Mountain Winter Resort, 5662 Route 64, Canandaigua, 374-1125, www.bristolmountain.com BUILDING CURIOSITY. Build your own house from builder boards, Construction tools and an inside look at the building of a house are a big part of the fun. In the Frank Lloyd Wright -style architectural studio, your kids can design and build houses. $5. Explore & More children’s museum, 300 Gleed Ave., East Aurora, 716-655-5131, www.exploreandmore.org

JOURNEYS INTO PAPUA. A unique collectionsbased exhibit of Oceanic culture. The exhibit presents artifacts collected from different South Pacific explorers and combines them to form a revealing look into life in Papua New Guinea. 10am-4pm. $7-$9. Buffalo Museum of Science, 1020 Humboldt Parkway, Buffalo., 716-8965200. www.sciencebuff.org PENGUIN EXHIBIT. The African black-footed penguin exhibit located in the Rocky Coasts area of the Zoo. Seneca Park Zoo is home to one of the top three African black-footed penguin breeding programs in North America. Today, thirty-three penguins are on exhibit at the Zoo; 13 males, 13 females and 7 juveniles. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St. 336-7123, www.senecaparkzoo.org THE HERSCHELL CARROUSEL FACTORY MUSEUM. The Herschell Carrousel Factory Museum currently operates two historic carousels inside its building complex in North Tonawanda. Located in the Children’s Gallery is a small 1940’s aluminum carousel. Called a “Kiddie Carousel” in the Allan Herschell Company catalog, it was created specifically for small children to ride without the need for adults to accompany them. The Herschell Carrousel Factory Museum, 180 Thompson St., North Tonawanda, 14120, 716-693-1885 or visit www.carrouselmuseum.org

next issue Coming in the November issue of Genesee Valley Parent Our Annual Education Guide Natural Cold & Flu Remedies Modern Families Part III Adoption Kids & Culture Baking Holiday Cookies

TOUR THE RIEDMAN ROBOTIC MILKING CENTER The Riedman Robotic Milking Center is an airy free-stall barn with room for 60 cows, plus four calf pens and box stalls for cows that are giving birth. Attached to the barn is a milk house that includes a reception lobby, the robotic milking parlor, viewing area and a milk storage tank. Tours are available Monday through Saturday11am-2pm. $2-$3. Springdale Farm, 700 Colby Street, Spencerport. 349-2090, www.heritagechristianservices.org WHEM ANKH: THE CIRCLE OF LIFE IN ANCIENT EGYPT Suitable for young children to world travelers, it is truly one of the world’s most innovative presentations on the people of this important and interesting part of Africa. This is your opportunity to time travel back into the past at a time when everything from birth to death revolved around the seasons and the river of life – the Nile. The Buffalo Museum of Science, 1020 Humboldt Parkway, Buffalo, 716-896-5200, www.sciencebuff.org

Call 585-287-5330 to learn about advertising in the upcoming issue

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • October 2011

59


Party Planner – Everything to get the party started! Carnival Supplies & Rentals “Imitated, But Not Duplicated” Fully Insured

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Wildlife Education Starts Here Exciting Wildlife Programs

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Diamonds Limo Presents “Pizza By Limo”

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www.GVParent.com Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • October 2011

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[ out & about ]

By Hayden Freedman

Take a Hike!

STONY BROOK STATE PARK

W

ith the autumn season upon us, it's time to get outdoors. If you're looking for a weekend day trip or overnight adventure for your family, consider Stony Brook State Park in Dansville. The 577 acre park contains the famous Gorge Trail (or the Trail of a Thousand Stairs), which runs right along a beautiful stream and passes by three large waterfalls. The park manager, Jerry Egenhofer, says that when people come to Stony Brook State Park, this trail is "what everyone is looking for," though there are several other trails to explore as well. The Gorge Trail is a breathtaking journey where hikers can climb up through showers of refreshing water and pass over the gorge on stone brides. At the very top of the trail, you'll find the forty-five foot Upper Falls. The hike is one that even kids who hate hiking can enjoy, because there are many distractions from the actual walking including views of stunning fall foliage and the chance to see wildlife in action. Camping and picnicking areas are also available at Stony Brook State Park, as well as a playground and two swimming areas. The park has a no alcohol policy and for the campers, quiet hour begins at 10 pm. Both of these rules are very strictly enforced. There are also two pavilions on-site which can be rented out.



Hayden Freedman is an journalism intern from Pittsford Sutherland High School.

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Where it's located: 10820 Route 36 South, Dansville, NY, 14437 When it’s open: Open year round. Camping season runs April 30-October 9. (Cabins are available until 10/9/11.) Shelters/Pavilions are available until 10/31/11. All gorge trails close the Friday before Thanksgiving.

Pricing: Free to enter, $7 parking, $15-$19 camping per night depending on campsite location.

For more information: http://nysparks.state.ny.us, (585) 335-8111


From diapers to diplomas... Genesee Valley & Rochester Area Parent is the area’s best resource, providing expert advice, stories on parenting trends and issues, local resources, calendar of family-friendly events and numerous ways for parents to enrich their experience raising the next generation. Find us monthly in print and online 24/7.


Genesee Valley Parent - October 2011  

Rochester NY’s premier parenting resource since 1994

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