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Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • November 2013

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Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • November 2013

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Inside november

Vol.20 Number 11

in this issue 6|R  ocParent.com

On the Web in November

8 | Editor’s Note 10 | Buzzworthy 

Newsworthy & Notable

28 | P arenting – Teens &

Tweens When Girls Use Disrespectful Names to Refer to Themselves and Their Friends

30 | P arenting – all ages Holiday Etiquette Tips for Tots, Tweens and In-Betweens

32 | Education

10 Tips for Selecting a Tutor for Your Child

34 | Y  our Family –

activities 11 Ways Families Can Salute a Veteran

36 | C  alendar of Events

Family-Friendly Events Winter & Holiday Events Ongoing Events & Exhibits

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Tech Saavy Schools // how technology is shaping education in rochester area schools

more feature articles

e u

Comfort & Care //

how the harley school's hospice program makes a difference in and out of the classroom

Get Caught Reading // at the rocheter children's book festival

on the cover OUR education ISSUE 119 Things to Do This Month 32 Tech Saavy Schools 22 Education Issue 12, 16, 22, 32, 36 Tips for Selecting a Tutor 32 Get Caught Reading at the Rocheste Children's Book Fesitval 16 The Harley School's Hospice Program 12 11 Ways to Honor a Veteran 34

special advertising section:

36-47

educational resources guide

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • November 2013

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[ what’s online ]

Visit us online!

Scan this code with your smart phone to view this content and more on our website!

november // what you can find this month at www.RocParent.com

Did you Know for November.. November is Native American Heritage Month, National Homeless Youth Awareness Month and National Prematurity Awareness Month

5 Tweeters to Watch Our picks for great tweets:

@magur / Memorial Art Gallery of the University of Rochester. A visit to the MAG is a journey through more than 5,000 years of art history.

• November 11: Veterans Day • November 19: International Men's Day • November 20: Transgender Day of Remembrance

@WritersandBooks / Writers and Book, a literary non-profit based in Rochester. Promoting reading and writing to all age groups for over 30 years. @RocBrainery / Rochester Brainery is a place to take and teach classes, founded on the belief that learning should be fun, affordable, and accessible. @NazArtsCenter / Nazareth College Arts Center is one of Greater Rochester's premier performing arts venue for world-class dance, children's theatre and international entertainment. @SISRochester / Sustain Inspire Survive is a Rochester non-profit that helps patients financially while they battle breast cancer. Don’t forget to follow us at @RocParent

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online content & editorial

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National Sundae Day - NOV. 11 Celebrate the day with a recipe for Pumpkin Gingersnap Ice Cream. Bonus points if you use fresh pumpkin from one of our local farmers!

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give love

November is National Adoption month. Learn about how the National Museum of Play at The Strong® is honoring it with The Judge Wagner 2013 Heart Gallery, a display of 20 photographs of children in need of adoptive families.

More Recipe Ideas

Are you already dreading eating all the same Thanksgiving dishes you did last year? Change it up with some of our new twists on leftovers or check out some alternatives on classic recipes for family members with dietary restrictions.

Giveaways This month get ready for the theatre season with tickets to Naz Performing Arts Center, TYKE'S Theatre, RBTL and GEVA performances.Little Pony DVD's, Fairy Garden set and more!!

 Enter to win at www.RocParent.com/giveaways


Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • November 2013

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[ editor’s note ]

By Jillian Melnyk

giving thanks

Staff publisher Barbara Melnyk mail@GVParent.com

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what’s on your mind? 

I would love to hear from you! send me an email to editor@GVParent.com

hen I first read this month's article by Christa Melnyk Hines, I burst into tears. I knew, of course, that there are organizations and groups that support veterans and the men and women who serve our country, but many of the organizations Christa highlights in 11 Ways to Honor a Veteran I was previously unfamiliar with. As I learned more, I was awestruck and grateful.

Both of my grandfathers were WWII veterans and I have a number of friends who are part of military families. It was heartwarming to learn that there are so many programs and people out there who give a part of themselves to help others. Christa's article reminded me that while sometimes this world can seem harsh and unfair, and people can seem selfish and cruel, the reality is that there are a lot of people out there everyday who are giving – giving to our country and giving to others. While these selfless people don't often make big news, they exist, and I'm incredibly thankful for it. I don't want to think about what our world would be like without them.

November (with Veterans Day, Thanksgiving, and the kick-off to the holiday season) is the ideal time to start thinking about how we can support and give to those in need. As I approach this month, I'm planning to give back more. The thread that holds us together is the people who give rather than take – which would you rather be? I know that I want to be a giver.

With thanks,

Jillian

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Jillian Melnyk editor@GVParent.com COMMUNITY EDITOR Natalee Kiesling Natalee@GVParent.com Account Executives Cynthia Goldberg Natalee Kiesling Magazine layout & design Jillian Melnyk graphics@GVParent.com CALENDAR EDITOR calendar@GVParent.com DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Sandy Citarella contributing writers Susan Henninger John Boccacino Vicki Schultz Myrna Beth Haskell Christa Melnyk Hines Denise Yearian Malia Jacobson Basic subscription rate: $25/year. Send subscription inquiries and changes to address below. Copyright 2013, by GVP, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. Distribution of this magazine does not necessarily constitute an endorsement or necessarily reflect the opinions of this publication.

Genesee Valley Parent Magazine P.O. Box 25750 Rochester, NY 14625 p: 585-348-9712 f: 585-348-9714 www.RocParent.com

member of parenting media association

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Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • November 2013

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[ buzzworthy ]

newsworthy + notable

thankful treats Pumpkin Gingersnap Ice Cream

Yield: 2 1/2 quarts / Prep time: 15 minutes INGREDIENTS: 2 cups heavy whipping cream 1 tablespoon vanilla extract 1 1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon 1 1/2 teaspoons ground ginger 1 cup solid-pack pumpkin 1 (14 ounce) can Eagle Brand® Sweetened Condensed Milk 1 1/2 cups crushed gingersnap cookies HOW TO: BEAT heavy whipping cream, extract, cinnamon and ginger in large bowl on medium speed with electric mixer until stiff peaks form. COMBINE pumpkin and sweetened condensed milk. Fold pumpkin mixture and gingersnap cookies into whipped cream mixture. POUR into 9x5-inch loaf pan or other 2-quart container; cover. Freeze 6 hours or until firm.

growing education Thanks to the support of local farmers and America’s Farmers Grow Rural Education, the Greece Central School District and Wheatland-Chili Central School District each received a $10,000 grant sponsored by the Monsanto Fund to enhance math and science education. The Wheatland-Chili District will use the grant money to build a greenhouse to further develop their agriculture program. The greenhouse will allow the school to expand on its current curriculum, engaging

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wheatland-chili receiving their grant money

students in hands-on learning, while applying what they learn in school to the real world. America's Farmers Grow Rural Education helps farmers support math and science education in local

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rural school districts. Currently in its second year, this program is part of the Monsanto Fund's overall effort to support rural education and communities. To learn more visit www.americasfarmers.com

open your heart

Open your heart. Open your home. That’s the message Children Awaiting Parents (CAP) seeks to impart at The Judge Wagner 2013 Heart Gallery, a display of 20 photographs of children in need of adoptive families, on view at the National Museum of Play at The Strong® during National Adoption Month. The first Heart Gallery took place in New Mexico in 2001. Since then, the concept has been replicated across the country. The majority of the children in the program are ages 10 or older, live in either residential care facilities or in foster homes, and are in need of permanent families. The exhibit runs November 2–30, 2013. For more information visit www.thestrong.org or www.childrenawaitingparents.org


Celebrating 19 years of excellence! YOUR FAVORITE

award-winning FAMILY MAGAZINE & WEB SITE

• Gold Award WINNER for the design of our magazine’s annual Rochester Baby Guide • SILVER Award WINNER for the editorial in our Special Parent Section (featured in our September 2012 issue) • SILVER General Excellence Award for our magazine’s annual Rochester Baby Guide • B  ronze GENERAL EXCELLENCE award for Genesee Valley Parent’s website RocParent.com • FINALIST for overall writing of our magazine’s annual Rochester Baby Guide

www.RocParent.com Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • November 2013

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comfort &

care how the harley school's Hospice program makes a difference in and out of the classroom By Susan Henninger

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he current generation of young people often bears the label of being self-centered and entitled. But, digging a little deeper, you’ll find many kids who are ready and willing to make a difference in other people's lives in action-oriented and compassionate ways. Often all they need to get started is a leader who sees their potential.

Ten years ago the Harley School in Rochester hired Bob Kane, not only to teach English, but for his proven ability to lead a hospice volunteer program for high school students. Having just received the highly coveted Leading Edge Award (given by the National Association of Independent Schools) for his forward-thinking curriculum at Rochester’s Norman Howard School that linked high schoolers with patients in Rochester’s Comfort Care Homes, Kane was eager to expand his ideas about the positive role young people could play in helping to provide physical and emotional support to terminally ill patients. Harley’s year-long elective class is called Hospice. Students who take it receive full course credit by attending a daily class and completing a minimum of eight hours a

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Bob Kane teaching a class with Harley students


month in hands-on fieldwork. When the program first began, nine students enrolled in it. A few years later, Kane estimates that about 75% of Harely seniors were signing up, mostly based on word-of-mouth recommendations from other students. Working in a hospice setting is a world apart from a high school senior’s normal schedule, which is usually packed with activities, testing, college applications, and keeping current on social media. “Doing means something different in hospice,” Kane says. “Multitasking doesn’t work here.” He believes kids these days are caught on a hamster wheel of too many expectations versus not having enough real life skills and experiences. This type of volunteer work gives them a much-needed space where they can just be themselves. “All masks are gone with the dying,” Kane notes. “With their clients, students begin to realize it’s the little things that matter.” Students are often surprised to discover how meaningful it is to simply help someone brush their teeth or to sit with a bed-bound person and watch the snowflakes fall outside. Kids hunger for this connection, Kane asserts. “When a family member says to them, ‘You did so much for my mother; I’ll never forget you,’ it’s so powerful,” Kane adds. Not only that, but students begin to understand that what they do doesn’t matter as much as who they are. In a hospice setting they’re not living up to anything or anyone, they’re just being present. “When you’re with a person reaching the end of life, you become the ultimate tool to help them die peacefully,” he adds. The first thing Kane does when the course begins in September is light a candle in front of the class and ask a student to come up and blow it out. “Once the breath is gone, that’s it,” Kane tells his students. This vivid example launches a class discussion about the fragility of life. Later, students then take a “death inventory,” covering all types of loss, including the passing of a beloved pet or a divorce. This can be emotional but Kane emphasizes to the teens, “It’s important to care for each other. You’re going to need each other’s support doing this kind of work.” Next he shows a film where the class actually sees several people die so they’ll have a sense of what to expect in the comfort care homes. The kids also begin shadowing people at the various comfort care homes. Shortly afterwards, they’re on their own, with plenty of supervision and support from their teacher. Though Kane has a course syllabus, he views the reading and writing requirements as organic, changing slightly each year to meet the needs of the specific students enrolled in the class. There are always lectures, guest speakers, and readings (like Tuesdays with Morrie), and students are required to keep a journal about their experiences. There is a particular journal prompt that he assigns three times throughout the year, “Who are we? Where are we going? Why are we here?” that Kane's students find especially meaningful as their answers usually change as the class progresses. Another important piece of the course is learning to breathe and meditate, which is crucial for several reasons, says Kane. It’s important for caregivers to recognize how breathing changes as a person gets closer to death and students need to learn how to clear their mind so when they’re sitting with an unresponsive person they’ll be able to completely tune in to their patient’s nonverbal cues. “Having a peaceful, focused intentionality is crucial to your work,” he tells the teens. Additionally, the course teaches the teens how to physically take care of the people they work with. Kane observes that most kids today have had only fleeting experience with hospital continued >>> Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • November 2013

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It’s unique and powerful to care for another human being who is at the end of his life.

You’re not just dropping off flowers. The contact and touch during a time of mortality is transformative.”

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settings where everything is so “medicalized” that it’s much harder to get close to the patient. Comfort care is different -- more of a home setting. “You’re not seeing a disease or a chart number, you’re seeing a real person… Betty or Bill,” he says. Since New York State’s comfort care designation allows hospice volunteers to provide certain care tasks without a license, Kane has students use mannequins in the classroom to practice the different techniques they’ll be using when working with their terminally ill clients. This hands-on approach is part of what makes the experience so meaningful for the young people. “It’s unique and powerful to care for another human being who is at the end of his life,” Kane notes. “You’re not just dropping off flowers. The contact and touch during a time of mortality is transformative.” Because he is also a nursing assistant with twenty years of experience in hospice care under his belt, Harley administrators and parents can rest reassured that Kane knows what he’s doing. There’s always a level of concern about students being exposed to contagious diseases, he acknowledges, but he addresses this by explaining universal precautions. “There’s also my track record,” he adds. “No student has ever gotten sick from working in Harley Hospice.” Though Kane’s never had a parent refuse to let their teen participate in the program, he concedes that it can be both tough and uncomfortable for

mothers and fathers when their kids share stories of what they and their classmates are doing at the comfort care homes and what they’re talking about in class. There’s a common myth that young people are fearless and don’t see death as being relevant to them, but that’s not true Kane says. Teens do worry about dying and they definitely realize that they aren’t infallible. Initially, they’re also fearful of saying or doing something wrong or of crying in front of their patients. Kane asks them why this would be a bad thing. “They’ll see that you’re mourning them,” he reassures the kids. Another reason that Harley Hospice has been so successful is that Kane is there for his students the way he teaches them to be there for those they’re working with. He always makes sure that anyone taking his class knows that he’s only a phone call away if they need him. The class concludes with a Remembrance Day Ceremony, where students talk spontaneously about what their hospice experience meant to them. Kane says both he and the other adults present are often moved by the sudents' honesty and heartfelt remarks. In a poignant parallel to what he’s taught so many kids over the years, he summarizes, “The real payoff for me is that I mattered in their lives. As a teacher that means the world...I don’t need to do anything else in life.”


Students of the Harley Hospice Program practice providing oral care

Kane’s final Remembrance Day was June 2013, but he hasn’t left the end-oflife field or his work with young people. Following a class visit to Ireland where the youthful ambassadors of the Harley Hospice program shared their experiences with the dying, a school in Sligo decided to start a similar program. Kane accepted their invitation to join them, leaving the Harley Hospice program in the capable hands of Michael Brennan. For further information visit www.cmeeharley.org or contact Michael Brennan at mbrennan@harleyschool.org..  Sue Henninger is a freelance writer, a frequent contributor Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine. Contact her at www.fingerlakeswriter.com

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • November 2013

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get caught

reading at the Rochester Children’s Book Festival

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By Vicki Schultz

s a child, did you ever get caught reading with a flashlight after bedtime, so engrossed in a story that you couldn’t put it down? Do you remember the thrill of turning each page and discovering its secrets? That’s the kind of magic the Rochester Children’s Book Festival wants to inspire in all kids − though they may get “caught reading" in some funny situations.

From the moment they’re born, children love the soft cadence of their parents’ voices reading books aloud. It’s a bonding experience that leads to so much learning. Judy Bradbury, an author participating in this year’s festival, believes continued >>>

attend! 16

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WHAT: Rochester Children's Book Festival • WHEN: Saturday, November 16th. 10am-4pm. • WHERE: Monroe Community College


Henrietta librarian Anne Hicks gets caught reading on the job.

local librarians

get caught reading

Kathy Wolf of the Rochester Central Library was reading in her stalled car, waiting for AAA to arrive, when an ambulance, fire truck, and police car pulled up, sirens wailing. The policeman said, "Ma'am, are you all right? We got a report of an unresponsive woman in a car." She’d been too caught up in her book to notice anything.

Maria Heeks-Heinlein of the Sully Library was caught reading on the bus. The wrong bus. “I was so involved in the book, I did not realize I was on the wrong bus for about 15 minutes.” Gina Wells of the Charlotte Branch Library allowed her son to take a library book to the Renaissance Fest but worried he’d get it dirty and

have to confess to his librarian. Who should they run into on the jousting field but that very librarian. “An hour away, hiding amongst the grass, we were caught reading!” Jane McManus of the Winton Branch Library parked in an empty school lot to finish reading her book without interruption. It didn’t work. “A school security vehicle pulled

up along-side of me, scaring the daylights out of me.” Luckily, they let her finish her book. Abby DeVuyst of the Arnett Branch Library was once caught reading in a hammock—that she didn’t own. “What better way to test out a new hammock than to read in it for a little while!” continued >>>

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Melissa Seyba, Darryl Camiolo, and Tara Stein of South Towne Veterinary Hospital get caught reading to rescued kittens.

reading aloud is the best way for parents, teachers, and librarians to get kids hooked on books. In her Read-Aloud Scaffold and Children’s Book Corner series, Bradbury highlights books that are “the alphabet soup meant to nourish the spirit and introduce the young child to the wonderful world of reading.” She provides read-aloud plans to help you engage children with questions before, during, and after each book, making the experience more enriching for them—and for you. Kids love to interact while reading. Have them point out details in the illustrations. Ask how they think the characters are feeling and why. Have them predict what’s going to happen next. Children then become your partners in the reading process, gleaning all they can from the story. As they learn to read for themselves, the balance of power shifts gradually from you to them. But it’s important to keep reading aloud, choosing books beyond your kids’ reading levels, to entice them with the great stories that will soon be within their reach. You can model proper pronunciation, define new words, and explain tricky plot twists — all while sharing your love of reading. It’s a gift they’ll cherish. As parents, we may dread the bedtime mantra, “Just one more book, please,” but that means we’re doing our jobs right.

Reading Isn’t Just For Bedtime Anymore

Try reading aloud: • While waiting for the school bus. • On a porch swing or picnic blanket. • During gaps between scheduled activities. • In the doctor’s/dentist’s waiting room. • While traveling. (Always keep a basket of books in the family car.) • Classic books that have movie adaptations you can then watch with your children.

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We’re laying the foundation for good reading skills and habits. We’re bonding with our kids while getting them hooked on books. And there’s no telling where they’ll get caught reading next. 

Henrietta firefighters Todd Strassner and Bill Morman get caught reading with Skyler Schultz.

Vicki Schultz is the sponsorship coordinator for the Rochester Children's Book Festival.

Amelia Bedelia Turns 50! It’s been 50 years since Amelia Bedelia first delighted the world by mixing up her employers’ household chores, literally—dusting the furniture with a sprinkle of powder, dressing the chicken in a tiny outfit, and drawing the drapes with a pencil and paper. Author Peggy Parish wrote twelve books about her literal-minded character and witnessed Amelia Bedelia’s 25th anniversary before passing away in 1988. Unaware of her passing, children continued to write, asking for more books. The letters did not go unread. Herman Parish, Peggy’s nephew, responded to the fan mail in the best possible way — by giving the world more Amelia Bedelia. Since 1995, Herman Parish has written dozens of Amelia Bedelia books, showing us new sides to the cast of characters his aunt created and letting them misunderstand each other in hysterical new ways. Amelia Bedelia may be 50 this year, but she’s younger than ever in the Young Amelia Bedelia series, which highlights her many firsts as a first grader, and the chapter books that chronicle her misadventures in third and fourth grade. The Rochester Children's Book Festival is proud to welcome Herman Parish to celebrate Amelia Bedelia’s 50th anniversary.

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tech saavy schools how technology is shaping education in rochester area schools

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By John Boccacino

eaching used to be such a straight-forward occupation. As children gathered in the classroom, teachers would scribble down the day’s lessons on a chalkboard, and the students would dutifully take notes in their notebooks. Once at home, these same children would then use a pen or pencil to 22

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complete their homework assignments, which usually consisted of worksheets or take-home essays. Parents would occasionally meet with their child’s teacher to discuss the student’s progress during the course of the school year, and report cards containing letter grades and comments on how to improve

in the classroom would be sent home with the child for both to analyze. To quote the songwriter Bob Dylan, when it comes to your child’s education, "the times are a changing"… with technology invading the classroom like never before.


Know your Tech

Smartboard — A digital whiteboard that has replaced the chalkboard, allows teachers to relay information and data on a touch screen to better educate their students on the day’s lessons. TurtleArt — Software which lets users create and design images on the computer by following a sequence of commands given by the student. School Wire — Individual school and classroom websites online. Parent Connect — An online site that allows parents to monitor their students’ academic progress, including report cards. If a student misses class for an unexcused absence or fails to turn in an assignment, parents can sign up for email or text alerts that will, in real-time, notify them of the absence and the missing work. GameChanger — An iPad app that keeps track of the statistics and details from a sports game instead of scoring the games by hand using a pencil and a scorebook.

While the goals of attending school remain basically the same — helping children receive an education that will prepare them for adulthood while teaching them about responsibility and community — the tools available to schools to accomplish their educational goals have vastly changed over the last 10 years. More and more, classrooms are becoming filled with technology meant to enhance a child’s ability to learn, a teacher’s ability to instruct and a parent’s ability to monitor the educational process of their children. As the world outside of the classroom becomes inundated with technology (think about the last time you left your iPhone or smart phone at home, and how lost you felt without it), schools, too, have realized the benefit of joining the technological age and the numerous ways our ever-changing technology can aid in a student’s education. Smart Boards, a digital whiteboard that has replaced the chalkboard, allows teachers to relay information and data on a touch screen to better educate their students on the day’s lessons. These notes are also easily saved and uploaded to classroom websites, which are becoming more and more common as teachers realize the value of having the day’s lesson available around the clock for student consumption. Students, in turn, utilize these classroom websites as a valuable resource for uploading homework assignments, reviewing prep materials for an upcoming test and even performing research for their assigned group projects.

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rom the first day youngsters enter the Harley School, a private school located in Brighton, their teachers and administrators are busy preparing them to handle the challenges that life will throw their way. And technology plays a major role in their education, says Jim Tiffin, director continued >>> Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • November 2013

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Learning is more of an expedition than just a teacher standing in front of students delivering a lecture. All of this technology makes it easier for students and teachers to work from the same content and have access to the same information while learning on an interactive platform."

— Tim Cliby, executive director of instructional technology for the Rochester City School District

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of academic technology at the Harley School, which services 537 students in grades kindergarten through high school. “You used to work on integrating technology with learning, which was like putting the frosting on the cake, but now technology is mixed into the cake batter, it’s not something you apply after the cake is baked,” Tiffin adds, referencing a popular quote about how inter-twined technology has become in the education process. “Technology is not going away; we need to use it as a part of everything we do at school. My job is to help each person use the available technology to aid in their learning and their ability to create, from our administrators all the way down to our kindergarteners.” Younger students can learn about angles, geometry and catapults using the popular phone game, “Angry Birds,” where students launch these birds in the air towards the intended target with the goal of knocking over all the targets. When students are in the first and second grade, they use TurtleArt software, which lets the user create and design images on the computer by following a sequence of commands given by the student. Commands that determine the color, size, shape and location of the image. It’s basic computer programming, says Tiffin, but because of the fun interface and the ability to constantly tinker with their

idea, the children learn at an early age how to design and then modify their concept. As the students get older, their programming skills evolve appropriately, using the lessons learned from years past as a springboard to the current programming challenges. Students also master storytelling with video cameras, learning how to record video and use graphics to deliver weather forecasts or tell a story. “We recognize the world around us is changeable and our students learn that you can take technology and use it to create whatever you want to create,” Tiffin says. “Sometimes it’s about writing computer programs or special hardware, other times our students are busy repurposing a remote control car so it becomes a robot. Technology is more than just a keyboard and a screen; it’s a tool for working on and addressing problems.” Soon, the students at the Harley School will have a unique opportunity to put their classroom knowledge to work on a real-world problem: conserving energy and cutting down on our consumption of the Earth’s natural resources. In December, the school plans to debut the Commons, which, according to Aimee Lewis, the director of communications, will be the first K-12 education space in the country to offer students multiple dimensions of education around creating a sustainable


future. Operating as a living building, the 14,000-square-foot structure will “create its own energy, both heat and cool with renewable nontoxic resources, capture and utilize water and carbon in its greenhouse, and operate efficiently using students as the 'brains' or controls for managing its operations,” Lewis says. Learning how to manage the facility, which will include wind turbines, solar panels, a greenhouse and an algae farm, will test the knowledge the students learned in their previous classes while also offering a real-world example of the importance of careful energy consumption.

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nother growing technological trend in schools is for teachers to maintain their own websites where students can receive and turn in homework assignments, study class notes, receive a list of required school supplies and get help on their assignments. Parents can stay up-to-date on parent-teacher conferences and required reading lists for their children while also consuming electronic newsletters detailing the latest projects their children have completed. Such online resources exist in the Harley School, at Allendale-Columbia and a majority of the schools in the Rochester City School District, plus schools in Brighton, Brockport, Hilton, Pittsford, Rush-Henrietta and Victor, to name a few. In the Rochester City School District, all pupils in grades K-2 work extensively with iPads and personal computers at designated stations in their classrooms. Realizing there wasn’t sufficient space for more computer labs, the schools have several mobile computer carts where students can check out laptops. Every classroom features Smart Boards, and every teacher received a new laptop to aid in the day-to-day instruction of their students. “The Smart Boards are part of a huge change we’re seeing in how teachers engage their students, especially if teachers create or use lessons that put the children, and not themselves, in front of the classroom,” says Tim Cliby, executive director of instructional technology for the Rochester City School District. “Learning is more of an expedition than just a teacher standing in front of students delivering a lecture. All of this technology makes it easier for students and teachers to work from the same content and have access to the same information while learning on an interactive platform. Our teachers can take concepts and turn them into activities of exploration for the students using this technology as teachers facilitate instruction, not just deliver the information.” Every elementary, secondary and high school building in the district is completely wireless, meaning teachers and students alike can utilize technology whenever and wherever it is needed, instead of rushing down to a physical computer lab and waiting for a machine to open up. Each teacher and each school in the district has an individualized website on School Wire. Parents can monitor their students’ academic progress, including report cards, on Parent Connect. If a student misses class for an unexcused absence or fails to turn in an assignment, parents can sign up for email or text alerts that will, in real-time, notify them of the absence and the missing work. Those advancements are part of the district’s eLearning curriculum, says Annmarie Lehner, the information technology officer for the Rochester City School District. The eLearning curriculum also includes: Regents prep classes, professional development opportunities for teachers, virtual

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learning opportunities (six classes are currently offered online in the district) and online credit recovery classes for students who needed to complete makeup work in order to pass a class.

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Find More! For calendar events, news, family activities, recipes and resources: Click to our new website: • Quickly scan activities • End of Week selection • Recipe of the Week • Community News • Seasonal activities & articles • Timely local articles and parenting tips

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echnological advances are not limited to the classroom. In the Pittsford Central School District, the baseball and softball teams use GameChanger, an iPad app that keeps track of the statistics and details from every game instead of scoring the games by hand using a pencil and a scorebook. The school’s football, boys and girls basketball and boys and girls lacrosse teams utilize HUDL software, which allows video highlights to be uploaded onto a website for players and coaches to break down and analyze what areas of a game or a play went right, and what still needs improvement. Coaches are also utilizing the iCoach app to break down film and go over a particular lesson during the practice, so an athlete can observe what needs to be fixed and receive immediate feedback on how to apply those changes to become better on the field. “Not only are our kids interacting and being taught outside of the actual practice field, this type of learning is more in line with how this generation of students learns, which tends to be more visual learning,” says Scott Barker, in his 18th year as the athletic director for the district. “Without a doubt this helps prepare our kids if they play collegiate sports. Everything trickles down: pro sports have been using video as a teaching tool, and that also happens at most colleges. Now we’re seeing it in high schools, too.”  John Boccacino is a freelance writer and monthly contributor to Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine. He is currently the Director of Sports Information for Keuka College. He lives in Webster, NY.


Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • November 2013

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[ parenting teens & tweens ]

By Myrna Beth Haskell

Good Girls, Bad Names //

when girls use disrespectful terms to refer to themselves or their friends

m

y seventeen-year-old daughter wanted to show me a cute picture posted on Instagram of some of her classmates at the beach. The picture could have been on the cover of a Hallmark card. The beautiful waves, sandy beach, and smiling, tanned teens made me yearn to be near the coast, listening to the waves crash and smelling the salty air. My mood took a sharp turn, however, when I glanced at the caption below which read, “All My Bitches.” “Are you kidding me?” I asked my daughter. “What’s wrong?” was the innocent reply. “What does that caption mean?” I asked as if I couldn’t read plain English. “Oh…that’s just something friends call each other sometimes. It’s not a bad thing,” she

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insisted. Seriously? Not a bad thing? I’m very familiar with the generation gap, but this is ridiculous. Newsflash adolescents: a bitch is a female dog, ergo a derogatory term. Here’s the problem: If girls use “bitches” and “hoes” as terms of endearment, adolescent boys think it’s just fine to refer to them with the same. Teenage girls need to realize that their disrespectful banter can have negative consequences.

What are they thinking? Teens have picked up on this trend from the obvious – pop culture. Rap lyrics, for instance, are laden with demeaning terms for females, and they appear casually in movies as well. Unfortunately, “bitch” and “hoe” have become more mainstream than the terms of yesteryear – chicks, dames, and broads. Although also considered pejorative for their time, it was not typical for women to refer to their friends this way. Does this commonplace usage degrade how females are perceived in general? “I think the girls are doing this because it helps them feel

inclusive with their friends,” explains Mary Jo Rapini, LPC, psychotherapist and co-author of Start Talking: A Girl's Guide for You and Your Mom About Health, Sex or Whatever (Bayou Publishing, 2008). “However, their casual manner of disgusting names for one another is lowering their sense of self,” she adds.

Losing Respect Neil McNerney, LPC, family counselor, parent consultant, and author of Homework: A Parent's Guide to Helping Out Without Freaking Out! (Integrated Press, 2011), agrees that these disparaging names are harmful. “If we use degrading language, even in jest, about ourselves and our friends, it will be interpreted as degrading by others.” Although some adolescents believe this name calling is harmless amongst female friends, McNerney believes that teen boys might, in turn, feel compelled to refer to their female peers in the same way. “Boys are trying to be accepted by the girls, so they are using the lingo that helps them achieve that. Unfortunately,

they will begin thinking those words accurately describe not just friends, but all women. If we want men to be respectful, allowing this type of name calling is not going to help us get that respect,” Rapini warns.

Choosing to Emulate the Positive “The very nature of teenagers throughout the generations is to like things that their parents don’t like," McNerney points out. "We can discourage the negative trends, but be prepared for pushback. It’s what teenagers do." Parents should encourage their teens to focus on positive behaviors of the celebrities they admire. Many top athletes, pop stars, and movie celebrities give back to their communities. “For example, PINK, a music pop star, speaks out against bullying,” says Rapini. She advises parents to point out when they see popular artists doing good deeds and behaving with dignity, and there are plenty of examples. Lady Gaga founded the Born This Way Foundation to combat bullying. New Orleans quarterback Drew Brees has

Want to share your ideas? Upcoming topic: How should parents handle their daughter’s attachment to an abusive boyfriend? Send your full name, address, & brief comments to: myrnahaskell@gmail.com or visit: www.myrnahaskell.com

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awesome stats on the field, but his work off of the field is just as inspiring -- his Brees Dream Foundation improves the quality of life for cancer patients, and provides education and opportunities for children and families in need. Mega star Justin Bieber supports “Pencils of Promise” which builds schools in third world countries. Of course, the other side of the coin continues to make headlines. Miley Cyrus’ obscene performance at the Video Music Awards in August was over-the-top and inappropriate, according to many of her peers and fans. Rapini suggests parents use events like this as a teaching moment. “Use the Miley Cyrus incident as an example of what happens when people compete against others for shock value," says Rapini. "If you are authentic, you needn’t compete. Be yourself."

Perceptions Matter Rapini counsels, “Parents should demand ‘word replacement’ and not back down. In our family the words ‘shut up’ and ‘stupid’ were not allowed. To this day, my kids still don’t use those words.” McNerney explains, “I think we should remind our daughters how other people will perceive them when they use degrading language.” He also points out that teenagers will go on the defensive. “If she replies with something like, ‘It doesn’t mean that anymore’ or ‘We’re just kidding,’ don’t get into an argument.” Instead, he suggests that parents reiterate their point of view, explaining why their word choice will likely be misunderstood by others. Most importantly, Rapini reminds parents of their role. “Parents have to demand respect. You cannot be your teen’s buddy and parent. Be your child’s parent.”  Myrna Beth Haskell is a freelance writer and monthly contributor to Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine who lives in Salt Point, NY. She is the author of the newly released book, LIONS and TIGERS and TEENS: Expert advice and support for the conscientious parent just like you (Unlimited Publishing LLC). For more information visit www.myrnahaskell.com.

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • November 2013

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[ parenting all ages ]

By Malia Jacobson

manners magic //

holiday etiquette for tots, teens, and in-betweens

i

f you're already dreading the thought of taking your rambunctious brood to Grandma's for a holiday meal, you know that manners don't come naturally to children. Though most parents strive to teach children niceties like “please” and “thank you,” good manners don’t begin and end with the magic words. What about the tot who squirms at the dinner table and jumps up after two minutes? What about the grade-schooler who runs wild at friends’ homes? Or how about the high-schooler who shrinks during introductions?

If you’re raising a manners-challenged child, you’re not alone. Childhood manners mishaps are as common as children themselves, says Chris J. Rock, etiquette coach and founder of Etiquette and Protocol Consulting in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. The good news: youth is a time to learn and practice appropriate behavior, and mistakes are expected. Even better, swift etiquette intervention can lay the groundwork for a lifetime of civility.

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TODDLER/PRESCHOOL: Table Training The golden rule — treat others as you’d like to be treated — is the basis of all etiquette, says Rock. So how soon should parents start teaching children manners? “You can’t start them too young,” she notes. “There is no certain age when the magic begins.” That means establishing family behavior norms early on. If you don’t want your children to run indoors, traipse through airplane rows, or jump on furniture, correct these behaviors in toddlerhood with a firm, gentle reminder: “That is not how we act in this family. It doesn’t matter what other children do.” Toddlers have notoriously short memories, so catchy songs can help etiquette

lessons stick, says Rock. “We sing ‘Yes is better than Yeah’ with our grandchildren,” she says. Table manners training can also start early. Rock recommends introducing flatware as soon as children can hold it (often in late infancy or early toddlerhood), discouraging eating with the hands, and gently stretching the time tots can sit still during meals. Start with just four or five minutes, and build to fifteen or twenty. Children as young as two can be taught to ask their host — in most cases, mom or dad — to be excused from the table when finished.

ELEMENTARY YEARS: Social Graces The grade-school years bring more friend visits and sleepovers — potential manners minefields, since kids will be away from parents’ watchful eyes. Teaching children to be a respectful guest in friends’ homes will ramp up confidence at a time when children are developing a social identity (and increase the odds of receiving a repeat invitation). Pre-playdate, remind children that being a guest means respecting the household rules of their host. If the host family removes their shoes at the door or doesn’t allow snacking in bedrooms, a guest should comply. To show respect, ask children to address their


friend’s parents as “Mr. and Mrs.” unless directed by the parents to do otherwise. And for an especially nice touch, follow up a sleepover or a special playdate with a personal thankyou note from the child.

TWEENS/TEENS: Introduction Anxiety Want your tween or teen to make a good impression? Teach them to make a proper introduction, a habit that pays lifelong dividends. To start, insist that children learn to introduce themselves with confidence and greet new acquaintances with eye contact and a firm handshake. “Today’s teens are typically more comfortable interacting with technology than they are face-to-face. And yet, those who master the ability to meet and greet others with ease will always be viewed more favorably,” notes Deborah King, president of Final Touch Finishing School in Seattle. The basics of a positive introduction include standing up straight, making eye contact, smiling, saying hello and your name in a clear voice, and extending a firm handshake. Like any skill, repetition is the key to mastery. “It’s important for parents to know introduction protocol themselves so they can model correctly,” says Rock. For example, when introducing two parties, the senior or more important person’s name is said first. Likewise, when introducing two friends, use equal terms for both; never use first and last name for one and just first name for the other. Polish introduction prowess by encouraging tweens and teens to introduce you and others at social gatherings and in group settings. Soon, they’ll be ready to take on the world — civilly, of course.  Malia Jacobson is a mom of three and frequent contributor to Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine.

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • November 2013

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[ education ]

By Denise Yearian

choosing a tutor //

10 tips for selecting a tutor for your child

t

utors offer a wealth of educational resources for students who need remedial work, as well as for those who want academic enrichment and maintenance. To choose the right tutor for your child, consider these 10 tips:

1. Pitch & persuade.

Before searching for a tutor, discuss it with your child to get his buy in. Keep the conversation positive —“You know how reading is kind of hard sometimes? We are going to find someone who can help you.” Most students don’t like to struggle, so if your child is aware that there is a problem, he may be more likely to want help. Even so, expect apprehension and offer encouragement.

2. Ponder priorities.

There is no one-size-fits-all when it comes to tutoring. It depends on your child’s needs, setting, convenience and cost. Some people choose a private tutor. Others go with a tutoring center. Still others opt for an online service. When choosing a setting – either small group or one-on-one instruction – determine which is the best fit for your child. If you choose a group setting, find out the maximum number of students per class. Convenient location is important too. Studies show that more

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frequent tutoring sessions yield greater results. When it comes to cost, bear in mind that one-on-one tutoring may be more costly than group sessions and in-home tutoring more expensive than traveling to a center.

3. Reach for recommen-

dations.

Begin your search by asking your child’s teacher, principal, guidance counselor or others within the school unit. Some school districts have a list of tutors and are willing to make recommendations. Other parents are a good resource too. Is there someone they have had success with?

4. Check credentials.

Find out if the tutor has experience teaching the subject your child needs help with. Although the instructor may not be credentialed for your child’s grade level, it’s a good idea to find one who holds a college degree and has completed a tutor training program. This will ensure he understands educational theory, instructional strategies and remedial approaches. Graduate students with strong content knowledge may be a good option too. Equally important is experience and teaching style. Ask if the tutor has taught children of similar age and learning style as your child. Likewise, consider per-

SIGNS YOUR CHILD NEEDS A TUTOR

There are a number of indications a child needs a tutor. If you see any one of the following signs, your child may be a good candidate for tutoring: • Doesn’t want to go to school • Difficulty doing homework • Gaps in learning • Poor test grades • Hiding test scores from parents • Teacher reports missing assignments • Unable to keep up • Multiple wrong answers • Unfinished assignments • Frustration and possibly tears • Decreased self confidence • Parents are frustrated and don’t know how to help


QUESTIONS TO ASK WHEN CHOOSING A TUTOR

• What age do you tutor? • Is it for remedial work only? Or do you do enrichment and maintenance too? • What subjects do you offer? •D  o you have summer programs? •C  an my child go during school hours? •D  o you offer diagnostic testing? Is it required? •D  o you teach in small group sessions or one-on one? •W  here does tutoring take place? •W  hat qualifications do you/ your teachers have? •W  hat if my child has a personal problem with the tutor, can I get another one? •H  ow often is the child required to go? •C  an you work sessions around my family’s schedule? •H  ow often will I receive progress reports? Will they be written for verbal? •W  hat is the duration of the contract? •H  ow much do you charge? •A  re there any hidden fees?

INFORMATION HELPFUL TO YOUR TUTOR

To equip your tutor in understanding your child better, consider sharing the following information: • What motivates your child. •W  hether or not he likes school. •W  hat his favorite and least favorite subjects are. • How good his memory is. •H  ow he feels about being tutored. • School work samples. • Teacher’s contact information. •H  ow your child feels about standardized tests. If he gets anxious. What past scores are like. • If he has specific organizational or study skill issues.

sonality and attitude. Is he patient, upbeat and encouraging? Is he congenial with children?

niques. The teacher may also be willing to give feedback on your child’s progress in the classroom.

5. Tally the track record.

8. Request prog-

Equally important to check references and track record. Does the tutor you are considering have satisfaction surveys from past parents and students that prove he has helped them raise test scores, improve classroom grades, and/or experience better homework completion?

Many tutors offer periodic progress reports and will check off goals and redefine them, if necessary. Ask for a sample of progress reports to see if they are clear and helpful. Also inquire how often reports will be given.

ress reports.

6. Time it right.

Although extracurricular activities and parents’ work schedules often dominate the clock, try to be flexible so tutoring sessions are held at a time when your child is most open to learning. Some students need a 30 to 40 minute break after school. But if you give other kids that same down time, it will be a battle to get them to work. Know what timing works best for your child and adjust your schedule accordingly.

7. Collaborate on goals. When formulating tutoring goals, get everyone on board – teacher, tutor, parent and child. Teachers and tutors are aware of what the goals should be, but parents know their child best and should be involved in the goal-setting process. It’s ideal if the tutor and teacher work toward a common goal and communicate regularly to reinforce each other’s tech-

9. View policies.

Clarify policies before signing on the dotted line. Some tutors charge clients if an appointment is canceled without a 24-hour notice. Others have detailed policies for scheduling makeup sessions. Also ask about substitutes. How much say will you have in who teaches your child, in the event your tutor is out due to illness?

10. Show support. Remember, parents play an important role in the whole learning process, so look for practical ways to support your child’s academic endeavors. At the end of each tutoring session, find out what he is expected to do before the next one – whether it’s memorizing his multiplication facts or completing all of his classroom assignments – and couple those learning efforts at home. 

Denise Yearian is a former educator and editor of two parenting magazines, and the mother of three children.

Looking for a doctor? Check out our online directory at www.RocParent.com

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • November 2013

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[your family activities ]

By Christa Melnyk Hines

with honor //

11 ways families can salute a veteran

veterans day is monday, november 11

d

uring this month of thanksgiving, don't forget our military service members. Many organizations and veterans groups offer ways to help support and show gratitude to members of the armed forces. Help a veteran, a deployed service member and military families know that you appreciate their sacrifices. Here's how:

1. Help an expectant military mom.

3. Support their furry friends.

Nothing relieves a soldier's worries more than knowing his family is supported back home. Operation Top Knot, an organization started by college student Audri Cid in 2003, is a nationwide network of individuals who sew, knit and create gift baskets to support new and expectant mothers whose husbands are deployed. To donate baby blankets, diapers, bottles, clothing and other items, visit http://soldiersangels.org/ top-knot.

Raise money to go toward fostering pets of active duty service members, wounded warriors and homeless veterans. Guardian Angels for Soldier's Pet is a non-profit organization that finds qualified foster families to care for pets while soldiers are deployed or when military families transfer overseas. The foster families also care for pets whose warriors have died.

2. Write a letter.

This organization supports veterans who suffered a spinal cord injury. Participate in one of the organization's sporting events or fundraisers, make a monetary donation or collect and donate bags of clothing, shoes, belts, hats, books, CDs and small household goods. For more information, visit www.pva.org.

Remind veterans and their families that you are thinking about them and appreciate their commitment to our nation. Write a letter to a deployed soldier, a wounded warrior or a veteran who has served in past wars through Operation Gratitude (OperationGratitude.com) or a military family through Operation Appreciation sponsored by Blue Star Families (www.bluestarfam.org).

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4. Contribute to Para-

lyzed Veterans of America.

5. Assist disabled and wounded veterans. Volunteer at your local Veterans Affairs (VA) hospital or help disabled veterans, whether running errands, doing yard work or assisting them with transportation. Contact www.dav.org for more information. Also, check out the Wounded Warrior Project for other ways to help injured service members.

6. Help them call home.

Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) supports and assists military veterans and their families through a variety of programs, including Operation Uplink. The program enables service members and hospitalized veterans to make free calls back home to loved ones for three days each month. Go to www.VFW.com to find out how you can make a donation.


did you know... Veterans Day originated as "Armistice Day" on November 11, 1919, to mark the one-year anniversary when Germany signed the Armistice to formally end WWI. It became a national holiday in 1938. In 1954, President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed legislation to change the name of the holiday to Veterans Day, to honor all those who served in American wars.

7. Aid service dogs.

PatriotPaws trains dogs to serve disabled veterans. You can volunteer to help the organization by bathing and walking dogs, running errands or fundraising. For more information visit www.patriotpaws.org.

8. Clip coupons.

Don't toss your expired coupons! Military families stationed overseas can use coupons for up to six months past their expiration. Visit www.coupsfortroops.com for drop-off sites or to find out where to mail your coupons.

9. Donate DVDs.

DVDS4Vets is a non-profit organization started by Dr. Richard Landis, an orthopedic surgeon who helped build clinics in Afghanistan, and James F. Nicholson, who served as an Air Force pilot in Korea between 1950 and 1953. Landis and Nicholson saw a need to provide basic entertainment for veterans who returned home with traumatic brain injuries and other serious wounds and were undergoing long-term rehabilitation. To donate used or new DVDs to veterans, visit www.dvds4vets.org.

10. Send a care package. Soldiers who are serving far from home look forward to receiving mail. Visit Anysoldier.com to learn how to send a letter and what is appropriate for care packages. If you'd like to help support a veteran who does not have family to assist in the transition to home and civilian life, check out the Adopt a Veteran program through www.soldierangels. org. Those who volunteer to be an Adopting Angel make a 12-month commitment to send a letter each week and a small gift once a month, tailored to the individual veteran's specific needs.

11. Say thank you.

If you see a soldier in uniform or a veteran, a simple "Thank you for your service" is a considerate way to express your gratitude. For more ways to thank a vet, visit www.kidsthankavet.com.  Freelance journalist, Christa Melnyk Hines, daughter of retired USAF SMSgt. Walter Melnyk, is thankful for all of our veterans and their families for their service.

Join

our Team! Interested in working for an award-winning company that cares about Rochester’s families? Genesee Valley Parent Magazine is looking for an Account Executive to work with area businesses who focus on the parenting community for both our print and growing web products.

For information on this and other positions at GVP, go to www.RocParent.com/employment

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • November 2013

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Educational Resources Guide Time to do YOUR homework to find the best educational programs, public and private schools in the area.

Adult Education After-school Enrichment Family Enrichment Montessori Programs Nursery & Preschools Drama & Performing Arts Private Schools - Elementary Private Schools - High Schools Special Learning & Tutoring

Fit by Five Preschool

2051 Fairport Nine Mile Point Rd, Penfield 14526 585-388-8686 www.gtc-rochester.com Fit by Five is a progressive preschool program for youngsters up to 5 years old. It uses physical movement including gymnastics and other sports, to teach more effectively the concepts of letters, vocabulary and reading. Students learn by doing, they learn through senses and through play and fun.

Rochester Christian School

260 Embury Rd., Rochester, 14625| 671-4910 www.rochesterchristianschool.org The only Accredited Christian PK-8 school. Our mission is to partner with parents to develop a child's head, heart and hands for Jesus Christ through God's Word and academic excellence. Students are known and challenged in small class sizes led by our dedicated teachers who are all NYS certified. Financial aid, busing and after-school care available. Tour the school, meet the staff and learn more about how RCS has been a leading Christian school for over 95 years.

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10 Prince Street, Rochester, 14607 271-4548 || www.cobblestone.org Cobblestone School is unlike any other school in Rochester. Our teachers work with students to shape a curriculum that is dynamic, truly interdisciplinary, and rich both in creative expression and academic rigor, with dedicated faculty for math, literacy and Spanish. We educate children ages 4 through 12 (including full-day pre-K), in small classes, using authentic assessment instead of grades and standardized tests. This is independent, progressive education at its best.

Margaret’s House Child Care Center at RIT

112 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, 14623 475-5176, Voice/TTY www.rit.edu/studentaffairs/margaretshouse

Come to visit our center and see our excellent staff in action – a high quality fun-filled environment for children to learn and grow! Infants through preschool, a full-day Kindergarten, and innovative summer program activities for grades 1-4.


Educational Resources Guide St. Paul’s Child Care Center

13 Vick Park B, Rochester 14607 244-4527 www.stpaulschildcare.org St. Paul's offers children a rich environment for their first learning experiences. Our curriculum invites children to explore interests and experience new activities at all developmental levels. Our convenient location in the Neighborhood of the Arts provides children easy access to museums, parks and gardens. Visit us today!

100 Cobblestone Court Dr., Victor, NY 14564 402-8186 www.bestfootforwardkids.com We offer Dance, Music, Theater, and Themed Birthday Parties for kids, and Fitness classes for adults. Dance classes for age 2 and up include Creative Movement, Ballet, Tap, Jazz, & HipHop, Theater program with full scale performances, and music lessons in voice, piano, drum, & guitar. Sibling discounts available. Complete class information online!

PLUS... check our Education Guide as well as all our family focused directories online for more great resources and articles

www.RocParent.com for you 24/7! Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • November 2013

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Calendar november events Activities • Exhibits • Theater • Storytelling • Shows • Family Fun • Outdoor Adventures Parenting Programs • and lots more for families to do in & around Rochester!

//

Rochester Children's Book Festival

Nov 16

H

undreds of titles and 40+ authors and illustrators will be on hand at this Rochester Area Children's Writers and Illustrators Society event. Workshops, picture book readings, and programs for young readers of all ages will be presented.

Where: Monroe Community College, 1000 East Henrietta Rd. When: Saturday, November 16, 10am-4pm. For More Info: Visit www.rochesterchildrensbookfestival.com

sat

sun

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4th Annual Lots to the Tots Fundraiser Shop among 30 vendors, complimentary finger foods, desserts and coffee, available bar service and music by Jimmy C's Music Machine. Silent Auctions, Chinese Raffles, and Door Prizes. 100% of proceeds go to local Marines Toys for Tots 12-4pm. Lake Shore Country Club 1165 Greenleaf Rd Rochester, 14612. www.facebook.com/LotsToTheTots

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Tues

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Gilda's Club Heroes Ball

Thanksgiving Centerpiece

Celebrating the Power of Hope, Courage and Commitment. All fundraising efforts are to support the free programs for men, women, teens and children living with cancer in the Rochester community. 6pm. $175. RIT Inn and Conference Center, 5257 W Henrietta Rd, West Henrietta, 14586. www.gildasclubrochester.org

Jackie Enright of Enright Florist will teach you to make a beautiful centerpiece for your holiday table. Registration required. 6:308:30pm. $15 supply fee. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. Henrietta, 14467. www.hpl.org


calendar of events • local family-friendly activities calendar guide: December����������������54 Holiday Events ��������56 Ongoing������������������58

01 * Friday A Magical Journey Thru Stages presents Dr. Dolittle. The classic musical tale of a wacky but kind Doctor who can talk to animals. The show takes the audience on a journey from the small English village of Puddleby-in-the-Marsh to the far corners of the world. Rated G. 7:30pm. $13 Advance, $16 Day of Show. Stages, 875 East Main St, Auditorium Center, Third Floor, Rochester. www.mjtstages.com Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey® Presents: Dragons A once in a millennium event that honors The Year of the Dragon. Circus performers from the farthest reaches of the earth have assembled to showcase their astounding acts of bravery and astonishing athleticism. 7pm. $15-25. Blue Cross Arena, 1 War Memorial Square, Rochester. 1-800-745-3000. www.ringling.com RPO Presents: Disney’s Fantasia. Walt Disney’s timeless masterpiece is an extravaganza of sight and sound. See scenes from the classic 1940 animated film starring Mickey Mouse, in addition to its 2000 counterpart, with the music performed live. 8pm. Varies by seat. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 60 Gibbs St. Rochester. 274-1110. www.rpo.org

02 * Saturday A Magical Journey Thru Stages presents Dr. Dolittle. See Nov 1. 7:30pm. $13 Advance, $16 Day of Show. Stages, 875 East Main St, Auditorium Center, Third Floor, Rochester. www.mjtstages.com Animal Birthdays at the Zoo. Celebrate the birthday of your favorite zoo animals! “Happy Birthday” song & treats for the birthday animal, a docent-run touch table station. If you want to bring a gift see the website for ideas! Today’s Birthday: Polar bear, Aurora, Zero. 1-3pm. Included with admission. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St. 336-7123. www.senecaparkzoo.org Fall Family Day. See the woodcarvers at work, and then try making your own carved masterpiece. A variety of crafts and hands-on activities will examine the historical, scientific, and artistic qualities of wood and how it was transformed into carrousel animals. 12-4pm. $6. Herschell Carrousel Factory Museum, 180 Thompson St. North Tonawanda, 716-693-1885. www.carrouselmuseum.org

RCT Presents: Rapunzel. In this hilarious adventure, Princess Rapunzel may indeed find a way to escape the tower and take her rightful place on the throne, while discovering her inner strength. 11am & 2pm. $15-$18. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave, Rochester, NY 14618. www. rochesterchildrenstheatre.org, artscenter. naz.edu Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey® Presents: Dragons See Nov 1. 11am, 3pm & 7pm. $15-25. Blue Cross Arena, 1 War Memorial Square, Rochester, 1-800-745-3000. www.ringling.com RPO Presents: Disney’s Fantasia. See Nov 1. 8pm. Varies by seat. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 60 Gibbs St. Rochester. 274-1110. www.rpo.org FREE *Toddler Dance Party. Come and dance your sillies out. Toddlers and their caregivers will have a blast listening and dancing along to some of their favorite tunes. No registration. 10:1510:45am. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. www.hpl.org TYKE’S Theatre Presents: Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing. Meet nine-year-old Peter Hatcher, whose life would be perfect if it weren’t for Fudge, his impossible little brother. Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing is a hilarious look at family life and the troubles that can only be caused by a younger sibling. 2pm. $15. Hart Theater at the JCC, 1200 Edgewood Avenue, Rochester, 723-6080. www.tykestheatre.org TYKE’S Theatre Presents: Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing.Sensory Friendly. The beloved story brought to life, with modifications to make it sensory-friendly including: allowing kids to move around, lower volumes, Gluten-free snacks, two intermissions, a quiet room available during the performance and more. 4:30pm. $15 Hart Theater at the JCC, 1200 Edgewood Avenue, Rochester, 723-6080. www.tykestheatre.org

03 * Sunday A Magical Journey Thru Stages presents Dr. Dolittle. The classic musical tale of a wacky but kind Doctor who can talk to animals. The show takes the audience on a journey from the small English village of Puddlebyin-the-Marsh to the far corners of the world. Rated G. 4pm. $13 Advance, $16 Day of Show. Stages, 875 East Main St, Auditorium Center, Third Floor, Rochester. www.mjtstages.com Fall Foliage by Trolley and Train. Enjoy the beauty of Autumn in western New York State from the window of an authentic 80-year-old electric trolley car. Trolleys depart every half-hour no reservations are required. 11:30am. $5-$8. New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 East River Road, Rush, 533-1113. www.nymtmuseum.org

Sweet Creations George Eastman House November 13th-December 17th

Go Green Recycle Rally. Recycle larger items such as televisions, computers, monitors, DVD players, microwaves and video game systems. The Zoo will also be collecting clothing, shoes and bicycles. Please note: Batteries must be sealed in sealed Ziploc bags before depositing. 10am-3pm. All items free of charge to recycle. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St. Rochester. www.senecaparkzoo.org Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey® Presents: Dragons See Nov 1. 1 & 5pm. $15-25. Blue Cross Arena, 1 War Memorial Square, Rochester, 1-800-745-3000. www.ringling.com TYKE’S Theatre Presents: Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing. See Nov 2. 11am & 2pm. $15. Hart Theater at the JCC, 1200 Edgewood Avenue, Rochester, 723-6080. www.tykestheatre.org

04 * Monday Monday Kicks for Ages 2-6. Playful learning activities designed for 2- to 6-year-olds, one Monday a month. This month: Let’s Create! 10am-2pm. Free with admission. Ages: 2yrs-6yrs. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 263-2700. www.museumofplay.org FREE *Munchkin Monday Story Hour. Stories and crafts for children ages 2-5 with caregiver. 10:30-11:15am. Hamlin Public Library 422 Hamlin-Clarkson Townline Rd Hamlin, 14464. www.hamlinny.org

FREE *Teen Writing Group. Do you like to write? Have you been looking for a place to share your writing with other teens? Meet on the 1st & 3rd Monday each month to write, share, edit, and laugh. Please register. 5-6:30pm. Ages: 7-12 grade Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. www.hpl.org The Cheese Course. An educational evening of cheese and entertainment ideas. Learn about several intriguing cheeses that will be sure to get you ready for entertaining this holiday season. Call the library to register. 6:30-8:30pm. $2 supply fee. Wegmans Café, 745 Calkins Rd, Rochester, 14623. www.hpl.org

05 * Tuesday FREE *Open online Q&A with experts from Unity Diabetes Center. Today’s presenters: Karen Gessell, C.D.E, Unity Diabetes and Endocrinology Services, and Kelly Mueller, American Diabetes Association. 8pm. www.UnityDiabetesCommunity.com Evening Craft Series for Tweens. Craft: Pumpkin Wreath. This is a craft project that can be completed in the allotted time. All materials for the crafts will be provided free of charge. Class size is limited to 20 people, so register early. 6:30-7:30pm. Gates Public Library 902 Elmgrove Road, Rochester, 14624. 247-6446. www.gateslibrary.org FREE *Teen Advisory Board. Come and be a part of the Teen Advisory Board. Grades 7-12. No registration. 6-7pm. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. www.hpl.org

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calendar of events • local family-friendly activities

CHRISTMAS WITH SANTA AT SPRINGDALE FARM Visit with Santa and Mrs. Claus and the petting zoo, children’s holiday craft making and holiday music. Saturdays, Nov. 30, Dec. 7 & 14 with seatings at 9am, 10am, 11am and noon. Reservations required. 9am. $8. Springdale Farm, 700 Colby Street, Spencerport. www.springdalefarm.org

06 * Wednesday Dialogue on Acceptance. A New York Times national correspondent examines what it means to be normal in this thoughtful, personal and humorous memoir. The book also focuses on the scientific and legal issues related to gay teens and suicide risk. 7:30pm. $8 Members / $11 Non-Members. Hart Theater at the JCC, 1200 Edgewood Avenue, Rochester. www.rjbf.org

07 * Thursday Holiday Card Making. Learn how to make holiday cards. Make 3 cards using rubber stamps, fancy papers and embellishments. All supplies will be provided. Registration required. 6:30-8:30pm. $6 supply fee. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. www.hpl.org Howland’s Island Birding van tour. Hop in the van for an excursion to the Island’s birding hotspots where dozens of species of waterfowl, raptors, and songbirds can be seen and heard! Bring your camera and binoculars. 9am-12pm. $7.50/child; $12.50/adult, $35/ family. Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savanna, 13146. www.audubon.org

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National Toy Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony. The 2013 toy honorees are revealed at a public ceremony that takes place in the National Toy Hall of Fame. Nationally syndicated artist Leigh Rubin (Rubes) will unveil two cartoons in honor of the new inductees. 10:30am. Included with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. www.museumofplay.org FREE *Thursday Night Story Hour. Story and craft for children ages 5-10. 6:45-7:30pm. Hamlin Public Library 422 Hamlin Clarkson Townline Rd Hamlin, 14464. www. hamlinny.org/Library/programs.html

09 * Saturday Haudenosaunee Day. Celebrate Iroquois culture with artisans from the community. Learn about jewelry making, beading, and basket making. Hear storytellers, view artifacts rarely on display for the public. Learn firsthand about the tradition of making corn-husk dolls. 12-4pm. Included with museum admission. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. www.rmsc.org


calendar of events • local family-friendly activities Meet Rubes Creator, cartoonist Leigh Rubin. Meet nationally syndicated cartoonist Leigh Rubin, creator of Rubes cartoons, during the National Toy Hall of Fame Weekend Celebration. More than 50 hilarious Rubes cartoons with a focus on toys and play will be on display. 11am-4pm. Included with musuem admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. www.museumofplay.org National Toy Hall of Fame Celebration. A weekend of toy-filled revelry. Meet nationally syndicated cartoonist Leigh Rubin (Rubes) and check out his whimsical art inspired by toys in the Hall of Fame. Special 40-minute presentations in the museum theater. 11am & 2pm. Included with museum admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. www.museumofplay.org FREE *Preschool Science Time. Science- themed storytime. Read stories and do hands-on science activities! Registration required. 10:15-11am. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. www.hpl.org RCT Presents: Rapunzel. See Nov 2. 2pm. $15-$18. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave, Rochester, NY 14618. www.rochesterchildrenstheatre.org, artscenter.naz.edu FREE *Teen Volunteer Program. Do you have community service hours to complete? Register to come and help out at the library. Earn 2 hours towards your community service requirement. You must register in order to attend and earn the volunteer hours. 12-2pm. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. www.hpl.org TYKE’S Theatre Presents: Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing. See Nov 2. 2pm. $15. Hart Theater at the JCC, 1200 Edgewood Avenue, Rochester, 723-6080. www.tykestheatre.org

10 * Sunday Meet Rubes Creator, cartoonist Leigh Rubin. See Nov 9. 1-4pm. Included with musuem admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. www.museumofplay.org National Toy Hall of Fame Celebration. See Nov 9. 1 & 3pm. Included with museum admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. www.museumofplay.org RCT Presents: Rapunzel. See Nov 2. 2pm. $15-$18. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave, Rochester, NY 14618. www.rochesterchildrenstheatre.org, artscenter.naz.edu

TYKE’S Theatre Presents: Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing. See Nov 2. 11am & 2pm. $15. Hart Theater at the JCC, 1200 Edgewood Avenue, Rochester, 723-6080. www.tykestheatre.org

11 * Monday FREE *Men of Color, to Arm: Now or Never! The Call, Late but Critical. Review barriers that had to be overcome before men of color could be enlisted in the Civil War Union Army. Anecdotes and documents attributed to notables in Rochester and beyond will be included, as will the words of several soldiers. 7-8:30pm. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. www.hpl.org FREE *Wild Thing. A Wild Thing will be visiting the Library! Read Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak, make a craft, and get pictures taken with a Wild Thing! For all ages. Registration required. 10:30-11:15am. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. www.hpl.org

12 * Tuesday FREE *Lego Club. The library will provide the bricks and challenge participants to be as creative as possible. Registration required. 4:155pm. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7093. www.hpl.org

13 * Wednesday FREE *Books & Bites for Teens. A fun easy going book club just right for Summertime reading. For teens ages 12-up. Please register. 6:307:30pm. Great Northern Pizza 640 Jefferson Road Rochester. www.hpl.org

14 * Thursday FREE *Our Postal Heritage: Collecting, Researching & Preserving It. The program begins with the start of mail service during the pioneer era, then examines the expansion of the service including changes resulting from the development of new technologies and the expansion of the population. Registration required. 7-8:30pm. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. www.hpl.org

15 * Friday FREE *Shanghai Ballet: The Butterfly Lovers. The awardwinning Shanghai Ballet has mesmerized audiences around the world with its diverse repertoire of classical ballet, contemporary dance, and Chinese ballet for more than 30 years. 8pm. $50-65. Nazareth College Arts Center 4245 East Avenue, Rochester, 14618. www.artscenter.naz.edu

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calendar of events • local family-friendly activities A MAGICAL JOURNEY THRU STAGES PRESENTS DR. DOLITTLE

The classic musical tale of a wacky but kind doctor who can talk to animals. The show takes the audience on a journey from the small English village of Puddleby-in-the-Marsh to the far corners of the world. Rated G. Friday, November 1, 7:30pm; Saturday, November 2, 7:30pm; Sunday, November 3, 4pm. $13 advance, $16 day of show. Stages, 875 East Main St,, Auditorium Center, Third Floor, Rochester. www.mjtstages.com

16 * Saturday

17 * Sunday

Howland’s Island Birding van tour. See Nov 7. 1:30-4:30pm. $7.50/child; $12.50/adult, $35/family. Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savanna, 13146. www.audubon.org

FREE *4th Annual Lots to the Tots Fundraiser to benefit Toys for Tots. Shop among 30 vendors, complimentary finger foods, desserts and coffee, available bar service and music by Jimmy C’s Music Machine. Silent Auctions, Chinese Raffles,and Door Prizes. 100% of proceeds go to local Marines Toys for Tots. 12-4pm. Lake Shore Country Club 1165 Greenleaf Rd Rochester, 14612. www.facebook.com/LotsToTheTots

FREE *Rochester Children’s Book Festival Hundreds of titles and 40+ authors and illustrators will be on hand at this Rochester Area Children’s’ Writers and Illustrators Society event. Workshops, picture book readings, and programs for young readers of all ages will be presented. 10am-4pm. Monroe Community College, 1000 E. Henrietta Rd. Henrietta. www.rochesterchildrensbookfestival.com

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calendar of events • local family-friendly activities 18 * Monday Storytime Club. Readings of classic children’s tales. Have your Storytime Club passport stamped once during each visit. Collect five stamps and receive a free children’s book. This month: Playful Palettes. 10:30 & 11:30am. Included with museum admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 263-2700. www.museumofplay.org FREE *Teen Writing Group. Do you like to write? Have you been looking for a place to share your writing with other teens? Meet on the 1st & 3rd Monday each month to write, share, edit, and laugh. Please register. 5-6:30pm. Ages: 7-12 grade Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. www.hpl.org

19 * Tuesday Evening Craft Series for Tweens. Craft: Loopy Turkey. This is a craft project that can be completed in the allotted time. All materials for the crafts will be provided free of charge. Class size is limited to 20 people, so register early. 6:30-7:30pm. Gates Public Library 902 Elmgrove Road, Rochester, 14624. 247-6446 www.gateslibrary.org

20 * Wednesday FREE *American Girl Book Club. Kids ages 7-12 are invited to celebrate all things American Girl! Read an excerpt from one of the books, make a craft, and learn. Tonight’s girl is Caroline. Please register. 4:15-5pm. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. www.hpl.org

21 * Thursday Project FeederWatch. Participants will identify and count birds that visit feeders then submit their observations to help scientists monitor bird populations across the continent. Binoculars will be provided. 10am-12pm. $7/child. Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savanna, 13146. www.audubon.org FREE *Rochester’s Bird Lore. Stories about the ever changing bird life in our area, as habitat and climate change. Did you know cardinals were once a rarity here? Registration required. 7-8:30pm. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. www.hpl.org FREE *Tween Tech Lab. Toontastic! Use iPads to draw and narrate an animated story! Registration required. 4:15-5pm. Ages: 8-12yrs. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. www.hpl.org

22 * Friday Eastman School of Music Performance. Enjoy a 20-minute family concert and Q&A session with Eastman School of Music students. 6pm. Included with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester. www.museumofplay.org Project FeederWatch. See Nov 21. 10am-12pm or 1-3pm. $7/child. Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savanna, 13146. www.audubon.org

THE 7th ANNUAL MAD HATTERS TEA PARTY Presented by Rochester Childfirst Network, festivities include: A Fashion Show, Silent Auction, Great Raffles, Wine Pull, Door Prizes. Prizes for Best Hat. With antique and decorative teacups and unique tea pot centerpieces for sale. Sunday, November 24, 2-5pm. $45 The Country Club of Rochester, 2935 East Avenue, Rochester. www.rcn4kids.org

23 * Saturday Gilda’s Club Heroes Ball Celebrating the Power of Hope, Courage and Commitment. All fundraising efforts are to support the free programs for men, women, teens and children living with cancer in the Rochester community. 6pm. $175 RIT Inn and Conference Center, 5257 W Henrietta Rd, W. Henrietta, 14586. www.gildasclubrochester.org FREE *HFL’s Nordic Ski Swap and Sale. Used cross country equipment, demo equipment, and clothing will be available in the cafeteria. New Nordic equipment and clothing from ski shops around New York State will be available in the gym. 9am-2pm. Honeoye FallsLima Middle School 619 Quaker Meeting House Rd, Honeoye Falls, 14472. Literature Live: Brother Bear. Each Literature Live weekend offers the opportunity to meet, greet, and pose for photos with some of the most popular storybook characters of all time and enjoy related story readings. Meet Brother Bear from the Berenstain Bears. 10am-8pm. Free with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 2632700. www.museumofplay.org

Stories for Sheepdogs. Practice your reading with Emmie, the Shetland Sheepdog. No registration required. 10:30am. Irondequoit Public Library - Evans Branch 45 Cooper Road Rochester, 14617. www.libraryweb.org

24 * Sunday Literature Live: Brother Bear. Each Literature Live weekend offers the opportunity to meet, greet, and pose for photos with some of the most popular storybook characters of all time and enjoy related story readings. Meet Brother Bear from the Berenstain Bears. 1-4pm. Free with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 263-2700. www.museumofplay.org Rochester Childfirst Network Presents the 7th Annual Mad Hatters Tea Party. Festivities include: A Fashion show, Silent Auction, Great Raffles, Wine Pull, Door Prizes. Prizes for Best Hat - Winners will be chosen by secret roaming judges. With antique and decorative teacups and unique tea pot centerpieces for sale. 2-5pm. $45 The Country Club of Rochester, 2935 East Avenue, Rochester. www.rcn4kids.org

FREE *Turkey Classic 5-Mile Race and 1-Mile Family Fun Run Kids and parents, join in the 5-Mile/1-Mile TURKEY CLASSIC event. Celebrating their 30th year! Prizes, food and more. Call or go online for complete details and ask for Race Director Ryan McLean. 8-11am. Southeast Family YMCA 111 E. Jefferson Road, Pittsford. www.rochesterymca.org/turkeyclassic

25 * Monday FREE *PJ Storytime. This program will include stories, songs, fingerplays, and puppets. Kids are welcome to come in their PJ’s and bring a stuffed animal! For all ages. No registration required. 7-7:30pm. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. www.hpl.org Storytime Club. Readings of classic children’s tales. Have your Storytime Club passport stamped once during each visit. Collect five stamps and receive a free children’s book. This month: Playful Palettes. 10:30 & 11:30am. Included with museum admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 2632700. www.museumofplay.org

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calendar of events • local family-friendly activities

Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey® Presents: Dragons Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey® Presents: Dragons A once in a millennium event that honors The Year of the Dragon. Circus performers from the farthest reaches of the earth have assembled to showcase their astounding acts of bravery and astonishing athleticism. October 30-November 3rd. $25-$80. Blue Cross Arena, 1 War Memorial Square, Rochester. www.ringling.com

26 * Tuesday Thanksgiving Centerpiece. Jackie Enright of Enright Florist will teach you to make a beautiful centerpiece for your holiday table. Registration required. 6:30-8:30pm. $15 supply fee. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. www.hpl.org

27 * Wednesday

Please Note: Dates and times for all calendar and ongoing events are subject to change. Please call the numbers provided or visit their website to confirm event information.

To submit an event to our calendar

e-mail:

calendar@GVParent.com

NEW:  Submit your calendar events online at www.RocParent.com/calendar/calendar-submit All entries must be received by the 10th of the month prior to publication in order to be considered. Events printed as space permits.

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FREE *Teen Game Night- in the afternoon! Come and hang out with your friends at HPL’s monthly Teen Game Night. No registration. 4:30pm. Ages: 12yrs+. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. www. hpl.org

December 02 * Monday Storytime Club. Readings of classic children’s tales. Have your Storytime Club passport stamped once during each visit. Collect five stamps and receive a free children’s book. This month: Let It Snow. 10:30 & 11:30am. Included with museum admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 263-2700. www. museumofplay.org

07 * Saturday Howland’s Island Birding van tour. Hop in the van for an excursion to the Island’s birding hotspots where dozens of species of waterfowl, raptors, and songbirds can be seen and heard! Participants are encouraged to bring their camera and binoculars. 9am-12pm, $7.50/ child; $12.50/adult, $35/family. Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savanna, 13146. www.audubon.org Literature Live: Frosty the Snowman. Each Literature Live weekend offers the opportunity to meet, greet, and pose for photos with some of the most popular storybook characters of all time and enjoy related story readings. Meet Frosty the Snowman. 10am-8pm. Free with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 263-2700. www.museumofplay.org


calendar of events • local family-friendly activities 08 * Sunday

14 * Saturday

Literature Live: Frosty the Snowman. Each Literature Live weekend offers the opportunity to meet, greet, and pose for photos with some of the most popular storybook characters of all time and enjoy related story readings. Meet Frosty the Snowman. 1-4pm. Free with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 263-2700. www.museumofplay.org

Meet the Jolly Good Fellow. Meet the Jolly Good Fellow, the museum’s old-fashioned Santa, and tell him your holiday wishes. Also view an extremely rare, signed copy of the beloved Clement Moore poem, ‘A Visit from St. Nicholas.’ 10am-8pm. Included with general museum admission fees. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. www.museumofplay.org

09 * Monday Storytime Club. Readings of classic children’s tales. Have your Storytime Club passport stamped once during each visit. Collect five stamps and receive a free children’s book. This month: Let It Snow. 10:30 & 11:30am. Included with museum admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 263-2700. www.museumofplay.org

11 * Wednesday Roc the Day The Rochester community’s 24-hour giving extravaganza. Last year, more than 6,000 ROCstar donors gave over $875,000 to help local not-forprofits. All day. www.roctheday.org

RCT Presents: The Wizard of Oz. The classic tale that inspired countless productions comes to life in this delightful musical about how magical friendship can be and how wonderful it is to return home. 2pm. $17-$20. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave, Rochester, 14618. www.rochesterchildrenstheatre.org, artscenter.naz.edu

RCT PRESENTS: RAPUNZEL

15 * Sunday Meet the Jolly Good Fellow. See Dec 14. 12-5pm. Included with general museum admission fees. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. www.museumofplay.org

In this hilarious adventure, Princess Rapunzel may indeed find a way to escape the tower and take her rightful place on the throne, while discovering her inner strength. November 2,11am & 2pm; November 9, 2pm; November 10, 2pm. w$15-$18. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave, Rochester, NY 14618. www.rochesterchildrenstheatre.org, artscenter.naz.edu

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holiday events TT T

A Christmas Carol Friday November 27 - December 28 Geva Theatre Presents: A Christmas Carol On Christmas Eve, Scrooge is visited by a series of ghosts who remind him who he was and what he might yet become. The famous tale of redemption for the most despised man in London will awaken your heart and rekindle your spirit. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Rochester. 232-1366. www.gevatheatre.org

November

& Carriage House, 295 N. Main St., Canandaigua. www. canandaiguachristkindlmarket.com

02 * Saturday

Festival of Trees opens. See theme-decorated trees, wreaths, and holiday décor items on display in the Granger Homestead & Carriage Museum. Continues through Dec. 8. 1-7pm. $1-$5. Granger Homestead & Carriage House, 295 N. Main St., Canandaigua. www.grangerhomestead.org

Christkindl Market Dinner Dance. Dance the night away at this fantastic event. A great way to kick off your holiday season with a lovely dinner, and music from Nik and the Nice Guys. Registration is required. 5:30pm. $30 per person. Granger Homestead & Carriage House, 295 N. Main St., Canandaigua. www. canandaiguachristkindlmarket.com FREE *Labors of Love Craft and Food Fair. Proceeds will benefit Bivona Child Advocacy Center. Offerings will include holiday & seasonal items, a variety of handmade crafts, jewelry & baked goods. A lunch of homemade soups, sandwiches, and quiches is also available. 9:30am-4pm. Atonement Lutheran Church, 1900 Westfall Rd, Brighton, 14618. www.atonementrochester.org

08 * Friday Christkindl Market. The Christkindl Market is a Europeaninspired, weekend-long holiday craft show with over 130 venders. Carriage rides, visit with St. Nick, Elf School for children, live entertainment, and peruse holidaythemed displays. 10am-6pm. $6, children 12 and under are free. Granger Homestead

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09 * Saturday Christkindl Market. See Nov 8. 10am-6pm. Granger Homestead & Carriage House, 295 N. Main St., Canandaigua. www. canandaiguachristkindlmarket.com FREE *Santa Arrives at Eastview. Children of all ages will enjoy welcoming Santa he arrives in a limo and be part of the parade around the mall. Free carousel rides with Santa as part of the event! Main entrance by Pottery Barn. 11am. Eastview Mall, 7979 Pittsford Victor Rd, Victor. www.eastviewmall.com

10 * Sunday Christkindl Market. See Nov 8. 10am-6pm. Granger Homestead & Carriage House, 295 N. Main St., Canandaigua. www. canandaiguachristkindlmarket.com

Holly Trolley Rides. Santa may still use reindeer power, but museum visitors can enjoy a ride on an authentic 80 year-old electric trolley car. 10:30am-4pm. $5 adult, $4 child. New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 E. River Road, Rush, 533-1113. www.nymtmuseum.org

13 * Wednesday Sweet Creations- Opening Day. The Eastman House’s 17th annual gingerbread house exhibition. Continues through Dec. 17th. 10am-5pm. Free with admission. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave., Rochester. www.eastmanhouse.org

17 * Sunday Holiday Laser Show opens. This all-music show brings you favorite holiday songs back-to-back, choreographed with dancing laser light against the starry background of the planetarium sky. Runs through Jan. 4- see website for full schedule. 3pm. $6-$7. RMSC Strasenburgh Planetarium, 657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. www.rmsc.org Holly Trolley Rides. See Nov 10. 10:30am-4pm. New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 East River Road, Rush, 533-1113. www.nymtmuseum.org

22 * Friday Holiday Bazaar Arts & Crafts Sale. Over 200 elite, fine artists and craftspeople. A spectacular variety of

creative, unique items such as ceramics, jewelry, glass, woodwork, photography, painting, printmaking, sculpture, fiber arts and floral crafts. 5-9pm. $5-$7. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. www.rmsc.org

23 * Saturday Holiday Bazaar Arts & Crafts Sale. See Nov 22. 9:30am-5pm. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. www.rmsc.org Medina Railroad: Polar Express. A trip to the North Pole, complete with cocoa and cookies served on board the train. Santa will greet the children. Departure Times: 2:15, 3:30, 4:45 & 6pm. 2:15pm. $23-$45. Medina Railroad Museum, 530 West Ave., Medina. 798-6106. www.railroadmuseum.net

24 * Sunday Holiday Bazaar Arts & Crafts Sale. See Nov 22. 11am-4pm. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. www.rmsc.org Holly Trolley Rides. See Nov 10. 10:30am-4pm. New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 E. River Road, Rush, 533-1113. www.nymtmuseum.org Medina Railroad: Polar Express. See Nov 23. 2:15pm. Medina Railroad Museum, 530 West Ave., Medina. 7986106.


calendar of events • local family-friendly activities Turkey Classic. A 1-mile family run, then a 5 mile race. Afterward, enjoy an awards ceremony, preThanksgiving feast and festivities. Proceeds benefit the Southeast YMCA Invest in Youth Campaign. Registration is required. Child care available. 7am. $10-$33. Southeast Family YMCA, 111 E. Jefferson Rd, Pittsford. www.rochesterymca.org/ southeast

27 * Wednesday GEVA Presents: A Christmas Carol. Opening day. On Christmas Eve, Scrooge is visited by a series of ghosts who remind him who he was and what he might yet become. Continues through Dec. 28. 7:30pm. Ticket price varies. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Rochester. www.gevatheatre.org

29 * Friday Crafts for Kids. Try your hand at crafts from different decades of the Herschell companies’ history, from the Victorian period through the 1950s. 12-4pm. Included with admission. Herschell Carrousel Factory Museum, 180 Thompson St. N. Tonawanda. www.carrouselmuseum.org Holiday Festival of Crafts. Presented by The Rochester Folk Art Guild. Crafts, gifts and more all under one roof and just in time for the holidays. 10am-5pm. $2. The Harley School, 1981 Clover St., Rochester. www.folkartguild.org Holiday Kick-Off Celebration. Kick off the holiday season on Thanksgiving weekend. Christmas decorations are up and special activities officially launch us into the Christmas season. There’s something for all ages during this festive weekend! 12-4pm. Free with admission. Herschell Carrousel Factory Museum, 180 Thompson St. N. Tonawanda. www.carrouselmuseum.org Holiday Tour. Learn about changes in American holiday traditions from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries with themed trees and hands-on objects in this special tour. 1pm. Included with paid admission. Herschell Carrousel Factory Museum, 180 Thompson St. N. Tonawanda. www.carrouselmuseum.org The Nutcracker. Join the Rochester City Ballet and the RPO, along with the Bach Children’s Chorus, for Rochester’s only fulllength, live-music performance of an enchanting classic. It’s a dazzling, heartwarming spectacle that will leave all ages delighted. 2pm & 7pm. $10$89. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 60 Gibbs St., Rochester. www.rpo.org

30 * Saturday Christmas with Santa at Springdale Farm. Visit with Santa and Mrs. Claus and the petting zoo, children’s holiday craft making and holiday music. Seatings at 9am, 10am, 11am & noon. Reservations required. 9am. $8. Springdale Farm, 700 Colby St, Spencerport. www.springdalefarm.org Holiday Festival of Crafts. See Nov 29. 11am-5pm. The Harley School, 1981 Clover St., Rochester. www.folkartguild.org Holiday Kick-Off Celebration. See Nov 29. 12-4pm. Herschell Carrousel Factory Museum, 180 Thompson St. N. Tonawanda. www.carrouselmuseum.org Holly Trolley Rides. See Nov 10. 10:30am-4pm. New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 E. River Road, Rush. 533-1113. www.nymtmuseum.org Medina Railroad: Polar Express. See Nov 23. 2:15pm. Medina Railroad Museum, 530 West Ave., Medina. 798-6106. www.railroadmuseum.net Santa on the Carrousel. Start the day off with lunch at 11am, where you can visit with Santa and make sure he got your letters. Fun, festive crafts and games, hot chocolate and treats, and plenty of opportunity to ride the carrousel. Reservations required for lunch. 11am-3pm. $6 or $10 with lunch. Herschell Carrousel Factory Museum, 180 Thompson St. N. Tonawanda. www.carrouselmuseum.org The Nutcracker. See Nov 29. 2pm & 7pm. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 60 Gibbs St., Rochester. www.rpo.org

December

FREE *Holidays at the Market. The largest selection of holiday trees and fresh decorations in WNY. Free horse-drawn sleigh rides. Excellent gift shopping for unique holiday gifts from around the world. 9am-3pm. Rochester Public Market, 280 N. Union St. www.cityofrochester.gov Holly Trolley Rides. Santa may still use reindeer power, but museum visitors can enjoy a ride on an authentic 80 year-old electric trolley car. 10:30am-4pm. $5 adult, $4 child. New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 E. River Road, Rush, 533-1113. www.nymtmuseum.org Medina Railroad: Polar Express. A trip to the North Pole, complete with cocoa and cookies served on board the train. Santa will greet the children. Departure Times: 2:15, 3:30, 4:45 & 6pm. 2:15pm. $23-$45. Medina Railroad Museum, 530 West Ave., Medina. 798-6106. www.railroadmuseum.net The Nutcracker. Join the Rochester City Ballet and the RPO, along with the Bach Children’s Chorus, for Rochester’s only fulllength, live-music performance of an enchanting classic. It’s a dazzling, heartwarming spectacle that will leave all ages delighted. 2pm & 7pm. $10$89. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 60 Gibbs St., Rochester. www.rpo.org

03 * Tuesday FREE *Pittsford Candlelight Night. Share the warmth of the holiday season throughout the Village of Pittsford. Shopping, caroling, and holiday treats are features during this event as well as beautiful storefronts, traditional tree lightings, luminaries, and wagon rides! 4-9pm. Municipal parking lot, behind Pittsford Library Main Street. www.townofpittsford.org

05 * Thursday

01 * Sunday FREE *6th Annual Public Menorah Lighting. Participants will carry on the tradition of Tikkun Olam, “repairing the world”, by donating canned food which will be made into a giant menorah and then donated to the Pittsford Food Cupboard. 5pm. Four corners in Pittsford Village. 385-4368. www.jewishpittsfordcom.clhosting.org Holiday Kick-Off Celebration. See Nov 29. 12-4pm. Herschell Carrousel Factory Museum, 180 Thompson St. North Tonawanda. www.carrouselmuseum.org Holiday Tour. Learn about changes in holiday traditions from the 19th & 20th centuries with themed trees and hands-on objects in this tour. 1pm. Included with admission. Herschell Carrousel Factory Museum, 180 Thompson St. North Tonawanda. www.carrouselmuseum.org

Park Avenue Holiday Open House. 20th Annual Open House, includes performances of holiday music, horse-drawn wagon rides, hot roasted chestnuts, holiday characters, and Santa Claus arriving by horsedrawn wagon for the Opening Ceremony to light the Christmas tree. 5-9pm. Park Ave, from Alexander St to Culver Rd. www.park-avenue.org

06 * Friday FREE *Festival of Lights. Cherished tradition continues with horse drawn wagon rides, Santa Claus, treats from merchants, performance by Midlakes students & Dickens Carolers, shopping specials, street vendors and more! 5-8pm. Historic Downtown, Clifton Springs. www.cliftonspringschamber.com

Living Nativity. See an outdoor dramatic presentation of the very first Christmas. Carol singing around the shepherd’s campfire at 8:30. In addition to the live outdoor scenes there will be refreshments, games, crafts and more fun for all ages indoors. 6-9pm. Crossroads Community Church, 1188 Jackson Rd, Webster. www.crossroadscommunity-church.org Yuletide in the Country. Journey back through time on a guided tour of the historic village to meet characters from the past as they celebrate Christmas. Reservations required. 5-8:30pm. $18-$22. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd., Mumford. www.gcv.org

07 * Saturday Christmas Around the World on the Lake Ontario Wine Trail Travel the Lake Ontario Wine Trail to experience Christmas Around the World. Stops along the trail and each will feature food and/or wine pairings from different countries. 11am-5pm. $10/person or 2/$15. Lake Ontario Wine Trail. www. lakeontariowinetrail.com Christmas with Santa at Springdale Farm. Visit with Santa and Mrs. Claus and the petting zoo, children’s holiday craft making and holiday music. Seatings at 9am, 10am, 11am and noon. Reservations required. 9am. $8. Springdale Farm, 700 Colby St, Spencerport. www.springdalefarm.org Create a Critter. Make great gifts or ornaments using natural materials (nuts, seeds, twigs, bark, pinecones, etc.) collected at the Genesee County Park & Forest. No experience necessary - only your imagination. Pre-registration is Required. 10am-12pm. $5/One adult and one child ($3/ additional child). Genesee County Park & Forest Nature Center, 11095 Bethany Center Rd., E. Bethany. www.co.genesee.ny.us Holly Trolley Rides. See Dec 1. 10:30am-4pm. $5 adult, $4 child. New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 E. River Road, Rush, 533-1113. www.nymtmuseum.org Medina Railroad: Polar Express. See Dec 1. 2:15pm. Medina Railroad Museum, 530 West Ave., Medina. 798-6106. www.railroadmuseum.net FREE *One Stop Christmas Shop. Vendor/Crafter event to Benefit CURE Childhood Cancer Association. There will be vendors, crafters, snacks and a Chinese auction. 9:30am-3:30pm. Moose Lodge, 5375 W. Henrietta Rd., Rochester, 14586.

more holiday events >>

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calendar of events • local family-friendly activities

Ongoing events & exhibits Grand Canyon Adventure: River AT RISK @ RMSC Grand Canyon Adventure: River at Risk combines exhilarating river-rafting action, the grandeur of the Grand Canyon, and family fun to tell an engaging story of people making a difference. Earth is running out of clean, fresh water so fast that the United Nations estimates that 40 percent of the world could face life-threatening shortages by 2050. Narrated by Robert Redford. Runtime: 50 mins, suitable for all ages. Now playing at the Rochester Museum and Science Center Strasenburgh Planetarium, 657 East Avenue, Rochester. See website or call for daily Admission: $7/adults, $6/seniors and college students with ID, $6/children and teens (ages 3–18) and $3/RMSC members. For more info visit www.rmsc.org or call 271 4320.

STRASENBURGH PLANETARIUM

ROCHESTER MUSEUM & SCIENCE CENTER

657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. 271-1880. www.rmsc.org/ StrasenburghPlanetarium/ Check website or call for prices and hours

657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. 271-1880. www.rmsc.org Check website or call for prices and hours

MY PLANETS. For children ages 3-5 and the adults with them, this friendly introduction to the planetarium features worlds in our solar system. Saturdays at 10am. $8. Ages: 3-5yrs. Ends Aug 31.

ADVENTURE ZONE. Dive to the bottom of Lake Ontario in the Deep Submergence Vehicle simulator. Experiment with wind currents, stream erosion, and more.

SATURDAY NIGHT LASER SHOW. Intensely colored beams from argon and krypton lasers fill the planetarium dome with dazzling color patterns that spontaneously dance to classic rock music. Shows change monthly. 9:30pm. $9-$10. Ages: 5+.

AT THE WESTERN DOOR. The hundreds of objects displayed show the Seneca’s and Haudenosaunee’s creative response to new technologies and materials introduced following European Contact.

SATURDAY SUN, MOON AND STARS. This relaxed, enjoyable family show presents prominent constellations and takes the audience on a quick trip to the moon. Show Times: confirm at rmsc.org. $8-$10.

DISCOVER OUR WEATHER. Make a cloud, measure the wind, and marvel at the power of lightning!

AMAZING JOURNEYS. Embarking on impressive treks across thousands of miles, the creatures featured in the film exemplify astonishing feats of stamina and perseverance in their efforts to ensure survival of their offspring. See website for full details. $3-7.

Energize it. What powers our bodies, cities and planet, and is neither created nor destroyed? ENERGY. ENERGIZE it brings you through a multi-sensory, highly physical experience where YOU hold the power! EXPEDITION EARTH. Explore your connections to the natural world in this interactive natural science exhibition. FLIGHT TO FREEDOM. Rochester’s Underground Railroad. Explore stories of courageous African Americans who traveled through Rochester on their way from slavery to freedom.

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HOW THINGS WORK. Through fun, hands-on investigation, find out how mechanisms such as light switches, thermostats, and traffic signals work. K’NEX. Be an engineer! Build trucks, towers- anything you can imagine with this colorful construction toy. RACEWAYS. Experiment with momentum, friction, gravity, and acceleration as you send wooden balls looping and racing over ramps. KEVA Planks. Construct your own wooden masterpiece with KEVA Planks--identical, stackable construction blocks. Blending science with art, KEVA planks bring out the designer, architect and engineer in each of us. LIGHT HERE-LIGHT NOW. Have hands-on fun with light, color, & optics with mirrors, lenses & lasers.

National Museum of Play at The Strong One Manhattan Sq., Rochester 14607. 263-2700 or TDD 423-0746, www.museumofplay.org Check website or call for prices and hours GAME TIME! Move like a piece on a giant game board through three centuries of American games, puzzles, and public amusements.

American Comic Book Heroes: The Battle of Good vs. Evil. Climb up the side of a building, make your own cape, test your superhero skills, pose for pictures with Spiderman and learn more about your favorite comic book hero. NATIONAL TOY HALL OF FAME. The prestigious hall features historic examples of toy inductees and play stations. Berenstain Bears: Down a Sunny Dirt Road. Step into the playful world of the Berenstain’s including Main St, Bear Country School, Brother & Sister Bear’s Club Houses, and the Family Tree House. Can You Tell Me How to Get to Sesame Street? See yourself on TV with the Muppets, drive Elmo around Sesame Street in a big yellow taxicab, sell movie tickets at the Circle in the Square Cinema ticket booth, and more. Dancing Wings Butterfly Garden®. The team has raised the bar by introducing a variety of birds and animals into the garden to create a lively ecosystem that they have dubbed “butterfly garden 2.0.” eGameRevolution. An original, highly interactive exhibit that explores the history of video games and their impact on the way we play, learn, and relate to each other. One History Place. Amid original artifacts and reproductions, children explore mini-environments and get a taste of life as it was a century ago.


calendar of events • local family-friendly activities READING ADVENTURELAND. Step into a life-sized pop-up book and follow the Yellow Brick Road into five literary landscapes from children’s books. Super Kids Market. Cruise the aisles and fill your cart with a selection of colorful produce that looks so real, you can almost taste it. Departments are filled with highly interactive stations for dramatic role-playing. THE ELAINE WILSON AND STRONG EXPRESS TRAIN. Experience the thrill of old-fashioned train travel as the mini locomotive chugs down the track surrounded by scenic postcards from across America.

OTHER AREA ATTRACTIONS CUMMING NATURE CENTER: A 900acre preserve located 40 minutes south of Rochester. $3 per person/$10 family. 6472 Gulick Rd., Naples. 374-6160, www.rmsc.org WHEM ANKH: THE CIRCLE OF LIFE IN ANCIENT EGYPT. Travel back into the past at a time when everything from birth to death revolved around the seasons and the river of life - the Nile. The Buffalo Museum of Science, 1020 Humboldt Pkwy, Buffalo. 716-896-5200 www.sciencebuff.org Cultures for Kids. Learn about kids from all over the world. $5. Explore & More children’s museum, 300 Gleed Ave., E. Aurora. 716-655-513. www.exploreandmore.org Tour the Riedman Robotic Milking Center. Tours available MonSat 11am-2pm. $2-$3. Springdale Farm, 700 Colby Street, Spencerport. 349-2090 www.heritagechristianservices.org The Herschell Carrousel Factory Museum. Operates two historic carousels. 180 Thompson St., North Tonawanda, 14120. 716-693-1885 www.carrouselmuseum.org A Step Into Africa. This state of the art exhibit, focusing on the Ngorongoro Crater region of Tanzania, is the only one of its kind in the country. Included with admission. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St, Rochester, 14621. 336-7200. www.senecaparkzoo.org Genesee Country Village & Museum. Meet and chat with the village potter, storekeeper, printer, tinsmith and blacksmith. Speak with re-enactors and townsfolk about the clothing styles of the period and visit select pieces from the museum’s historic clothing collection. 1410 Flint Hill Rd., Mumford. 538.6822. www.gcv.org. Corn Hill Navigation. All aboard the Sam Patch & Mary Jemison! These authentic tour boats embark from Pittsford and Rochester, and provide unparalleled opportunities to experience history and enjoy relaxing getaways that showcase the beauty and ingenuity of America’s celebrated Erie Canal. For details please call 585-662-5748 or visit www.SamandMary.org.

T additional holiday events

Santa on the Carrousel. Join St. Nick on the carrousel. Start off with lunch at 11am, where you can visit with Santa and make sure he got your letters. Then there will be lots of fun, festive crafts and games and more. Lunch price includes all activities. 11am-3pm. $10 per person with lunch; $6 per person for activities only. Herschell Carrousel Factory Museum, 180 Thompson St. North Tonawanda. www.carrouselmuseum.org Yuletide in the Country. See Dec 6. 1:15-7:45pm. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd., Mumford. www.gcv.org

08 * Sunday Christmas Around the World on the Lake Ontario Wine Trail See Dec 7. 11am-5pm. Lake Ontario Wine Trail. www.lakeontariowinetrail. com FREE *Holidays at the Market. See Dec 1. 9am-3pm. Rochester Public Market, 280 N. Union St. www.cityofrochester.gov Holly Trolley Rides. See Dec 1. 10:30am-4pm. New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 E. River Road, Rush, 533-1113. www.nymtmuseum.org Medina Railroad: Polar Express. See Dec 1. 2:15pm. Medina Railroad Museum, 530 West Ave., Medina. 798-6106. www.railroadmuseum.net Yuletide in the Country. See Dec 6. 5-8:30pm. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd., Mumford. www.gcv.org

10 * Tuesday RBTL Presents: Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas. Max the Dog narrates as the mean and scheming Grinch, whose heart is two sizes too small, decides to steal Christmas away from the holiday loving Whos. Featuring songs from the original animated series. 7:30pm. $30-60. Auditorium Theatre, 885 E. Main St., Rochester. www.rbtl.org

11 * Wednesday RBTL Presents: Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas. See Dec 10. 7:30pm. Auditorium Theatre, 885 E. Main St., Rochester. www.rbtl.org

12 * Thursday RBTL Presents: Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas. See Dec 10. 7:30pm. Auditorium Theatre, 885 E. Main St., Rochester. www.rbtl.org

13 * Friday RBTL Presents: Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas. See Dec 10. 8pm. Auditorium Theatre, 885 East Main St., Rochester. www.rbtl.org Stages Presents: It’s A Wonderful Life. This dramatization of the classic story not only celebrates the faith of the season, it also celebrates the American philosophy of life: hard work, fair play and the love and support of one’s family and community will be rewarded. 7:30pm. $13/advance, $16/ door. Stages, 875 E. Main St, Auditorium Center, Third Floor, Rochester. www.mjtstages.com Yuletide in the Country. See Dec 6. 1:15-7:45pm. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd., Mumford. www.gcv.org

14 * Saturday Breakfast with Santa at the Zoo. When you arrive, take a “sleigh” ride via golf cart to the Rocky Coasts Gallery. There, you will gather for a hot breakfast buffet and say hello to our polar bears and sea lions. Seatings at 8:30, 10 & 11am. Reservations required. $12 for adults; $8 for youth (ages 3-11); $3 for children 2 and younger. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St., Rochester. www.senecaparkzoo.org Christmas with Santa at Springdale Farm. See Dec 7. 9am. Springdale Farm, 700 Colby Street, Spencerport. www.springdalefarm.org Holly Trolley Rides. See Dec 1. 10:30am-4pm. New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 E. River Road, Rush, 533-1113. www.nymtmuseum.org Medina Railroad: Polar Express. See Dec 1. 2:15pm. Medina Railroad Museum, 530 West Ave., Medina. 798-6106. www.railroadmuseum.net

Santa on the Carrousel. See Dec 7. 11am-3pm. Herschell Carrousel Factory Museum, 180 Thompson St. North Tonawanda. www.carrouselmuseum.org Stages Presents: It’s A Wonderful Life. See Dec 13. 2 & 7:30pm. Stages, 875 East Main St, Auditorium Center, Third Floor, Rochester. www.mjtstages.com Yuletide in the Country. See Dec 6. 1:15-7:30pm. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd., Mumford. www.gcv. org

15 * Sunday Breakfast with Santa at the Zoo. See Dec 14. 8:30, 10 & 11am. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St., Rochester. www.senecaparkzoo.org Breakfast with Santa. Join Santa for a delicious healthy breakfast: Pancakes, Eggs, Toast , Bacon, Ham, Juices, Coffee. Reservations Required. 9-11:30am. Children $7, Adults $12. Mooseberry Café & Soap Co, 2555 Baird Rd, Penfield. 3489022. www.mooseberrysoap.com FREE *Holidays at the Market. See Dec 1. 9am-3pm. Rochester Public Market, 280 N. Union St. www.cityofrochester.gov Holly Trolley Rides. See Dec 1. 10:30am-4pm. New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 E. River Rd, Rush, 533-1113. www.nymtmuseum.org Medina Railroad: Polar Express. See Dec 1. 2:15pm. Medina Railroad Museum, 530 West Ave., Medina. 798-6106. www.railroadmuseum.net RBTL Presents: Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas. See Dec 10. 1 & 6:30pm. Auditorium Theatre, 885 E. Main St., Rochester. www.rbtl.org Stages Presents: It’s A Wonderful Life. See Dec 13. 2pm. Stages, 875 E. Main St, Auditorium Center, Third Floor, Rochester. www.mjtstages.com Yuletide in the Country. See Dec 6. 5-8:30pm. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd., Mumford. www.gcv.org

RBTL Presents: Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas. See Dec 10. 2 & 8pm. Auditorium Theatre, 885 E. Main St., Rochester. www.rbtl.org

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • November 2013

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Party Planner – Everything to get the party started!

2/15/13

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Diamonds Limo Presents “Pizza By Limo”

Featuring Mark’s Pizzeria receive a 2-hr limo cruise, stop at a point of interest, a 2-liter of Pepsi and the best pizza in town! Only $99! (Sunday-Thursday)

www.diamondslimo.com

533.9050

Fri. & Sat. packages, larger limos, and service outside of Monroe County are available at an additional charge.

Are you planning

a party? check our party & celebration guide and articles online for great party ideas!

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • November 2013

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Genesee Valley Parent Nov 2013