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Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • July 2013

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Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • July 2013

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Inside july

Vol.20 Number 7

in this issue

6|G  VParent.com

On the Web in July

8 | Editor’s Note 10 | Buzzworthy 

Reviews & News

20 | Y  our Family –

health Have the Sun Safety Talk

22 | Y  our Family –

health Water Safety for the Whole Family

24 | Y  our Family –

health Sweet Dreams at Sleepaway Camp

26 | P arenting – Teens &

Tweens What Parents and Teens Should Know About Body Piercing

28 | Y  our Family –

activities 12 Ideas for All Things Blueberry

u

30 | B  ook Nook

more feature articles

Top Summer Reads

40 | C  alendar of Events

Museums Visits with Kids

Family-Friendly Events Library Events July 4 Events Ongoing Events & Exhibits

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And All That Jazz //

buffalo's colored musicians club still makes music & history

54 | O  ut & About

Area Farmers' Markets

on the cover OUR HEALTH & WELLNESS ISSUE 135 Things to Do 40 Family Health & Wellness 20, 22, 26, 28 Museum Visits with Kids 16 A Trip to Buffalo's Colored Musician's Club 12

special advertising section:

32-39 area fitness & health providers annual guide

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • July 2013

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[ what’s online ]

Visit us online!

Scan this code with your smart phone to view this content and more on our website!

july // what you can find

this month at www.gvparent.com Did you Know for July... Prior to the Roman Senate naming it in honor of the Roman general, Julius Caesar, (being the month of his birth), it was called Quintilis.

corn hill arts festival

5 Tweeters to Watch Our picks for great tweets:

@HonestToddler / From the popular blog of the same name, follow the insights of what goes through the mind of your average 3 year old surrounded by 'clueless' adults.

'Dog days' of summer begin in early July, when the hot sultry weather of summer usually starts.

@RochRazorSharks / The official Twitter page for The Rochester Razor Sharks - follow the exciting action live! @Roc2ndThought / Attention vintage lovers! Discover 'A Second Thought,' a quality thrift store to buy & donate gently used clothing & household items. Store proceeds benefit people with disabilities here & abroad. Operated by @HCSnews (Heritage Christian Services) @RochesterRoots / Rochester Roots teaches city youth to grow organic produce & entrepreneurial skills to market it. Keeps kids in school; eliminates hunger. @GirlsRockROC / Girls Rock! Rochester is dedicated to empowering girls through music creation and performance. Don’t forget to follow us at @GVParentMag

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online content + editorial

Summer Fairs & Festivals

It's time for festivals! Whether you fancy a good old fashioned county fair, or an ethnic festival with delicious delicacies, or something a bit more out of the ordinary... there is something for everyone! Check out our ultimate guide to festivals in the Greater Rochester Area for summer!

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Summer is here. Kids don’t have to suffer from summer tedium, not when parents have iPhones, iPads and iPods to help quell the boredom. Find five free fun apps that will keep kids playing, learning and strategizing for hours at a time – whether on road trips, plane rides or just sitting at home.

Visit our Virtual Baby Fair online and browse booths from some of Rochester's favorite local businesses that support new and expecting parents and growing families. Find everything from health providers to child care right at your fingertips!

fun apps

virtual baby fair

Giveaways Our summer ticket giveaways continue with your chance to win passes to Roseland Water Park, Seabreeze, Darien Lake and more!

 Enter to win at www.gvparent.com/giveaways


Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • July 2013

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[ editor’s note ]

By Jillian Melnyk

museum seeds

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e were a Museum Family. When it came to vacations, my parents – my father in particular, always scouted out what museums would be in the area before we boarded the plane or packed up the car. Our family trip to Europe (when my sister and I were not yet teenagers) included hours spent at the Tate Modern, Tower of London, Musée d'Orsay, and Louvre. At age 12, I learned what it was like to have sore feet and an achy back.

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what’s on your mind? 

i would love to hear from you! send me an email to editor@gvparent.com

While it was sometimes exhausting (and I'll admit there were some meltdowns), I'm appreciative and thankful that my parents planted what I call 'the museum seeds' early. I have a billion fond memories of museums, and I know that the experiences shaped me into who I am today. I can still imagine the feel of the slippery museum map paper between my fingers and the particular smell of San Francisco's Exploratorium – which, after all these years, still ranks as one of my alltime favorites. (If you're ever in the area, I highly suggest a visit!) There's a lot to be gained from bringing kids to all types of museums – regardless of your child's age or the museum type. I am who I am today because of my exposure to and engagement with everything from art to science to history. As you pack up your car and head out for family travels this July, you may be considering a vacation or trip that includes a museum trip or two. We've included a helpful article about museum trips with

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kids that is full of great tips for how to enjoy museums with young visitors. Whether you're stopping by your first art gallery or checking out a museum of science or history, it's never too early to start exploring – and enjoying. It's not quite accurate to say we were a Museum Family, because we still are. When my father now comes to visit from out of town, one of the first things he asks is what kind of exhibits are up at the local museums and galleries. We visit together and talk about art, life, and everything in between. The love of learning, exploring, and devouring culture isn't something you grow out of, it's something you continue to grow into. As parents, all you need to do is plant the seeds.

Happy summer travels,

Jillian

Staff publisher Barbara Melnyk mail@gvparent.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Jillian Melnyk editor@gvparent.com COMMUNITY EDITOR Natalee Kiesling Natalee@gvparent.com Account Executives Cynthia Goldberg Natalee Kiesling Magazine layout & design Jillian Melnyk graphics@gvparent.com CALENDAR EDITOR calendar@gvparent.com DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Sandy Citarella contributing writers Susan Henninger, Denise Yearian, Ashley Talmadge, Heidi Smith Leudtke, Malia Jacobson, Myrna Beth Haskell, Meagan Ruffing Basic subscription rate: $25/year. Send subscription inquiries and changes to address below. Copyright 2013, by GVP, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. Distribution of this magazine does not necessarily constitute an endorsement or necessarily reflect the opinions of this publication.

Genesee Valley Parent Magazine P.O. Box 25750 Rochester, NY 14625 p: 585-348-9712 f: 585-348-9714 www.gvparent.com

member of parenting media association


Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • July 2013

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[ buzzworthy] sweet summertime Cool down this summer with a rainbow of color and flavor. Add raspberry, orange or strawberry extract to a simple syrup and mix in a few drops of vibrant food color to create this classic frozen treat. Here are a few tips from the McCormick Kitchens to get you started: Make It Snow At Home: If you don’t have a shaved ice maker, crush ice to a snowy texture in your blender or by wrapping a plastic bag of ice in a kitchen towel and smashing it with a rolling pin or mallet.

health bite Think only adults can get heartburn? Think again. One of the top reasons kids complain about chest pain is because they actually have heartburn. It has nothing to do with the heart, but everything to do with the stomach and esophagus. If your child is complaining about discomfort, see if his plate includes these common triggers:

• Fried foods like chicken nuggets or french fries • Junk foods like doughnuts • Soda, coffee, tea and caffeinated energy drinks • Acidic foods like orange juice and tomato sauce • Peppermint and gum Symptoms of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) or heartburn can often include chest pain, stomachaches, nausea, hoarseness or scratchy throat, sour burps, and night cough. These can be brought on by fatty foods, stress, eating large meals and even eating and lying down right after the meal. What can you do if you suspect these foods are causing discomfort in your child? Skip the drive-thru and opt for healthier choices. “Fruits and veggies like spinach and peaches go a long way toward balancing out the acids so get in at least 1-2 per meal,” says Wendy Anderson-Willis, a Pediatrician at Nationwide Children's Hospital. ”Try to get your child to eat several smaller meals throughout the day and don’t allow him to skip meals. Also, more exercise, drinking more water and reducing any stress are good tactics to stop the triggers of heartburn.” Talk to your pediatrician if you have additional concerns.

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Mix and Match: Store syrups in small squeeze bottles and mix and match flavors in each shaved ice. Create layers of color and flavor in the ice, and then gobble them up before the creation melts. You’ll have a different summer treat every time!

Cool Tips // If you want to make your ice more natural, opt for natural extract instead of imitation and skip the food coloring to create a natural-colored ice. For those who want a nonfruity mix try vanilla, almond, chocolate or root beer flavors!

Easy Fruity Shaved Ice Prep Time: 5 minutes // Makes 2 cups syrup. Blue Raspberry Syrup 2 teaspoons McCormick® Raspberry Extract 10 drops Blue McCormick® Assorted Food Colors & Egg Dye Strawberry Cotton Candy Syrup 2 teaspoons McCormick® Imitation Strawberry Extract 10 drops McCormick® Red Food Color Crushed Orange Syrup 1 teaspoon McCormick® Pure Orange Extract 8 drops McCormick® Yellow Food Color 2 drops McCormick® Red Food Color Lemon Blast Syrup 1 teaspoon McCormick® Pure Lemon Extract 10 drops McCormick® Yellow Food Color  ring 2 cups of sugar and 1 cup of water to boil in small •B saucepan on medium heat, stirring to dissolve sugar. Boil 1 minute. Remove from heat. For desired flavor syrup, stir in extract and food color. •C  ool to room temperature. Pour into squeeze bottle for easier serving. Pour syrup over shaved ice. For more inspiring summer ideas, visit www.McCormick.com or www.Pinterest.com/mccormickspices.


Celebrating 19 years of excellence! YOUR FAVORITE

award-winning FAMILY MAGAZINE & WEB SITE

• Gold Award WINNER for the design of our magazine’s annual Rochester Baby Guide • SILVER Award WINNER for the editorial in our Special Parent Section (featured in our September 2012 issue) • SILVER General Excellence Award for our magazine’s annual Rochester Baby Guide • B  ronze GENERAL EXCELLENCE award for Genesee Valley Parent’s website GVParent.com • FINALIST for overall writing of our magazine’s annual Rochester Baby Guide

www.GVParent.com Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • July 2013

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and all

that jazz buffalo’s colored musicians club still makes music & history

By Susan Henninger

I

discovered these hidden treasures on a January afternoon when the Trumansburg Jazz Band visited the Colored Musicians Club (CMC) and Museum in Buffalo. Temperatures may have been frigid outside, but the atmosphere inside the two buildings was smoking hot! George Scott, President of CMC’s Board of Directors, and Danny Williams, who oversees museum operations at the Historic Landmark building, gave the teens a quick overview of CMC’s rich labor and music history before turning them loose to meander through the colorful, interactive exhibits. 12

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The History

According to Scott, at one point in time Buffalo was the eighth largest city in the country. People were moving to the city for work and they needed restaurants to eat in and bars to relax in, resulting in a plethora of opportunities for skilled musicians. Unfortunately, segregation was not just confined to the South and Buffalo’s all-white union had a hold over who was allowed to play in these venues, often requiring a union card which wasn’t easily


accessible for African Americans. In 1917, Blacks decided to form their own union in response to this situation. Scott explains that the Local #533 wasn’t for just anyone; musicians had to audition for membership. The #533 drew emerging instrumentalists and talented singers from all over the country to the Colored Musicians Club, including such greats as Dizzy Gillespie, Billie Holiday, Lena Horne, and Count Basie. In an ironic twist of fate, it was the civil rights era that led to the dissolution of the historic union when it was forced to merge with the White union so as not to violate the Civil Rights Act. Luckily the CMC and Local #533 were regarded as separate entities, allowing CMC to remain open and eventually achieve its current status as the only remaining African American Club in the United States. However, about twelve years ago, members found themselves facing a different kind of crisis. The building was in bad shape and membership was on the decline. The remaining supporters decided to form a 501 (c) and turn the old union headquarters into a museum to permanently preserve the rich slice of African American History it represented. Not wanting a museum where they had to “lead people by the hand,” their goal was to create an environment where kids and adults could

focus on whatever interests them most. With the help of Hadley Exhibits, a local firm with an international reputation, they were able to create a legacy that’s informative, entertaining, and enlightening.

handy device lets you move at whatever pace is comfortable and allows you to hear some really amazing selections of music from the 1900’s. The learning portion of the museum sets the stage for the perfor-

Music is a good craft to learn. You can have it in your life in many ways, be it professionally, as a hobby, or just listening to it. — George Scott, President of CMC’s Board of Directors

“Most importantly we want to show everyone who comes through our doors that there’s a strong connection between the past and the present in musical entertainment,” Scott explains. For example, many kids today think Michael Jackson invented the “Moon Walk.” Not true says Scott; it was actually first done by the Nicholas Brothers in 1920, followed by Bill Bailey in 1955. And Scott has the old black and white film clips to prove it!

The Exhibits

When you arrive at the Museum, stop at the front desk to pick up a soundstick. This

mances to come, beginning with an eight minute video that traces the history of the Local #533, an exhibit that tells the story of the Music Club, and a display about the evolution of Jazz music. Two exhibits that kids will particularly enjoy are the Instrument Interactive, where they can hear the sounds of eight different instruments and the Arrangement Interactive which allows them to be the “sound mixer” for three different pieces of music. Don’t forget to take a look at the exhibit about how CMC continues to influence musicians and music in Buffalo in the 21st century. At the CMC Museum it’s not only the exhibits that families can learn from. continued >>>

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • July 2013

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// visiting // Colored Musicians Club and CMC Museum

WHERE 145 Broadway (Between Elm and Michigan Streets), Buffalo, New York (716) 885-1815 www.coloredmusiciansclub.org Hours WednesdaySaturday, 11am -4pm Museum Tickets $10.00/ adults with discounts for senior citizens, children, and military.

Queen City Jazz Festival at the CMC WHEN Saturday, July 27th Time 12-8 pm COST Free!

Williams and Scott are full of stories they’ve accumulated over the years which they love to share with their guests. “Kids can listen to real people like me and Danny reminisce if they don’t feel like reading the educational signs,” Scott notes cheerfully. Be sure to ask the two men about the bricked up window, the trap door in the kitchen, or the street-crossing saxophone solos! Hearing, as well as seeing, the breadth and caliber of African Americans that contributed to today’s musical styles can be an eye-opening and inspiring experience for kids of all ages. Scott encourages individual families, as well as school groups, to stop by any time. “We’re all part of Western New York,” he says. “It’s an interesting piece of history many people in our region know nothing about.” Though CMC may not be familiar to everyone in New York State, the club is internationally renowned for its expertise in “all things jazz” and Scott says they get emails from around the world on a regular basis. Foreign jazz musicians will often drop in to play a few sets when they’re in the Buffalo area, whether they speak English or not. “We communicate through music!” Scott asserts.

Entertainment

Upstairs the CMC Jazz Club is still going as strong as when Scott took lessons there as a boy. In fact he and another student in his youth program, a bass player, are still playing together in a band today. He makes sure to emphasize the social, as well as musical, benefits CMC provides to the community by giving kids a place to come in off the streets and try one of their affordable and interesting options. “Music is a good craft to learn. You

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can have it in your life in many ways, be it professionally, as a hobby, or just listening to it,” he observes. “We don’t delude the kids by telling them they’ll be the next Beyonce but we do show them that there are many opportunities for musicians to enjoy playing together.” The Club continues to host regular jazz performances, along with having open jam nights. “It’s a place for people of all ages, races, and ethnicities who want to share their love of jazz to get together,” Scott explains, adding “We’re not a club like a bar; we’re like an upstairs living museum!” Though there is an old wooden bar, there are plenty of tables for kids to sit. A limited food menu with nonalcoholic drinks is available. In 2004, Club members found one more way to draw jazz lovers to their Broadway location. To commemorate their 70th anniversary, they decided to hold a free outdoor concert. Much to their surprise, nearly 3,000 people showed up to hear the music. Scott says everyone had such a good time they decided to make it an annual occasion and the Queen City Jazz Festival was born! Not only does the rain or shine July event attract a cross-section of visitors from all over the state, people frequently travel from as far away as Cleveland, Pittsburg, Canada, even England to spend the day in Buffalo. “It’s a fun atmosphere in a laid-back place,” Scott says. “We want people to come spend the day with us, relaxing and enjoying the music!”  Sue Henninger is a freelance writer who enjoys writing about the unique people, places, and events that can be found in the Finger Lakes Region. Contact her at www. fingerlakeswriter.com


Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • July 2013

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museum visits

with kids





Story by Denise Yearian / Photograph courtesy of the Strong, Rochester, New York

I will never forget the first time I took my kids to an art museum. They tore through the place like it was an indoor playground. 16

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In fact, the only thing they did stop to see was a statue of a naked lady! Forget seeing the exhibits myself. All I did was chase my kids around hollering, "Wait! Don't you want to see this?" Driving home that afternoon, I realized if I ever wanted to give my children a cultural education, I would have to think ahead and be creative. One week later we entered the same museum, and instead of tearing through the galleries like madmen from Borneo, my children actually stopped to look at and observe the exhibits.

Museums pop up on many families' vacation and stay-cation to-do and to-see lists. If you think your kids have to be a certain age to enjoy museum visits, think again! Whether it's a museum of fine art, a museum of science and history, or a museum built with kids in mind, with a little prior planning and creative thinking, a trip to a museum can be a fun and enjoyable experience for everyone. Here's how:


Plan in Advance

Before you go, do your research. “Check the museum's website for their hours to make sure you have plenty of time to visit once you arrive. While you’re there, also check what special exhibits and programs are being offered the day of your visit,” suggests Amy Biber of Buffalo's Museum of Science. “Depending on the museum, they might have a planetarium, 3D cinema, or facilitated programs that need to be booked in advance, or a special traveling exhibit that could require additional fees on top of your general museum admission.” The Strong in Rochester offers a helpful “Plan a Visit” section on their website where visitors can learn about museum exhibits. “Depending on the ages and interests of family members, everyone will have different favorites,” says Jon-Paul Dyson, PhD, Vice President for Exhibit Research and Development at The Strong. He suggests that parents keep in mind the time of year when planning a museum visit – for example, schools breaks can be busy and he says parents might want to consider purchasing tickets to The Strong's popular butterfly garden in advance.

Consider Timing

The best time to visit a museum with your children is when they are well-fed and well-rested. For most kids this means early in the morning – after a good night's rest and a nutritious (not heavy or sugary) breakfast. Another benefit to visiting early in the morning is that most museums aren't too crowded then. And the less crowded the facility is, the more freedom you have to roam. What happens if your child gets hit with a case of the grumpies in the middle of your museum trip? “If they’re starting to get thirsty, hungry, or tired, then take care of those basic needs first before doing more playing,” suggests Dyson. Biber suggests that you move to a quiet area of the museum to relax or have a snack break.” I’ve witnessed a number of children get cranky when they don’t want to leave a certain area of the museum, so plan ahead and go to the exhibits your child will want to spend the most time in first and let them naturally progress to other areas,” she reccomends.

Bringing Family and Friends

This can be a plus or minus depending upon your situation. If you decide to have family or friends join you, keep in mind your children may be distracted by having their friends there. To cut down on distractions, keep the ratio at about two or three kids to every adult. This way the kids’ attention won't be diverted and adults can help them stay focused. Another benefit to bringing others along is that you can share child-watching responsibilities. If, for example, Tyler and Trey want to see the Civil War weapons, and Emily and Kaitlin want to see clothing or dolls from that particular period, the adults can divide up the children for a while. This allows everyone to explore the areas of the museum that interest him or her most.

Make Visits Short & Often

When visiting a museum, keep in mind your child's attention span. If the museum is fairly large, don't try to see it all in one day. Instead, focus on the exhibits that really interest you and plan to return. “Pick key exhibits and experiences you want to visit, especially if individuals in your group have different interests,” says Biber. continued >>> Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • July 2013

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// Things to consider & ask before your visit // CURRENT EXHIBITS What are the current exhibits? Are any of them geared for children? What about hands-on activities? Many museums today have a host of interactive areas so kids can learn by doing, not just by seeing. SPECIAL ATTRACTIONS Ask about special attractions, such as presentations, shows and movies. These can be a real treat if you plan it right, but there are several things you need to find out first. How long does the event run? What times during the day is it scheduled? Does it involve audience participation? Is there an additional cost for the attraction? If possible, plan to see special attractions after you have visited a few exhibits. This will break up the day and give you a chance to get off your feet. FACILITIES When you call, remember to ask about the facility. Where are the bathrooms? Is there a lunchroom and/or restaurant? Does the restaurant offer kids meals? What about strollers? Can you rent them or take your own? Is there a children's play area? Are cameras permitted? If the facility has a brochure, ask them to send you one. This way you'll know what to expect before you go.

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Another reason to plan a second visit is that some exhibits change every so often. Find out which ones are temporary and which ones are permanent, so you can see the temporary exhibits before they leave the museum. If you plan to visit more than once, ask about a family membership. Most often, an annual membership is less than or equal to what it would cost to visit twice. Depending upon the museum, you may even get a subscription to their monthly newsletter and/or a discount toward purchases in the gift shop.

Stimulate Thinking

The best way for children to enjoy a museum is to get them involved. “Let kids take the lead, but offer prompts from time to time to encourage deeper play and learning,” says  Dyson. “Psychologists refer to this as 'scaffolding' and it offers a great way to enrich the experience.” This can be done by asking questions and playing games. Questions such as, "What do you see?" "What does it feel like?" and "What does this remind you of?" will help children relate get the most out of their museum visit. You can also relate the museum exhibits to your child's real life experiences suggests Biber. “Compare the activities to experiences you’ve shared together,” she says. “For instance, we have a wind tunnel at our exhibit that reaches hurricane-force winds of 80 miles per hour. While kids love getting their hair whipped around, it’s beneficial to compare their experiences


to weather you’ve recently experienced or a well-covered weather event like the recent tornadoes in Oklahoma.” Also remember that kids love to play games. Here are a few to get you started: Twenty questions. As you walk into a gallery, pick out one item such as a painting or an object and give your child three clues about it. For example, "I see something that's big, has four legs, and is brown." Have your child guess what it is by asking "yes" or "no" questions. "Is it square?" "Is it alive?" etc. When he has figured it out, let him choose an item for you to guess. The Memory Game. Have your child stand in front of an exhibit or painting for several minutes. Tell him to look at everything he sees. Then have him turn around. Can he name the items on display or in the picture? Did he forget anything? Have him turn around again and look. Reverse roles and you play. The Imagination Game. Find an exhibit or painting with a scene. Ask your child, "If you could jump into this scene, what would it be like? Would you hear birds singing? Rain falling? Guns firing? What would it smell like? Fresh rain? Smoke? Trees? How about taste? Did someone make stew? Has fresh bread just been pulled from the oven? What is the weather like? Hot? Cold? Wet? Dry? How does this scene make you feel? Happy? Sad? Tired?" Tell stories. If you already know the story behind the exhibit or painting, explain it to your child in words he can understand. Be brief giving just an overview unless he asks more questions. "This is the cot the soldiers slept on" or "This is how the artist pictured a spring day." If you don't have much information, try making up a story. Choose one object, such as a drinking cup, and focus on it. Who drank from it? Was he young or old, rich or poor? What was in the cup? Remember, the point of these games is to get your child involved in the experience. In this way, he will begin to love visiting museums.

Take It Home

The best way to extend the museum experience is to check out the facility's gift shop for related books, games and kits you can take home with you. At the very least, pick up a few postcards. On the way home rehash some of your favorite museum memories. “Talk about your child's favorite experiences and then read the library books you checked out from the library,” says Dyson.” Over the days and weeks that follow, talk with your child about what he saw, and encourage him to listen to, play with, or explore one of the items you brought home from the museum. Biber suggests that when visiting grandparents, neighbors and relatives, ask your child to describe what he learned and enjoyed during the museum visit. Another idea is to help him create a journal about his visit to the museum by drawing pictures with related captions. This can be done with construction paper, crayons, and yarn for binding the pages together. Above all, when taking children to a museum, remember that kids sometimes look at things from a different perspective. By seeing the museum from your child's point of view, you can help him gain an appreciation for these cultural facilities and you will get a glimpse of life through your child's eyes. 

Denise Yearian is the former editor of two parenting magazines and the mother of three children.

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • July 2013

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[your family health ]

By Ashley Talmadge

sun safety// how to have 'the talk' cessful you’ll be at helping him remove those obstacles.

Provide alternative ways to “look good” and be healthy.

a

s parents, there are a variety of Talks we prepare to have with our children. There’s the Water Safety Talk. The Drug & Alcohol Talk. And of course, the Sex Talk. We know, too, that none of these subjects can be covered with just one Talk. As the wisdom goes, “Start early, make it age appropriate, and repeat it often as your child grows.”

But there’s another discussion you might not have thought about, and it’s becoming more and more important. The Safe Sun Talk. According to the Skin Cancer Foundation, skin cancer is by far the most common cancer in the United States, and 85-90% of all skin cancers are associated with exposure to ultraviolet rays. Melanoma, the deadliest skin cancer, is the second most common cancer among adolescents and young adults ages 15-29. And the incidence is increasing. Unfortunately, teens seem relatively oblivious to concerns about sun exposure. A study published in the journal Pediatrics found that between the ages of 10 and 13, kids tend to both increase their exposure to the sun’s rays, and decrease their use of sunscreens and other protection. The Environmental

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Protection Agency (EPA) reports that boys are less likely to use sunscreen routinely, report less knowledge of the sun’s effects, and spend more time in the sun than girls. But as girls move from the tween to teen years, they become more likely to view tanning positively, and many succumb to misinformation provided by the indoor tanning industry. Here are some tips for starting that all-important Safe Sun conversation:

Listen to your teen’s concerns. As we all know, a teen’s attitude is rarely swayed by a torrent of stern words. Don’t lecture. Provide straightforward information, but allow your child to express his feelings. The better you understand the barriers to your teen’s use of sun protection, the more suc-

teens choose their own protective gear. Items will get more use if they’re stylish and cool.

Provide a visual reminder. According to the EPA’s survey, tweens and teens report “I forget” as the top reason for not using sunscreen. Leave a tube on the bathroom counter along with all the other products your tweens and teens use daily. If your child plays sports, put sunscreen in the gym bag. Hang hats and other sun gear near the door.

Like it or not, tween and teen girls are concerned with their appearance, sometimes to an unhealthy degree. Your daughter may view tanned skin as an indicator of beauty and physical fitness. Thus, it may be more effective to talk to her about premature wrinkling than about skin cancer. In her post “Here Comes the Sun,” dermatologist Dr. Madeline Krauss says, “Wrinkles, brown spots, big pores, yellowish bumps, a sallow tone, these are the harvest of the sun worshiper. By protecting, you will look younger, period.” Discuss exercise and sunless tanning products as being great ways of achieving that healthy glow your teen is after.

ents in both OTC and prescription acne products may cause the skin to be more susceptible to the sun’s rays. Be sure your tweens and teens understand this if they use such products, and help them develop protection strategies.

Help your tween or teen find the right sunscreen. The

Don’t allow your teen to use a tanning bed—ever! There

Mayo Clinic reminds that, “If you don't care for the sunscreen, you're not as likely to use it consistently.” A spray may work well for the boy who says it takes too long to apply sunscreen. A cosmetic facial cream with SPF protection may work better with a girl’s makeup. Any form (spray, cream, lotion, gel, or stick) can be effective as long as it is a broad spectrum product with an SPF of at least 30.

Go beyond sunscreen. The sun is strongest and most likely to burn during midday, so teach the Shadow Rule: “If your shadow is shorter than you, seek shade.” Promote the use of accessories like brimmed hats, sunglasses, swim shirts, and sarongs. And let your tweens and

Acne products may cause sun-sensitivity. Some ingredi-

is absolutely no doubt that use of tanning beds is linked to melanoma, the most deadly form of skin cancer. In New York, children 17 and younger must have parent or legal guardian consent before using a tanning bed.

Be a good role model. Put on the sunscreen, wear a hat, and stay out of the sun during the middle of the day when possible. If sun safety measures are practiced as part of the household routine, it’s much more likely that your children will continue using such strategies through their teen years. (And if your own skin is well-preserved, you have a solid visual advertisement!)  Ashley Talmadge is a freelance writer.


Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • July 2013

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[your family health ]

By Heidi Smith Luedtke, Ph.D.

wet and wild // water safety for

the whole family

w

e’ve waited all winter for this weather – it’s time to hit up the water park at Seabreeze or spend the afternoon with our toes in the water at Charlotte Beach. But before you head out to get wet and wild this summer, refresh your water-safety skills. Drowning is extremely rare, but it isn’t the only danger. Slips and falls, water-born bacteria, wild weather and currents can injure even strong swimmers. Whether you’re enjoying one of the many amenities that the Rochester area has to offer or you’re packing up the kiddos and hitting the road for a family vacation, learn what you can do to protect everyone from tots to teens this summer. Spray Park Safety The biggest risk at spray parks comes from slips and falls. Don’t let injuries or illness spoil kids’ fun.   Before You Go. Kids get excited when they see the spray, so talk about safety at home. That way, they’ll be better listeners. "Make it clear: No running,” says Franceen Gonzales, Vice President of Risk Management for Great Wolf Resorts and former Chair of the World Waterpark Organization. “The most common injuries at spray parks are scrapes and cuts caused by slips and falls,” she says. Kids may not notice hazards in their path, like play equipment and other kids. Also, talk about where you will be and what kids should do if they’re lost. "If the park is staffed, introduce kids to the lifeguard and direct them to find a lifeguard if they’re lost," says Gonzales. You don’t want them to wander off looking for you.

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 At the Park. Spray park participants should wear swimwear. While it’s tempting to let kids play in street clothes, soaked clothes can make it harder for kids to move. And don’t forget a swim diaper. Recreational water illnesses including diarrhea and skin infections can be caused by germs from fecal matter. Remind kids not to drink the water. Protect heads and feet, too. A widebrimmed hat is the single best way to keep sun off your child’s face. Special rubber-soled water shoes can provide traction, but they need to fit well. Choose close-toed shoes to avoid tripping over flip-flops or stubbed toes.   At the Limit. Take breaks for drinks and snacks, and reapply sunscreen often. Injuries are most likely when kids are tired, so make naptime a priority. Spray play takes lots of energy.

Water Park Safety Wild rides and crashing waves are fun. But kids can get into trouble, especially if their lust for adventure overwhelms their good common sense.   Before You Go. "You may be past potty training, but make sure your kids know it isn’t okay to pee in the pool," says Gonzales. Poor hygiene increases the risk of illness, including diarrhea and infection, because warm wet conditions encourage bacterial growth. Go online and scout out what rides and attractions are offered, Gonzales suggests, and manage kids’ expectations. Guidelines for minimum rider height are established by safety agencies. These ensure riders have the size and strength needed to use the equipment.   At the Park. "Let the good, clean fun begin with a shower," Gonzales says. Wash your hair, too. Hair products and makeup cloud the water.

water-wise online resources   Get drowning prevention tips  www.waterparks.org   Learn about Recreational Water Illnesses  www.HealthySwiming.org   Take swimming lessons, first aid, & CPR classes through the local Red Cross or sign your teen up to learn lifeguarding skills  www.redcross.org   Find sun and sun-smart apparel for babies & toddlers  www.onestepahead.com & for kids  www.coolibar.com   Get safety tips and learn about rip currents  www.usla.org   Find beach & marine weather forecasts   www.weather.com


Shower again after playing to remove chlorine. Even if there are lifeguards on duty, swim and play with your kids. Lifeguards may be responsible for scanning large areas. "You know your child best," Gonzales says. Watch for fatigue and encourage kids to take breaks. Rest and re-hydration are important, especially in hot, humid conditions. A Red Cross survey found 30% of parents believe “floaties” are an okay substitute for supervision. Not so, Gonzales counsels. No matter what their age, weak swimmers should wear life vests approved by the U.S. Coast Guard Association. Most water parks won’t allow other devices.   At the Limit. Be vigilant. If you see something unsafe, bring it to the lifeguard’s attention. Safety is everyone’s responsibility.  

Beach Safety Nothing beats the beach on lazy summer days. But don’t leave your tween high and dry with just a cell phone and some spending money. Centers for Disease Control data show more than 20% of fatal drowning victims are kids age 14 and younger. And for every fatality, four kids suffer nonfatal injuries that may cause brain damage.   Before You Go. Alcohol use is involved in up to half of adolescent and adult water-related deaths. Remind kids that alcohol influences motor skills and judgment, and that heat and sun heighten these effects, increasing the risk of drowning and alcohol poisoning. Don’t skip the speech if your kids don’t drink, your reminder could enable them to help peers who do. Consult weather forecasts. Lightning, wind, and strong currents can spell disaster.

Stay home if lightning is expected.   At the beach. Heed posted signs and flags, which are color-coded to signal threat level (green means “calm;” yellow means “caution,” and red means “danger”). A double red flag usually means the beach is closed. If so, stay away. Choose to swim near a lifeguard. United States Lifesaving Association data show the chance of drowning at a beach without lifeguard protection is almost five times higher. Even then, use the buddy system. Tweens and teens may balk, but weak swimmers should wear life jackets approved by the U.S. Coast Guard. Rafts and swim noodles aren’t enough. If kids fall off, they can quickly get into trouble. Finally, avoid rip currents. Caution kids not to fight against strong currents. They’ll only wear themselves out. Experts recommend swimmers paddle parallel to shore until the current eases and then swim for the sand.   At the Limit. Stay close to tweens and teens at the beach, even if they are hanging out with friends. Your presence may keep kids from getting in over their heads in more ways than one.  Dr. Heidi Smith Luedtke is a personality psychologist and mom who loves hiking, swimming and camping out in her own back yard. She is the author of Detachment Parenting.

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • July 2013

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[your family health ]

By Malia Jacobson

sweet dreams at sleepaway camp // helping children sleep more soundly on overnight adventures

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his year, 10 million children will tote their sleeping bags to camp. But they may not do much sleeping. For many children, overnight camp is the first time they’ve slept away from their family for more than a night or two. Add an unfamiliar bed, strange nighttime noises, and the overall excitement of camp, and it’s no wonder many kids come home from camp severely overtired. So while you’re helping them pack their bags, take a few extra steps to help kids sleep well. With the shut-eye they need, they’ll enjoy all camp has to offer—and return refreshed, happy, and ready to fill you in on all of their adventures.

Pack Some Comfort Don’t forget to pack Teddy. According to leading pediatrician and author Dr. Harvey Karp, comfort items like special stuffed animals and pillows become particularly important when kids sleep in an unfamiliar place because they create a soothing sense of security at bedtime. Older kids might appreciate a small framed photo of the family or a note from mom and dad.

Check Nighttime Temps While you’re checking the daytime weather forecast for your child’s camp destination, make sure to check the nighttime forecast too. Nighttime temperatures may be much lower—or higher—than what your child is used to, particularly if he’ll be sleeping in a cabin or tent. Pack several pairs

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of pajamas and thick socks for layering.

Head Off Embarrassing Moments Around 7-10 percent of kids wet the bed at age 8—an age at which many kids are considering their first sleepaway camp experience. If your child is anxious about the possibility of an accident and mortified at the thought of packing disposable training pants, talk to her pediatrician. Pediatric urologist Dr. Steve Hodges says a short-term prescription for a medication like desmopressin, which slows nighttime urine production, can provide a temporary solution for camp and other circumstances that make bedwetting especially embarrassing.

Send Moonlight Munchies After an action-packed day

at camp, young campers may feel their stomachs growl just as the counselor announces “Lights out!” If camp rules allow it, pack a few pre-bedtime snacks so they don’t hit the sack hungry. Whole-grain crackers, granola, cold cereal, and protein bars travel well; tryptophan-rich foods like nuts, sunflower seeds, or soybeans score added sleepy-points.

Say No to Noise A child who is particularly sensitive to noise may find camp’s group-sleeping arrangements disconcerting. And strange outdoor sounds can trigger nighttime fears in timid campers. Consider packing earplugs so your camper can drift off to sleep in silence, or an iPod, if they prefer falling asleep to music.

Home Sleepy Home No matter what you do, kids probably won’t adhere to their regular sleep schedule at camp. “When they return, getting back to the normal routine is important,” says pediatric sleep specialist Dr. Krisztina Harsanyi. It may take a few days to a week to adjust to their regular schedule, so Harsanyi advises postponing sleepovers and trips until after kids have spent some quality time catching up on sleep.  Malia Jacobson is a nationally published freelance writer and mom who specializes in children’s sleep and health topics. Her latest book is Sleep Tight, Every Night: Helping Toddlers and Preschoolers Sleep Well Without Tears, Tricks, or Tirades.


The perfect local resource for new and expectant parents

2013 Summer Edition arriving in July

When you text a driver, you take their eyes off the road for as long as it takes to drive the length of a football field at 55 mph; F.Y.I. that’s

Join our Team! Interested in working for an award-winning company that cares about Rochester’s families?

SECONDS* Visit URthatDistracting.org to see how you can help end distracted driving.

Genesee Valley Parent Magazine is looking for an Account Executive to work with area businesses who focus on the parenting community for both our print and growing web products.

For information on this and other positions at GVP, go to www.GVParent.com/employment

*SOURCE: DISTRACTION.GOV

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • July 2013

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[ parenting teens & tweens ]

By Myrna Beth Haskell

Body Piercing // what every teen & parent should know

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got my ears pierced on my twelfth birthday. I was petrified – envisioning a needle the size of a twirler’s baton being punched through my tiny earlobe. Nonetheless, I was determined to get my ears pierced because all of my friends had already done it. Of course, it turned out to be no big deal. The aftermath was more of a problem. My left earlobe got infected, and the infection festered for what seemed like an eternity. Instead of designer jewelry, I sported a swollen lobe.

Today, teens are getting many parts of the body pierced – eyebrows, noses, tongues, nipples, navels, and lips. Some parents don’t want their teens to pierce anything besides earlobes because these piercings

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don’t seem “mainstream.” Others feel body piercing is not an issue they care to grouse about when they have more serious worries to deal with. Although parental viewpoints differ on this issue,

body piercing is certainly not something that should be taken lightly. Many problems can arise from getting your body pierced. In most states, it is illegal for teens under the age of eighteen to get pierced without a parent’s consent, so parents legally have the right to step in. No matter what your position is on this topic, it’s best to be informed.

safety checklist

Self-Expression

• Athletes: “No jewelry rule” goes for ALL piercings. Don’t get newly pierced before season begins.

Ear piercing has been popular in the United States for decades, but piercing other areas of the body started gaining popularity in the 1990s. Teens like to dare to be different. Piercing, like colorful hair highlights and tattoos, is a path to self-expression. Parents who disagree with these choices need to tread carefully when voicing their opinions. Teens should be given freedom to develop their own styles. However, there are many safety issues that both parents and teens need to be aware of.

Cause for Concern According to the National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL), “New York prohibits body piercing on a person under 18 years of age unless a parent or legal guardian provides written consent in the presence of the owner of the body piercing studio or a body piercing specialist.” Elizabeth M. Alderman, MD, a nationally recognized specialist in adolescent medicine and professor of clinical pediatrics at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Considerations • Immunizations should be current (especially hepatitis B and tetanus). • Don’t take aspirin or blood thinners within a week of getting a piercing. • Allergies to metal? Ask what is used in advance.

• Be aware of signs of infection (i.e. prolonged bleeding, puss, and change in your skin color around the pierced area). Evaluating the specialist • Is the shop certified by the Association of Professional Piercers? • Does the piercer have a license? Rules regarding licensing vary from state to state and sometimes city to city. • Piercing guns cannot be sterilized and should NOT be used for body piercing. • Specialist washes his/her hands with a germicidal soap. • Specialist wears disposable gloves. • Needle is being used for the first time. • Needles and other materials are disposed of in biohazard containers.


potential risks

• chronic infection • uncontrollable or prolonged bleeding • Keloids (thick scarring at the piercing site) • hepatitis B and C • tetanus • skin allergies to metals • abscesses or boils (pus that can form under the skin) • inflammation or nerve damage • dental damage caused by tongue or lip piercing (Teens Health: Nemours Foundation)

of Yeshiva University in Bronx, NY advises, “Anyone who plans to get a piercing should discuss it with someone else.” Teens who have diabetes, hemophilia, an auto-immune disorder, or any condition that might interfere with the healing process should find another way to express themselves. Furthermore, teens should not get pierced on areas of the body that have skin irritations, unusual lesions, rashes, or moles. In fact, all teens should learn about potential complications in order to make an informed decision. “There is always a risk of infection and scarring,” Alderman warns.

Talk it Out

navel piercing because her friends are doing it, or does she really love the look? Does she understand the possible complications that might arise? Parents should provide guidance and work with their teens to make an informed decision. Alderman suggests, “Make it about health, not youth culture.”  Myrna Beth Haskell is a freelance writer and monthly contributor to Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine who lives in Salt Point, NY. She is the author of the newly released book, LIONS and TIGERS and TEENS: Expert advice and support for the conscientious parent just like you (Unlimited Publishing LLC). For more information visit www.myrnahaskell.com. Also available at: Amazon.com.

Since the risks vary depending on a teen’s health and other factors, there is no simple answer as to how parents should approach this subject. “It is hard to be the parent of a teenager,” Alderman says. “Teens should understand the risks and benefits, and parents should explore the reasons why their teen wants the piercing done.” Is she considering a

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Want to share your ideas? Upcoming topic: Tips/ideas for Halloween activities for teens who are too old to trick-or-treat.

Send your full name, address, & brief comments to: myrnahaskell@gmail.com or visit: www.myrnahaskell.com Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • July 2013

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[your family activities ]

By Meagan Ruffing

go blue // 12 ideas for all things blueberry

july is national blueberry month

Where to go area Farms Browns Berry Patch 14264 Roosevelt Highway (Route 18) Waterport, 14571 www.brownsberrypatch.com

G and S Orchards 825 Atlantic Ave. (Route 286)  Walworth, 14568 www.gandsorchards.com Green Acre Farms 3460 Latta Road Rochester, 14612 www.greenacreupick.com Whittier Fruit Farm 219 Whittier Road Rochester, 14624 www.whittierfruitfarm.com

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y little girl Hannah loves blueberries. My son on the other hand, not so much. With July being National Blueberry Month, I thought it would be fun to come up with an assortment of bluerry activities. After all, what’s not to love about this indigenous flowering plant? Here are 12 kid-friendly ideas for all things blueberry.

1.

Blueberry Pickin’ Patch

blueberries and let her gnaw on them one at a time for instant relief.

Kids love anything hands-on. Set a date, load the kids in the car and show them first-hand where to get this delicious fruit. In the Rochester area check out Brown’s Berry Patch, Green Acre Farms and G and S Orchards.

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2.

5.

Blueberry Pancakes

It’s Sunday morning and your family is waking up to the smell of delicious blueberry pancakes sizzling on the griddle. If they want to help, drop the batter on the griddle and let your kiddos plop blueberries in the batter (with supervision, of course). This healthy, yummy breakfast will be sure to satisfy everyone’s appetites.

3.

Teething Secret

Do you have a little one? A great tip for teething tots is to freeze a container of

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 Flavored Water Add a little oomph to your water by throwing in a couple of blueberries for extra flavor.

 Smoothies Add fresh blueberries to your smoothie for added antioxidants. Or better yet, toss your blueberries in the freezer and blend them up with your smoothie to get that extra icy texture.

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 Rainbow Platter Assemble a cute fruit tray and arrange different pieces of fruit by their colors to make a rainbow. Blueberries can be the ‘blue’ ray in the rainbow and the kids will love that you’ve recreated something so cool!

area Markets Brighton Farmers’ Market Sundays, 9 am-1 pm Through October 30 Brighton High School Parking Lot, 1150 Winton Road Rochester, 14618 www.brightonfarmersmarket.org Monroe Village Farmers’ Market Wednesday Evenings, 4-7 pm Through October 16 Blessed Sacrament Church Parking Lot, 730 Monroe Ave. Rochester, 14607 www.monroevillagefarmersmarket.org Rochester Public Market Tuesdays & Thursdays, 6 am-1 pm Saturdays, 5 am-3 pm Year-round 280 N. Union Street, Rochester, 14609 www.cityofrochester.gov/publicmarket South Wedge Farmers’ Market Thursdays, 4-7 pm Through October 20 100 Alexander Street at Clinton Street, behind Boulder Coffee, Rochester, 14620 www.swfm.org // See our complete list of area farms and marekts at www.gvparent.com //


7.

Connect the Blueberries

Get a pint of blueberries and arrange them one-by-one on a piece of construction paper to create a shape (example: circle). Have your son eat the blueberries as he picks them up and drawn a line where the blueberry was. When all of the blueberries are gone, your child has had a healthy snack and he’s learned how to create art out of something edible.

8.

Growth

Plant a blueberry bush with your children. This will be a great way to teach them how to get their hands dirty while seeing the fruits of their labor for years to come.

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Ice Cubes

Fill up your ice cube tray and let your child put one or two blueberries in each cubicle. Put the trays in the freezer and voila! Throw the cubes in your next glass of water and now you have a pretty and yummy drink.

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Jam

Who doesn’t love jam? Find an old family recipe or scope one out on the Internet. Do most of the leg work but let your kids get involved in the kitchen by having them measure out the blueberries before putting them into the pot for boiling down with sugar and water.

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Road Race

Let your son line up blueberries on the floor or table to make ‘roads’ where his matchbox cars can drive along. He’ll love the idea of building his own racetrack and you’ll love the extra time to get things done around the house!

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Fun Facts

Let school-aged children get on the computer and see how many facts they can find about blueberries. This is a great way to encourage them to utilize the computer to learn as much a they can about a specific topic. Be sure to try some of these ideas for National Blueberry Month. Your kids will have a blast learning about all things blueberries and you’ll feel good knowing that they’re eating a healthy and nutritious fruit. 

Meagan Ruffing loves finding new ways to teach her kids about healthy foods. She tries to incorporate hands-on learning whenever possible and thinks it keeps her kids out of trouble and into fun. Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • July 2013

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[book nook ]

summer reads // the summer's best books for tots to teens

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hether it is a hot afternoon or a cool rainy day, keep your kids turning pages this summer with this awesome reading list that is packed with a fantastic selection of book picks for young readers. Brought to us by the experts at the Horn Book, the list includes everything from picture books to books for teens. Here's a sampling to keep your kids happily reading this summer.

 Find the full list of all 81 picks on our website at www.gvparent.com/summerreads2013 This Is Not My Hat

Picture Books It’s Our Garden: From Seeds to Harvest in a School Garden Written by and photographed by George Ancona (Candlewick) • Full-color photographs and no-nonsense prose (perfect for new readers) chronicle a year in the life of an elementary school garden; students compost soil, water plants, raise butterflies and sample edible delights. (K–3; 48 pages)

Traction Man and the Beach Odyssey, by Mini Grey

(Knopf) • Action-figure hero Traction Man and his sidekick Scrubbing Brush inhabit the fanciful world-within-a-world of a child’s creative play. Here they head to the beach for a day of scuba diving, picnic security duty and . . . makeovers? (K–3; 32 pages)

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By Jon Klassen (Candlewick) • In this 2013 Caldecott Award winner, a guilty-looking little fish has taken a tiny bowler hat from the head of a large sleeping fish. He explains why he won't be caught, but every claim he makes is belied by the darkly humorous pictures. (K–3; 40 pages)

The Dark By Lemony Snicket; illustrated by Jon Klassen (Little, Brown) Laszlo lives with the dark in a big house. When the comforting glow of his bedroom nightlight goes out, the dark comes to talk with Laszlo. Though the mood is ominous as the dark lures Laszlo into the basement, the resolution is bright and funny. (PreK–3; 40 pages)

Early Readers & Younger Fiction The No. One Car Spotter and the Firebird Bwy Atinuke; illustrated by Warwick Johnson Cadwell (Kane Miller) • Car-spotting champion Oluwalase Baba-

tunde Benson is also number one at solving problems. And there are all kinds of problems to be solved in and around his African village, as described in four accessible chapters. (1–3; 96 pages)

Dodsworth in Tokyo By Tim Egan (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt) • Affable duo Dodsworth and the duck visit Tokyo on their fifth outing. As usual, the irrepressible duck’s behavior leads to mayhem. Droll, understated watercolors illustrate the pair’s tour of popular Japanese tourist attractions. (K–2; 48 pages)

Penny and Her Marble By Kevin Henkes (Greenwillow) • In Penny’s third outing, she spies a marble on a neighbor’s lawn and takes it — even though she knows she shouldn’t. That night, Penny has bad dreams about the imagined consequences of this furtive act but is unwilling to confess to her parents; she finds her own resolution. (K–2; 48 pages)


Intermediate Fiction & Nonfiction

High School Fiction & Nonfiction

Suggested grade level for all entries: 4–6

Suggested grade level for all entries: 9 and up

The One and Only Ivan

The Diviners

By Katherine Applegate; illustrated by Patricia Castelao (Harper/HarperCollins) • In this 2013 Newbery Award winner, Ivan is a gorilla who lives in a circus mall. When a new baby elephant arrives, Ivan taps into his creative side to help them both escape captivity. (307 pages)

By Libba Bray (Little, Brown) In this lavish supernatural thriller set amidst the grit and gaiety of 1920s New York, wisecracking diviner Evie must use her special connection to the spirit world to solve a macabre series of occult murders. (584 pages)

Starry River of the Sky By Grace Lin (Little, Brown) The moon is missing, but no one besides runaway Rendi notices. This handsomely illustrated companion novel to the 2010 Newbery Honor Book Where the Mountain Meets the Moon intersperses stories that neatly circle around one another. A gratifying celebration of the significance of storytelling. (296 pages)

Middle School Fiction & Nonfiction Suggested grade level for all entries: 6–8

The Raft

By S. A. Bodeen (Feiwel • When the small plane carrying 15-year-old Robie goes down over open ocean, she seems doomed. The pilot is dead, the copilot is unconscious and no one knows she was on the flight. A good old-fashioned survival adventure story. (240 pages)

Seraphina By Rachel Hartman (Random) The royal court of Goredd celebrates a 40-year (uneasy) peace with dragonkind, but events take a dark turn when Prince Rufus is found murdered. Seraphina tries to unmask the killer, while concealing her own relationship with dragons. (476 pages)

Dark Triumph [His Fair Assassin] By Robin LaFevers (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt) • Sybella is a convent-trained assassin serving St. Mortain, Death himself. When she is ordered to free a warrior known as “the Beast” from her own abusive father’s dungeon, Sybella’s understanding of love and death begins to change. (386 pages)

Eleanor & Park By Rainbow Rowell (St. Martin’s Griffin) • Eleanor is the new girl in town, an ostracized, bullied “big girl”; Park is a skinny half-Korean townie who tries to stay out of the spotlight. Their slowly evolving but intense relationship is authentic in its awkwardness — and life-changing for them both. (328 pages)

Bomb: The Race to Build — and Steal — the World's Most Dangerous Weapon By Steve Sheinkin (Flash Point/Roaring Brook) • While comprehensive in its synthesis of the political, historical and scientific aspects of the creation of the first nuclear weapon, this account focuses on an extremely alluring angle: the spies. Sheinkin maintains the pace of a thriller without betraying history or skipping over the science. A 2013 Newbery Honor Book. (266 pages)

School is Out...Don’t miss a copy of Genesee Valley Parent Magazine Stop by and say ‘Hi’ to us at our booth at the Corn Hill Arts Festival July 13 & 14 During the summer months pick up your copy of GVP at select Wegmans, Wendys, Libraries or other family-friendly locations! Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • July 2013

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Health, Wellness & Fitness Providers Guide For All Your Family's Heath & Wellness Needs -- types of health care providers in the Greater Rochester Area. Included in the Health Care Directory are Dentists, Pediatricians, OB/Gyns, Hospitals, Urgent Care Centers, Mental Health Services, Chiropractors and more. Counseling, Coaching & Mental Health Services Dentists/Dental Care Disability Services Family Health Health & Fitness Programs OB/GYN & Women's Health Pediatricians & Pediatric Care Special Needs Health Services

Patti Follansbee, Ph.D.

LMFT Family Therapist 1441 East Ave., Rochester, 14610 234-4081 Individual, couples, families -- general concerns, intimate relationships, life stressors and change, sexuality concerns, illness impact on family.

Greater Rochester Health Foundation 50 State Street, Suite 100, Rochester, 14614 258-1799 ~ www.thegrhf.org

Visit www.BeAHealthyHero.com for ideas on how to keep your kids at a healthy weight using 5-2-1-0: activities, ideas, facts, recipes, parent toolkits, blogs.

Freedom to Speak

PLUS...

A speech therapy practice treating people who display disorders of fluency; most commonly, stuttering. Traditional/Intensive Programs available. Contact Susan M. Cochrane, Board Recognized Specialist in Fluency Disorders.

check our FULL Health Provider’s Guide as well as all our family focused directories online for more great resources and articles

8619 North Shore Dr., Honeoye, 14471 585-329-0616 ~ freedomtospeak@frontiernet.net www.stuttertherapy.com

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www.GVParent.com for you 24/7!


Health & Fitness Providers Guide

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • July 2013

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Health & Fitness Providers Guide

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Health & Fitness Providers Guide

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • July 2013

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Health & Fitness Providers Guide

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Health & Fitness Providers Guide

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • July 2013

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Health & Fitness Providers Guide

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Health & Fitness Providers Guide

PLUS... check our FULL Health Provider’s Guide as well as all our family focused directories online for more great resources and articles

www.GVParent.com

for you 24/7!

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • July 2013

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Calendar

july events

Activities • Exhibits • Theater • Storytelling • Shows • Family Fun • Outdoor Adventures Parenting Programs • and lots more for families to do in & around Rochester!

Corn Hill Arts Festival

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July 13 & 14

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he 2013 Corn Hill Arts Festival will once again feature hundreds of artists, four stages of continuous live music, and the Emerging Artists Expo. The Festival is all volunteer run and is a Rochester and Western New York favorite. This year's festivities will also include The Fairy Houses Tour, an exhibit of whimsical habitats crafted from natural materials for the fairies. The Corn Hill Arts Festival has something for everyone! Where:  Corn Hill Neighborhood, 133 South Fitzhugh Street, Rochester, 14608 When: Saturday July 13, 10am-6pm, Sunday July 14, 10am-5pm. Cost: Free! For More Info: visit  www.CornHillArtsFestival.com

fri

tues

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Geneseo Air Show "The Greatest Show on Turf" is the theme of this year's air show. Featuring World War II war birds, as well as other classic aircraft. Military re-enactments, displays and food. Friday July 12, 6am-dark. $20, under 12yrs free. Geneseo Airport, Big Tree Lane off Route 63, Geneseo. 243-2100. www.1941hag.org

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sat

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Raise money for Heritage Christian Services to support programs for people with developmental disabilities. Tuesday July 16, 9am. $125/golfer. Shadow Lake Golf Course, 1850 Five Mile Line Rd. Penfield. Shadow Pines Golf Course, 600 Whalen Rd. Penfield. www.heritagechristianservices.org

Celebrate the birthday of your favorite zoo animals! Enjoy the "Happy Birthday" song and treats for the birthday animal and a docent-run touch table station. If you want to bring a gift see the website for ideas! Today's Birthday: Gertrude the King Vulture. Included with admission. Saturday July 20, 1-3pm. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St. 3367123. www.senecaparkzoo.org

23rd Annual Heritage Christian Services Foundation Golf Classic

Animal Birthdays at the Zoo


calendar of events • local family-friendly activities calendar guide: August ��������������������48 Library����������������������49 Ongoing������������������50

01 * Monday

RED WINGS VS. SYRACUSE. Basch & Nickerson LLP Kids Eat Free (1st 500 kids 12 & under will receive a hot dog, soda & snack item), Hillside Family of Agencies Pre-Game Autograph Booth. 7:05pm. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Way, Rochester. 234-7660. www.RedWingsBaseball.com

02 * Tuesday RED WINGS VS. SYRACUSE. Knot Hole Kid’s Club Game, M&T Bank/ Messenger Post Media Family FourPack Night, Hillside Family of Agencies Pre-Game Autograph Booth. 7:05pm. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Way, Rochester. 234-7660. www.RedWingsBaseball.com

04 * Thursday FREE *Chil-E Fest. Live music, food booths, kid’s games and activities, senior center activities, the 6th annual car show, parade (5pm), inflatable rides, and fireworks at 10pm. Headlining bands: The Good Rats and Flint Creek. 12-10pm. Chili Center, Chili Ave., Rochester 14624. 8894680. townofchili.org RED WINGS VS. PAWTUCKET. ESL Federal Credit Union Post-game Fireworks, Hillside Family of Agencies Pre-Game Autograph Booth. 7:05pm. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Way, Rochester. 234-7660. www.RedWingsBaseball.com FREE *RPO PRESENTS: Independence Day Concert. On the Main Street Bridge in downtown Rochester (followed by fireworks). 9pm. Main Street Bridge, Rochester. www.rpo.org

05 * Friday FREE *Cool Kids! Green Kids! presents: CATSKILL PUPPET THEATER! Get there early for one of our most popular shows! The best way to celebrate your holiday weekend and stay-cation! It’s a traveling professional puppet troupe-you’ll never forget. 7-8pm. Sagawa Park, 100 Main St, Brockport 14420. 637-3984. www.generationcool.biz Family Fridays: Around the World in 80 Ways. New Fun Every Friday! Whether you are the ‘techie’ that wants to learn about the latest gadget, or anxious to explore your creative side there is always something new for you.12-4pm. Included with admission. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave. 271-1880. www.rmsc.org

RED WINGS VS. PAWTUCKET. Baseball/RPO Concert/Fireworks Tripleheader- Following the game, fans can enjoy an exclusive concert performed by the RPO, then stick around for a great fireworks show. Hillside Family of Agencies Pre-Game Autograph Booth. 6:05pm. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Way, Rochester. 2347660. www.RedWingsBaseball.com

NATIVE AMERICAN DANCE & MUSIC FESTIVAL. July 27 & 28, 10am-6pm. Ganondagan State Historic Site

RPO PRESENTS: Patriotic Celebration at Frontier Field. Free with admission to the Red Wings game, immediately following the game with fireworks to follow concert. 8:30pm. Free with admission to the game. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Way, Rochester. 234-7660. www.rpo.org

06 * Saturday RED WINGS VS. PAWTUCKET. Latino Night Post-Game Concert featuring Tony Vega, presented by McDonalds and Wegmans, Magnet Giveaway (1st 2,500 fans), Hillside Family of Agencies Pre-Game Autograph Booth. 6:05pm. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Way, Rochester. 234-7660. www.RedWingsBaseball.com RENAISSANCE FESTIVAL - JULY 6-AUG18, WEEKENDS ONLY An authentic English Renaissance village is created every Sat. and Sun. through August 18 with continuous live entertainment, old world rides, games and food. 10am-7pm. 15385 Farden Rd, Sterling. 800-879-4446. www.SterlingFestival.com

10 * Wednesday

RHINOS vs CHARLOTTE. Family Night! Family ticket special: 4 tickets and a game day program: Just $19.99! 7:05pm. Sahlen’s Stadium, 460 Oak Street, Rochester. 454-KICK (5425). www.rhinossoccer.com

07 * Sunday RED WINGS VS. PAWTUCKET. Knot Hole Kid’s Club Game, Post-Game Run the Bases with Spikes & Mittsy, Hillside Family of Agencies Pre-Game Autograph Booth. Francesco Rinaldi pasta sauce or Spikes Salsa label can be redeemed at the Box Office for a buy one, get one free ticket. 1:05pm. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Way, Rochester. 234-7660. www.RedWingsBaseball.com

09 * Tuesday FREE *NEW Summer Camp Program: Rainforest Rescuers. Designed for kids ages 6-10, and explores the Rainforest through a variety of hands-on activities that will compare and contrast New York and the Rainforest. The program is divided up into 8 session. 9am-12pm. $10 per child, per session. Long Acre Farms, 1342 Eddy Rd., Macedon. 315-9864202. www.longacrefarms.com

FREE *RPO PRESENTS: Concerts by the Shore. Brought to you by Wegmans. 7:30pm. Ontario Beach Park, Rochester 14612. www.rpo.org

11 * Thursday BIG RIB BBQ & BLUES FEST - JULY 11-14 Rib masters from across the USA serving a full menu of delicious barbeque specialties and 20 musical performances by blues bands. 11:30am-10pm Admission: lunchtime- free. $5 or $10 after 3pm. 12 & under: free. Highland Park, Highland Ave., Rochester. 4734482 www.mybigrib.com Hochstein at High Falls Concert Series Presents: Mikaela Davis. Harpist and vocalist teams up with other eclectic instruments to create a unique and soulful lo-fi sound. 12:10pm. Granite Mills Park at High Falls Rochester. 454-4403. www.hochstein.org MOMS CLUB OF HENRIETTA EAST. See what we’re all about. Here Moms and kids are finding support, friendship and more. Meetings are the second thursday of each month. (children always welcome) Please contact for location and time info. Email HenriettaEastMoms@yahoo. com, or call 234-4666 ext 6.

YATES COUNTY FAIR - JULY 9-13 Exhibits, tractor pulls, jousting, family activities, food, games, contests and live entertainment. 10am. Old Route 14A, Main Street, Penn Yan. 315-536-3830 www.yatescountyfair.org

STUART HORSE TRIALS. The 300 competitors come from all over the United States and many foreign countries. Fun for the whole family. Parking is $10 a car, admission is free. Continues through July 14. 8am. Townline & Murray Rds, Victor, 14564. www.stuarthorsetrials.org

Temple B’rith Kodesh Concert. Fundraiser will also feature the Rochester Philharmonic League Young Artist Auditions’ Special Award Winner, Pittsford baritone Aaron Bigeleisen. 7:30pm. Temple B’rith Kodesh, 2131 Elmwood Ave. Rochester. www.rpo.org

12 * Friday FREE *Cool Kids! Green Kids! presents: The MAGIC GUY!! Comedy magic! Bring your giggle meter--this guy rocks it off the charts! Come see why The Magic Guy is touted as “Rochester’s favorite entertainer”!! It’s a nonstop laughfest! And some eye-popping magic!! 7-8pm. Sagawa Park, 100 Main St, Brockport, 14420. 637-3984. www.generationcool.biz Family Fridays: Super Villains. New Fun Every Friday! Whether you are the ‘techie’ that wants to learn about the latest gadget, or anxious to explore your creative side there is always something new for you during Family Fridays. 12-4pm. Included with admission. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave. 271-1880. www.rmsc.org FREE *Friday Movies in the Park. Bring lawn chairs and blankets and enjoy a movie on the big screen! Movies start at sunset; approx 9pm. Tonight: The Lorax. 9pm. 3720 Union Station Rd, Chili, 14514. 889-4680. www.townofchili.org GENESEO AIRSHOW - JULY 12-14 “The Greatest Show on Turf” is the theme of this year’s airshow. Featuring World War II war birds, as well as other classic aircraft. (gates open daily at 6am.) Military re-enactments, displays and food.

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calendar of events • local family-friendly activities HOCHSTEIN AT HIGH FALLS CONCERT SERIES PRESENTS: MIKAELA DAVIS. Indie harpist and vocalist Mikaela Davis teams up with other eclectic instruments to create a unique and soulful lo-fi sound. Davis has been playing the harp since the age of 8 and started writing music when she was 12 years old. Thursday July 11, 12:10pm. Free. Granite Mills Park at High Falls Rochester. 454-4403. www.hochstein.org

6am-dark. $20, under 12yrs. Free. Geneseo Airport, Big Tree Lane off Route 63, Geneseo. 243-2100. www.1941hag.org FREE *HILL CUMORAH PAGEANT JULY 12,13, 16-20 Outdoor drama based on the Book of Mormon. Hollywood special effects, and a costumed cast of over 650 provide a spectacular show. 9:15pm. The Hill Cumorah, Highway 21 between the villages of Palmyra and Manchester. 315-597-5851. www.hillcumorah.org FREE *Hochstein presents: Arts and Action Camp Performance Around the World. Music, dance, art, and culture from different places around the globe. 11:15am. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 North Plymouth Ave. Rochester 14614. 454-4596. www.hochstein.org

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RHINOS vs RICHMOND. Christmas in July! Christmas decor, Christmas cookie eating contest, and pictures with Santa! Bring a toy to donate to the children of the Hillside Family of Agencies and receive a $5 ticket to the game! 7:35pm. Sahlen’s Stadium, 460 Oak Street, Rochester, 454-KICK (5425). www.rhinossoccer.com RPO PRESENTS: Summer Spectacular with Fireworks. RPO performance followed by fireworks on the Athletic Field. 8:30pm. $10/$5 for students in advance, $12 and $6 the day of show. SUNY Geneseo 1 College Cir Geneseo,14454. www.rpo.org STUART HORSE TRIALS. See July 11. 8am.


calendar of events • local family-friendly activities 13 * Saturday FREE *45th Annual Corn Hill Arts Festival. Enjoy the Historic Corn Hill Neighborhood, Free Admission. Experience 400+ Original Artists, 4 Stages of Live Music, Food & Family Fun. 10am-6pm. Corn Hill Neighborhood, 133 South Fitzhugh Street Rochester, 14608. 421-1570 x227. www.CornHillArtsFestival.com FINGER LAKES LAVENDER FESTIVAL - JULY 13-14 Stroll through fragrant fields. Harvest your own bouquet of fresh lavender. Many artistic and culinary delights. 9am - 5pm. Lockwood Lavender Farm, 1682 West Lake Road, Skaneateles, 13152. www.fingerlakeslavenderfestival. blogspot.com RPO’s 90th Anniversary Celebration. The 1920s-themed evening will feature an RPO performance conducted by Principal Pops Conductor Jeff Tyzik, cocktails, dinner, dancing, and a live auction. 6pm. $200/person ($400/couple) and $1,500 for a table of eight. Rochester Riverside Convention Center 123 E Main St Rochester, 14604. www.rpo.org STUART HORSE TRIALS. See July 11. 8am.

14 * Sunday 45th Annual Corn Hill Arts Festival. Enjoy the Historic Corn Hill Neighborhood, Free Admission. Experience 400+ Original Artists, 4 Stages of Live Music, Food & Family Fun. 10am-6pm. Corn Hill Neighborhood, 133 South Fitzhugh Street Rochester, 14608. 421-1570x 227. www.CornHillArtsFestival.com FREE *Herschell Carrousel Factory Museum 30th Anniversary Celebration. A grand celebration of the museum’s 30th season and the start of Canal Fest! Top off the celebration with hot dogs, popcorn, and an old-fashioned ice cream social 12-4pm. Herschell Carrousel Factory Museum, 180 Thompson St. North Tonawanda. 716-693-1885. www.carrouselmuseum.org STUART HORSE TRIALS. See July 11. 8am.

16 * Tuesday 23RD ANNUAL HERITAGE CHRISTIAN SERVICES FOUNDATION GOLF CLASSIC. Raise money for Heritage Christian Services, to support programs for people with developmental disabilities. 9am. $125/golfer. Shadow Lake Golf Course, 1850 Five Mile Line Rd. Penfield. Shadow Pines Golf Course, 600 Whalen Rd. Penfield. www.heritagechristianservices.org

HEMLOCK “LITTLE WORLD’S” FAIR - JULY 16-20 Amusement rides, 4-H events, harness racing, food, concerts, demolition derbies, truck pulls, talent show & more. 9am-12am. $8-$11. Free parking. 7370 Water St., Hemlock. 367-3370. www.hemlockfair.org RHINOS vs WILMINGTON. Men’s Health Night, wear blue to support the fight against prostate cancer. The 1st 1000 fans will receive a Rhinos rally towel! players will be wearing special BLUE jerseys that will be auctioned off during the game, proceeds will benefit Project Zero. 7:35pm. Sahlen’s Stadium, 460 Oak Street, Rochester. 454-KICK (5425). www.rhinossoccer.com

17 * Wednesday GARDEN VIBES CONCERT SERIES. The Eastman House presents live music in the Townson Terrace Garden and on the East Vista Lawn, with catered concessions and children’s activities. Ticket prices include museum admission. This show features NRBQ. 6-8pm. $12 adults; $7 members; $5 youths (ages 13-18); and free to children ages 12 and under. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave., Rochester. 271-3361. www.eastmanhouse.org MOMS CLUB OF IRONDEQUOIT. Moms and kids are finding support, friendship and more. We look forward to meeting you! Meets the third Thursday of the month. 9:30-11am. Check web site or email April at momsclubofirondequoit@yahoo.com.

Hochstein at High Falls Concert Series Presents: Nimrod Wildfire. Genre-busting outfit plays guitar-centric, Britishinspired rock throughout Rochester. The band combines five music veterans, thoughtful lyrics and a toe-dip in several styles to generate wide appeal. BYOChair. Rain location at High Falls Center. 12:10pm. Granite Mills Park at High Falls Rochester. 454-4403. www.hochstein.org

RPO PRESENTS: Eastman Summer Conducting Institute. Features the RPO with various conductors. 7:30pm. $15/$5 students. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 60 Gibbs St. Rochester. 274-1110. www.rpo.org

The Eastman House presents live music in the Townson Terrace Garden and on the East Vista Lawn, with catered concessions and children’s activities. Ticket prices include museum admission. This show features NRBQ. Wednesday July 7, 6-8pm. $12 adults; $7 members; $5 youths (ages 13-18); and free to children ages 12 and under. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave., Rochester, 271-3361. www.eastmanhouse.org

19 * Friday

18 * Thursday

RED WINGS VS. SYRACUSE. Drawstring Backpack Giveaway (1st 1,000 kids 18 & under) presented by Alfred State College, Knot Hole Kid’s Club Game, Hillside Family of Agencies Pre-Game Autograph Booth. 7:05pm. . Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Way, Rochester. 234-7660. www.RedWingsBaseball.com

GARDEN VIBES CONCERT SERIES

CONVENTION DAYS - JULY 19-20 Displays, discussions, tours and activities commemorating the 165th anniversary of the 1848 American Women’s Rights Convention. National Women’s Hall of Fame, Women’s Rights National Historic Park, Seneca Museum, Seneca Falls Historical Society, People’s Park and the Stanton Home. 315-568-2703, www.conventiondays.com FREE *Cool Kids! Green Kids! presents: En GardeFencing fun. Join En Garde Batavia to participate in a night of swashbucklin’ fun! Try the basics of the fantastic sport of fencing! Not only does it increase concentration and focus but teaches respect, confidence, and gets you fit. All ages. 7-8pm. Sagawa Park, 100 Main St, Brockport, 14420. 637-3984. www.generationcool.biz Family Fridays: Make it! Whether you are the ‘techie’ that wants to learn about the latest gadget, or anxious to explore your creative side there is always something new for you during Family Fridays. 12-4pm. Included with admission. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave. 271-1880. www.rmsc.org FESTA ITALIANA -JULY 19-21 Arts and Crafts, live entertainment, food, children’s activities and more. Italian American Community Center, 150 Frank DiMino Way. 594-8882 www.iaccrochester.org

FREE *Friday Movies in the Park. Bring lawn chairs and blankets and enjoy a movie on the big screen! Movies start when the sun sets; approx 9pm. Tonight: Space Jam. 9pm. 3720 Union Station Rd, Chili, 14514. 889-4680. www.townofchili.org FREE *Hochstein presents: Art in Action Camp Performance Dance to the Beat! Sounds and rhythms using the most unusual things. 11:15am. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 North Plymouth Ave. Rochester 14614. 454-4596. www.hochstein.org MACEDONIAN FESTIVAL JULY 19-21 Folk music, food, performances and costumes and activities that are representative of both the past and present of Macedonian culture. St. Dimitria Macedonian Orthodox Church Grounds, 235 Telephone Rd., W. Henrietta. 334-6675. www.macedonianfest.com RED WINGS VS. SYRACUSE. Postgame Fireworks,Tote Bag Giveaway (1st 3,000 fans), presented by The College at Brockport, Mercy Flight Central Night and Jersey Auction, Magnet Giveaway (1st 2,500 fans), Hillside Family of Agencies Pre-Game Autograph Booth. 7:15pm. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Way, Rochester. 2347660. www.RedWingsBaseball.com

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calendar of events • local family-friendly activities

STUART HORSE TRIALS The 300 competitors come from all over the US and many foreign countries. Fun for the whole family. July 11 through July 14, which is Kids Activity Day. “Mickey the Belgian” will be available for a “meet and greet” and photo ops with kids from 10am-12pm. Parking is $10 a car, admission is free. July 11-14. Stuart Horse Trials, Townline & Murray Rds, Victor, 14564. www.stuarthorsetrials.org

July Game dates: Saturday, July 6th vs. Charlotte Eagles at 7:05pm Friday, July 12th vs. Richmond Kickers at 7:35pm Friday, July 19th vs. Wilmington Hammerheads at 7:35pm Sunday, July 28th vs. Antigua at 4:05pm

RPO PRESENTS: Ward Stare Conducts Mozart & Beethoven. The Rochester native returns to conduct the RPO. Will feature classical favorites including Mozart’s lyrical Clarinet Concerto featuring RPO Principal Clarinet Kenneth Grant, and more. 8pm. $24-$87. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 60 Gibbs St. Rochester. 274-1110. www.rpo.org

TROLLEYS AT TWILIGHT. An evening at an old-time trolley park, complete with refreshing ice cream and the happy sound of the calliope wafting across the beautiful Genesee valley countryside. The Pittsford Fire Department band will provide entertainment. 4-10pm. New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 East River Road, Rush. 533-1113. www.nymtmuseum.org

20 * Saturday

22 * Monday

ANIMAL BIRTHDAYS AT THE ZOO. Celebrate the birthday of your favorite zoo animals! “Happy Birthday” song and treats for the birthday animal, a docent-run touch table station. If you want to bring a gift see the website for ideas! Today’s Birthday: Gertrude the King Vulture. 1-3pm. Included with admission. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St. 336-7123. www.senecaparkzoo.org

MOMS Club of Clarkson/ Hamlin. The MOMS Club of Clarkson-Hamlin holds daily activities as well as occasional evening events for you and your child. We offer playgroups, family activities, field trips, kid’s activities, moms and couples nights out, and many other activities. 10am. 502-8805. www.frontiernet. net/~clarksonhamlinmomsclub/

CIVIL WAR RE-ENACTMENT - JULY 20-21 Hundreds of re-enactors recreate Civil War life in 1863 with two battles daily and townfolk offering concerts and vignettes depicting civilian life during the war. 10am-5pm. Free with admission. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd., Mumford. 538-6822. www.gcv.org

ORLEANS COUNTY FAIR-JULY 22-27 Hands on activities and free entertainment as well as the many exhibits will leave you with more choices than you can imagine. Orleans Co Fairgrounds, 12690 Route 31, Albion 14411. www.orleans4-hfair.com

RPO PRESENTS: MATTHEW MORRISON. Actor, dancer, singer/ songwriter, musician and Glee star Matthew Morrison. 8pm. $24 to $87. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 60 Gibbs St. Rochester. 274-1110. www.rpo.org

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RED WINGS VS. LEHIGH VALLEY. Basch & Nickerson LLP Kids Eat Free (1st 500 kids 12 & under will receive a hot dog, soda & snack item), Curious George Appearance, Hillside Family of Agencies Pre-Game Autograph Booth. 7:05pm. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Way, Rochester. 2347660. www.RedWingsBaseball.com


calendar of events • local family-friendly activities 23 * Tuesday

25 * Thursday

26 * Friday

ONTARIO COUNTY FAIR - JULY 23-27 Amusements, rides, games, rodeo, horse drawn wagon rides, 4-H displays, auto racing, food and activities. Ontario County Fairgrounds, 2820 County Rd 10, Canandaigua. 394-4987 www.ontariocountyfair.org

Hochstein at High Falls Concert Series Presents: The Pickpockets. A band of buskers embarking on Rochester’s indie music scene, The Pickpockets employ several unique (and sometimes toy) instruments to play their gypsysounding tunes. BYOChair. Rain location at High Falls Center. 12:10pm. Granite Mills Park at High Falls Rochester. 454-4403. www.hochstein.org

FREE *2013 Kotlarz Classic golf tournament The 2013 Kotlarz Classic golf tournament raises money for organizations that help families struggling after the death of a parent. It’s a serious tournament -- with a sense of humor. 8am-3pm Brookwoods Country Club, 2101 Country Club Lane, Ontario. 662-8623. www.akotlarz.com

RED WINGS VS. LEHIGH VALLEY. M&T Bank/Messenger Post Media Family Four-Pack Night, Hillside Family of Agencies Pre-Game Autograph Booth. 7:05pm. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Way, Rochester. 2347660. www.RedWingsBaseball.com

24 * Wednesday RED WINGS VS. LEHIGH VALLEY. Baseball Hall of Famer Rod Carew Autograph Appearance (6-6:45, 7:15-8. Carew will not be able to sign bats or jerseys) presented by Canandaigua National Bank & Trust, D&C Wings Wednesday, Hillside Family of Agencies Pre-Game Autograph Booth. 7:05pm. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Way, Rochester. 2347660. www.RedWingsBaseball.com

FREE *OSWEGO HARBORFEST JULY 25-28 Enjoy activities for the entire family, music, crafts, midway rides. Concerts held in any parks. Children’s activities. Use the Park & Ride parking areas located at SUNY Oswego, Rt. 104 West. www.oswegoharborfest.com RED WINGS VS. LEHIGH VALLEY. Alternate parking for weekday games, fans can park at Oak Street lots, including Kodak lot D, Camp Day, presented by Sportsplex Operators & Developers, Hillside Family of Agencies Pre-Game Autograph Booth. 11:05am. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Way, Rochester. 234-7660. www.RedWingsBaseball.com

FREE *Cool Kids! Green Kids! presents: World Drum Jam. Final Week-join this trio of drummers andtravel the world on the beat of a drum. Best part? Everyone gets to play actual riffs from Ghana, Cuba, and more! No need to bring your own- we bring over 25 djembes, Congas and you bring the fun! 7-8pm. Sagawa Park, 100 Main St, Brockport, 14420. 637-3984. www.generationcool.biz Family Fridays: Music Madness. New Fun Every Friday! Whether you are the ‘techie’ that wants to learn about the latest gadget, or anxious to explore your creative side there is always something new for you during Family Fridays. 12-4pm. Included with admission. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave. 271-1880. www.rmsc.org

FREE *Friday Movies in the Park. Bring lawn chairs and blankets and enjoy a movie on the big screen! Movies start when the sun sets; approx 9pm. Tonight: Wreck It Ralph. 9pm. 3720 Union Station Rd, Chili, NY 14514. 889-4680. www.townofchili.org FREE *Hochstein presents: Arts in Action Camp: Performance Jazz It Up! Campers will perform jazz music and dances. 11:15am. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 North Plymouth Ave. Rochester 14614. 454-4596. www.hochstein.org RED WINGS VS. NORFOLK. Lou Gramm Book Signing & National Anthem Performance, Francesco Rinaldi sauce/Spikes Salsa label can be redeemed at the Box Office for a buy one, get one free ticket, 7:15pm. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Way, Rochester. 234-7660. www.RedWingsBaseball.com

27 * Saturday NATIVE AMERICAN DANCE & MUSIC FESTIVAL - JULY 27-28 Traditional dancers, musicians, storytellers, and artists sharing their cultural heritage, crafts and arts. Also popular children and adult workshops. 10am-6pm. Ganondagan State Historic Site, 1488 State Rd. (Rte. 444) Victor, 14564. 742-1690. www.ganondagan.org

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calendar of events • local family-friendly activities RED WINGS VS. NORFOLK. ESL Federal Credit Union Post-game Fireworks, Cowboy Monkey Rodeo Appearance, presented by Invisible Fence Brand, Star Wars Night and Jersey Auction, presented by Hillside Family of Agencies, Hillside Family of Agencies Pre-Game Autograph Booth. 7:05pm. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Way, Rochester. 234-7660. www.RedWingsBaseball.com FREE *SPENCERPORT CANAL DAYS - JULY 27-28 Arts & Crafts, live music, children’s activities, incl. games & face painting, classic car show. Union St., Downtown Spencerport. 349-1331 www.spencerportcanaldays.com TEN UGLY MEN FESTIVAL. An all day festival that benefits charities in the Rochester area. Food, games, children’s activities and more. 10am-8pm. $30 advance, $40 day of, Kids 13 - 20: $10, 12 and under free. North Side Entrance to Genesee Valley Park, Elmwood Ave. Rochester. www.tenuglymen.com WATERFRONT ART FESTIVAL - JULY 27-28 Juried items on display & for purchase. Handmade crafts & artwork by 180 artists. Enjoy cool, outdoor breezes & ample shade. . 10am-5pm $3. 12 & under free. Kershaw Park (Lake Shore Dr.), Canandaigua, 14625. 671-9102 www.waterfrontartfestival.com

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28 * Sunday RED WINGS VS. NORFOLK. Dwight Gooden Autograph Appearance (5-5:45, 6:15-7), Knot Hole Kid’s Club Game, Chili’s Grill & Bar PostGame Run the Bases with Spikes & Mittsy, Hillside Family of Agencies Pre-Game Autograph Booth. 6:05pm. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Way, Rochester. 234-7660. www.RedWingsBaseball.com RHINOS vs ANTIGUA. Kid’s Day! (Courtesy of Bimbo Bakeries USA). Join Rex the Rhino and all of his mascot friends for a day of kid-friendly fun and activities! 4:05pm. Sahlen’s Stadium, 460 Oak Street, Rochester, 454-KICK (5425). www.rhinossoccer.com

29 * Monday

3955 Mt. Read Blvd, Rochester, 14616. 865-5505. www.journeyontheweb.org

30 * Tuesday LIVINGSTON COUNTY FAIR - JULY 30-AUG 3 Harness Racing, Tractor pulls, demolition derby, horse show, 4-H displays, rides, food and activities. Livingston County Fairgrounds, 310 Leicester St., Caledonia. 538-2168. www.livingstoncountyfair.org

August 01 * Thursday

RED WINGS VS. NORFOLK. Hall of Fame Pitcher Gaylord Perry Autograph Appearance (6-6:45, 7:15-8), Basch & Nickerson LLP Kids Eat Free (1st 500 kids 12 & under will receive a hot dog, soda & snack item), 7:05pm. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Way, Rochester. 234-7660. www.RedWingsBaseball.com

Hochstein at High Falls Concert Series Presents: The Dady Brothers. The versatile duo plays fiddle, mandolin, guitar, bodhran, banjo, uilleann pipes, harmonica, and even pennywhistle. BYOChair. Rain location at High Falls Center. 12:10pm. Granite Mills Park at High Falls Rochester. 454-4403. www.hochstein.org

FREE *SonQuest Rainforest Vacation Bible School. This VBS transports young minds into a vivid rainforest environment of jungle sounds, sights and smells, where they’ll dig into the Bible. Church,

MONROE COUNTY FAIR - AUG 1-4 Carnival rides, games, 4-H displays and competitions, music, local foods and drinks 680 Colby St., Spencerport, 14559. 262-3247. www.mcfair.com

PHELPS SAUERKRAUT FESTIVAL - AUG 1-4 Family Fun for all ages. Arts & Crafts, Kraut Idol, Cabbage Bowling, 20K Road Race, a Giant Parade, Live Music, Mustang Rally Car Show, and a fantastic Fireworks Display. Fireman’s Field, Ontario St., Phelps. 315-548-2222. www.phelpsny.com

02 * Friday FREE *Friday Movies in the Park. Bring lawn chairs and blankets and enjoy a movie on the big screen! Movies start when the sun sets; approx 9pm. Tonight: Free Willy. 9pm. 3720 Union Station Rd, Chili, 14514. 889-4680. www.townofchili.org FREE *Hochstein presents: School of Rock Camp Performance. Campers performing Rock songs they rehearsed all week. 5:30pm. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 North Plymouth Ave. Rochester 14614. 454-4596. www.hochstein.org RHINOS vs DUTCH LIONS. Fire and Ice Post game Fireworks! 7:35pm. Sahlen’s Stadium, 460 Oak Street, Rochester, 454-KICK (5425). www.rhinossoccer.com

03 * Saturday LIMA CROSSROADS FESTIVAL AUG 3 Pancake Breakfast, vendors, children’s activities, car cruise and show, games, contests, and the


calendar of events • local family-friendly activities

July 4th events // fireworks & more

Brighton 5k Race at Twelve Corners and Brighton High School starting at 8am. Meridian Centre Park festivities. 2025 Winton Road South, starting at 2pm including rides, games, food, and entertainment including The Skycoasters, ending with a Fireworks Display at 9:50pm. 784-5260. www.townofbrighton.org

RPO PRESENTS: MATTHEW MORRISON

Brockport 4th of July Brockport. “Old Fashioned Celebration” with musical entertainment, games for children of all age sand refreshments. 11am-3pm. Morgan Manning House, 151 Main St. Brockport, 6373645. www.brockportny.org

Actor, dancer, singer/songwriter, musician and Glee star Matthew Morrison. Saturday July 20, 8pm. $24 to $87. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 60 Gibbs St. Rochester. 274-1110. www.rpo.org

annual bed race. 8am-10pm. Main St., Routes 5 & 20, Lima. www.crossroadscouncil.org

Canandaigua. 315-331-4022. www.pageantofsteam.org

08 * Thursday PARK AVE SUMMER ARTS FEST AUG 3-4 Unique shopping, food & entertainment, juried arts & crafts, as well as three stages of musical acts. Parking in area lots & on side streets. No pets. 10am-6pm. Park Avenue (Alexander to Culver), Rochester. |4734482. www.rochesterevents.com RED WINGS VS. SYRACUSE. ESL Federal Credit Union Post-game Fireworks, Girl Scout Sleepover, Season Seatholder Party (3:30-5:30), Hillside Family of Agencies Pre-Game Autograph Booth. Gates open early at 5:30pm. 7:05pm. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Way, Rochester. 234-7660. www.RedWingsBaseball.com

04 * Sunday RED WINGS VS. SYRACUSE. Former Buffalo Bills Wide Receiver Andre Reed Autograph Appearance (12-12:50 pm), Magnet Giveaway (1st 2,500 fans), Knot Hole Kid’s Club Game, Post-Game Run the Bases with Spikes & Mittsy, Pre-Game Autograph Booth. 1:05pm. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Way, Rochester. 234-7660. www. RedWingsBaseball.com

07 * Wednesday PAGEANT OF STEAM - AUG 7-10 Display of antique farm equipment dating back to early 1900’s, parades, tractor pulls, flea market, live music, displays, demos & food. 8am-8pm. 8am-8pm. $6. Kids under 12 FREE. Pageant Fair Grounds, Gehan Rd.,

Hochstein at High Falls Concert Series Presents: String Theory Bluegrass Bands. The group brings together influences from the world of roots, rock, reggae, and of course, bluegrass. BYOChair. Rain location at High Falls Center. 12:10pm. Granite Mills Park at High Falls Rochester. 454-4403. www.hochstein.org MOMS CLUB OF HENRIETTA EAST. See what we’re all about. Here Moms and kids are finding support, friendship and more. Meetings are the second thursday of each month. (children always welcome) Please contact for location and time info. Email HenriettaEastMoms@yahoo.com, or call 234-4666 ext 6. FREE *String Theory Bluegrass Band at Hochstein at High Falls. Based out of Rochester, String Theory Bluegrass Band has been astounding audiences with its hefty Americana sounds since it was formed in 2001. The group brings together influences from the world of roots, rock, reggae, and of course, bluegrass. 12:10-12:50pm. Granite Mills Park at High Falls Rochester. 454 - 4403 x 21. www.facebook.com/hochstein. highfalls.9

Canandaigua 4th of July Parade on Main Street. 10am. Parade will go south on Main Street from the County Court House to Lakeshore Drive. Community Picnic at Kershaw Park, 3pm. Live Music begins at 6pm in the gazebo, Featuring Taran. Fireworks! 9:30-10:15pm. More music until 11pm.

www.canandaiguachamber.com

Chili From Noon to 10pm there is a ton of Fun Family Entertainment! The 24th Annual Chil-e Festival includes Food Booths, Craft Vendors, Senior Center activities, 6th Annual Car Show, bungy Trampoline, inflatable rides, Fire Department Activities, and, of course, the Parade at 5pm and Fireworks at 10pm. All day there will be music from multiple groups (Including the Goodrats @ 8pm) to keep you in the spirit of the celebration. 889-4680. www.townofchili.org Fairport Firecracker 5k Race starts at 8am, Parade on Main St at 10am, followed by Picnic in the Park from Noon- 4:00pm with music, food, and other events. Village of Fairport & Perinton Park, Route 31F and O’Connor Road, Fairport. 586-9840,

www.fairportperintonchamber.org

Henrietta Henrietta Annual Craft and Garage Sale, Senior Center, 515 Calkins Rd, 9am-2pm. At 4pm, go to Veteran’s Memorial Park 595 Calkins Rd, Enjoy live bands, children’s games, activities and local food vendors. Fireworks 9:40pm www.henrietta.org Irondequoit Irondequoit 4th of July Festival: July 3rd and 4th. Come to Irondequoit Town Hall campus where there will be community booths, Arts & Crafts Show and Sale and a Pioneer House & Blacksmith shop open house. Beverage Garden Entertainment for adults 3-10:30pm, register for the 10k and 2-mile Fun Run at 6-8pm (race is the 4th), and Street Dance at 7-11pm. Irondequoit 2-mile Fun Run at 8am, 10k race at 8:15am, decorated bicycle contest 10am, followed by the Parade at 11am along Titus Avenue from Irondequoit Plaza to Town Hall, Beverage Garden Entertainment for adults 2-10:30pm, Kids’ Area Entertainment 1:30-4:15pm, Musical performances at 5:30 & 7pm and Irondequoit Concert Band 8pm, Fireworks (weather permitting) at 9:30pm. Town Hall Campus 1280 Titus Ave 336-6070, www.irondequoit.org Rochester Celebrate Independence Day with your family and friends at the City’s July 4th Celebration, on the Main St. Bridge. Fabulous fireworks over the downtown skies at 10 pm! Recommended viewing areas: Main St. Bridge, Broad St. Bridge, Chestnut St. near the Washington Square Garage and surrounding streets. Attendees are encouraged to bring chairs or blankets for more comfortable viewing of the fireworks show. Music begins at 7:30pm with the RPO playing at 9pm. No pets, please. Free parking at all city-owned garages. Info: 311 or 428-5990. www.cityofrochester.govwwww

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calendar of events • local family-friendly activities

Library // programs & activities  01 * Monday

 08 * Monday

Storytime with Mike. Participate in a fun and interactive story telling program. 10:30 -11:30am. Central Library of Rochester and Monroe County 115 South Ave Rochester, 14604. 428-8150. www.libraryweb.org

Baby Story Times. For babies 0-23 months and a caregiver. 10:30am. East Rochester Public Library, 111 West Elm St., East Rochester, 428-8248. www.libraryweb.org

 02 * Tuesday BABY STORYTIME. For newborns - 18 months with a caregiver. No registration required. 10-10:30am. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7093. www.hpl.org

 03 * Wednesday DROP-IN STORYTIME. For kids of all ages. No registration require 10-10:30am. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7093. www.hpl.org Wednesday Afternoon at the Movies: Rise of the Guardians. When the evil spirit Pitch launches an assault on Earth, the Immortal Guardians team up to protect the innocence of children all around the world. Rated PG. 2:304pm. Central Library of Rochester and Monroe County 115 South Ave Rochester, 14604. 428-8150. www.libraryweb.org

 05 * Friday Friday Make and Take Craft. Every Friday during the summer, create a crafty project to take home. All supplies will be provided while they last. Families with children three and up are welcome. 1-5pm. Central Library of Rochester and Monroe County 115 South Ave Rochester, 14604. 428-8150. www.libraryweb.org GARDEN BINGO. Enjoy a game of garden-themed Bingo with prizes and refreshments. No registration required. 2pm. Irondequoit Public Library - Evans Branch 45 Cooper Road Rochester, 14617. 336-6062. www.libraryweb.org

 06 * Saturday Pete the Cat Visits the Library. The enormously popular children’s book character will be visiting. You’ll listen to one of his stories, make a craft, and get pictures taken with Pete! All ages. Please register. 2-3pm. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7092. www.hpl.org

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Blue Ridge Country Ramblers Outdoor Concert. This bluegrass band will perform on the Library lawn. Refreshments will be served. Families encouraged to attend! No registration required. 7-8:30pm. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7092. www.hpl.org Crafty Kids. Share your love of storytelling and all things creative with other like-minded kids. We’ll share stories and make a craft. For ages 5-10. Younger siblings are welcome if accompanied by a caregiver. 3pm. East Rochester Public Library, 111 West Elm St., East Rochester, 428-8248. www.libraryweb.org

 09 * Tuesday BABY STORYTIME. For newborns - 18 months with a caregiver. No registration required. 10-10:30am. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7093. www.hpl.org Evening Craft Series for Tweens. Sand Art Craft. All materials for the crafts will be provided free of charge. Class size is limited to 20 people, so register early. 6:30-7:30pm. Ages: 8-13yrs. Gates Public Library 902 Elmgrove Road, Rochester, 14624. 247-6446 www.gateslibrary.org Scrabble Coaster Craft. Create a unique drink coaster for the summer using Scrabble tiles. All supplies will be provided. For ages 10-up. Please register. 3-4pm. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7092. www.hpl.org

 10 * Wednesday Catfish Charlie’s Hot Diggety Dog Show with Barrel of Fun Productions. Get hooked on Charlie and his puppet partners. 10:30-11:30am. Kate Gleason Auditorium, Central Library of Rochester and Monroe County, 115 South Ave., Rochester, 428-8150. www.libraryweb.org DROP-IN STORYTIME. For kids of all ages. No registration require 10-10:30am. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7093. www.hpl.org

Wednesday Afternoon at the Movies: The Odd Life of Timothy Green. A childless couple buries a box in their backyard, containing all of their wishes for an infant. Soon, a child is born, though Timothy Green is not all that he appears. Rated PG. 2:30-4:30pm. Central Library of Rochester and Monroe County 115 South Ave Rochester, 14604. 428-8150. www.libraryweb.org

 11 * Thursday BOOK MAGIC. Read Are the Dinosaurs Dead, Dad? By Julie Middleton, and then make a fossil to take home. Registration is requested. 2pm. Irondequoit Public Library - Evans Branch 45 Cooper Road Rochester, 14617. 336-6062. www.libraryweb.org Cook with Tops Cooking School. Kids will learn to make pizza with a pro! Please register. 11am-12pm. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7092. www.hpl.org It’s Magic of Course. Magician Ted Burzynski is bringing his hilarious and interactive magic show to the Library. Parents will enjoy this program just as much as the kids! All ages. Please register. 6-7pm. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7092. www.hpl.org

 12 * Friday DIG INTO READING MAGIC SHOW. Join Klondike Dave, Old West gold prospector for a show filled with comedy, magic, and audience participation! With Moreland the Magician. No registration required. 10:30am. Irondequoit Public Library - Evans Branch 45 Cooper Road Rochester, 14617. 336-6062. www.libraryweb.org Friday Make and Take Craft Every Friday during the summer, create a crafty project to take home. All supplies will be provided while they last. Families with children three and up are welcome. 1-5pm. Central Library of Rochester and Monroe County 115 South Ave Rochester, 14604. 428-8150. www.libraryweb.org Worm Farm Party. Learn how to make a composting worm farm. We’ll also watch a short film and make a dirt craft. For ages 5-10. Younger siblings are welcome if accompanied by a caregiver. 2pm. East Rochester Public Library, 111 West Elm St., East Rochester, 4288248. www.libraryweb.org

 13 * Saturday STORIES FOR SHEEPDOGS. Practice your reading with Emmie, an adorable 4-year-old Shetland sheepdog! No registration required. 10:30am. Irondequoit Public Library - Evans Branch 45 Cooper Road Rochester, 14617. 336-6062. www.libraryweb.org

 16 * Tuesday BABY STORYTIME. For newborns - 18 months with a caregiver. No registration required. 10-10:30am. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7093. www.hpl.org

 17 * Wednesday An Evening of Magic. A magical summer evening of illusions and wonder with magician Richard McClendon. 6pm. East Rochester Public Library, 111 West Elm St., East Rochester, 428-8248. www.libraryweb.org DROP-IN STORYTIME. For kids of all ages. No registration require 10-10:30am. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7093. www.hpl.org Morning with RW Magic. Magical Entertainer Richard McClendon II mixes amazement, wonder, and magical illusions. 10-11am. Kate Gleason Auditorium, Central Library of Rochester and Monroe County, 115 South Ave., Rochester, 428-8150. www.libraryweb.org Wednesday Afternoon at the Movies: Hotel Transylvania. Dracula, who operates a high-end resort away from the human world, goes into overprotective mode when a boy discovers the resort and falls for the count’s teen-aged daughter. Rated PG. 2:30-4pm. Central Library of Rochester and Monroe County 115 South Ave Rochester, 14604. 428-8150. www.libraryweb.org

 18 * Thursday OmniPresent Puppet Theater. An action-packed re-telling of “Rumpelstiltskin” done in the fashion of the classic detective thrillers of the 1940s! Bring the whole family! Please register. 11am-12pm. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7092. www.hpl.org


calendar of events • local family-friendly activities  19 * Friday Friday Make and Take Craft. Create a crafty project to take home.. All supplies will be provided while they last. Families with children three and up are welcome. 1-5pm. Central Library of Rochester and Monroe County 115 South Ave Rochester, 14604. 428-8150. www.libraryweb. org Movie Friday. Take a break from the summer heat and enjoy a film about a journey that takes you “there and back again.” There’ll be a craft for the kids and snacks for the whole family. Film is rate PG-13. For all ages. 2pm. East Rochester Public Library, 111 West Elm St., East Rochester, 428-8248. http://www. libraryweb.org MOVIE MANIA! Showing Gnomeo and Juliet. Popcorn will be provided. No registration required. 2pm. Irondequoit Public Library - Evans Branch 45 Cooper Road Rochester, 14617. 336-6062. www.libraryweb.org

 22 * Monday Sing, Sign, and Play. Teach your baby to sign. For babies 6-24 mo. and their caregivers. Please register by contacting the library. 10:30am. East Rochester Public Library, 111 West Elm St., East Rochester, 4288248. http://www.libraryweb.org/ erochester/Childrens_Room.htm

 23 * Tuesday Evening Craft Series for Tweens. Craft: Tissue Fish. This is a craft project that can be completed in the allotted time. All materials for the crafts will be provided free of charge. Class size is limited to 20 people, so register early. 6:30-7:30pm. Ages: 8-13yrs. Gates Public Library 902 Elmgrove Road, Rochester, 14624. 247-6446 www.gateslibrary.org

wwwTie-Dye For Teens. Make beautiful Tie-Dye works of art out of your old clothes. Be sure to bring at least three pieces of white clothing to tie-dye and wear clothes you don’t mind getting dirty or stained. Weather permitting. 2-3:30pm. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 3597092. www.hpl.org

 24 * Wednesday American Girl Book Club: Kit. Kids ages 7-12 are invited to celebrate all things Kit! Read an excerpt from one of her books, make a craft, and learn. Please register. 4:15-5pm. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7092. www.hpl.org Books & Bites for Teens. A fun easy going book club just right for Summertime reading. For teens ages 12-up. Please register. 6:307:30pm. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7092. www.hpl.org Candy Sushi. Kwik Creations will lead a class on the Japanese art of sushi making. No raw fish here--this sushi is all sweets and candy. For ages 11 and up. 4pm. East Rochester Public Library, 111 West Elm St., East Rochester, 428-8248. http://www. libraryweb.org/erochester/Teens.htm LEGO CLUB. The library will provide the bricks and challenge participants to be as creative as possible. Registration required. 3-4pm. Ages: 6-12yrs. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7093. www.hpl.org Wednesday Afternoon at the Movies: Scooby Doo and the Loch Ness Monster. Scooby-Doo and the Mystery Inc. travel to Scotland to visit Daphne’s relatives at Blake Castle, which is situated on Loch Ness, home of the legendary creature. Not Rated. 2:30-4pm. Central Library of Rochester and Monroe County 115 South Ave Rochester, 14604. 428-8150. www.libraryweb.org

 25 * Thursday Preschool Drive-in Movie. Toddlers and Preschoolers are invited to join us for a ‘drive-in’ movie! Each child will make a car out of a cardboard box which they will then get to sit in while we watch a movie. For children ages 2.5- 5 years and their caregiver. Please register. 1:303:30pm. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7092. www.hpl.org

 26 * Friday Teen CPR/First Aid Program. The American Heart Association Heartsaver CPR/AED course covers adult, child and infant CPR, using an AED and how to help someone who is choking. Each student needs a lunch. Receive an American Heart Association card, valid for 2 years. 9:30am-5pm. The fee is $60.00 per student. Henrietta residents pay $30.00 per student. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7092. www.hpl.org CREATE YOUR OWN ANCIENT SCROLL. Use ancient symbols to design a scroll to display as a decoration. This program is sponsored by LSTA. Presented by Deb Coller of Artistic Ambitions. Registration is required. 2pm. Irondequoit Public Library - Evans Branch 45 Cooper Road Rochester, 14617. 336-6062. www.libraryweb.org Friday Make and Take Craft. Create a crafty project to take home. All supplies will be provided while they last. Families with children three and up are welcome. 1-5pm. Central Library of Rochester and Monroe County 115 South Ave Rochester, 14604. 428-8150. www.libraryweb. org Vegetable Garden Party. Kids can try their hand at vegetable gardening. We’ll plant seeds, make a craft, and play games in celebration of the summer growing season. For ages 5-10. Younger siblings are welcome if accompanied by a

caregiver. 2pm. East Rochester Public Library, 111 West Elm St., East Rochester, 428-8248. www.libraryweb.org/erochester

 29 * Monday Animals that Dig with the Wegmans ZooMobile. Meet many different animals who dig or live in the earth. 10:30-11:30am. Kate Gleason Auditorium, Central Library of Rochester and Monroe County, 115 South Ave., Rochester, 4288150. www.libraryweb.org

 30 * Tuesday BABY STORYTIME. For newborns - 18 months with a caregiver. No registration required. 10-10:30am. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7093. www.hpl.org Reptile Guys: Captive Lifeforms. The Reptile guys introduce some very exotic animals. You may even get to hold a snake! All ages. Please register. 2-3pm. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7092. www.hpl.org

 31 * Wednesday DROP-IN STORYTIME. For kids of all ages. No registration require 10-10:30am. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7093. www.hpl.org TEEN GAME NIGHT. Come and hang out with your friends at HPL’s monthly Teen Game Night. No registration. 6-8:30pm. Ages: 12yrs+. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 3597093. www.hpl.org Wednesday Afternoon at the Movies: The Smurfs When the evil wizard Gargamel chases the tiny blue Smurfs out of their village, they tumble from their magical world into New York City. Rated PG. 2:30 -4pm. Central Library of Rochester and Monroe County 115 South Ave Rochester, 14604. 428-8150. www.libraryweb.org

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calendar of events • local family-friendly activities

Ongoing events & exhibits Atari by Design: From Concept to Creation at the National Museum of Play at the Strong Arcade video games often sport stunning graphics and wildly different playing elements—like shifters, pedals, joysticks, buttons, and steering wheels— to heighten a gamer’s playing pleasure. See the creative thinking behind the finished designs of some of the most popular video arcade games at Atari by Design: From Concept to Creation, an original new display open at the National Museum of Play at The Strong until September 8th.

STRASENBURGH PLANETARIUM

ROCHESTER MUSEUM & SCIENCE CENTER

657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. 271-1880. www.rmsc.org/ StrasenburghPlanetarium/ Check website or call for prices and hours

657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. 271-1880. www.rmsc.org Check website or call for prices and hours

MY PLANETS. For children ages 3-5 and the adults with them, this friendly introduction to the planetarium features worlds in our solar system. Saturdays at 10am. $8. Ages: 3-5yrs. Ends Aug 31.

ADVENTURE ZONE. Dive to the bottom of Lake Ontario in the Deep Submergence Vehicle simulator. Experiment with wind currents, stream erosion, and more.

SATURDAY NIGHT LASER SHOW. Intensely colored beams from argon and krypton lasers fill the planetarium dome with dazzling color patterns that spontaneously dance to classic rock music. Shows change monthly. 9:30pm. $9-$10. Ages: 5+.

AT THE WESTERN DOOR. The hundreds of objects displayed show the Seneca’s and Haudenosaunee’s creative response to new technologies and materials introduced following European Contact.

SATURDAY SUN, MOON AND STARS. This relaxed, enjoyable family show presents prominent constellations and takes the audience on a quick trip to the moon. Show Times: confirm at rmsc.org. $8-$10.

DISCOVER OUR WEATHER. Make a cloud, measure the wind, and marvel at the power of lightning!

AMAZING JOURNEYS. Embarking on impressive treks across thousands of miles, the creatures featured in the film exemplify astonishing feats of stamina and perseverance in their efforts to ensure survival of their offspring. See website for full details. $3-7.

Energize it. What powers our bodies, cities and planet, and is neither created nor destroyed? ENERGY. ENERGIZE it brings you through a multi-sensory, highly physical experience where YOU hold the power! EXPEDITION EARTH. Explore your connections to the natural world in this interactive natural science exhibition. FLIGHT TO FREEDOM. Rochester’s Underground Railroad. Explore stories of courageous African Americans who traveled through Rochester on their way from slavery to freedom.

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HOW THINGS WORK. Through fun, hands-on investigation, find out how mechanisms such as light switches, thermostats, and traffic signals work. K’NEX. Be an engineer! Build trucks, towers- anything you can imagine with this colorful construction toy. RACEWAYS. Experiment with momentum, friction, gravity, and acceleration as you send wooden balls looping and racing over ramps. KEVA Planks. Construct your own wooden masterpiece with KEVA Planks--identical, stackable construction blocks. Blending science with art, KEVA planks bring out the designer, architect and engineer in each of us. LIGHT HERE-LIGHT NOW. Have hands-on fun with light, color, & optics with mirrors, lenses & lasers.

National Museum of Play at The Strong One Manhattan Sq., Rochester 14607. 263-2700 or TDD 423-0746, www.museumofplay.org Check website or call for prices and hours GAME TIME! Move like a piece on a giant game board through three centuries of American games, puzzles, and public amusements.

American Comic Book Heroes: The Battle of Good vs. Evil. Climb up the side of a building, make your own cape, test your superhero skills, pose for pictures with Spiderman and learn more about your favorite comic book hero. NATIONAL TOY HALL OF FAME. The prestigious hall features historic examples of toy inductees and play stations. Berenstain Bears: Down a Sunny Dirt Road. Step into the playful world of the Berenstain’s including Main St, Bear Country School, Brother & Sister Bear’s Club Houses, and the Family Tree House. Can You Tell Me How to Get to Sesame Street? See yourself on TV with the Muppets, drive Elmo around Sesame Street in a big yellow taxicab, sell movie tickets at the Circle in the Square Cinema ticket booth, and more. Dancing Wings Butterfly Garden®. The team has raised the bar by introducing a variety of birds and animals into the garden to create a lively ecosystem that they have dubbed “butterfly garden 2.0.” eGameRevolution. An original, highly interactive exhibit that explores the history of video games and their impact on the way we play, learn, and relate to each other. One History Place. Amid original artifacts and reproductions, children explore mini-environments and get a taste of life as it was a century ago.


calendar of events • local family-friendly activities READING ADVENTURELAND. Step into a life-sized pop-up book and follow the Yellow Brick Road into five literary landscapes from children’s books. Super Kids Market. Cruise the aisles and fill your cart with a selection of colorful produce that looks so real, you can almost taste it. Departments are filled with highly interactive stations for dramatic role-playing. THE ELAINE WILSON AND STRONG EXPRESS TRAIN. Experience the thrill of old-fashioned train travel as the mini locomotive chugs down the track surrounded by scenic postcards from across America.

OTHER AREA ATTRACTIONS CUMMING NATURE CENTER: A 900acre preserve located 40 minutes south of Rochester. $3 per person/$10 family. 6472 Gulick Rd., Naples. 374-6160, www.rmsc.org WHEM ANKH: THE CIRCLE OF LIFE IN ANCIENT EGYPT. Travel back into the past at a time when everything from birth to death revolved around the seasons and the river of life - the Nile. The Buffalo Museum of Science, 1020 Humboldt Pkwy, Buffalo. 716-896-5200 www.sciencebuff.org Cultures for Kids. Learn about kids from all over the world. $5. Explore & More children’s museum, 300 Gleed Ave., E. Aurora. 716-655-513. www.exploreandmore.org Tour the Riedman Robotic Milking Center. Tours available MonSat 11am-2pm. $2-$3. Springdale Farm, 700 Colby Street, Spencerport. 349-2090 www.heritagechristianservices.org The Herschell Carrousel Factory Museum. Operates two historic carousels. 180 Thompson St., North Tonawanda, 14120. 716-693-1885 www.carrouselmuseum.org A Step Into Africa. This state of the art exhibit, focusing on the Ngorongoro Crater region of Tanzania, is the only one of its kind in the country. Included with admission. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St, Rochester, 14621. 336-7200. www.senecaparkzoo.org

Please Note:

Dates and times for all calendar and ongoing events are subject to change. Please call the numbers provided or visit their website to confirm event information.

To submit an event to our calendar

e-mail: calendar@gvparent.com

NEW: Submit your calendar events online at www.gvparent.com/calendar/ calendar-submit All entries must be received by the 10th of the month prior to publication in order to be considered. Events printed as space permits.

Genesee Country Village & Museum. Meet and chat with the village potter, storekeeper, printer, tinsmith and blacksmith. Speak with re-enactors and townsfolk about the clothing styles of the period and visit select pieces from the museum’s historic clothing collection. 1410 Flint Hill Rd., Mumford. 538.6822. www.gcv.org. Corn Hill Navigation. All aboard the Sam Patch & Mary Jemison! These authentic tour boats embark from Pittsford and Rochester, and provide unparalleled opportunities to experience history and enjoy relaxing getaways that showcase the beauty and ingenuity of America’s celebrated Erie Canal. For details please call 585-662-5748 or visit www.SamandMary.org.

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • July 2013

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Party Planner – Everything to get the party started!

2/15/13

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Diamonds Limo Presents “Pizza By Limo”

Featuring Mark’s Pizzeria receive a 2-hr limo cruise, stop at a point of interest, a 2-liter of Pepsi and the best pizza in town! Only $99! (Sunday-Thursday)

www.diamondslimo.com

533.9050

Fri. & Sat. packages, larger limos, and service outside of Monroe County are available at an additional charge.

Are you planning

a party? check our party & celebration guide and articles online for great party ideas!

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • July 2013

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[ out & about ]

By Natalee Kiesling

farm fresh // rochester area farmers' markets

t

his summer while you're out and about, stop and visit one of the Rochester area's many farmers' markets! Buying at a farmers' market is a great way to get in-season, organic, wholesome products and produce while supporting the local economy. Plus, it's a great opportunity to teach kids about farming, cooking, and nature. Here are some from around the area, and you can find a more complete list online at www.gvparent.com!

Brighton Farmers' Market Sundays, 9 am-1 pm, through October 27 • Where: Brighton High School Parking Lot, 1150 Winton Road • Products: Dozens of vendors selling jams, jellies, biscotti, bread, honey, artisan chocolate, pasta, maple syrup, fruits, and vegetables. • Special note for 2013: Beginning June 30, the market will temporarily relocate to the Temple B’rith Kodesh parking lot, 2131 Elmwood Ave. (between Twelve Corners and S. Clinton). Details on the market’s move and return to BHS will be posted at the market’s website, www. brightonfarmersmarket.org, as the season progresses.

Foodlink Farmers' Market When: Wednesdays 11 am-2 pm, through September 4 Where: Washington Square Park, corner of Court St. and South Clinton Ave. • Products: Popcorn, coffee, nuts, smoothies, sandwiches, salads. Cash, debit and EBT are all accepted. • 328-3380,  foodlinkny.org

Fairport Farmers' Market Saturdays, 7 am-noon, through November • Where:58 S. Main St., Fairport (behind the Bank of America) • Products: Baked goods, plants, honey, maple syrup, goat cheese, peppers, carrots, tomatoes, corn, lettuce, spinach, broccoli, cauliflower, potatoes, squash. 421-3209, village.fairport.ny.us  

Irondequoit Farmers' Market Thursdays, 4-8 pm, through October • Where: Behind Irondequoit Town Hall, 1280 Titus Ave. at King's Highway Products: Flowers, jewelry, clothing, food, pastries, fresh fruits and vegetables. 336 6070, irondequoit.org   Mendon Farmers' Market Tuesdays, 4-7pm, through

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Greece Ridge Mall Farmers’ Market Thursdays & Saturdays, 9am – 3pm, through early November Where: Ridge & Long Pond Rds., Sears Parking Lot Products: Fresh, local produce, products made locally including baked goods, popcorn and more. 225-1140

October 15 • Where:101 Mendon Ionia Road (Route 64), Mendon Fire Hall Products: Fresh produce; pasture raised meats farm fresh, cheese, apple cider, molasses syrup, baking mixes, honey, maple syrup, pasta and jellies. • 624-9590,  www.cibi-d.com/market.php Pittsford Farmers' Market Tuesdays and Saturdays, 8am2 pm, through November Where: 3750 Monroe Ave. Products: Maple syrup, organic flowers, meat, organic eggs, soap, jelly, free-range chickens, berries, apples, peaches, tomatoes, cucumbers, pies, breads, fudge, peppers, broccoli, squash and lettuces. Call 733-814, for a list of other markets and stands in the Pittsford area or visit townofpittsford.org/stands_ markets Rush Farmers' Market Thursdays, 3-6:30 pm, through November 7 • Where: Rush United Methodist Church, 6200 Lima Road • Products: Flowers, fruits and vegetables, corn, carrots, broccoli, beets, peaches, blueberries, strawberries and apples. • 533-2170

Scottsville Farmers’ Market Wednesdays, 4-7 pm, through September 25 • Where: Scottsville American Legion #367, 61 Main Street • Products: Locally grown fruits, vegetables, cheese, baked goods, cut flowers, coffee, wine, and more. Community groups will be selling dinners each week. Free kids’ activities from 4:30-6pm • 889-3981, www. scottsvilleny.org Victor Farmers' Market Wednesdays, 3-7 pm, through October 30 • Where: Victor Village Hall Parking Lot, 60 E. Main St., Victor • Products: Local fruits and vegetables, pies, pasta, ice cream. 742-6320, victorldc.org   Webster Joe Obbie Farmers' Market Saturdays 8am-12:30pm, through November 2 •Where: Webster Towne Center , Holt Rd. (Kohl's/Target plaza • Products: Locally grown fresh produce, baked goods, jams & jellies, honey, maple syrup, plants and crafts! • 315-589-8703, www.villageofwebster.com 


Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • July 2013

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angel face To Fidelis Care, every child is an angel. That's why we cover kids with quality, affordable health insurance through Child Health Plus, a New York State-sponsored health insurance program offered by Fidelis Care. • If your child needs health insurance, Fidelis Care can help. • Almost every child up to age 19 in New York State is eligible! • And, we help members keep their health insurance each year.

Quality Health Coverage. It’s Our Mission. Some children who had employer-based health insurance coverage within the past six months may be subject to a waiting period before they can enroll in Child Health Plus. This will depend on your household income and the reason your children lost employer-based coverage.

1-888-FIDELIS (1-888-343-3547) (TTY: 1-800-421-1220)

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www.GVParent.com

fideliscare.org


Genesee Valley Parent July 2013