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Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • January 2014

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Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • January 2014

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Inside january

Vol.21 Number 1

in this issue 6|R  ocParent.com

On the Web in January

8 | Editor’s Note 10 | Buzzworthy 

o

Newsworthy & Notable

22 | M  odern Mom

Making the Most of Your Time

26 | P arenting – Teens &

Tweens Tattle-tale Parents What to Consider When Approaching Another Parent About Her Teen's Risky Behaviors

28 | T ry This

Ring in the New Year with Reading // books for moms

more feature articles

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1994 vs. 2014 // celebrating 20 years: how four of rochester's favorite family-friendly establishments have grown

Handmade with Love - Tips for Crafting a Handmade home

30 | Y  our Family - Health

Winter Woes? Have Some Honey for Your Health

34 | C  alendar of Events

Family-Friendly Events Winter Events Library Events Ongoing Events & Exhibits

on the cover CELEBRATING 20 YEARS 120 Things to do This January 34w 1994 vs. 2014: Then and Now 12 Happy Home Issue 18, 22, 28, 30 Ring in the New Year with Books... For You!18 Making the Most of Your Time 22 Honey for Your Health 30

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • January 2014

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[ what’s online ]

Visit us online!

Scan this code with your smart phone to view this content and more on our website!

january // what you can find this month at www.RocParent.com

Tweet, Tweet! Still not sure why you should be on Twitter? Check out some of our favorite recent Tweets:

5 Tweeters to Watch

@eieiochelse (eieio photography): I am just photo-shopping off boogers from the sweetest little faces...What are you doing on this chilly morning?

Our picks for great tweets:

@URdistracting / The Ad Council of Rochester is teaming up with the local community to end distracted driving - starting with changing behavior of those outside the car. www.urthatdistracting.org

@buriedwithkids: I always make it my goal to leave with four kids and come back with four kids. It's a bonus if it's the same four.

@BabyAnimals / Making your days easier, one adorable baby animal picture at a time. Stressed? Take a quick peek at one of their pics and instantly improve your day. @US_FDA / Here you'll find the latest US Food and Drug Administration news and information. www.fda.gov @womenshealth / The Office on Women’s Health is part of the U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services. www.womenshealth.gov @AmerAcadPeds / Committed to the attainment of optimal physical, mental, and social health and wellbeing for all infants, children, adolescents, and young adults. www.aap.org Don’t forget to follow us at @RocParent

Tweet to us @RocParent or comment on our Facebook page or posts and you could see your comments/ feedback here!

online content + editorial healthful sips

Was one of your resolutions to drink less soda? Discover the magic of a Soda Stream and making your own carbonated, but less sugary, drinks at home.

warm up

January is National Soup Month! Keep your family warm, satiated and healthy all winter long with some of our favorite homemade soup recipes. Have an original favorite you want to share? Email it (with photos if possible) to Natalee@gvparent.com

Giveaways

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feline fashionistas January 14th is National Dress Up Your Pet Day! Check out our Facebook album with some of our favorite pets and submit photos of your furry friends!

New Year, new prizes! This year we'll continue to bring you tons of great freebies, contests and tickets to the best shows and attractions around!

 Enter to win at www.RocParent.com/giveaways www.RocParent.com


Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • January 2014

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[ editor’s note ]

By Jillian Melnyk

looking back, looking forward

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8 what’s on your mind?  i would love to hear from you! send me an email to editor@GVParent.com

o say that this magazine is all about family is obvious – we're a magazine for parents! But the family connection runs much deeper. While I'm the editor, our publisher is my mother. My parents founded this magazine in 1994 and from day one I was a part of the business. In early days, I helped wax ads (things weren't digital yet, so we physically saved each advertisement that was used in the month's issue to stick onto the pages of the next month's layout -- kind of like a post-it note!), I retyped articles when writers sent them in via snail mail, and I individually bagged hundreds of copies of our magazine each month so they could be distributed with cloth diapers. At times, it was arduous work, and like many other children who grow up with entrepreneural parents, I learned the value of hard work and owning a business.

If someone had asked me 20 years ago what I would be doing today, Genesee Valley Parent Magazine's editor would have been the furthest thing from my mind. However, life throws you curve balls, and when the opportunity to become the editor was presented to me, I jumped…. and it was one of the best decisions I ever made. I love digging up the best local parenting information for area families, scouting out cool things to do, and sharing new parenting trends and resources. Our magazine has grown a lot in 20 years – but haven't we all? Look around, is anything just like it was 20 years ago? Every day is a learning experience and an opportunity for growth. We will be celebrating our milestone

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anniversary all year long with great features throughout the year. This month, we take a look at four family-oriented establishments (The Strong, Seneca Park Zoo, Monroe County Library and Rochester Red Wings) and see how much they have grown and changed in 20 years. Here's to the past, present, and future!

Staff publisher Barbara Melnyk mail@GVParent.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Jillian Melnyk editor@GVParent.com COMMUNITY EDITOR Natalee Kiesling Natalee@GVParent.com Account Executives Cynthia Goldberg Natalee Kiesling Magazine layout & design Jillian Melnyk graphics@GVParent.com CALENDAR EDITOR calendar@GVParent.com DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Sandy Citarella contributing writers John Boccocino Beth Fornauf Christina Katz Myrna Beth Haskell Ashley Talmadge Basic subscription rate: $25/year. Send subscription inquiries and changes to address below. Copyright 2014, by GVP, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. Distribution of this magazine does not necessarily constitute an endorsement or necessarily reflect the opinions of this publication.

Cheers,

Jillian

Genesee Valley Parent Magazine P.O. Box 25750 Rochester, NY 14625 p: 585-348-9712 f: 585-348-9714 www.RocParent.com

member of parenting media association


Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • January 2014

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[ buzzworthy ]

newsworthy + notable

soup is on!

Warm up this January with comfort food. This recipe, created by BBQ expert Chef Ray Lampe, is perfect during cold winter months. After simmering all day on the stove, a bowl of Chef Lampe’s soothing, heart-warming, porkfilled soup is the perfect complement to a grilled Swiss cheese sandwich or a fresh salad – whether you’re feeling under the weather or just craving a little pick-me-up. Remember, for juicy and tender chops as an ingredient or center-of-the-plate star, cook to an internal temperature between 145°F (medium rare), followed by a three-minute rest and 160°F (medium), using a digital thermometer to ensure accuracy.

Pork Chop Noodle Soup / Courtesy of Chef Ray Lampe, Dr. BBQ, from his cookbook Pork Chop (2013, Chronicle Books) Yield: 8-10 servings

3 Ribeye pork chops, bone-in, about 3/4inch thick 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 2 cups chicken broth or pork stock 4 cups unsalted vegetable broth 1 red onion, chopped 4 carrots, chopped 2 large celery sticks, chopped 2 garlic cloves, crushed 1 teaspoon dried thyme 1/2 teaspoon dried basil 1 cup dried rotini pasta Salt and pepper to taste

• Season pork chops with salt and pepper. Heat oil in Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Add chops and cook for about 4 minutes, until golden brown. Flip and cook for 4 minutes more, until golden brown. Transfer chops to plate and set aside. •Pour half of chicken broth into pot, scraping all browned bits from bottom. Add remaining chicken broth, vegetable broth, onion, carrots, celery and garlic. Mix well and bring to a simmer. Add 1 quart water, thyme, basil, 2 teaspoons salt and 1 teaspoon pepper. Mix well and

bring to a simmer. Add chops back to pot and return to a simmer. Reduce heat and simmer for 90 minutes, stirring occasionally, being careful not to break up chops. • Transfer chops to plate, trying not to break them up. Set aside to cool. Raise heat and bring soup to a boil. Add pasta and cook for about 12 minutes, until tender. When chops are cool, pull them apart, discarding all bones and fat. Add meat back to soup and stir well. Add salt and pepper to taste before serving.

in the community Five Doodle Bugs! Children’s Centers in Rochester recently hosted an annual food drive and collected 1,067 non-perishable food items to be donated to local organizations. Food items collected by the Greece, Henrietta, Penfield, Victor and Webster centers were donated to Food Link and the Victor Food Cupboard. “It’s so inspiring to watch young children get excited about bringing in items that will help local families enjoy a holiday meal. We have to thank our

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parents and center families for their tremendous support of this initiative," says Christina Fecio, director of education at Doodle Bugs! Children's Centers.

have community news to share?

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Email our Editor at editor@GVParent.com


Celebrating 20 years of excellence! YOUR FAVORITE

award-winning FAMILY MAGAZINE & WEB SITE

• Gold Award WINNER for the design of our magazine’s annual Rochester Baby Guide • SILVER Award WINNER for the editorial in our Special Parent Section (featured in our September 2012 issue) • SILVER General Excellence Award for our magazine’s annual Rochester Baby Guide • B  ronze GENERAL EXCELLENCE award for Genesee Valley Parent’s website RocParent.com • FINALIST for overall writing of our magazine’s annual Rochester Baby Guide

www.RocParent.com Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • January 2014

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1994 vs. 2014 celebrating 20 years:

how four of rochester's favorite family-oriented establishments have grown By John Boccacino

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he Genesee Valley Parent Magazine is celebrating its 20th anniversary of bringing you the most up-to-date information on trends and topics that affect families in and around Rochester.

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As we celebrate our birthday, we thought it would be fun to take a look at four family-friendly institutions in Rochester — The Strong National Museum of Play, the Seneca Park Zoo, the Monroe County Library System and the Rochester Red Wings baseball team — to see how those organizations have changed and what big plans are in store for the next 20 years.


THE STRONG NATIONAL MUSEUM OF PLAY

When the Strong Museum first opened its doors in 1982, the museum’s original goal was to properly portray the American way of life while examining how the industrialization effort changed the world. According to Susan Trien, senior director of public relations and advertising for the museum, when Rollie Adams took over as CEO, he was hired to help transform the museum into something more community-centered and more essential to the area, so he decided to shift the museum’s focus towards founder Margaret Strong’s vast collection of toys, games and dolls. Today, with nearly 600,000 guests visiting the 282,000-square foot facility, play is certainly at the heart of the museum. In 1997, the museum debuted a new glass atrium complete with a “Sesame Street” exhibit, a working 1918 carousel and a 1950s-style diner. The National Toy Hall of Fame was acquired in 2002, and has garnered national media attention for Rochester with its annual induction ceremony, which this year saw the rubber duck and the game of chess become the 52nd and 53rd inductees. After expanding in 2006, the museum opened its "Reading Adventure Land" display, which features giant pop-up books, and the Dancing Wings Butterfly Garden, where 1,000 brightly-colored tropical and native butterflies flutter around the facility. Games, too, are highly emphasized in the museum, which houses the International Center for the History of Electronic Games, with more than 50,000 video games and other electronic games. Guests can try their hand at arcade video games such as Pac-Man and Pong, as well as try out their favorite childhood games for Nintendo, Super Nintendo, Atari, Sega Genesis, PlayStation, Xbox, Nintendo Wii, personal computers and others. “Our mission is to explore the importance of play and how deeply ingrained play is in the American culture,” says Trien, who has worked for the museum since 1991. “We have become a highly interactive environment for children and adults alike. Generations can explore and discover using play, and we’re never finished. We’re proud that we’re the only museum in the world dedicated to the study of play. Everything about The Strong is whimsical and playful, including the architecture.

top: the strong museum before the 2006 expansion bottom: what the museum looks like today

We’ve evolved into a vital place that enhances not only Rochester, but the surrounding region.” looking forward: Trien says plans are in place to open “Make Believe,” an exhibit on imaginative play featuring a giant interactive dollhouse and exhibits on action figures, in the fall of 2014. There are also plans for an exhibit on different types of vehicles and cars. “I don’t know where we will be in 20 years, but while technology will be more and more an important part of play and our lives, there will always be classic toys involved,” Trien says. “Children will still pick up a stick, a cardboard box or a toy car and have a whole pretend world at their fingertips, and our museum will be about play, because that’s our core.”

SENECA PARK ZOO

Seneca Park Zoo opened in 1893 and for much of its early history, the zoo operated as a menagerie, a place to house assorted animals such as peafowl, quail and deer for exhibition. However, the zoo has

transformed itself into a diverse zoological garden and currently houses 250 animals that range from elephants and baboons to polar bears and penguins on 15.5 acres of land. During 2012, more than 428,500 people visited the zoo, with 16,000 people purchasing membership to the zoo. Over the last 20 years, the zoo has expanded its offerings to include more animals native to New York state, more animals found along the assorted land/ water interfaces, as well as the addition of more elephants and baboons as part of its three-pronged “A Step Into Africa” development, according to Larry Sorel, the Monroe County Zoo Director since 1997. The zoo opened its Genesee Trail in 1993, showcasing animals native to the state in their natural habitats. This project also included the Kodak E.C.O. Center, which serves as a connector between the zoo and its numerous off-site conservation efforts. Penguins first arrived at the zoo as part of the $8 million “Rocky Coasts” continued >>>

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • January 2014

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The Internet was a big change for libraries. People

use libraries very differently now than 20 years ago. They read more at the library back then and more of our collections were in use by patrons, especially in research because you didn’t have Google or the internet for home reference." – Sally Snow, the assistant director for the Monroe County Library System

project, which aimed to introduce Rochesterians to more animals that are found along the land/ water interfaces. Additionally, the Animal Health and Education complex, featuring a 1,200-square foot interactive education space complete with classrooms and veterinary facilities, was completed in 2004. Sorel says once the “A Step Into Africa” project was completed in 2012, there was more of an effort to make visitors aware of conservation efforts, specifically the competition between animals and humans for the Earth’s resources. The effort paid off with a 38 percent spike in attendance in just one year, and a 20 percent increase over the last five years. "Through the exhibition of animals in naturalistic settings, the Seneca Park Zoo will provide engaging and educational experiences to give our community the motivation and skills to act as stewards of the environment,” Sorel adds. “Thus, not only will we improve the lives of the animals, but we will make the zoo the top of mind destination for families by providing fun, stimulating and interactive experiences on its grounds."

looking forward: “We need to continue to address the old parts of the zoo physical plant, and in doing so, we will absolutely keep in mind our mission,” Sorel says. “We will continue to build out our education offerings, both formal and informal, in a way that will provide knowledge of attachment and inspire action on behalf of our environment. Finally, we will grow our support of direct conservation efforts locally and globally.”

MONROE COUNTY LIBRARY SYSTEM

Originally chartered in 1954, the Monroe County Library system serves tens of thousands of Rochesterians every year. With 20 independent libraries located around the county, the library system has long been the preferred meeting place for students working on a group project, and for parents hoping to hook their children on reading. The library has undergone some significant changes in the last 20 years, says Sally Snow, the assistant director for the Monroe County Library System. Twenty years ago, the internet was in its in-

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent celebrates its 20th anniversary in 2014! We invite you to our year-long party, including the launch of the

20 Under 20 Awards

Honoring the top youth in our community in arts, sports, community service, and innovation.

Stay tuned … nominations open mid-January

Visit www.RocParent.com/20under20 for more information! 14

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remember these? a card catalog from the rochester public library

fancy, email was rarely used as a vital form of communication, most libraries still had card catalogs to list the specific books in their collections and nearly all of those materials patrons sought out were actual books, not their electronic-book counterparts that are so prevalent today. Fast-forward to 2013, and almost everything in libraries is digital, from checking out books to the actual materials being loaned out. Snow says the libraries experimented with eBooks in the early 2000s, but most of the research found reading books electronically was cumbersome. Slowly, patrons started changing their attitudes towards eBooks. Through the first 11 months of 2013, circulation numbers for eBook checkouts were at 220,520 more than double the 100,241 figure from 2011. “The Internet was a big change for libraries,” Snow says. “People use libraries very differently now than 20 years ago. They read more at the library back then and more of our collections were in use by patrons, especially in research because you didn’t have Google or the internet for home reference. Nowadays, people still check out books, but more and more they’re checking out eBooks. eBooks make up 2-3 percent of our annual circulation and it’s been steadily growing.” While libraries used to be coveted for their research and reference materials, Snow says more and more people are coming to the library for its work spaces, the ability to do group work and for its wireless networks and internet access. looking forward: More library collections – from magazines to microfilm – are being digitized to reduce the space they occupy in a library. Snow says the library system is always looking at new ways to connect with people digitally, from offering more computers and ebooks to maintaining a rich collection of archived Rochester photos on its website. “The library has always been the people’s university where anyone can come in and learn,” Snow says. “As the cost of a college education continues to skyrocket, people can always come to libraries for their higher education needs and access all of those materials for free. The gap between the haves and the have-nots is growing and it’s hard to gain access to that information without your own laptop or computer. We will always provide access to these materials to help people better their lives.” continued >>> Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • January 2014

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More competition for fans has made us elevate our operation, both artistically and from an entertainment standpoint. We work hard to keep costs down for our fans. We will continue to provide affordable, family-friendly entertainment and fun for all who come out to the park.”

– Nick Sciarratta, the Red Wings' director of corporate development/online content

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ROCHESTER RED WINGS

As one of the oldest organizations in baseball, the Rochester Red Wings have seen their fair share of changes over the years. Since they were officially dubbed the Red Wings in 1929, Rochester’s longest-running minor league sports team has, for the most part, consistently contended for a spot in the International League playoffs while claiming 10 IL championships, most among the 14 current clubs. The Red Wings have also been successful at the box office, annually drawing 400,000 or more fans to Frontier Field. One of the biggest changes for the Red Wings occurred before the 1997 season, when the organization left behind the cavernous and outdated Silver Stadium for the cozy confines of Frontier Field. Silver Stadium’s capacity ranged from 15,000 when it opened in 1929 to 11,502 its final years of operation while Frontier Field has 10,840 seats, so the move from the Norton Street ballpark to one closer to the heart of downtown was more about providing fans with the best modern day ballpark experience than it was in drawing higher attendance figures. It took one year to build the $33 million dollar stadium, but once it was completed, the

switch to Frontier Field was a game-changer for the ballclub, according to Nick Sciarratta, the team’s director of corporate development/online content. Attendance, which had been down in the years before the move, jumped as more and more people wanted to take in a ballgame in the new downtown facility. Those first two years, Sciarratta says attendance surpassed 500,000, whereas in the old park, the club hadn’t seen back-to-back years with attendance figures of 400,000 or more since the 1940s. “If you want to pick a dream season, 1997 was that season,” says Sciarratta, who has been with the club since 2001. “We moved to a new stadium and in our first year there, the Wings capped it off by winning the championship. The stadium atmosphere improved with our move to Frontier and it was definitely part of the trend of baseball teams moving to downtown parks that featured older looks. There are better sightlines, more concessions and more choices for concessions. The park also was situated to give our fans a beautiful view of downtown Rochester.” When the team hits the field this spring, the Red Wings will also have a new look, as the club announced a new series of logos during a Novem-


ber press conference. Spikes, the Wings’ mascot, has been a big hit among fans (especially children) since his debut in 1997. He remains at the core of the new logos. The ballpark itself will receive a facelift, as the right field video board will be updated prior to the 2014 season so fans can watch video replays on both the left and right field boards. Sciarratta says the team plans on unveiling a new mobile app before the spring and will also make it easier for fans to purchase and print up tickets at home. looking forward: Back in 1993, the Rochester Amerks hockey team and the Red Wings were the only minor league sports teams in town. Nowadays, there is plenty of competition, as Rochester boasts three soccer teams (Rhinos, Lancers and the women’s Western New York Flash), two lacrosse teams (Knighthawks and Rattlers), a basketball team (the Razorsharks) and an indoor football team (Monroe County Sting). With more entertainment choices in town, Sciarratta says there has been added emphasis placed on improving the game day experience. Almost every weekend of the summer, the team will offer a fireworks show after home games, and there are more giveaways and promotional opportunities for ballpark-goers. Among the potential renovations to Frontier Field, Sciarratta says the club is considering adding a section of Adirondack-style chairs in the outfield as well as potentially adding in Rochester’s version of the Green Monster, the iconic wall in Fenway Park, complete with VIP seating to offer fans a unique vantage point for taking in a ball game. “More competition for fans has made us elevate our operation, both artistically and from an entertainment standpoint,” Sciarratta says. “We work hard to keep costs down for our fans and we’re the only community-owned team in town. That hasn’t changed, but it is still a strong guiding principle that we use for our other changes. We will continue to provide affordable, family-friendly entertainment and fun for all who come out to the park.”  John Boccacino is monthly contributor to Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine. He reported on sports and local news for more than 6 1/2 years with the Democrat and Chronicle newspaper. He is currently the Director of Sports Information for Keuka College. Boccacino is a Brighton native who currently resides in Webster. To comment on this story email our editor at Editor@GVParent.com

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • January 2014

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ring in the new year with reading By Beth Fornauf

i

f the last book you remember reading was made of cardboard and had a rhyme scheme, you are not alone. Many busy parents fall victim to packed schedules (their own and their children’s), and don’t make time to unwind with a good book. Why not make 2014 the year you change that?

Reading is a great way to ring in the New Year. Often, parents focus on their children’s literacy habits, without paying attention to their own. But pleasure reading has benefits for folks of all ages. Recent research from the National Endowment for the Arts found that frequent readers performed better on tests, and were more likely than non-readers to visit museums, attend concerts and play sports. The study also indicated that readers tended to be more civically minded, with a higher percentage participating in charity work and voting in national elections. Sarah Brino, the Program Director of a non-profit that helps single mothers find jobs that support their families, thinks reading for pleasure is beneficial for moms in particular. She believes books are a powerful way for moms to

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connect their own experiences with what others might be going through. “Many mothers I’ve worked with feel isolated,” says Brino. “Relatable characters help them realize that there is a shared experience of motherhood. Though the particulars are different, many of the joys and challenges are the same.” So let 2014 be the year to clear the board books off your nightstand, and make room for some grown-up literature. Below is a list of great reads (for all kinds of moms) to get your reading resolution off to a great start. Happy reading!

The Hunger Moon by Suzanne Matson This book will delight nursing moms with its tender description of breastfeeding, and the precious few days we have when our children are young and totally dependent on us. But more than that, it shows how something as pure as


a little baby can bring people’s lives together. Matson uses an infant, baby Charlie, to connect the lives of three women, and show the impact female friendship, no matter how unlikely, can have on people.

Little Earthquakes by Jennifer Weiner

If you haven’t read a Jennifer Weiner book in a while (or ever), now is the time to start. Weiner’s witty writing style will make you want to laugh, and then cry with every chapter. This book is perfect for pregnant women who are seriously burned out on pregnancy books. The novel traces the lives of four women in various stages of new motherhood and is perfect for expectant or new moms who are tired of learning about all the horrible things they can expect, and are, instead, craving a good story.

What You Wish For by Kerry Reichs

As nice as it would be if women could control where, when and how easily they become pregnant, we all know that’s not the case. In this book, Kerry Reichs tackles controversial conception issues with heart. The lives of her leading characters intersect as each travels a circuitous path toward – and away from – parenthood. This book offers a startling look at what some people, both men and women, go through to become parents, and will have readers questioning their beliefs about what it means to be a parent.

Where We Belong by Emily Giffin

There are several good reasons Emily Giffin has been called the modern day Jane Austen, but one of them must be that her characters are so compelling that her books feel impossible to put down. From the first pages of this novel, readers will be captivated by the protagonist, Kirby Rose, who was conceived eighteen years earlier by two teenagers. Adopted shortly after her birth, Kirby takes the reader on a journey to find and get to know her biological parents. Her story alternates with the tender account of her birth mother Marion, who kept the adoption a secret from virtually everyone in her life. The two women’s histories, and the relationship they forge will have you smiling, crying and reading late into the night.

Lean In by Sheryl Sandberg

Don’t read Sandberg’s book to fuel the fire of the “Mommy Wars.” Read it because it’s smart, well-written, and full of fascinating research. This book offers a refreshingly honest perspective on women who want to be successful professionals and parents. Sandberg offers practical advice for working women who are or may want to become parents (even something as simple as asking for pregnant parking spots). She is a true advocate for continued >>> Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • January 2014

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mothers and fathers who want to do the best they can for their kids, while also thriving in careers.

Amanda Bright @ Home by Danielle Crittenden

If you’ve ever looked at yourself in the mirror and had trouble remembering who you were before you had kids, well, this is the book for you. Amanda Bright is a former career woman living in Washington D.C. who is struggling with her decision to be a stay-at-home mother and wife of a busy attorney. Crittenden cleverly looks at the role of mothers today who feel pressure to do and have it all – a family, career, and time to enjoy them.  Beth Fornauf is a freelance writer and mother of two. She has a tall stack of grown-up books on her nightstand that she plans to read this year.

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • January 2014

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[ modern mom ]

By Christina Katz

making the most of your time // how to stop the

self-sacrificing & recover your personal time

r

emember when you were young and kid-free? You had a lot of time on your hands, right? You had so much time that you never even thought about how much time you had.

And now that time is gone. At least you can't find any of it. But you can recover some of that precious you-time with just a little forethought and planning, if you give yourself permission to make time for self-care. Besides, your kids don’t need just any ol’ grown up around, they need you — the person only you can be. So test-drive these ten steps and squeeze more time for you into every week.

1. Pleasure first. Prioritize pleasurable activities and you’ll be more motivated to do everything else that has to

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get done. Make a list of all of the things you used to enjoy doing before you had kids. Maybe you loved running, journaling, or watching old movies. Print out a blank calendar page for the next month from your computer and pencil in some of your old favorite activities.

that has to happen to keep your world spinning. Whether you enjoy doing these things or not, these are the things you must do, or you’ll be sorry. Pencil in time for every have-to on your to-do list.

2. Sketch out the “musts.”

Next, pencil in the extended family’s ongoing commitments. Your husband’s bimonthly early morning staff meeting. Your teenage son’s driving test. Your in-laws are coming into town. Make sure you account for everyone’s plans. Have a weekly

Okay, now let’s get real. If your toddler doesn’t nap twice a day for 90 minutes each time, your day is going to be shot, right? So the next thing to do is pencil in all the stuff on your calendar

3. Outside commitments.


Books On Breaking the Cycle of Self-sacrifice

 Mommy Guilt: Learn To Worry Less, Focus On What

Matters Most, And Raise Happier Kids by Julie Bort, Aviva Pflock and Devra Renner

 Simplicity Parenting: Using the Extraordinary Power of Less to Raise Calmer, Happier and More Secure Kids by Kim John Payne with Lisa M. Ross

 The Balanced Mom: Raising Your Kids Without Losing Your Self by Bria Simpson

 Anxious To Please: 7 Revolutionary Practices For The

Chronically Nice by James Rapson and Craig English

 Better Boundaries: Owning And Treasuring Your Life by Jan Black and Greg Enns

check-in date for schedule reviews. And don’t say yes to any new plans without looking at your current ongoing commitments first.

4. “Chunk” your free time. You are now likely to start getting a sense of what your daily, weekly, and monthly time commitments look like. Take note of two types of rhythms: the hectic times and the quiet times. If you are like most parents, you have more of the former than the latter. Don’t worry. Just mark off whatever quiet time you can find. Make a little box around each chunk of quiet time that’s available. I bet it’s more than you realized.

5. Reset Your Rest. Are you a morning person or a night person? If you are a morning person, see if you can set your alarm an hour earlier each day to make the most of those dark, quiet morning hours when everything is hushed and still. I bet you could get a lot done if you simply rose earlier. Similarly, if you are a night person, plan to stay up an extra hour so you can use some of your midnight oil. Draw boxes around any chunks of extra time you’ve created rising early or turning in late.

6. Be Equitable. Both parents need down time. So now that you see the possibilities, don’t get greedy. Show your calendar to your partner and discuss who still needs more down time. Be prepared to say what you want, what you need, and what you are pretty sure you can’t live without. And let your partner do the same. Put names in the boxes to represent who gets which chunks of unavailable time. Don’t forget to encourage your spouse to get up earlier or go to bed later, if that is helpful.

7. Set Your Alarms. Now that you have a plan, execute it. Start with your bedroom alarm clocks. Reset yours. Do you also need to reset your children’s alarms? Maybe you’d like them to go to bed earlier, so you can have more time undisturbed at night. Next set your cell phone to remind you fifteen minutes before each chunk of available free time. Once you are more aware of your available time, you will be less likely to let it slip by unnoticed.

8. Defend Your Rights. When inevitable interruptions come along such as flu season, pet problems, and continued >>> Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • January 2014

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last-minute show-and-tell projects, you can cheerfully give up your me-time. However, on days when no crisis is looming on the horizon, you need to guard your time like a dog growls low and quiet over a bone. Don’t bite. Don’t even bark. Just calmly remind your family members to respect whatever you are doing. Parents get to have time to do their own things. With a little practice everyone will get the hang of this concept no matter how radical.

9. Watch Out For Nervous Habits. If you’ve scheduled you time right in the middle of the old laundry or dishes time, you might initially have to fight off the nervous anxiety that comes with walking away from these duties. However, you will soon notice opportunities to multi-task your chores into your unreserved time. And I bet you will become better at rallying the troops for additional assistance to help you pick up the slack. After all, why shouldn’t you share the wealth of household chores?

10. Find Your Rhythm. Once you start taking time for yourself, something magical will happen. Your little respites will become seamlessly incorporated into your family’s natural ebb and flow. Without schedules or alarms, your pleasures will become a natural part of the family rhythm. And no one will question whether or not you really need that time to yourself because they will notice the difference when you don’t get any. Reclaim your time and you will reclaim your smile, as well as set a good example for your kids.  Christina Katz has been encouraging busy parents to make downtime a priority for over a decade. Her latest book is The Writer’s Workout from Writer’s Digest Books.

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Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • January 2014

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[ parenting teens & tweens ]

By Myrna Beth Haskell

tattletale parents// what to consider when approaching another parent about her teen’s risky or bad behavior

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o people really abide by the adage, “It takes a village to raise a child,” or do most people today feel that they do not want to get involved in someone else’s business? Many parents have been privy to someone else’s teenager engaging in destructive or illicit behavior. Is it appropriate to report such behavior to that parent?

When I’ve discussed this issue with close friends, most have responded, “I would say something if the parent were a friend of mine because I would want to know.” Perhaps when such information comes from a close friend, it is easier for a parent to accept because she knows that her friend truly cares about her teen’s well being. These situations are always delicate, though, and parents are oftentimes unsure about playing the role of informant.

When is it OK to Report? Parents need to separate hearsay from fact when choosing to inform another parent about her teenager’s destructive or dangerous behavior. Witnessing a behavior is a lot different than hearing about it at a soccer game from a third party. Even if a parent believes the source is reliable, he should have solid evidence before approaching another parent with disturbing

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news about her child. Parents should also evaluate the behavior. Is the behavior something that endangers the teen’s – or someone else’s – well being, health or safety? Substance abuse, self harming, relationship violence, and gang activities are behaviors that have potential life-threatening consequences and should be reported. Rebecca L. Hashim, PhD, an attending psychologist on the Behavioral Consultation Team at the Children’s Hospital at Montefiore Medical Center and assistant professor of psychiatry and pediatrics at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in Bronx, NY, advises, “If you become aware of a teen’s destructive behavior, it is important to communicate these concerns to that teen’s parent.” She says that parents often talk themselves out of reporting such information because they believe it’s not their problem or

they convince themselves that maybe they’re just imagining it and don’t investigate further. However, if a parent truly believes a behavior will risk the teen’s well being, it’s best to relay the information to the other teen’s parent. “If what you have seen or have been told is actually happening, and you don’t share that information, you run the risk that the destructive behavior continues or even escalates, which can lead to serious consequences,” she adds. “When a parent personally believes that there is a credible and reasonable threat to the life, safety or well-being of her teen as a result of another teen’s behavior, the

first and most important consideration should be the safety of her teen,” explains Gilberto Velez-Domenech, MD, chief of adolescent medicine at Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital located in Westchester Medical Center. However, some situations are not so clear cut, such as issues involving sexual behaviors. Velez-Domenech says, “I would advise parents to seriously think twice before ever discussing their own teen’s or someone else’s teen’s sexuality with another parent. The source of the information about a teen’s sexuality is almost always second-hand and intrinsically unreliable.” He also states that perceptions and

Want to share your ideas? Upcoming topic: What have you heard about “Hookah” and do you feel it’s worse than smoking? Send your full name, address, & brief comments to: myrnahaskell@gmail.com or visit:

www.myrnahaskell.com www.RocParent.com


tips and tales “When I was growing up, if an adult in the neighborhood saw any ‘bad behavior’ our parents knew about it before we got home. As kids, this made us think about whether or not the chance of our parents finding out was worth it. The information should be immediate and before the behavior gets out of hand.” Judi Glazer Strong – Tillson, NY "I would definitely talk with the teen first myself and offer to tell the parents together. But of course I would talk with the parents and I would expect the same from my daughter's friends' parents." Alysia A. – Rochester, NY

opinions about teen sexuality differ greatly among parents. “The potential for misperception and misunderstanding is very high,” he cautions.

Best Way to Approach Another Parent Dr. Velez-Domenech states, “One parent should approach the other directly, in person, and with total privacy and discretion. The conversation should be straight to the point and non-judgmental, making reference only to the actions of the teen involved and not to his/her person or values.” However, he also says that a parent should not be apologetic. “Protecting their own children is every parent’s right and duty. Protecting other parents’ children is a very noble act,” he points out.

Possible Repercussions Be aware that reporting distressing information to another parent may result in a loss of a friendship, strained relations between families, or the other parent not believing that her teen would do such a thing. Hashim warns, “You do run the risk of the other parent not believing you or becoming upset that you would ‘accuse’ her child.” She reminds parents to weigh the possible consequences and seriousness of the behavior.

“If the behavior is potentially serious, it’s better in the long run to make the parent aware of it and let him/her handle it as he/she sees fit.” If a parent truly feels the well being of another child is at risk, they should put this ahead of worry about whether or not the teen’s parent will still like them. Velez-Domenech warns that emotions will run high because someone’s privacy has been violated. “There is a good chance that relationships will be permanently damaged, but it’s the price to pay for the safety of the teens involved,” he says. Adults need to step in when a young person’s health or well-being are at stake.  Myrna Beth Haskell is a freelance writer and monthly contributor to Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine who lives in Salt Point, NY. She is the author of the newly released book, LIONS and TIGERS and TEENS: Expert advice and support for the conscientious parent just like you (Unlimited Publishing LLC). For more information visit www. myrnahaskell.com.

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • January 2014

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[try this ]

By Jillian Melnyk

handmade with love // tips for crafting a handmade home from ceramics and painting to weaving. They also offer collaborative classes for kids and parents and family classes. While picking up supplies check to see if your favorite craft, yarn, or bead shop offers classes and workshops – many of them do! Formal workshop not your thing? In the past few years there has been an explosion of DIY blogs, craft websites and tutorials for free online. Check out www.Pinterest.com for inspiration. Looking to make your new project a group activity? Host a Pinterest craft party. Invite participants to find an easy DIY project. Purchase the supplies for the group, then spend the day socializing and crafting.

i

've always been one for handmade gifts. Each holiday season I strive to craft my own Christmas cards, make gifts, and buy gifts handmade by others. There are myriad benefits – gifting handmade goods strengthens our American economy, supports local artisans and, of course, makes gifts incredibly special. But now that the holidays are through, how can you continue crafting a handmade lifestyle? It's easier than you think!

Get Crafting The start of a new year is the perfect time to think about adding a new skill or hobby to your repertoire. Always wanted to try out painting or learn how to knit? There are a bevy of resources right here in Rochester and online to help you learn. Websites like www.craftsy.com offer online courses in hobbies like quilting,

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knitting, and cake decorating. Here in Rochester, the Genesee Center for Arts and Education offers a variety of courses in pottery, photography and book arts. You can let the new hobby be your personal endeavor or make it a family affair. Rochester's Memorial Art Gallery offers art and craft classes for both kids and adults so you can learn everything

Giving Thanks Handmade gifts during the holiday season are special, but so are handmade thank you notes. The kids probably have a list of grandparents, aunts and uncles to thank for their special holiday gifts… why not go handmade? You can buy blank cards at a craft store like Michael's or simply use a folded and cut piece of paper. Grab glue, glitter, crayons, watercolors and decorate! A handmade note is like a present itself.

Share Traditions Both my mother and grandmothers were incredibly crafty. What kind of handmade traditions run in your family? If Great Aunt Ester was an avid knitter maybe you and your

seeking handmade

Honeoye Craft Lab 6 Honeoye Commons, Honeoye, 14471 802-342-6342 www.honeoyecraftlab.com Open Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays Take classes or buy materials and local handmade crafts. Rochester Brainery 274 N. Goodman St (inside Village Gate) Suite B134, Rochester, 14607 730-7034 www.rochesterbrainery.com Take a class in a variety of craft disciplines or teach one yourself! Genesee Center for the Arts & Education 713 Monroe Avenue, Rochester, 14607 244-1730 www.geneseearts.org Make pottery, take photographs, weave fibers and much more with classes and workshops. Patricia's Fabric House 333 W. Commercial Street, E. Rochester, 14445 248-2362 www.patriciasfabrichouse.com Sewing machine repair, scissor sharpening, quilting services and more. Memorial Art Gallery 500 University Ave, Rochester,14607 276-8900 www.mag.rochester.edu Classes for kids, adults and families to take together! Crochet, clay, drawing, painting - they have it something for everyone.


teenage daughter would enjoy taking a knitting class together to learn the skill. Passing down the family craft can be an educational and fun way for kids to connect with their ancestors and older family members.

Buy Handmade Maybe crafting just isn't for you – no worries! If you want to support local artisans and crafters you can find a variety of handmade items both online and here in Rochester. Websites like Etsy (www.Etsy.com) are dedicated to handmade goods that are made by artists around the world. Locally, stop by Craft Company No. 6 which is filled with unique gifts and American made items. You can also scout out handmade goods at your local farm market or at one of Rochester's many art festivals. Don't get discouraged! There are whole websites dedicated to Pinterest DIY failures. It's inevitable sometimes you will make a mess and your project won't come out right. Remember, creating handmade should be fun for you and fun for your family. Relax and enjoy!  Jillian Melnyk is the Editor for Rochester Area and Genesee Valley Parent Magazine. She's also an avid crafter and DIY fan.

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • January 2014

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[your family – health]

By Ashley Talmadge

hi,honey // winter woes?

have some honey for your health

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he holidays may be over, but long weeks of winter still lie ahead. Chilly weather and decreased daylight can be harsh on the body and spirit. Thankfully, a little pick-me-up is no further away than the honey jar in your cupboard.

We love honey our tea and on our toast. But honey has a long history beyond its popularity as a sweetener. It was valued by the ancients for its healing and rejuvenating properties, and sealed combs of honey have been found in Egyptian tombs, fully preserved and still edible. Recent studies suggest that for certain maladies, honey may be more effective than modern medicine as a treatment option. Rosanna Mattingly, author of Honey Maker: How the Honey Bee Worker Does What She Does, says that honey can be used as a wound treatment, a cough suppressant, and a source of energy — just a few examples of “the benefits of honey for which scientific evidence exists.” Take a look at what this age-old golden elixir can do for your family.

Energy booster. Honey is full of carbs, and research shows that consuming honeyed water before, during, and after a workout increases energy and promotes muscle recovery. Your kids can add that much-needed oomph to the middle of their school day by eating a peanut butter and honey sandwich, or using the sweet stuff as a dip for apple slices. And be ready with a mug of steamed milk and honey as an after school treat.

Cough control. Mixing honey with lemon and warm water has been a longtime home remedy for soothing a sore throat and quieting a cough. But a recent study found that a spoonful of honey was actually more effective than dextrometho-

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rphan (the cough suppressant typically added to over-thecounter pediatric cough medicine) in treating night-time coughing in children as young as two. This is good news, since it is considered unsafe to use dextromethorphan to treat children younger than six.

Wound treatment. Honey has been used to treat wounds for centuries, and now there’s plenty of science to back up this remedy of yore. Honey contains an enzyme that produces small amounts of hydrogen peroxide, a mild antiseptic. So when skin becomes dry enough to crack at the knuckles or lips, a topical application of honey makes the wound less hospitable to bacteria and fungi.

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looking for sweet inspiration? Follow our Honey Crafts, DIY, and Recipe board on Pinterest for loads of ideas >> www.pinterest.com/gvparentmag/honey/

Skin softener. Dry winter air can wreak havoc on skin and hair, and there’s a good reason so many beauty products tout honey as an ingredient. Honey is a natural humectant; it attracts and holds water from the atmosphere. When applied to the skin or hair, it acts as a moisturizer. So drizzle a little honey straight from the jar onto your face or hair, smooth it in, and rinse after 10 minutes. Or try mixing honey with coconut oil and heated beeswax for a rejuvenating homemade cream for lips, face, and hands. Whip up an easy lemon and honey face mask by mixing juice from a half of lemon with 2-3 tablespoons of honey. Stir together and apply to face (avoiding eye area.) Leave on for 15-20 minutes then rinse off.

A Word of Caution

Honey should not be given to children under the age of one. The American Academy of Pediatrics warns that very young children, with their under-developed immune systems, are at risk for contracting botulism from spores sometimes present in honey. Honey is no safer than table sugar for the diabetic. The American Diabetes Association warns that, as with any sugar, honey should be used in moderation in the diabetic diet, and its effects monitored closely.


local buzz Where you can find honey locally

Seaway Honey Trail www.seawaytrailhoney.com A small honeybee apiary on the Historic Seaway Trail by Lake Ontario. Brighton Honey www.brightonhoney.com Local, natural honey from Brighton, NY.

Antioxidant advantage. Ounce for ounce, honey packs the same powerful punch as popular antioxidant-containing fruits and veggies. In addition to eating plenty of greens, strengthen your defense against cancer-causing free radicals by replacing other sweeteners with honey. Applied topically, the antioxidant therapy may restore vitality to your skin.

Mellowing agent. Winter is the time for chill-chasing soups and stews, but many a batch is made bitter by cold weather veggies like cauliflower and broccoli. Try tempering the flavor with a bit of honey. Ditto for the five-alarm chili that has you sweating bullets. Whether banishing the bitter or softening the spice, what could be sweeter than some honey in the pot?

How to Buy Honey Read labels. Look for descriptions such as: raw; unprocessed; 100 % pure; minimally processed. When honey is overheated during pasteurization or filtration, the nutritive value is reduced and antibacterial effectiveness decreases. And don’t pay more for honey labeled “organic.” Bees may forage up to five miles from their hive, an area over which the beekeeper almost certainly has no control.

Simply New York Marketplace and Gifts www.simplynystore.com Gourmet foods including local honey. Rochester Public Market www.cityofrochester.gov/publicmarket A variety of sellers offer local honey including Davis Honey from Cayuga, NY. Brighton Farmers Market www.brightonfarmersmarket.org A variety of sellers including honey from the Seaway Honey Trail.

Shop local and natural. Mattingly says that in order to avoid buying honey that has been overheated, ultrafiltrated, or diluted with other sweeteners, “it’s important to get honey from a known source whenever possible.” She warns that ultrafiltration “removes pollen and makes tracing the source of the honey impossible… [and] often enough, such honey is contaminated with some pretty yucky stuff.” Indeed, a study sponsored by Food Safety News found that most honey sold by large grocery chains was completely pollen-free due to filtration. In contrast, according to the report, “every one of the samples Food Safety News bought at farmers markets, co-ops and ‘natural’ stores like PCC and Trader Joe’s had the full, anticipated, amount of pollen." Color counts. Mattingly says, “Some honeys, such as manuka honey, may have additional medicinal properties.” Studies suggest that darker honeys (e.g. manuka and buckwheat) generally offer better protection against infection and disease than lighter honeys (e.g. acacia and clover).  Ashley Talmadge is a freelance writer and frequent contributor to Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine. Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • January 2014

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the evolution of

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine January 1994

Our magazine's first issue hits the stands! It was 32 pages.

1995

We join Parenting Publications of America (now Parenting Media Association).

March 1995 August 1995

We publish our first After School Guide.

We publish our second camp guide and hold our first annual camp fair at Eastview Mall.

January 1997 1999

GVP takes the web! We launch our first website www.GVParent.com

May 2001

We publish our First Annual Baby Guide.

We publish our first Family Resource Directory.

2007

Our magazine cover changes from newsprint to glossy.

2007 Summer 2007

We send out our first e-mail newsletter.

June 2008

GVP gets social! We join Twitter.

September 2008

We launch our Facebook page.

We become a sponsor of The Little Theatre's Little Buddies film series.

September 2007

We publish our first Special Needs Guide – it features the Kelly Family & Hunter's Hope.

2011

Our magazine evolves from interior newsprint to full glossy.

2012

We become a sponsor of The Strong's storytime 32

www.RocParent.com

Fall 2011

We become a sponsor of the Rochester Children's Book Festival.

September 2013

We launch our new website, www.RocParent.com


Celebrating 20 years

of supporting Rochester Area families! Thank you to our advertisers who have been supporting our magazine and Rochester area families since our first year! • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Asbury Day Care Au Pair Care Browns Berry Patch Camp Pathfinder Child Care Council Chris Wilkinson – The Magic Guy Crayon Campus Cricket on the Hearth Dancing with Denise Draper Dance Studio Fitzsimmons Dance Genesis Pediatrics GEVA Girl Scouts of Western NY Gymnastics Training Center Harley School JCC Camps Kumon Mall at Greece Ridge Center

• Martial Arts America (Matt Dorsey) • MCC Child Care • McQuaid High School • Nazareth Schools • Northside Children’s Center • Northstar Christian Academy • Rochester Childfirst Network (Rochester Children's Nursery)

• • • • • • • • •

RPO Stella Maris Camp Stepping Stones Learning Storybook Child Care The Strong Museum Toddler’s Workshop Trinity Montessori Webster Montessori YMCA of Greater Rochester

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • January 2014

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Calendar

january events

Activities • Exhibits • Theater • Storytelling • Shows • Family Fun • Outdoor Adventures Parenting Programs • and lots more for families to do in & around Rochester!

TYKE's Theatre Presents:

Henry and Mudge

//

Jan. 18 & 19

W

arm up heart and soul with this charming musical based on the best-selling children’s books. Moving from the city to a new house in the country can be tough. Just ask Henry. He misses Annie, his cousin and best friend, and can't find a playmate in his new neighborhood. Luckily Mom and Dad buy him a great big, slobbery dog named Mudge to join him on all kinds of adventures. Where: Hart Theatre, 200 Edgewood Avenue, Rochester, 14618. When: January 17 & 18 For More Info and Full Schedule: Visit www.TykesTheatre.org or call the box office at 461-2000

photo by: joan marcus

sat

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SCIENCE SATURDAYS:: EXTREME ANIMAL ADAPTATIONS

Using live native and exotic species, the Wildlife Defenders provide interesting and stimulating information about animal ambassadors and encourage environmental and wildlife conservation awareness. 11am-3pm. Included with museum admission. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. www.rmsc.org

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sun

sat

owl prowl

epilpesy foundation's annual chocolate ball

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Live owls will be on display during an indoor presentation that will highlight the adaptations that make owls successful hunters of the night. Then join the staff to search for the threatened short-eared owl in the grasslands. 3-5pm. $5/ child, $7.50/adult, $20/family Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savanna, 13146. www.audubon.org

feb. 8

Celebrating 28 years of the Chocolate Ball at the Rochester Riverside Convention Center. A highlight of the event comes after dinner with a live auction for the many unique chocolate cakes created exclusively for the Chocolate Ball. 5:30pm. Rochester Riverside Convention Center, 123 East Main St., Rochester, 14604. www.epilepsyuny.org


calendar of events • local family-friendly activities calendar guide: February ������������������39 Library����������������������40 Ongoing������������������42

01 * Sunday

Happy New Year! 03 * Friday Monster Jam The most popular monster truck tour returns to Rochester. Trucks and drivers expected include: Grave Digger and driver Gary Porter, Monster Mutt and driver Whit Tarlton, Crowd pleaser, Aftershock and driver Bob Robbins, a Western New York native. 7:30pm. Tickets start at $10 for children (ages 2-12) and at $20 for adults. Prices subject to market demand. Blue Cross Arena, 1 War Memorial Square, Rochester. www.ticketmaster.com FREE *The Little Mermaid Childrens Theater Auditions No experience necessary to be a part of this colorful full scale theater production. Auditions are for placement in the show, everyone gets a part. Please bring a photo of yourself and be prepared to sing a song and recite a poem/story/monologue. 4:306:30pm. Ages: 4-12yrs. Best Foot Forward 8000 Cobblestone Court #100 Next to UPS Victor, 14564. www.BestFootForwardKids.com

04 * Saturday Exhibit Closing: Little Builders. See this exhibit before it moves on to the next museum! Don an orange vest and construction vest and explore the concepts of construction, motion, and simple machines at more than 20 interactive stations. 10am-8pm. Included with museum admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester. www.museumofplay.org Monster Jam See Jan 3. 7:30pm. Tickets start at $10 for children (ages 2-12) and at $20 for adults. Prices subject to market demand. Blue Cross Arena, 1 War Memorial Square, Rochester. www.ticketmaster.com The Empire Strikes for Bucks. Bowling, video games, Kids Activities, Jedi Academy, Face Painting, Basket Raffles, 50/50, and more! Wear a Star Wars costume and get 5 free Imperial Credits for games, basket raffle and prizes! Proceeds benefit Summit Educational Resources. 12-4pm. $10 presale, $15 at the door. AMF Thruway Lanes, 1550 Walden Ave., Cheektowaga, 14225. amf.com/thruwaylanes

FREE *The Wizard of Oz Children’s Theater Auditions No experience necessary to be part of the show. Separate shows for each age group. This is a tuition based program. Please bring a photo of yourself & be prepared to sing a song and recite a poem/story (age 4-9) or monologue (age 10-17). 1-3pm. Ages: 4-17yrs. Best Foot Forward 8000 Cobblestone Court #100 Next to UPS Victor, 14564. www.BestFootForwardKids.com

05 * Sunday Exhibit Closing: Little Builders See this exhibit before it moves on to the next museum! Don an orange vest and construction vest and explore the concepts of construction, motion, and simple machines at more than 20 interactive stations. 12-5pm. Included with museum admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester. www.museumofplay.org Hot Cocoa and Snow- Crusoe Lake Snowshoe Strap own a pair of snowshoes and trek through the marshes and woods to Crusoe Lake, which is normally not accessible without snow to cover the swampy forest floor. After the hike warm up inside with some hot cocoa. 1-2:30pm. Fee with snowshoe rental: $5/child, $7.50/adult, $20/family; Fee without rental: $3/child, $5/adult, $15/family. Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savanna, 13146. www.audubon.org Monster Jam See Jan 3. 2pm. Tickets start at $10 for children (ages 2-12) and at $20 for adults. Prices subject to market demand. Blue Cross Arena, 1 War Memorial Square, Rochester. www.ticketmaster.com

06 * Monday Storytime Club Readings of classic children’s tales. Have your Storytime Club passport stamped once during each visit. Collect five stamps and receive a free children’s book. This month: Bear Buddies. 10:30 & 11:30am. Included with museum admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. www.museumofplay.org

08 * Wednesday Book and Beast It’s story time at the Zoo! Bring your little ones to the Zoo for a cuddly story and special animal visitor each week. 11am. Included with admission. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St. Rochester. www.senecaparkzoo.org Father and Son Sports Night Games, swimming and pizza. 6:308:30pm. $16 Perinton Community Center, 1350 Turk Hill Rd., Perinton, 14450. www.perinton.org

Wildlife Defender, Terry Hamilton with an Indian stick bug.

EXTREME ANIMAL ADAPTATIONS

January 11: Using live native and exotic species, the Wildlife Defenders provide interesting and stimulating information about animal ambassadors and encourage environmental and wildlife conservation awareness. 11am-3pm. Included with admission. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. www.rmsc.org

09 * Thursday FREE *MOMS Club of Henrietta General Meeting Our general meeting is the second Thursday of every month. We offer support for SAHM and their kids in Henrietta and Rush. Activities include tours, crafts, play dates, Mom’s Night Out and more. 10am. Email HenriettaEastMoms@yahoo.com

10 * Friday The Seussification of Romeo and Juliet and A Midsummers Night’s Dream The Bard’s most fanciful tales are retold in Dr. Seuss’s whimsical style in this creative take on the classics. The results are charming, delightful and pure fun. 7pm. $9; $7 seniors, students and children; $5 for SOTA sutdents with ID. School of the Arts Black Box Theatre, 45 Prince St., Rochester, 14607. www.sotarochester.org

11 * Saturday Fashionistas Weekend Transform yourself into a fashion model with glamorous outfits, design your own crazy hat or mysterious mask. Then strut your stuff on the catwalk and pose for pictures with adoring fans. 10am-8pm. Included with admission National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. www.museumofplay.org

FREE *Reign the Concert. “REIGN...the concert” is the official launch of Project RULE. The concert will celebrate this new organization and encourages students to let their own “REIGN” begin. 7pm. $15 Main Street Armory, 900 E Main St, Rochester, 14605. www.projectrule.com Science Saturdays: Extreme Animal Adaptations Using live native and exotic species, the Wildlife Defenders provide interesting and stimulating information about animal ambassadors and encourage environmental and wildlife conservation awareness. 11am-3pm. Included with museum admission. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. www.rmsc.org Snowshoe Workshop Learn how to snowshoe- it’s as easy as walking. Enjoy the winter weather and take a guided hike. Refreshments will be provided following the hike. Snowshoes will be provided. Two sessions to choose from. 10am-12pm or 1-3pm. $10/person per session. Genesee County Park & Forest Nature Center, 11095 Bethany Center Rd., E. Bethany. www. co.genesee.ny.us/departments/ parks/inc.html

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • January 2014

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calendar of events • local family-friendly activities

Disney on Ice

January 22- 26 -- Embark on the ultimate sightseeing holiday with all your favorite Disney characters. Join Mickey, Minnie, Donald, Goofy and Daisy on a journey to the magical worlds of Disney’s The Lion King, The Little Mermaid, Peter Pan and Lilo & Stitch. Wednesday, Thursday & Friday 7pm; Saturday 11am, 3pm & 7pm; Sunday 1 & 5pm. $15-$60 Blue Cross Arena, 1 War Memorial Square, Rochester. www.ticketmaster.com

The Seussification of Romeo and Juliet and A Midsummers Night’s Dream See Jan 10. 2 & 7pm. $9; $7 seniors, students and children; $5 for SOTA sutdents with ID. School of the Arts Black Box Theatre, 45 Prince St., Rochester, 14607. www.sotarochester.org

12 * Sunday Cayuga Lake Birding Van Tour Hop in the van for an excursion to the northern part of the lake where up to 30 species of ducks, geese and swans can be seen. Bald eagle sightings are a possibility too! Participants are encouraged to bring their camera and binoculars. 1-4pm. $7.50/child; $12.50/adult; $35/ family. Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savanna, 13146. www.audubon.org Fashionistas Weekend See Jan 11. 12-5pm. Included with admission National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. www.museumofplay.org

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The Seussification of Romeo and Juliet and A Midsummers Night’s Dream See Jan 10. 5pm. $9; $7 seniors, students and children; $5 for SOTA sutdents with ID. School of the Arts Black Box Theatre, 45 Prince St., Rochester, 14607. www.sotarochester.org

13 * Monday Little Tykes Winter Investigation Stroll Put on those thinking caps, looking eyes and listening ears to spot signs of life in winter. Each session will focus on a exploring a different section of the Preserve. If there’s enough snow, we’ll strap on snowshoes. Registration required. 10-11am. Non-members $6 per child and adult, $3 additional children with same adult. Buffalo Museum of Science, TIFFT Nature Preserve, 1200 Fuhrmann Blvd., Buffalo, 14203. www.sciencebuff.org Monday Kicks for Ages 2 to 6 Playful learning activities designed for 2- to 6-year-olds, one Monday a month. This month: A B C’s and 1 2 3’s. 10am-2pm. Included with admission Ages: 2yrs-6yrs. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. www.museumofplay.org


calendar of events • local family-friendly activities 15 * Wednesday

657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. www.rmsc.org

Book and Beast It’s story time at the Zoo! Bring your little ones to the Zoo for a cuddly story and special animal visitor each week. 11am. Included with admission. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St. Rochester. www.senecaparkzoo.org

TYKE’S Theatre Presents: Henry and Mudge A charming musical based on the best-selling children’s books about a boy and his huge canine buddy. 1 & 3pm. $11-$16 Hart Theater at the JCC, 1200 Edgewood Avenue, Rochester. www.tykestheatre.org

16 * Thursday

Winter Tour of Mount Hope Cemetery Guided walking tour (60 to 90-minutes long) presented by Friends of Mount Hope Cemetery. 1pm. $5; free to ages 15 and younger accompanied by an adult. Mount Hope Cemetery 1133 Mt. Hope Ave Rochester 14620- South Entrance. www.fomh.org

Hot Cocoa and Snow Groomed XC Skiing Get your blood pumping with a refreshing cross-country ski. Ski about two miles of groomed trails through woods and open field. Enjoy a cup of hot cocoa after the program (participants must bring their own skis). 10-11:30am. $3/child, $5/adult, $15/family. Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savanna, 13146. www.audubon.org

18 * Saturday The Food that Makes Us Our food is also who we are, in more ways than one. Celebrate cultures from around the world and learn about different cuisines as you explore the science and history behind what makes food an international pastime. 12-4pm. Included with admission. Rochester Museum & Science Center,

19 * Sunday FREE *Bowl-A-Thon For COTA in honor of 2 Year Old Jovani P 3rd annual Bowl-A-Thon for the Children’s Organ Transplant Association in honor of 2 year old Jovani P to assist in raising the $15,000 that is still needed for Jovani’s kidney transplant. For more info visit the website. Two times: 2 & 4 pm. 2 or 4pm. $10 donation includes 3 games of bowling & shoe rental per person. AMF Terrace Garden Lanes 1151 Ridgeway Ave Rochester, 14615. www.COTAForJovaniP.com

Mendon Ponds Winterfest Learn about and try winter activities such as ice fishing, snowshoeing and ice boating. Refreshments will be available at the Nature Center , Stewart Lodge and East Lodge with deliveries made to the competition sites. 11am-4pm. Mendon Ponds Park, Clover St. and Pittsford-Mendon Center Road Pittsford, 14534. www.mendonpondswinterfest.org The Food that Makes Us See Jan 18. 12-4pm. Included with admission. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. www.rmsc.org Tracks and Traces Tour Explore the trails during a winter investigation of animal tracks and evidence. Look for signs of active winter natives and maybe even see them up close! 2-4pm. Non-Members $5; snowshoe rentals adt’l $2 per person, weather permitting. Buffalo Museum of Science, TIFFT Nature Preserve, 1200 Fuhrmann Blvd., Buffalo, New York 14203. www.sciencebuff.org TYKE’S Theatre Presents: Henry and Mudge See Jan 18. 11am & 2pm. $11-$16 Hart Theater at the JCC, 1200 Edgewood Avenue, Rochester. www.tykestheatre.org

20 * Monday Celebrating Diversity, featuring Art Force Five Honor the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Enjoy playful, interactive theater shows by Alfred U’s Art Force Five and learn how creativity can promote equality. 10am-8pm. Included with admission National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. www.museumofplay.org Challenger Learning Center of Greater Rochester Embark on a virtual voyage of discovery to the planet Mars at the Challenger Center, a high-tech, hands-on facility for space flight simulation. Children must be at least 7 yrs. Children 7 -10 must be teamed one-to-one with adult. Reservations required. 10:30am-12:30pm. Included with admission. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. www.rmsc.org Lancer Louie Meet and Greet Meet Lancer Louie from the Rochester Lancers indoor soccer team. 10am-8pm. Included with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. www.museumofplay.org

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calendar of events • local family-friendly activities The Food that Makes Us See Jan 18. 12-4pm. Included with admission. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. www.rmsc.org

22 * Wednesday Book and Beast It’s story time at the Zoo! Bring your little ones to the Zoo for a cuddly story and special animal visitor each week. 11am. Included with admission. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St. Rochester. www. senecaparkzoo.org Disney On Ice presents Passport to Adventure Embark on the ultimate sightseeing holiday with all your favorite Disney characters. Join Mickey, Minnie, Donald, Goofy and Daisy on a journey to the magical worlds of Disney’s The Lion King, The Little Mermaid, Peter Pan and Lilo & Stitch. 7pm. $15-$60 Blue Cross Arena, 1 War Memorial Square, Rochester. www.ticketmaster.com

23 * Thursday Disney On Ice presents: Passport to Adventure See Jan 22. 7pm. $15-$60 Blue Cross Arena, 1 War Memorial Square, Rochester. www.ticketmaster.com

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24 * Friday Disney On Ice presents: Passport to Adventure See Jan 22. 7pm. $15-$60 Blue Cross Arena, 1 War Memorial Square, Rochester. www.ticketmaster.com

25 * Saturday 7th Annual Seed and Houseplant Swap You are encouraged to bring seeds and houseplant cuttings to swap, but they are not required, and there will be plenty for everyone to take some home. Fee includes both talks, the swaps, and refreshments. 9:30am-12:45pm. $15. Rochester Civic Garden Center, 5 Castle Park Rochester, 14620. www. rcgc.org Disney On Ice presents: Passport to Adventure See Jan 22. 11am, 3pm & 7pm. $15-$60 Blue Cross Arena, 1 War Memorial Square, Rochester. www.ticketmaster.com FREE *Edgerton Model Railroad Club Open House 4 O-gauge layouts depicting the 4 seasons. Plenty of accessories to operate, vintage and modern trains, displays of vintage model railroad items of local interest. Parking is free. 11am-2pm. Donations accepted Edgerton Recreation Center, 41 Backus St. Rochester, 14608. www.edgertonmodelrailroadclub.com

RBTL PRESENTS: Rock of Ages

January 30 - 31: In 1987 on the Sunset Strip, a small town girl met a big city rocker and in LA’s most famous rock club, they fell in love to the greatest songs of the 80’s. Thursday 7:30pm; Friday 8pm. $35+ Auditorium Center, Third Floor, 875 E. Main Street, Rochester, NY 14605. www.rbtl.org


calendar of events • local family-friendly activities Paws and Claws Meet unusual animals and special dogs. See a variety of scaly and furry animals ambassadors from Nickel City Reptiles and Exotics. Shake paws with trained therapy dogs, retired racing greyhounds, and Siren the Fire Dog. 10am-8pm. Included with admission National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. www.museumofplay.org Snowshoe Workshop See Jan 11. 10am-12pm or 1-3pm. $10/ person per session. Genesee County Park & Forest Interpretive Nature Center, 11095 Bethany Center Rd., E. Bethany.

26 * Sunday Amerks Meet and Greet Meet players and mascot Moose from the Rochester Americans’ hockey team. 12-5pm. Included with admission National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. www.museumofplay.org Disney On Ice presents: Passport to Adventure See Jan 22. 1 & 5pm. $15-$60 Blue Cross Arena, 1 War Memorial Square, Rochester. www.ticketmaster.com Owl Prowl Live owls will be on display during an indoor presentation that will highlight the adaptations that make owls successful hunters of the night. Then join the staff to search for the threatened short-eared owl in the grasslands. 3-5pm. $5/child, $7.50/adult, $20/family Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savanna, 13146. www.audubon.org Paws and Claws See Jan 25. 12-5pm. Included with admission National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. www.museumofplay.org RPO Presents: Tales of Russia The enchanting Russian fairy tales of the Snow Maiden, Sadko the sailor, and the Tsar Sultan are woven together with the descriptive music of Rimsky-Korsakov. 2pm. Varies by seat. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 North Plymouth Ave. Rochester 14614. www.rpo.org Science Saturday: Birds Presented by Birds Unlimited. 11am-3pm. Included with museum admission. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. www.rmsc.org

27 * Monday Storytime Club See Jan 6. 10:30 & 11:30am. Included with museum admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. www.museumofplay.org

30 * Thursday RBTL Presents: Rock of Ages In 1987 on the Sunset Strip, a small town girl met a big city rocker and in LA’s most famous rock club, they fell in love to the greatest songs of the 80’s. 7:30pm. $35+ Auditorium Center, Third Floor, 875 E. Main Street, Rochester, NY 14605. www.rbtl.org

31 * Friday RBTL Presents: Rock of Ages See Jan 30. 8pm. $35+ Auditorium Center, Third Floor, 875 E. Main Street, Rochester, NY 14605. www.rbtl.org Stages Presents: Into the Woods When a Baker and his wife learn that they cannot have a child because of a Witch’s curse, the two set off on a journey to break the curse. Rated PG. 7:30pm. $13 Stages, 875 East Main St, Auditorium Center, Third Floor, Rochester. www.tykestheatre.org

04 * Tuesday

10 * Monday

FREE *New Day Christian Preschool Open House Meet the teachers, see the classroom, and ask any questions you may have about the preschool experience. 6:30-8pm. New Day Christian Preschool (inside Park Ridge Church) 10 Straub Rd. Rochester, 14626. www.parkridgefmc.org/preschool

Monday Kicks for Ages 2 to 6 Playful learning activities designed for 2- to 6-year-olds, one Monday a month. This month: Celebrating Friendship. 10am-2pm. Included with admission. Ages: 2yrs-6yrs. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester 14607. www.museumofplay.org

05 * Wednesday

11 * Tuesday

Book and Beast It’s story time at the Zoo! Bring your little ones to the Zoo for a cuddly story and special animal visitor each week. 11am. Included with admission. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St. Rochester. www.senecaparkzoo.org

RBTL Presents: Sister Act The story of Deloris Van Cartier, a wannabe diva whose life takes a surprising turn when she witnesses a crime and the cops hide her in the last place anyone would think to look: a convent. 7:30pm. $32.50- $75. Ages: 9+yrs. Auditorium Center, Third Floor, 875 E. Main Street, Rochester, NY 14605. www.rbtl.org

07 * Friday Stages Presents: Into the Woods See Feb 1. 7:30pm. $13 Stages, 875 East Main St, Auditorium Center, Third Floor, Rochester. www.mjtstages.com

08 * Saturday

February 01 * Saturday Exhibit Opening: Animation Explore the science behind the art of animation amid colorful, larger-thanlife graphics of popular characters from Cartoon Network. See an array of animation tools and techniques, including cartoon drawing, computer animation and more. 10am-8pm. Included with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. www.museumofplay.org Stages Presents: Into the Woods When a Baker and his wife learn that they cannot have a child because of a Witch’s curse, the two set off on a journey to break the curse. Rated PG. 7:30pm. $13 Stages, 875 East Main St, Auditorium Center, Third Floor, Rochester. www.mjtstages.com

02 * Sunday Stages Presents: Into the Woods See Feb 1. 2pm. $13 Stages, 875 East Main St, Auditorium Center, Third Floor, Rochester. www.mjtstages.com

03 * Monday Storytime Club. Readings of classic children’s tales. Have your Storytime Club passport stamped once during each visit. Collect five stamps and receive a free children’s book. This month: Love Is in the Air. 10:30 & 11:30am. Included with museum admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester. www.museumofplay.org

Celebrate a Rhino-riffic Birthday. Celebrate birthdays for Bill and Roscoe, the Zoo’s male white rhinos. Learn fascinating facts, help sing ‘Happy Birthday’ and watch as they enjoy some special birthday treats! 1-3pm. Free with zoo admission. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St., Rochester. www.senecaparkzoo.org Epilepsy Foundation’s Annual Chocolate Ball Celebrating 28 years of the Chocolate Ball at the Rochester Riverside Convention Center. A highlight of the event comes after dinner with a live auction for the many unique chocolate cakes created exclusively for the Chocolate Ball. 5:30pm. Rochester Riverside Convention Center, 123 East Main Street, Rochester, 14604. www.epilepsyuny.org Nite Hike Enjoy the Genesee County Park & Forest at night. Take a stroll on snowshoes through the park and have refreshments by a warm fire at Pavilion A. Snowshoes will be provided. Dress for the weather. Preregistration required. 6-8pm. $15/ person. Genesee County Park & Forest Interpretive Nature Center, 11095 Bethany Center Rd., E. Bethany 14054. Stages Presents: Into the Woods See Feb 1. 7:30pm. $13 Stages, 875 East Main St, Auditorium Center, Third Floor, Rochester. www.mjtstages.com

09 * Sunday

12 * Wednesday RBTL Presents: Sister Act See Feb 11. 7:30pm. $32.50- $75. Ages: 9+yrs. Auditorium Center, Third Floor, 875 E. Main Street, Rochester, NY 14605. www.rbtl.org

13 * Thursday RBTL Presents: Sister Act See Feb 11. 7:30pm. $32.50- $75. Ages: 9+yrs. Auditorium Center, Third Floor, 875 E. Main Street, Rochester, 14605. www.rbtl.org

14 * Friday RBTL Presents: Sister Act See Feb 11. 8pm. $32.50- $75. Ages: 9+yrs. Auditorium Center, Third Floor, 875 E. Main Street, Rochester, NY 14605. www.rbtl.org RPO Presents: Singin’ in the Rain See the timeless comedy Singin’ in the Rain—regarded as one of the best Hollywood musicals of all time and starring Gene Kelly and Debbie Reynolds—on the big screen as your RPO performs the score live. 8pm. Varies by seat. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 60 Gibbs St. Rochester. www.rpo.org

15 * Saturday Fat-Brain School-Break Week Fatten up your brain through play! Put on your thinking cap and challenge yourself to mind-expanding Fat Brain games and toys such as the new Squigz and Tobbles, along with classics such as Twig, Animalogic, Reptangles, and Hexactly. 10am-8pm. Included with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. www.museumofplay.org

Stages Presents: Into the Woods See Feb 1. 2pm. $13 Stages, 875 East Main St, Auditorium Center, Third Floor, Rochester. www.mjtstages.com

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calendar of events • local family-friendly activities

library //

programs & activities

03 * Friday

10 * Friday

Cereal Box Collages Cereal boxes will be the medium for making colorful, one-of-a-kind collages. Cut out words and letters to spell out phrases, your name, anything you want! You’ll have an art piece that looks like it belongs in a pop art gallery. Registration required. 2pm. Irondequoit Public Library - Evans Branch 45 Cooper Road Rochester, 14617.

Winter Wonderland Picnic Enjoy some wintry stories and songs. We’ll warm up afterwards with some hot chocolate and a sweet treat. Please register. 11-11:45am. Ages: 3-6yrs. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Road, Penfield, 14526.

07 * Tuesday Evening Craft Series for Tweens Craft: Candy Snowman Craft. This is a craft project that can be completed in the allotted time. All materials for the crafts will be provided free of charge. Class size is limited to 20 people, so register early. 6:30-7:30pm. Gates Public Library 902 Elmgrove Road, Rochester, 14624. Teen Games Teens in grades 7-12 are invited to play board games, Wii games, and PlayStation games with their friends. 3:30-4:30pm. Parma Public Library 7 West Avenue, Hilton, 14468. Teen Tuesday: Movie Day/Make a Pillow Bring your friends and join us for Despicable Me 2. There will be free popcorn and soda. Get cozy with a fleece pillow you can make yourself during the movie. Registration is not required. 2:45-4:30pm. Ages: 14-18yrs. Penfield Public Library 1985 Baird Road, Penfield, 14526.

08 * Wednesday His & Herstory Travel through his and herstory, discussing books and learning how people lived in times gone by. Stop at the Circulation Desk to pick up this month’s book. No registration is required. 4-5pm. Ages: 7-11yrs. Chili Public Library, 3333 Chili Avenue, Rochester.

09 * Thursday Chess Club Learn from and play with other kids, computers, and local experts! No registration is required. 3:30-5pm. Chili Public Library, 3333 Chili Avenue, Rochester. Pajama Storytime Join us in your pajamas for an evening storytime with your favorite stuffed friend! For children of all ages with an adult. No registration is required. 7-8pm. Chili Public Library, 3333 Chili Avenue, Rochester.

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11 * Saturday The Bubble Man Family-friendly show by Doug Rougeux, who learned how to juggle, joined the circus, then bubbled the world. Fun for all ages. No registration required. 2-3pm. Pittsford Community Library, 24 State Street, Pittsford, 14534.

13 * Monday Magic the Gathering Fans of the game meet up the second Tuesday of each month to play and trade cards. Free snacks and a booster pack raffle at each event! Registration is not required. 3:30-5pm. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Road, Penfield, 14526. Tail Waggin’ Tutors Read to a therapy dog - they make wonderful listeners! This is a great opportunity for children who are learning to read and reluctant readers. For children of all ages and families. No registration is required. 6:30-7:30pm. Chili Public Library, 3333 Chili Avenue, Rochester. Winter Evening Storytime Join Miss Amy for stories, puppets, crafts and more! Registration is required. Space is limited. Grades Preschool-First. 6:30-7:30pm. Parma Public Library, 7 West Avenue, Hilton, 14468.

14 * Tuesday Game Day Wii, PS3, and plenty of board games to play as well as a new Lego Architecture set. The Center for Youth will be there to give a presentation on services available and to talk about what the library’s designation as a ‘Safe Place’ means. 2:45-4:15pm. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Road, Penfield, 14526. Teen Art Club Teens in Grades 7-12 can make a craft or work of art to take home each month. 3:304:30pm. Parma Public Library, 7 West Avenue, Hilton, 14468. Teen Community Service Need Community Service credits? PCL wants volunteers to help in the library. Students will straighten the Teen Place and help with various other library tasks as assigned. For students in

grades 6-12. Registration required. 3:30-4:30pm. Pittsford Community Library, 24 State Street, Pittsford, 14534.

15 * Wednesday Puzzle Pals Do you like hidden pictures, mazes, and word searches? Then this is the place for you! Drop in for a plethora of puzzles. For children of all ages and families. No registration is required. 4-5pm. Chili Public Library, 3333 Chili Avenue, Rochester. Tail Waggin Tutors Book-loving dogs are coming to the library to listen to kids read stories. Reading to calm, trained dogs who love to listen is a great way for kids to build confidence reading out loud. 4-5pm. Arnett Branch Library, 310 Arnett Blvd, Rochester, 14619.

16 * Thursday LEGO Club-Arnett Kids can have fun building with LEGOs and making new friends. We supply the LEGOs and kids supply the creativity! 4:305:30pm. Arnett Branch Library, 310 Arnett Blvd, Rochester, 14619. Lego Club- Parma The Library has bins full of Legos of all shapes and sizes. Pick something fun to build with your friends and family and display it in the Children’s area until the next Lego Club. 4-5pm. Parma Public Library, 7 West Avenue, Hilton, 14468. Teen Manga Club Watch Manga movies, draw Manga, discuss our favorite series, make Manga crafts and eat Japanese snacks! 5-6pm. Sully Branch Library, 530 Webster Avenue, Rochester.

17 * Friday Dance Like Snowflakes Come hear a winter story and then get set for some snow dancing! Class will include lots of creative movements and fun! Registration begins Friday, January 3 for Penfield town or school district residents; Friday, January 10 for all others. 10:30-11:15am. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Road, Penfield, 14526.

18 * Saturday Libraries Love Legos Calling all Legos lovers - join us for a speical program building with everyone’s favorite little bricks! For children with an adult helper. Registration is required and begins January 6.

10-11am. Chili Public Library, 3333 Chili Avenue, Rochester. Practice SAT Test Take an official, timed full-length practice exam proctored by a test expert. After the test, you will learn how to score the exam and interpret those results! Bring pencils, snacks and a calculator. Registration is required. 10am-2pm. Gates Public Library 902 Elmgrove Rd., Rochester, 14624. www.gateslibrary.org SAT Practice Test Chariot Learning will administer a practice SAT. Bring pencils, an eraser, and a calculator the day of the test. Registration required. 10am-2pm. Pittsford Community Library, 24 State Street, Pittsford, 14534.

20 * Monday Library Lego Lab We’ll provide all the Legos, you bring your imagination. Creations will be photographed then dismantled for our next Lego Lab! Registration begins Monday, January 6 for Penfield town or school district residents; Monday, January 13 for all others. 2-3:30pm. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Road, Penfield, 14526. Magic Show Welcome Chris Wilkinson, the Magic Guy! Don’t miss his fun-filled hilarious magical extravaganza. Registration begins Monday, January 6 for Penfield town or school district residents; Monday, January 13 for all others. 11-11:45am. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Road, Penfield, 14526. Winter Evening Storytime See Jan 13. Space is limited. Grades Preschool-First. 6:30-7:30pm. Parma Public Library, 7 West Avenue, Hilton, 14468.

21 * Tuesday Evening Craft Series for Tweens Craft: Feather Snowflakes. This is a craft project that can be completed in the allotted time. All materials for the crafts will be provided free of charge. Class size is limited to 20 people, so register early. 6:30-7:30pm. Gates Public Library 902 Elmgrove Road, Rochester, 14624. Lego Club Have fun building with Lego at the library! Bricks will be provided and the library staff will challenge participants to be as creative as possible! Registration required. 4:15-5pm. Ages: 6-12yrs. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd.


calendar of events • local family-friendly activities Teen Movie Day Teens in grades 7-12 may watch a teenselected movie rated PG-13 or lower. 3:30-5pm. Parma Public Library, 7 West Avenue, Hilton, 14468.

23 * Thursday Chess Club See Jan 9. 3:305pm. Chili Public Library, 3333 Chili Avenue, Rochester. Family Games Play various board games and Wii games with your family and friends! 4-5pm. Parma Public Library, 7 West Avenue, Hilton, 14468.

25 * Saturday Preschool Science Time Science- themed storytime. Read stories and do hands-on science activities! Registration required. 11-11:45am Ages: 3-5yrs. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. Tail Waggin’ Tutors A few friendly dogs and their masters visit the library and kids read to them! It’s a relaxing & fun way to practice reading. Families are most welcome! 11am-12pm. Maplewood Community Library, 1111 Dewey Avenue, Rochester, 14613.

26 * Sunday Make It and Take It Enjoy an afternoon of crafts for the whole family! For children of all ages and families. Registration is required and begins January 6. 2-3pm. Chili Public Library, 3333 Chili Avenue, Rochester, 889-2200.

27 * Monday Meet a Rochester Amerk and the Moose Hear a story, see a demo of the player’s hockey equipment, play an Amerks Trivia Game and more! You can get autographs and take photos, too! For children of all ages and families. Registration is required and begins January 6. 4-5pm. Chili Public Library, I3333 Chili Avenue, Rochester. Winter Evening Storytime Join Miss Amy for stories, puppets, crafts and more! Registration is required. Space is limited. Grades Preschool-First. 6:30-7:30pm. Parma Public Library, 7 West Avenue, Hilton, 14468.

28 * Tuesday JUnior Friends If you are interested in helping expand the teen collection, volunteering in the community and the library, or meeting other young adults who share your love of reading and the community, this group is for you. 6-7pm. Chili Public Library, 3333 Chili Avenue, Rochester. Meet the Moose (and an Amerk Player) Enjoy hot chocolate while you hear one of Rochester’s own hockey players read a book, demonstrate equipment, and sign autographs. Moose the Mascot will be here as well, so bring your camera! For all ages. No registration required. 6:30-7:30pm. Pittsford Community Library, 24 State Street, Pittsford, 14534.

Teen Tech Club Teens in grades 7-12 are invited to invent and create with a variety of technologies to make movies, photos, and games for the library, and whatever else we can dream up. New technology and tools will be added to this program throughout the year. 3:30-4:30pm. Parma Public Library, 7 West Avenue, Hilton, 14468.

29 * Wednesday Teen Game Night. Hang out with your friends at HPL’s monthly Teen Game Night. No registration. 6:30-8pm. Ages: 12yrs+. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd.

30 * Thursday Pajama Storytime Join us in your pajamas for an evening storytime with your favorite stuffed friend! For children of all ages with an adult. No registration is required. 7-8pm. Chili Public Library, 3333 Chili Avenue, Rochester. Teen Manga Club Check out the bi-weekly Teen Manga Club! Watch Manga movies, draw Manga, discuss our favorite series, make Manga crafts and eat Japanese snacks! No registration required. 5-6pm. Sully Branch Library, 530 Webster Avenue, Rochester.

Please Note:

Dates and times for all calendar and ongoing events are subject to change. Please call the numbers provided or visit their website to confirm event information.

Want to See Your Event in Print & Online?

To submit an event to our calendar

e-mail: calendar@GVParent.com

NEW:  Submit your calendar events online at www.RocParent.com/calendar/calendar-submit All entries must be received by the 10th of the month prior to publication in order to be considered. Events printed as space permits.

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • January 2014

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calendar of events • local family-friendly activities

Ongoing

events & exhibits Next generation Erie Canal Lock exhibit

Get hands-on and learn how canal locks work in the real world with the next-generation Erie Canal Lock exhibit. The new permanent exhibit features several exciting enhancements made to the Museum’s previous Eric Canal lock exhibit. Visitors can operate a tugboat, open valves to lower and raise water, power a locomotive and so much more! Rochester Museum and Science Center 657 East Ave., Rochester 14607.I ncluded with admission during regular museum hours. For more info visit www.rmsc.org or call 271-4320

STRASENBURGH PLANETARIUM

ROCHESTER MUSEUM & SCIENCE CENTER

657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. 271-1880. www.rmsc.org/ StrasenburghPlanetarium/ Check website or call for prices and hours

657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. 271-1880. www.rmsc.org Check website or call for prices and hours

MY PLANETS. For children ages 3-5 and the adults with them, this friendly introduction to the planetarium features worlds in our solar system. Saturdays at 10am. $8. Ages: 3-5yrs. Ends Aug 31.

ADVENTURE ZONE. Dive to the bottom of Lake Ontario in the Deep Submergence Vehicle simulator. Experiment with wind currents, stream erosion, and more.

SATURDAY NIGHT LASER SHOW. Intensely colored beams from argon and krypton lasers fill the planetarium dome with dazzling color patterns that spontaneously dance to classic rock music. Shows change monthly. 9:30pm. $9-$10. Ages: 5+. SATURDAY SUN, MOON AND STARS. This relaxed, enjoyable family show presents prominent constellations and takes the audience on a quick trip to the moon. Show Times: confirm at rmsc.org. $8-$10. MYSTERIES OF THE DARK UNIVERSE Journey though some of the many puzzling parts of the universe that emit no visible light. Explore cutting-edge astronomical research while enjoying stunning images in the dome. A high-resolution video system surrounds audiences with magnificent images Saturdays, 1pm. Ages: 6yrs to adult. $7 for adults, $6 for seniors, college students, and ages 3-18, and free for RMSC members.

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AT THE WESTERN DOOR. The hundreds of objects displayed show the Seneca’s and Haudenosaunee’s creative response to new technologies and materials introduced following European Contact. DISCOVER OUR WEATHER. Make a cloud, measure the wind, and marvel at the power of lightning! Energize it. What powers our bodies, cities and planet, and is neither created nor destroyed? ENERGY. ENERGIZE it brings you through a multi-sensory, highly physical experience where YOU hold the power! EXPEDITION EARTH. Explore your connections to the natural world in this interactive natural science exhibition. FLIGHT TO FREEDOM. Rochester’s Underground Railroad. Explore stories of courageous African Americans who traveled through Rochester on their way from slavery to freedom.

HOW THINGS WORK. Through fun, hands-on investigation, find out how mechanisms such as light switches, thermostats, and traffic signals work. KEVA Planks. Construct your own wooden masterpiece with KEVA Planks--identical, stackable construction blocks. Blending science with art, KEVA planks bring out the designer, architect and engineer in each of us. LIGHT HERE-LIGHT NOW. Have hands-on fun with light, color, & optics with mirrors, lenses & lasers. ERIE CANAL LOCK EXHIBIT. The new permanent exhibit features several enhancements made to the Museum’s previous Eric Canal Lock exhibit. Enhancements include six computers to control the system, a new tugboat, improved lighting, new plumbing and electrical systems and more.

National Museum of Play at The Strong

One Manhattan Sq., Rochester 14607. 263-2700 or TDD 423-0746, www.museumofplay.org Check website or call for prices and hours GAME TIME! Move like a piece on a giant game board through three centuries of American games, puzzles, and public amusements.

American Comic Book Heroes: The Battle of Good vs. Evil. Climb up the side of a building, make your own cape, test your superhero skills, pose for pictures with Spiderman and learn more about your favorite comic book hero. NATIONAL TOY HALL OF FAME. The prestigious hall features historic examples of toy inductees and play stations. Berenstain Bears: Down a Sunny Dirt Road. Step into the playful world of the Berenstain’s including Main St, Bear Country School, Brother & Sister Bear’s Club Houses, and the Family Tree House. Can You Tell Me How to Get to Sesame Street? See yourself on TV with the Muppets, drive Elmo around Sesame Street in a big yellow taxicab, sell movie tickets at the Circle in the Square Cinema ticket booth, and more. Dancing Wings Butterfly Garden®. The team has raised the bar by introducing a variety of birds and animals into the garden to create a lively ecosystem that they have dubbed “butterfly garden 2.0.” eGameRevolution. An original, highly interactive exhibit that explores the history of video games and their impact on the way we play, learn, and relate to each other. One History Place. Amid original artifacts and reproductions, children explore mini-environments and get a taste of life as it was a century ago.


calendar of events • local family-friendly activities READING ADVENTURELAND. Step into a life-sized pop-up book and follow the Yellow Brick Road into five literary landscapes from children’s books. WEGMANS Super Kids Market. Cruise the aisles and fill your cart with a selection of colorful produce that looks so real, you can almost taste it. Departments are filled with highly interactive stations for dramatic role-playing. THE ELAINE WILSON AND STRONG EXPRESS TRAIN. Experience the thrill of old-fashioned train travel as the mini locomotive chugs down the track surrounded by scenic postcards from across America.

What are your kids doing this summer?

OTHER AREA ATTRACTIONS CUMMING NATURE CENTER: A 900acre preserve located 40 minutes south of Rochester. $3 per person/$10 family. 6472 Gulick Rd., Naples. 374-6160, www.rmsc.org Science Studios A new model of interactive science exhibition – one which connects the museum’s unique collections with the engagement of hands-on activities. Current exhibits include: Explore YOU, Our Marvelous Earth, In Motion, and Bug Works. The Buffalo Museum of Science, 1020 Humboldt Pkwy, Buffalo. 716-896-5200. www.sciencebuff.org Cultures for Kids. Learn about kids from all over the world. $5. Explore & More children’s museum, 300 Gleed Ave., E. Aurora. 716-655-513. www.exploreandmore.org Tour the Riedman Robotic Milking Center. Tours available MonSat 11am-2pm. $2-$3. Springdale Farm, 700 Colby Street, Spencerport. 349-2090 www.heritagechristianservices.org The Herschell Carrousel Factory Museum. Operates two historic carousels. 180 Thompson St., North Tonawanda, 14120. 716-693-1885 www.carrouselmuseum.org A Step Into Africa. This state of the art exhibit, focusing on the Ngorongoro Crater region of Tanzania, is the only one of its kind in the country. Included with admission. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St, Rochester, 14621. 336-7200. www.senecaparkzoo.org Genesee Country Village & Museum. Meet with the village potter, storekeeper, printer, tinsmith and blacksmith. Speak with re-enactors and townsfolk about the clothing styles of the period and visit select pieces from the museum’s historic clothing collection. 1410 Flint Hill Rd., Mumford. 538.6822. www.gcv.org. Corn Hill Navigation. All aboard the Sam Patch & Mary Jemison! These authentic tour boats embark from Pittsford and Rochester, and provide unparalleled opportunities to experience history and enjoy relaxing getaways that showcase the beauty and ingenuity of America’s celebrated Erie Canal. For details call 585662-5748 or visit www.SamandMary.org.

Save the Date! Sunday, March 9, 2014

GVP's 20th Annual Camp Fair 11am - 5pm, Eastview Mall in Victor

Bring the kids and plan for the perfect summer!

Meet area summer camps, activities & programs...

* Dance * Sports * Music * Educational Enrichment * Art * Gymnastics * Special Needs * Science * Outdoor Activities * Drama & Theatre * * Overnight Camp * Day Camp * and much more!

Learn more at RocParent.com Call 585-348-9712 to learn about advertising in the upcoming issue Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • January 2014

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Party Planner – Everything to get the party started!

2/15/13

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Are you planning

a party? check our party & celebration guide and articles online for great party ideas!

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • January 2014

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Mail entries to: Genesee Valley Parent's Sesame Street Live Coloring Contest P.O. Box 25750, Rochester, NY 14625

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • January 2014

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Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent January 2014  

Rochester NY's Premier parenting resource - Celebrating 20 Years!

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