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Inside

May

Vol.19 Number 5

in this issue 6 GVParent.com

On the Web in May

8 Editor’s Note 10 Short Takes

Reviews & News

28 Book Nook Teen Reads

30 Your Family –

ACTIVITIES

Simple Activities to Celebrate Mom

32 Try This!

Slow Cookin’

34 Parenting –

TEENS &

TWEENS

Role Reversal: Teens as Caregivers

48 Calendar of Events • • • •

Family-Friendly Events Support Groups & Clubs Library Programs Ongoing Events & Exhibits

62 Out & About Highland Park

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Mom-trepreneurs

HOW TWO LOCAL MOMS TURNED THEIR CREATIVE IDEAS INTO LOCAL BUSINESSES

more feature articles

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The Power of Support

LOCAL MOMS FIND FRIENDSHIP & SUPPORT IN AREA MOMS’ GROUPS

A Different Kind of Pomp & Circumstance HOW AREA HOME-SCHOOLED STUDENTS CELEBRATE THE CULMINATION OF HIGH SCHOOL

Reality Check

WHAT IS REALITY TELEVISION TEACHING OUR YOUNG GIRLS?

on the cover

38-47

The power of support 12 Home-school graduations 16 Slow cookin’ 32

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION:

Celebrate mom! 12, 20 & 34 Annual child care guide 38-47

annual child care guide

Mom biz 20 Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • May 2012

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[ what’s online]

May 2012

What you will find at www.GVParent.com this month! Giveaways

This month you'll have opportunities to win tickets to the Rochester Red Wings, books celebrating Spring, Speech and Hearing Awareness month, and Memorial Day, and one of three Strawberry Shortcake DVD's.

Online Only Editorial WHO'S WHO IN SUPPORT GROUPS — As the famous African proverb states, "It takes a village to raise a child" and it's important to know that you're not alone on your parenting journey. Learn about the many support groups in our area that can help you navigate through the parenting process, from the everyday questions to the toughest problems, there is help available. Find your local chapters, see when they meet and what you need to know to join up!

What's Cookin'

We have all new yummy and fun recipes you and your kids can enjoy making and eating! Check out the Butterfly sandwich recipe – sure to float right off the plates of even the pickiest eaters!

PLUS: One lucky winner will win tickets to the upcoming American Idol tour in Rochester! Enter to win at www.gvparent.com/giveaways

VOTE ONLINE FOR FAMILY FAVORITES —

It's time once again for the annual GVP Family Favorites! Take a few minutes to cast your vote and let the Rochester community know who your family thinks is the best of the best in a variety of categories. For instructions and ballot go to www.gvparent.com/favorites

Win a Family Stay-cation package!

With gas prices steadily rising, once again many families are canceling their summer travel plans in favor of staying in Rochester, but that doesn't mean you can't still have a memorable vacation. We're going to give one lucky family a summer to remember with a Rochester Stay-cation package! It includes family 4 packs of tickets to a Red Wings game, Seabreeze Amusement Park, the National Museum of Play at the Strong, Roseland Water Park, the Rochester Museum and Science Center and a $50 gift card to Wendy's! All you have to do is join our online Scavenger Hunt: find the hidden campfire somewhere in our Virtual Camp Fair pages and click on it to enter. Visit www.gvparent.com for details. Contest ends May 31st.

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Find more recipes in our Family Kitchen section, www.gvparent.com/familykitchen

Online Poll

We asked area parents "Is your family a Green Family? What type of Green are you?” Here are the results. 45% We do a few things regularly, but could do more. 36% We do it ALL! From recycling, reusable bags, and more! 14% We try to do stuff, but need to do a lot more. 5% Has not been a priority but need to start focusing! Current Parent Poll: When it comes to gardening, what shade of green are your thumbs? Add your response at www.gvparent.com


Now even more ways to connect: Print, Website, Events, Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube and Twitter

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • May 2012

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[ editor’s note]

By Jillian Melnyk

This month's issue features my attempt at cooking with a slow cooker/crock pot for more than two weeks straight for every dinner. Here I am with my trusty friend. Read about it on page 32.

Staff PUBLISHER Barbara Melnyk mail@gvparent.com EDITOR Jillian Melnyk editor@gvparent.com COMMUNITY EDITOR Natalee Kiesling Natalee@gvparent.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Cynthia Goldberg CynthiaG@gvparent.com Natalee Kielsling

M

ay is the month of flowers, and for us Rochester folks, the first month that it really starts to feel like spring. It's also the month we honor mothers. (Though don't we really honor Mom all year long?)

This month's issue is loaded up with wonderful momcentric content including the stories of two local momtrepreneurs who turned their unique ideas into local businesses. One of the moms we feature is Jessica Stadt-Toner who wanted to treat her family to something tasty, yet wholesome, which inspired her to start her own traveling snow cone business. With all of the negative press about artificial ingredients, I can

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identify with Jessica's desire to avoid preservatives in favor of natural backyardgrown ingredients. I actually plan to do the same this summer (not in the form of snow cones) but in making my own homemade salsa, jam, and tomato sauce from my backyard garden and fresh, organic farm market bounty for friends and family to enjoy.

based articles like information about joining area support groups and moms' clubs and fun activities to get out and celebrate mom's special day. Have a fantastic mother's day!

In this month's issue you'll also find other great mom-

WHAT’S ON YOUR MIND? I WOULD LOVE TO HEAR FROM YOU! SEND ME AN EMAIL TO EDITOR@GVPARENT.COM

www.GVParent.com

MAGAZINE LAYOUT & DESIGN Jillian Melnyk graphics@gvparent.com CALENDAR EDITOR calendar@gvparent.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS John Boccacino, Sue Henninger, Angela Cannon-Crothers, Julia Garstecki, Sinea Pies, Myrna Beth Haskell Basic subscription rate: $25/year. Send subscription inquiries and changes to address below. Copyright 2012, by GVP, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. Distribution of this magazine does not necessarily constitute an endorsement or necessarily reflect the opinions of this publication.

Genesee Valley Parent Magazine 266 Alexander Street, Rochester, NY 14607 p: 585-287-5330 f: 585-287-5344 www.gvparent.com

MEMBER OF PARENTING MEDIA ASSOCIATION


Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • May 2012

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[short takes ]

roc’-in mom style goodies for mom handmade in rochester

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1 Natural mineral eye shadows in gorgeous spring and summer hues are perfect for adorning your lids day and night.

TO BUY: Mother's Day Eye Shadow Trio featuring Amethyst, Honey Taupe and Chrysanthemum, $13.99, Noella Beauty Works, NoellaBeautyWorks.etsy.com // 2 Trendy geometrics and hand-painted wood blend harmoniously in this stacked arrow necklace. TO BUY: Mint, White + Red Stacked Arrow Necklace, $38, The Knotty Owl, theknottyowlshop.etsy.com // 3 These recipe cards add a bit of colorful zest to your kitchen and keep you organized. TO BUY: "One Orange Whisk" Downloadable + Printable Recipe Cards, Up Up Creative, $6, also available in red, lavender, orange, pink, turquoise, yellow, blue, grape, peach, and light orange, upup.etsy.com // 4 Embrace the spirit of the Finger Lakes with this pendant made from genuine Finger Lakes glass and hand-wrapped with wire. TO BUY: Tree of the Finger Lakes Pendant Necklace, $18, Handcrafted by Heather, Finger Lakes glass earrings also available, HCbyHeatherJewelry.etsy.com

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curb your car Ditch your car for a greener method of transport during Curb Your Car Week, May 13-19. Hosted by ColorBrightonGreen.org, a nonprofit organization that supports local energy reduction measures, the goal of the program is to cut air pollution and increase energy independence… all while have fun, of course! Brighton residents (and non-residents, too!) are encouraged to spend the week leaving their car at home and opt for walking, biking, carpooling and combining trips when going to school, work, music lessons, the grocery store… and anywhere they would typically drive. Participants are encouraged to share their numbers – total miles, gallons of gas, and pounds of CO2 saved – and the grand total will be announced after the week. Last fall, the program saw 113 participants save 8000 miles, 303 gallons of gas, and over 5,700 pounds of CO2! Prizes will be awarded to high mileage savers, and randomly to participants. For more information contact info@ColorBrightonGreen.org or register for free at ColorBrightonGreen.org

snack healthy According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, obesity is a major issue facing Americans today. In fact, they report that around a third of all adults and 17 percent of all children are considered obese. "Research shows that snacking makes up around 27 percent of a child's daily calories," explains Dan Negroni, the chief executive officer and president of Fresh Healthy Vending (www.freshvending.com). "This means that it is crucial that we teach children to opt for healthy snacks. And that starts by us adults modeling healthy snacking behavior." When it comes to choosing healthy snacks that will help take on obesity, here are 5 to keep in mind: YOGURT. Reaching for low-fat yogurt can be a healthy snack because it provides the body with protein, as well as calcium. It also has vitamins, minerals, and beneficial bacteria that aid digestion. GRANOLA BARS. Natural granola bars that contain wholesome ingredients provide a satisfying way to snack. They also provide energy, protein, and fiber. Just opt for those that are low in fat and sugar. FRESH FRUIT. You can't go wrong eating fresh fruits or vegetables for a snack. They are low in calories and fat, plus they provide lots of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. SMOOTHIES. Low-fat smoothies can be a snack that provides a good pick-me-up, as well as a boost of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. Plus, many are a great source of protein. BAKED CHIPS. Opting for baked chips or naturally popped snacks is a great way to take on obesity. Anytime someone can reach for baked chips over traditional, fat-laden ones, they will be satisfying that snack craving without sacrificing health. Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • May 2012

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the power of

support

local moms find friendship & connections in area moms’ groups By John Boccacino

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rom the day the child is born, mothers and fathers alike will spend a great majority of their waking minutes attending to their child's every need: from ensuring they are sleeping enough and eating properly to concerns over their ability to fight off infections and stay healthy. Establishing a positive, productive parent-child relationship is paramount to creating a happy and mutually-beneficial family dynamic, especially during the first several years of life. But for mothers, the bond that connects parent to child goes beyond bringing their bundle of joy into this world. A mother nurtures her baby from the minute she discovers she is pregnant, and her ability to care for her child extends past breastfeeding and providing nourishment to this new, wide-eyed child. Sonya Biehler says that while it is easy for mothers – especially new moms – to focus all their attention on the baby while ignoring their own needs, it is critical that moms maintain both a healthy family life and a healthy personal life. Craving that balance, Biehler and hundreds of other moms like her have joined clubs specifically designed for mothers – both working moms and the stay-at-home mothers. These groups offer support in all shapes and sizes, from emotional support such as how to deal with postpartum depression or a child's temper tantrum to social support like finding play dates for their children.

FINDING YOUR GROUP For moms (and dads!) with an interest in natural health and mindful parenting, THE ROCHESTER CHAPTER OF THE HOLISTIC MOMS NETWORK (http://hmnrochester.homewebs.com) holds monthly meetings on the second Monday of each month at 6:30 pm at Christ Episcopal Church located at 36 South Main Street in Pittsford. The group welcomes caregivers, partners, grandparents and even soon-to-be parents.

Biehler is one of approximately 60 women who are active members in the Webster/Ontario M.O.M.S. (Moms Offering Moms Support) Club. These women enjoy the benefits of play dates with other children in the group, field trips to places such as the Seneca Park Zoo, assorted museums and playgrounds in town, as well as group outings to the story time programs at the different libraries in and around Webster. There are also "Mom’s Night Out" gatherings for the mothers, including frequenting nice restaurants, performing community service projects and participating in recurring book club get-togethers. "In my neighborhood, there aren't many children, and [the M.O.M.S. Club] gives me a good opportunity to meet other moms, and for my children to meet other kids their own age," says Biehler, a Webster resident and mother of twin boys, Tommy and Andrew, age 5. Not all of the group's members are stay-at-home mothers, says Biehler; there's a variety of members in the group. "It's been a great experience and has definitely been a fun way to learn from other mothers," she adds. "We all participate as much as we want to, and everyone can find something that interests them. There are activities for the children, activities for the mothers and even activities for the fathers in the group. My children have greatly benefitted and we've all made some nice friends."

S

ometimes, mothers seek the comfort and guidance of other parents who are experiencing the same challenges of

Not all of the support groups meet in-person. ROCHESTER MOMMIES SUPPORT GROUP (www.RochesterMommies.com) is a free online community for mothers living in Rochester and the surrounding communities. Utilizing chat and message boards, the more than 280 members of RochesterMommies.com connect with other local moms to discuss parenting issues, but also take advantage of frequent play-dates and in-person, face-to-face socialization activities for members, their children and their families.

In my neighborhood, there aren't many children, and [the M.O.M.S. Club] gives me a good opportunity to meet other moms, and for my children to meet other kids their own age. It's been a great experience and has definitely been a fun way to learn from other mothers." — Sonya Biehler

child-rearing, and possess the same religious beliefs. Nicole Kirsch and dozens of mothers in Canandaigua and the surrounding area gather weekly for M.O.P.S. (Mothers of Preschoolers) group meetings on Thursday mornings from September through June inside the Good Shepherd Lutheran Church at 320 S. Pearl Street in Canandaigua to chat about parenting, their faith, and whatever other topics are on members' minds. Kirsch says that when she moved to Farmington from New York City in 2008, she was lacking close friends nearby who had children, so she began searching for potential moms groups. After trying out the Rochester Mommies group, which mainly meets online in chat boards with periodic face-to-face gatherings, Kirsch found the Canandaigua M.O.P.S. group, and her search for a supportive, faithbased mothers' group ended.

For mothers of more than one child, the GREATER ROCHESTER MOTHERS OF TWINS CLUB (www.GRMOTC.com) has monthly meetings on Thursdays from September through June at the Laurelton United Presbyterian Church, located at 334 Helendale Road in Rochester. There, mothers with multiple children can gather, bounce ideas off each other and find some relaxation time in-between the chaos of parenting several children.

CONTINUED >>>

Learn more about MOTHERS OF PRESCHOOLERS online at www.mops.org For more information about M.O.M.S. CLUBS and to find your nearest chapter visit www.momsclub.org

TIP: Try checking out local groups on www.Meetup.com using "stay-at-home moms" or "playdates for kids" as your search topic/interest. You'll find lots of great area groups that are accepting members.

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • May 2012

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It also helps with my patience and my sanity to have an excuse to get out of the house and see other mothers.

Sometimes you get so tied up in the day-to-day duties of motherhood that you lose yourself and you're no longer Nicole, you're Mikey and Danny's Mom. This helps me find my sense of identity again." — Nicole Kirsch

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"I was desperately looking to reach out to similar stay-at-home moms like myself," says Kirsch, who has two boys, Danny, 4, and Mikey, 2. "I wanted advice on the dayto-day things, and to see what other moms were doing about health issues and childraising. As a mom, you tend to worry about every little thing concerning your child, but it was comforting to hear these mothers telling me not to rush my child to the hospital for an illness. It also helps with my patience and my sanity to have an excuse to get out of the house and see other mothers. Sometimes you get so tied up in the day-today duties of motherhood that you lose yourself and you're no longer Nicole, you're Mikey and Danny's Mom. This helps me find my sense of identity again."

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hat social element is also a big reason why approximately 25-30 mothers get together as part of the Clarkson/Hamlin M.O.M.S. Club. The mothers meet regularly, with two or three social activities scheduled each week for mothers and their children, from play dates to lunch outings. "It's a social thing for everyone, we all want to find other people and other mothers that we can identify with," says Tara Kolinsky, who works full-time and has two daughters, ages 3 and 7.

"A lot of our members join thinking they need a play group for their children, but then they find that we're a place to go with friendly people to chat with. Mom needs to have a place to vent when she's frustrated, and she needs to be able to chat with other mothers about topics other than, 'Barney,'" says Kolinsky. "This helps us be better parents; if we only focused on our children we wouldn't have any hobbies for ourselves. We need our own personal time and friendships, and we need to be wellrounded to show our kids balance between family and personal life."

John Boccacino is a freelance writer living in Webster, NY who reported on sports and local news for more than 6 1/2 years with the Democrat and Chronicle newspaper. He is currently the Director of Sports Information for Keuka College.

Check out our support group calendar listings on page 57 for upcoming group meetings this month!


Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • May 2012

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& circumstance a different kind of

pomp

how area home-schooled students celebrate the culmination of high school

By Sue Henninger

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NY STATE LEAH HOME-SCHOOL CLASS OF 2010

or many years, Ellen Gerwitz has been a member of Loving Education at Home (LEAH), an organization dedicated to promoting and supporting home education in New York, and she is currently the Chapter Leader of the LEAH group she founded eight years ago. Ellen decided to commit to the home-school process when her oldest child was about to start kindergarten in Greece.

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PHOTO COURTESY OF LRS IIIMAGES/LOUIS SABO III

Between herself and her husband, the couple's background included attending a Christian school, a Catholic school, and various public schools and, according to Ellen, "None of them were great, even though we were good students. I felt confident that we could provide a better educational experience where our kids were really challenged." The couple decided to home-school all three of their children and feel that it was a worth-


while and rewarding time commitment, one that they will be sorry to see come to an end when their youngest child, Allison, graduates this year. With all the excitement surrounding traditional graduations, it's easy to forget that there's another group of teens, like Allison, who will also be graduating in June – those who are home-schooled. These students' educations occur in a different physical space than their peers so, when it comes time to graduate, their parents contact the school superintendent of the district they live in to get a "letter of completion," equivalent to a high school diploma. Many parents who choose to home-school also prepare their own acknowledgment to mark the end of their child's schooling, often a blessing or a highly personal speech about what they've taken away from the experience. Though it's a slightly different process, completing their high school requirements is just as memorable and exciting of an occasion. Patti Owens serves as the Regional Representative for LEAH's Rochester/ Finger Lakes area, however she describes herself more informally as "the bridge

between the statewide LEAH and the local chapters." Though home-schooled students aren't allowed to participate in their local high school's celebration, Patti observes that the teens do have several ways that they can observe the culmination of their home-schooling. Some local LEAH chapters choose to organize a small-scale celebration for the families in their group. Other families decide to have a private family ceremony and party. Holly Phillips, New York State's LEAH Upstate Commencement Coordinator, says a significant number of New York State's home-schooled students are interested in being part of a larger celebration and partake in the annual homeschooler graduation ceremony. For the past five years, this event has been held at the Riverside Convention Center in Rochester. Last year it attracted 120 graduates and upwards of 2,100 guests. 132 teenagers are slated to graduate this year. The program format is similar to that found in many traditional high schools, Holly says. The average age of the students is seventeen and they wear caps and gowns and walk up on the stage just like their high school coun-

It's important to recognize [the parents] as well.

They've put so much dedication and sacrifice into the educational process." — Holly Phillips, New York State's LEAH Upstate Commencement Coordinator

terparts. Each year there is also a commencement speaker who is nationally recognized in the home schooling movement. This year's speaker will be Rick Boyer who, with his wife Marilyn, home-schooled their fourteen children and have written several books about their experiences, Christian parenting, and national reformation. Where the ceremony differs from a conventional high school's is that LEAH has a narrator, Jaime Cole, who announces each graduate by reading a short biographical sketch submitted by the student, a scripture verse that the teen selects, and a brief description of his or her future plans. CONTINUED >>>

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • May 2012

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Additionally, parents play a key role in the LEAH graduation, meeting their son or daughter on stage and personally handing out the diploma which acknowledges completion of a satisfactory course of study. "It's important to recognize [the parents] as well," says Holly, which is why the parents also come up on stage for the LEAH graduation ceremony. She explains it's not only because they are the ones who are actually graduating the student. "They've put so much dedication and sacrifice into the educational process." For most teens, there's much more to school than academics. Do home-schoolers miss out on the traditions and activities that are associated with the end of their high school careers – things like signing yearbooks, senior award ceremonies, the senior prom, or senior class trip? Ellen says her kids always had the option of doing the same social things as their peers. When her son felt he was missing out on the opportunity to play competitive hockey, Ellen and her husband coached a homeschoolers hockey team. Likewise when her second child really wanted to attend a prom the couple organized a home-school prom for other fifteen and sixteen year olds. "Our LEAH group also has a yearbook and anyone who wants to contribute to it can," Ellen adds.

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The 2012 New York State Upstate LEAH Commencement Ceremony is scheduled for June 2nd at the Riverside Convention Center in Rochester. For more information about LEAH visit www.leah.org According to Ellen's youngest daughter Allison, there isn't a single thing she'd change about her home-schooling experience. Allison says she's always felt much less regimented than her friends at public and parochial high schools. Since she could get her schoolwork done at whatever pace she chose to, she had more time to explore and pursue interesting hobbies, like Civil War reenactments, which she really enjoys. The teen quickly dispels what she says is "the myth of home-schoolers being isolated and housebound." She explains that her family actually enjoys spending time together and that, between church, sports, field trips and other activities they're "on the go" much of the time. Like other high school students, Allison's friends come from the various groups she belongs to, like dance troupes and basketball.

Ellen and her husband have let each of their children choose how they wanted to celebrate their graduation. Their son decided that a graduation party with family and friends, where he would receive his framed "letter of completion" and blessing from his parents, would be the most meaningful experience for him. Ellen's second daughter, who graduated in 2008, decided to participate in the LEAH ceremony along with having a private party. Allison will be graduating on June 2nd in the New York State Upstate LEAH Commencement Ceremony, followed by a party with family and friends. Allison is happy to have the option of being part of a more formal group event which publicly acknowledges the end of her schooling at home. "It's important to mark graduation; that's what you do," she says. "I worked hard to get to this point and it only happens once in your life!"

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Sue Henninger is a contributing writer to Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine. Contact her at www.fingerlakeswriter.com


Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • May 2012

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mom-trepreneurs how two local moms turned their creative ideas into local businesses by Angela Cannon-Crothers

Snow Daze all natural, gourmet snow cones

"M

y passion is food," admits Jessica StadtToner, owner and operator of Snow Daze. "I wanted to offer my community something I would offer my own family. I'd take my kids to events but I wouldn't let them eat anything there because I wanted to avoid the food colorings, artificial flavorings, preservatives and stuff." That was when Stadt-Toner, whose family is in the pasta making business (Flour City Pasta,) got the idea to make snow cones. "I always made my own fruit syrups for homemade sodas so I bought a hand shaver, a block of ice, and made my own snow cones," she says. Her twin toddler girls and husband became taste-testers for the syrups which she flavored with local fruits and organic sugar. So the business idea for Snow Daze was born. Because Stadt-Toner wanted a truly healthy, high-end product to sell, she invested in a quality ice shaver which she says practically makes snow. She experimented with everything from local strawberries to fresh herbs and even tofu and spinach. Next she needed a way to bring her refreshing treats to Rochester area summer fairs and festivals. She happened upon a vintage, 1964 Shasta pull-behind camper on Craig's List.

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I always made my own fruit syrups for homemade sodas so I bought a hand shaver, a block of ice, and made my own snow cones."

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For several weeks, she and her husband – with twins in tow – gutted and revamped the old camper to create a "retro-modern" look that would accommodate a snow cone machine and the traveling business. She researched permits and made phone calls to Farmer's Market and Festival Concessioners to find out what she needed to do to get a certification. "After the kids went to bed I'd stay up to test recipes and do paperwork, but it was worth it," says Stadt-Toner.

Massachusetts – my parents will help us at that one." Stadt-Toner adds, "It's a little like taking mini-vacations on the weekend and the kids love it; they get fed shaved ice all summer and get to hang out outside with people." As a mother of young twins, StadtToner appreciates being able to be home and make her own schedule, but it's not all weekend mini-vacations. "It's definitely a full-time job," she says. "I easily spend 20-30 hours a week making and packaging the homemade syrups and in sumSnow Daze can be found on Facebook at mer it will go up to workwww.facebook.com/RocCitySnowDaze ing about 60 hours a and at the Brighton Farmer's Market and week." She adds that her many Rochester area summer festivals. husband helps and that she doesn't work the same pace year-round. In the She threw a launch party with winter she does fundraising and development work for other organizations friends to finalize some of the trial flavors like organic banana, caramel apple, and like the University of Rochester. "Right now Snow Daze is the only ginger. The first week of July 2011 she all-natural shaved ice company in the headed off to the Brighton Farmer's Northeast," she says, adding, "And our Market. As she suspected, Snow Daze was snow cones are really delicious." Stadtquite popular with moms, kids – everyone! Toner's best advice for other moms con"This year Snow Daze will be at the sidering starting their own business is Brighton Farmer's Market again, and also this – "If you have an idea, it's a good at several community and art and music one. Just do it!" festivals like Grassroots in Trumansburg, and the Berkshires Art Festival in CONTINUED >>>

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • May 2012

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Opal and Twig Potions and Powers a magical mercantile

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elissa Boyack's business card reads, "Chief Enchantress." When she asked her daughter (at the time, about to turn five) what she wanted for her birthday, she never dreamed that her daughter's answer would grow into a business. "I want magic potions and special powers," her little girl had replied. Boyack thought the request was just makebelieve, but it got her thinking; maybe she could grant her daughter's wish. Boyack purchased some pretty, antique-looking bottles, a few odds and ends, a curio cabinet, and put her graphic design skills and creativity to work. She made a set of twenty-five Enchantments – from Mermaid Tears to Secret Listening Potions – complete with a document describing the magical attributes of each item. The magic of the gift was clear. Other moms and children at her daughter's birthday party loved the concept of carefully thought out potions and virtuous powers so much they all wanted to place an order. "I had been doing branding and graphic design for another start-up company at the time and all the pieces started coming together," says Boyack. "I thought – why don't I just do it?" So began the business of Opal & Twig Enchantments, first out of Boyack's dining room, then progressing to a separate workspace office, and now, just over three years later, it is off and running with business partner Sara Bumby who is based

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out of Portland Maine. The two entrepreneurs will be presenting a revised and finished product line this June at the American Specialty Toy Retailer Association trade show in Baltimore. Opal and Twig Potions and Powers takes the sense of wonder and imagination of childhood and weaves in multi-cultural legends and fairytales to bestow the greatest gifts - inspiring attributes like love and wisdom – to others. Although the target audience has been 8-12 year olds, the business has expanded to include teens and adults as well. "Our products are truly elegant," Boyack notes. "We even have interest from corporate people who think items like our Miracle Listening Serum would work well as a business tool."

We even have interest from corporate people who think items like our Miracle Listening Serum would work well as a business tool."


"I wrote my first business plan in 2010," says Boyack. "It was a great exercise; I also visited many websites for other templates including Crowd Funding with Kickstarter.com." Boyack says that her greatest guidance came from personal contacts and "being bold enough to pick up the phone and to tug on sleeves." Her advice to others interested in starting up their own business? Boyack says, "It's more important to get your idea out there; you can't be too protective." She's also had the help and support of her husband Michael, as well as the continued enthusiasm from her daughter.

Find Opal and Twig online at www.opalandtwig.com. And find them coming soon to local stores! The product line is meant to encourage both imagination and personal growth – Goblin Snot for instance helps get rid of "the grumpies" and The Magic Forest Thicket "contains a tingle of magical timberland to spark your mind's eye." Mermaid Tears are actually "pearly tears of cheers" that spread pure joy. As Boyack's vision and business model expanded, so have her notions of potions being tied to trans-media storytelling – converting the mythology of the products into electronic media, video, and small books to go with each item. Boyack worked with famed storyteller Jay Stetzer to capture the perfect inspirational legend or tale for several products and is working with a couple of children's writers to craft literary components for more. Although Boyack says that when she first jumped into business she could only see a certain distance, she knew she would find a way to succeed with focus and commitment. So far it seems that equipped with a handful of charms and determination, she's managed to find her own powers, meet many helpful guides along the way, and is having a magical adventure all her own.

Angela Cannon-Crothers is a contributing writer to Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine. She is an an educator at Herb Haven in Crystal Beach as well as a writer and author. You can visit her website at angelacannoncrothers.webs.com

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • May 2012

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reality check what is reality television teaching our young girls? By Julia Garstecki

'm a fan of certain reality shows. After a long day of work or news programs highlighting global, financial, and political unrest, a mindless show about bachelors, dancers, and housewives offer a little bubble of LaLa Land. I can't help but laugh at how absurd most of these shows are, but as I overhear more of my young female students discussing them before or after class, I am beginning to worry that what I consider "guilty pleasure" television, they think is normal.

I

For some women this is raising alarm. Kimberlee Salmond, Senior Researcher for the Girl Scout Research Institute, is one of those women. The Institute surveyed 1,100 girls, asking them if they thought reality shows promote bad behavior. All of the girls responded with “yes,” but still watch them anyway. "Girls who regularly watch reality television accept and expect a higher level of drama, aggression, and bullying in their own lives, and measure their worth primarily by their physical appearance," says Salmond, comparing these girls to their non-reality show watching counterparts. Jennifer L. Pozner, author of Reality Bites Back: the Troubling Truth About Guilty Pleasure TV reveals how some reality shows

"negatively impact women, people of color, and future generalizations." Her book is the most comprehensive study on this topic to date, offering an inside look at how reality shows are packaged and manipulated to create over-the-top drama without appearing to be edited. Pozner visits college campuses nationwide discussing women and the media, and has noticed “significant desensitizing” of what was once considered outrageous or offensive behavior. "Now when I screen clips, instead of snickering at cheesy narrators or blatant product placement, students giggle when women sob after being dumped, when beautiful girls are badgered about their bodies, and when women of color go off on violent tirades,"

Pozner says. "Girls used to ask me about the social and economic forces that might compel a woman to volunteer to have her appearance (or personality) savaged on TV. Now, girls regularly tell me they're dieting to audition for Top Model." So why would a young woman decide to be on a reality show? According to Holly Durst, Bachelor and Bachelor Pad contestant, “Appearing on The Bachelor was an opportunity to have an adventure." She added that because she "believed in love," it was a chance to possibly meet the love of her life in a fun setting. Durst did consider how she would be portrayed on television, which is why she watched what she said, and was much more reserved than she would normally CONTINUED >>>

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • May 2012

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“

Engage them in media literacy. Teach them to be an active, critical media consumer,

and to stay engaged with it. Ask your child, 'How does this show make you feel? Whose lifestyle are the producers showing? Who profits from this show? What are the producers of this show wanting you to know about certain demographics?'" — Jennifer L. Pozner, author of Reality Bites Back: The Troubling Truth About Guilty Pleasure TV

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would be. Yet when asked if she thought about her young viewers, Durst replied, "I never thought about what effect the show would have on girls. It didn't occur to me that anybody would care too much." Durst was surprised when Bachelor Pad aired (a Bachelor spin-off in which previous bachelors and bachlorettes live together and go on dates and perform challenges) and she received hate mail after ending a relationship with one bachelor and becoming engaged to a different bachelor she met on the show. Apparently, some fans were furious about her bachelor of choice. Surprised at how angry and hateful some of her viewers were, Durst stopped checking emails and twitter feeds for a few weeks. She is now looking forward to life without a camera crew as she plans her wedding. Pozner says it isn't surprising reality stars don't recognize the impact they may have on viewers, and girls who watch may shrug off the effect reality television has on them. After all, we're smart enough to know the shows are edited, right? Pozner suggests the repetition of visual and auditory exposure to images and messages most reality shows offer normalizes the language and perceptions of what is acceptable. Consider how often derogatory names are used to describe women, or how many times commercials

show women crying, fighting, or engaging in explicit or aggressive behavior. One scene of a girl crying or using offensive names might play as a coming attraction, during the actual show, replayed just after the commercial break, and again as a recap the following week. There may be numerous scenes during just one episode with this type of behavior, and it becomes a barrage of imagery. Without a show to offer counter messages of respecting themselves and supporting fellow women, Pozner cautions that girls may get a distorted view of what normal behavior might be.

So what can parents of realityhungry tweens and teens do? Pozner says to take the developmental stage of your child into account. Do they have critical thinking skills? If not, practice these skills with your child. "Engage them in media literacy," says Pozner. "Teach them to be an active, critical media consumer, and to stay engaged with it. Ask your child, 'How does this show make you feel? Whose lifestyle are the producers showing? Who profits from this show? What are the producers of this show wanting you to know about certain demographics?'" She also encourages parents to discuss the difference between what is seen


on the screen and what is subtext, so young girls can disconnect from the show and see it as a form of entertainment, not as a form of reality. Like some parents, Jennifer Lucas allows her twelve year old daughter to view some reality television. "Shows like American Idol work well because my much younger son can watch it as well," says Lucas. "I even let them watch Hillbilly Handfishin’ once, but then we talked about how I'd rather them play outside and get entertainment elsewhere. And if they want to watch TV, there are other options for them." It's nearly impossible to stay on top of the numerous reality shows on television, though the fact that there are choices available is a good thing, provided you know what choice your child is making and deem it acceptable.

Julia Garstecki is a contributing writer to Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine who lives in Bemus Point, New York. Visit her online at www.juliagarstecki.com

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award-winning FAMILY MAGAZINE & WEB SITE • GOLD AWARD GENERAL EXCELLENCE for Genesee Valley Parent’s website GVParent.com • AWARD WINNER for the design our magazine's annual Rochester Baby Guide • AWARD WINNER for the editorial in our Special Parent Section (featured in our September 2011 issue) • FINALIST for overall writing for Genesee Valley Parent Magazine • FINALIST for overall writing of our magazine's annual Rochester Baby Guide • FINALIST for editorial of Genesee Valley Parent’s Special Series on Modern Families

www.GVParent.com Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • May 2012

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[ book nook ]

By Jillian Melnyk

Teen Reads This month's selection of books features works by authors who will be at the 7th Annual Rochester Teen Book Festival on May 19th.

Forge

local author

WHO WILL BE AT THIS YEAR’S FESTIVAL:

By Laurie Halse Anderson Atheneum Books for Young Readers, 2010, hardcover, $16.99

SJ Adams

Laurie Halse Anderson, Upstate New Yorker and best-selling young adult author, will be in attendance at this year's festival. Her most recent release Forge (the sequel to National Book Award Finalist Chains) takes readers to Saratoga and Valley Forge and continues the thrilling adventure and fight for freedom. The third book of the series is due out this fall.

Laurie Halse Anderson Cyn Balog Charles Benoit Cinda Williams Chima Svetlana Chmakova Brent Crawford Megan Crewe

FUN FACTS ABOUT LAURIE HALSE ANDERSON: When injured, she curses in Danish. She fell in love with her husband when he walked her home from Kindergarten.

Matt de la Pena Julia DeVillers Beth Fantaskey Jack Ferraiolo Shawn Goodman Paul Griffin Jenny Han Amy Holder James Kennedy A. S. King Barry Lyga Carolyn MacCullough Brandon Mull Cat Patrick

Blood Wounds By Susan Beth Pfeffer Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2011, hardcover, $16.99 Best-selling author of the Last Survivors Trilogy, Susan Beth Pfeffer's newest release is just as hard-hitting, emotionally packed, and gripping as readers have come to expect from Pfeffer's eco-disaster series. 16-year-old Willa hasn't heard from her biological father for years until his face is all over the news‌ suspected of killing his new wife and daughters. In the wake of tragedy and gripped with fear, Willa's life changes forever. FUN FACTS ABOUT SUSAN BETH PFEFFER: She once took Second Prize for her chocolate cream pie at the Orange County Fair. The only problem was, she was the only person to enter. She got second prize in a field of one.

Susan Beth Pfeffer Nick Podehl Gae Polisner Jennifer Roy Inara Scott Adam Selzer Terry Trueman Melissa Walker Gabrielle Zevin

Everybody Sees the Ants By A.S. King Little, Brown & Company, 2011, hardcover, $17.99 Michael L. Printz Honor recipient (Please Ignore Vera Dietz) A. S. King will be at the festival with her newest release, Everybody Sees the Ants, a smart, passionate novel that skillfully tackles tough subjects like bullying, the effects of war, and family conflict. FUN FACTS ABOUT A. S. KING: At age 41, she suddenly started loving tacos. She has run off with the circus more than once.

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I Hunt Killers

By Barry Lyga Little, Brown Books for Young Readers, 2012, hardcover, $17.99 Full of mystery and thrill, Barry Lyga's newest book asks readers: What's it like to have a serial killer for a dad? Jasper Dent's father is one of the world's worst serial killers and when Jasper is recruited to hunt for a new killer who strikes in his small town, things start to get interesting. FUN FACTS ABOUT BARRY LYGA: He once wrote half a million words in one year. In college, he lived with John Hodgman, the "I'm a PC" guy from the Apple commercials.

ABOUT THE FESTIVAL: WHERE: Nazareth College, Main entrance at Shults Center, 4245 East Avenue, Rochester, NY 14618 WHEN: Saturday, May 19th, 9am-5pm COST: Free! No registration is needed. LEARN MORE: www.teenbookfestival.org

Teen reads bonus! Through the month of May we’ll be giving away tons of awesome tween & teen reads online!

Visit www.gvparent.com/giveaways

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • May 2012

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[ your family activities]

By Sinea Pies

Simple Activities to Celebrate Mom MOTHER’S DAY FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY

M

otherhood can take a lot of forms but each shares a common denominator: kids! Whether they gave birth to them, adopted them, or fostered them, moms are moms because of the children in their lives. And what better way to celebrate mom-hood than for mother and child to spend quality time together. (And don't forget the grandmothers, too.)

MOTHER'S DAY IS SUNDAY, MAY 13

IMAGE COURTESY OF THE STRONG

There are lots of fun ways for families to spend special time together this month celebrating that special lady in their lives. Some activities are best enjoyed when children are of a certain age. Others will be a pleasure for family members of all ages.

Tots and Toddler. Naturally, not every activity will work well for the youngest members of the family but there are some that will: HAND PAINTING: This toddler-friendly activity is great for older children, too. Get some bright or pastel fabric paints and a brand new t-shirt in mom's size. Each child places his or her hands in the paint and gently presses it against the fabric. Especially if your toddlers are the exuberant type,

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have an adult there to help them get away from the shirt once the prints are set. Let it dry. Then write a sweet message and the child's name by each print, using permanent markers. "To the Best Mom in the World" or "Love you, Mom" are some suggestions. PICK FLOWERS: If you don't have flowering plants in your yard, perhaps a friend or relative does. Let your tots pick them with mom or catch it on film for her to see later. Give her the pleasure of enjoying the "find" as well as the posies. WALK ALONG THE CANAL: Stroll along one of the many picturesque villages along the Barge Canal, such as Schoen Place in Pittsford. Buy mommy an ice cream cone at a

nearby ice cream shop. Dad, be sure to get one for yourself and the kids, too!

School Age Children like a little more action. Take the family somewhere "on the move." STRONG NATIONAL MUSEUM OF PLAY is a great place for the whole family to enjoy. While many of the activities are particularly designed for younger children, both older kids and mom will enjoy the Dancing Wings Butterfly Garden which features various butterflies in their tropical surrounding. The Butterfly Garden is so popular that they recommend pre-purchasing your tickets.

NATURE WALK: Rochester has many lovely parks and paths where your family can enjoy outdoor time together. Mendon Ponds Park, Tinker Farm in Henrietta, Highland Park, and the pier at Charlotte Beach are just a few of the possibilities. Bring along a yummy picnic lunch that mom doesn't have to make and a camera to capture some memories!

Teens and Tweens. Finding "mom activities" that interest teens and tweens can be more challenging, but these children are old enough to understand the need to put mom first. Here are some great possibilities that everyone can enjoy: ICE SKATING: Ice skate in May? Sure! Rochester Institute of Technology offers indoor


public skating times at the Ritter Ice Arena. Prices are reasonable for an activity that will be fun for the whole family. Bring your own skates or rent them there. Call ahead to confirm times: (585) 475-2223. TAKE A SUNDAY DRIVE: Hop in the car and drive to Avon for a delicious hamburger at the original Tom Wahl's. Many families do. Enjoy a custard twist cone for a Mother's Day dessert. SENECA PARK ZOO: Families of all ages love to visit the zoo. If you have tots, be sure to bring a stroller so you don't get left behind as your teens dash ahead. This is a family event, after all. Ask mom what her favorite animals are and be sure that you see them sometime in your journey. MOVIE NIGHT: Whether you rent or download a great DVD at home or head out to the movie theater, movies with hot buttered popcorn make a wonderful celebration. Pick a movie that everyone will like but be especially mindful of mom's preferences. This is her day! GAME NIGHT: Does your family enjoy board games? Set up a game night with lots of snacks to nibble on. For larger families, divide into teams so that everyone can play the same game together. Little ones can be appointed to roll the dice or advance the tokens for you.

"Just Us Girls"

Moms need some time off, wouldn't you agree? Pamper her! Moms with daughters might love a day at the spa. Whether you treat her to a luxurious mother-daughter fling at a local spa or set up a lavish spa day right at home, it will be a time to remember. Do her hair and nails, give her a facial, look at fashion magazines, or watch a great "chic flick" together and, of course, eat lots of chocolate!



Sinea Pies is a contributing writer to the Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine. She lives in the Rochester area and often writes about organizing, parent & family, education, cooking, nutrition, faith, dogs and time management on her website Ducks 'n a Row. www.ducksnarow.com

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • May 2012

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[ try this! ]

By Jillian Melnyk

Slow Cookin’

THE BEST MEALS ARE PREPARED SLOW

A

few years ago I inherited a brand new slow cooker from my then-boyfriend's mother. At the time, I was completely befuddled. I don't come from a slow cooker household. I don't remember my own mother ever cooking anything in a crock pot. Did we even own one? We were the "whip up some pasta" or "throw some salmon on the grill" kind of family. I always pictured slow cooker fare to be gooey stew with mushy vegetables. I pictured the 1960s. But I was always taught not to be unappreciative of a gift, so I was thankful for this 100 dollar kitchen appliance (price tag still attached!) even if I didn't know exactly how to use it. My first step towards enlightenment was to purchase a few cookbooks. And enlightened, I was. It appeared that the crock pot was making a comeback. In fact, the term "crock pot" itself was sort of out-dated and retro. People were calling it a slow cooker – something that sounded fancier and perhaps paid homage to the slow-food, home-cooking movement. I found cookbooks that offered gourmet recipes, recipes that claimed they "were not your grandmother's fare," and recipes that were on the more conventional side of the aisle. I grabbed them all. I remember the first day I made a slow cooker dinner – Beef Bourguignon, a la Julia Child. Last month when I received a letter from reader, Jennifer Verbakal, requesting that I try using my slow cooker to pre-

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pare dinner for a whole month, I jumped at the chance. I have a love-hate relationship with my slow cooker. While I love the recipes that I've found, and I love the idea of preparing meals hours in advance so that dinnertime is a breeze, I always find myself picking out slow cooker meals that turn into big productions. For some reason, whenever I pull the slow cooker off the shelf, I feel compelled to make dinner with Julia Childesque fanfare and pretend I'm auditioning for a spot on Top Chef. Browning meat, endlessly chopping fresh vegetables and herbs – my meal prep time ends up being longer than a normal dinner. Sure, the preparations all happen in morning or early afternoon, but two hours is still two hours, no matter how you slice it. Going into this challenge, I knew there was no way I could survive if I continued to channel my inner Julia. I couldn't give up two hours each day to cooking. (Not to mention cleaning up the jumbo-sized

MEAL #5: IRISH BEEF STEW

mess that's always left behind.) I scoured through my cookbooks to find a variety of recipes that I had never tried before – in particular, recipes that would be easy. There was no need for a big production. A simple soup or chili could suffice for an entrée, so could slow-cooked barbeque beef. (All of these recipes are much easier to prepare than my beloved Beef Bourguignon.)

HERE'S WHAT I DID FOR MEAL PLANNING & WHAT YOU CAN DO TOO: • Plan out a week's worth of meals in advance. I

picked recipes that included variety, accounting for the type of ingredient or meat (chicken, pork, beef, lamb or veggie), style of dish (stew, sandwich meat, soup, chili, etc.) and ethnicity, so I didn't feel like I was

eating the same thing every day.

• Pick meals that are great as leftovers. Whether you'll be reheating them for lunch or serving them up as another dinner, my favorite part about slow cooker fare is how delicious it is the next day. Make sure you give yourself a break. After a few straight days of cooking, buffer in a day or two of rest where you don't cook and just have "family pot luck" and re-heat your leftovers. Some recipes are known for doing double duty so that it doesn't feel like you're eating the exact same thing the next day; barbequed beef and pulled pork are a good example. Those dishes can be eaten as entrees served with potatoes and vegetables then turned into sandwiches the next day.

• Shop all at once for the week's meals. Visiting the

Do you have something you've been dying to try but you haven't been able to muster the energy? Or you just don't know where to start? Don't fret! Let our editor try it out for you! Each month our editor, Jillian, will accept a challenge and report back with her findings. Send Jillian an email to Editor@GVParent.com with subject line "Try This!"

www.GVParent.com


farm market is a great option because you'll often find the freshest produce and also the best deals. If you want to make meal preparation really simple, many grocery stores, like Wegmans, offer pre-sliced or chopped vegetables. This option is also available for things like garlic (available minced in jars) which, by the way, ended up being in just about all of my recipes.

• Prepare in advance.

Spend an afternoon chopping, dicing, slicing and getting prepared. It might not sound like a lot of fun, but pre-slicing all of those onions and carrots on Sunday afternoon will save you tons of time when you need them to toss into the slow cooker on Tuesday and Wednesday.

• Make simple sides.

Most likely your slow cooker meal will feed a small army. You've spent a lot of time

working to make it a great dish, so serve a simple side like a baked potato, mixed greens salad or anything that's easy to prepare in a few minutes. Afterall, the whole point of using a slow cooker is to minimize dinnertime prep so you can get a delicious dinner served up without much fuss. Mostly, my crock pot adventure went off without a hitch. (Except for the unfortunate incident where my cinnamon lamb stew burned to the side of my slow cooker, and even after soaking it in soapy water overnight, it still needed twenty minutes of vigorous scrubbing the next morning, wrecking my perfectly good manicure.) But it was delicious. You win some, you lose some.

Jillian Melnyk is the Editor for Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine. To comment on this story email Editor@GVParent.com

The perfect local resource for new and expectant parents

2012 Spring/SummerEdition arriving in May

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • May 2012

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[ parenting teens & tweens ]

By Myrna Beth Haskell

Role Reversal: Teens as Caregivers

WHEN TEENS TAKE CARE OF YOUNGER SIBLINGS

I

loved to hang out with my baby sister when I was a teenager. I used to take her everywhere, even to some social activities at my high school. I really enjoyed the "mommy role," even when she did something out of the blue like kicking one of my guy friends in the shin at a winter carnival. As I recall these memories, I realize that I probably enjoyed her tagging along with me because it was my choice. It may have been an entirely different story if I was obligated to care for her on a regular basis, especially if the care got in the way of my own activities.

Sometimes teens are responsible for younger siblings for long hours after school due to their parents' job schedules or their family's financial situation. This can be a catalyst to a teen becoming responsible at an early age; however, in some situations, a teen might feel resentment for having to assume a parental role while the majority of her peers are consumed with the next cool party or dealing with bad hair days. Is there a limit to how much responsibility a teen should take on? How much is too much?

The Benefits

Beth H. Garland, PhD, a licensed psychologist at Texas Children's Hospital, reports, "Benefits may include increased responsibility and an opportunity for increased trust between the adolescent and his parent." Pamela Garber, LMHC, a Manhattan-based therapist who works with adolescents regarding family issues and other life stressors, believes that teens can gain important life skills while caring for a younger

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sibling. "The benefits can be the opportunity to develop a strong sense of responsibility, an understanding of choices and consequences, and a value system based on family (as opposed to a value system based on things)," she explains. "Some teens may respond to caretaking roles in ways that promote skills for nurturing others, and these responsibilities may also increase feelings of closeness within the family," says Amy B. Acosta, PhD, a licensed psychologist at Texas Children's Hospital. She feels there is a potential for family connectedness when there is a sharing of responsibilities.

Too Much Responsibility?

Problems can arise from too much responsibility as well. Most experts agree that teens need time for social activities. This can be a challenge when teens are spending a great deal of time outside of school hours watching over younger siblings. "Often the negative consequences, such as resentment and an over-developed sense of responsibility, are linked to other issues and problems,"

warns Garber. For instance, teens might begin to exhibit negative behaviors because they feel their own needs are not being met. Dr. Garland remarks, "The balance between childcare responsibilities and activities associated with adolescent development (e.g. social events, dating, free time) may be one potential challenge." She finds that social experiences help teens learn skills that enable them to navigate situations as adults. Parents should also be acutely aware of their teen's feelings and talk things out if their teen is feeling lonely or overwhelmed.

Finding a Balance

Since resentment of the younger sibling can be an issue, Garber instructs, "While there is no fool-proof guarantee for preventing sibling resentment, it is helpful for parents to make sure their teen has structured time that is strictly for him. Ideally, teens should be able to allocate time in their schedule for both school and social obligations. This will help them feel cared for and valued. Additionally, teens will have the opportunity to mature socially, so the peer disconnect that many responsible caretaker teens experience (and later resent) will be limited." Garland suggests that parents consider community resources as possible alternatives to ease their teen's responsibility level, such as support groups and churches. Another idea is to work out childcare swaps where families take turns with childcare. Garland sug-

“

Some teens may respond to caretaking roles in ways that promote skills for nurturing others, and

these responsibilities may also increase feelings of closeness within the family."

— Amy B. Acosta, PhD, a licensed psychologist at Texas Children's Hospital

gests researching after-school and weekend programs offered at city parks or recreation centers as they can be free or low cost. Dr. Acosta says parents should look into extracurricular activities as well. "School sports and clubs may provide a logistical solution to child care while simultaneously honoring a need to explore new interests and create bonds with other children."



Myrna Beth Haskell is a freelance writer and frequent contributor to Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine who lives in Salt Point, NY. She is the mother of two teenagers and specializes in parenting issues and children's development.

WANT TO SHARE YOUR IDEAS?

UPCOMING TOPIC:

Tips for dealing with the day your teen leaves for college. Send your full name, address, & brief comments to: myrnahaskell@gmail.com or visit: www.myrnahaskell.com


summer camps & activities • spring programs

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • May 2012

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summer camps & activities • spring programs

Looking for more Summer Program Options?

It’s Just a Click Away! Online Parenting Resources

Available 24/7 www.GVParent.com

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summer camps & activities • spring programs

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • May 2012

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Child Care Providers & Programs Guide •

Special Advertising Section

Find Comfort in Choosing Your Child Care Program Do Your Homework It is important that you trust your instincts regarding your child and how you feel the program is meeting their needs. You should feel comfortable asking questions of the center or provider, and observing your child within the setting. There are several categories of things to observe and ask questions about:

Health and Safety-

S

electing a child care setting is a difficult decision for a family to make. There are several different types of child care and environments will vary greatly. New York State provides funding for local Child Care Resource and Referral Agencies. One of the services these agencies provide is parent referrals and counseling at no cost to the parent. A Child Care Consultant will inform families of what care is available based on the geographical area and type of care the family is seeking. Consultants can also give information regarding what quality child care looks like, and what type of setting may work well for an individual. Once a parent has received the referrals, it is important to visit different programs with your child, and interview prospective caregivers before making your decision.

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Are there written policies in place, both posted and given to parents, that include evacuation procedures, emergency health plans, medication and illness procedures, sanitation and food preparation, diapering and hand washing procedures? Have the adults been trained and approved to give medications, and does the program have a Health Care Consultant? Are children only allowed to be picked up by someone you designate in writing? Is the environment clean and free of safety hazards? Are infant and toddler toys large enough to prevent choking? Is equipment washed and disinfected regularly? Do children have their own space for belongings, and sleeping equipment assigned to them for only their use? Are infants put to sleep on their backs?

Partnerships with Parents How will information about your child be related to you each day? What are the procedures for contacting the family in case of an emergency? Are there adults who speak your home language, and if not, how will they make an effort to communicate with your family? Are caregivers interested in your family's culture and beliefs? How will they handle holidays throughout the year? Do you and the caregiver agree on practices such as feed-


Child Care Providers & Programs Guide •

ing, toilet training, and discipline? Will caregiver's respect your wishes and/or requests concerning your child? Is there an open door policy? Will caregivers conduct parent conferences periodically?

Learning EnvironmentYou want to look for an environment that encourages freedom of movement. There should be duplicates of toys, so children do not have to share; equipment should be stored on low, open shelves within the children's reach. Rooms should be large enough to accommodate sleeping and playing areas. Equipment that restricts movement such as swings, playpens, bouncy seats, and high chairs should be used infrequently, and only for it's intended purpose.

Caregivers-

Special Advertising Section

Are caregivers loving and responsive? What training do the caregivers have in child development? Are groups of children and adults consistent throughout the day and over time, to allow your child to form a strong attachment? For infants and toddlers, will there be a primary caregiver assigned to your child? What is the rate of turnover for caregivers? Are caregivers involved with the children at all times, encouraging language, providing close supervision, and playing with them? Do caregivers use appropriate guidance techniques with children- redirecting them to other activities, distraction, and reflecting feelings instead of punishment? Do caregivers have realistic expectations of children and their stages of development? This article provided by The Child Care Council, Inc., the local not-for-profit childcare resource and referral agency. Parents can call at any time to ask any questions related to early childhood. Offices are located in Monroe, Livingston and Wayne counties. The main office is located at 595 Blossom Road, Suite 120, Rochester, N.Y. 14610. The phone number is (585) 654-4720 or 1-800-743-KIDS. Detailed information can be found at childcarecouncil.com

For information regarding any regulated program, or to review a copy of the state regulations, visit the New York State Office of Children and Family Services website at www.ocfs.state.ny.us. If you would like to find out more information about a specific program you can also see the current status of its license or registration. Parents should be familiar with the regulations in order to better understand the policies and the day to day activities of their child care program.

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • May 2012

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Special Advertising Section

Child Care Providers & Programs Guide •

Your Area Guide to all your Child Care Needs

Child Care Centers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Child Care Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Montessori Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Nanny & At-Home Services . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Preschools & Nursery Schools . . . . . . . . . . 46

Child Care Centers Asbury Day Care Center 1040 East Avenue, Rochester, NY 14607 461-2920 ~ asburydc@frontiernet.net - www.asburydaycare.org Looking for the best care for your child? Come visit Asbury for an introduction to our nurturing and qualified staff, the light-filled "classrooms" and spacious playground, and exciting, child-centered programs. Serving families with children ages 6 mos. through 12 years, Asbury is a NAEYC accredited, non-profit center located in Rochester's beautiful Museum District. We also offer Pre-K for 4's and Camp Asbury: a full-day summer program for schoolagers.

Banners Childcare 3510 Winton Place, Rochester, 14623 427-0700 ~ www.bannerschildcare.com Banners is a licensed daycare and preschool program specializing in tending to the child as individual. Banners serves individuals from 6 weeks of age to 12 years of age. Before and after school program and field trip entrenched summer program. Meals and snack provided. 6am - 6:30pm. Flexible part-time and full-time schedules.

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Canandaigua Early Childhood Center 55 Wilcox Lane Canandaigua, NY 14424 ~ 394-5310 CECC School-Age Program 55 Wilcox Lane Canandaigua, NY 14424 ~ 394-5310 (at this location beginning 6/22/12) Our Children's Place Head Start 9 Village Drive Clifton Springs, NY 14432 ~ 315-462-3174 The CCDP's Children's Place 2075 State Route 245 Stanley, NY 14561 ~ 469-3594 http://www.ccdpkids.net/ Providing each child with high quality child care and education in a nurturing environment that encourages each child to reach their fullest potential. We provide a well-designed learning environment that encourages the whole growth of each child and the development of skills in decision making, problem solving and critical thinking.

The Children's Center of Brighton, Inc. 2501 Lac De Ville Blvd., Rochester, 14618 442-7400 ~ www.childrenscenter.net Family owned for four decades, The Children's Center of Brighton is committed to providing the highest quality child care available for children ages 6 weeks to 10 years. Owners work with highly qualified and dedicated staff to ensure that each child has the opportunity to enjoy learning in a safe, loving environment.

Crayon Campus, Inc. 101 Sully's Trail, Bldg. 30, Pittsford, 14534 381-4780 ~ www.crayoncampuschildcare.com We have over 20 unique years of experience. We are not a franchise! We treat children as individuals and with respect and do not use a cookie cutter approach, because every child is unique and learns and grows differently. Children are happy while learning, playing and socializing at Crayon Campus.


Child Care Providers & Programs Guide •

Expressive Beginnings Child Care 875 Commons Way , Rochester 14623 340-2077 ~ info@expressivebeginningschildcare.org www.expressivebeginningschildcare.org Facebook.com/ExpressiveBeginnings twitter.com/ExpBeginnings Offering infant and toddler care, preschool, pre-K, full-day kindergarten, before-and after-school care and school-age summer programs, plus Internet monitoring, topnotch learning curriculum and family fitness center next door, ready made dinners-to-go, valet dry cleaning and more. Located off I-390/E. Henrietta Road.

Faith Child Care & Nursery School 2576 Browncroft Blvd., Rochester, 14625 385-2360 ~ www.FCCNSChildcare.com FCCNS - an outstanding opportunity to learn and develop social consciousness in a Christian setting; providing quality programs for ages 8 wks.-12 yrs. including nursery school, infant/toddler/preschool, and before/after school care for Kindergarteners and up. Plus, we get to spend time every day exploring our natural playscape!

Fallone's Funtime Center

Special Advertising Section

124 Whittier Road, Rochester, 14624 594-2552 ~ www.fallonesfuntime.com Child Care and Fitness Program for ages 6 weeks - 15 years (Spencerport, Churchville-Chili School Districts). Teenage hangout or paid Counselor in Training Programs. Large gym, two playgrounds, field area and dance program. Indoor Soccer, Hockey and Climbing Room. Field trips during school recess breaks. Hours: 6am - 6pm Certified Teachers.

Friendship Children's Center 310 Fernwood Avenue, Rochester, 14609 342-7250 ~ friendshipchild@aol.com NAEYC Accredited Daycare. For children 12 months - 12 years. Free RCSD Pre-Kindergarten & Summer Camp Programs, Pre-Kdg 9 am 2:30 pm Monday - Friday. Before and after school care with great summer camp! Beautiful playground, all meals included and certified teachers.

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Special Advertising Section

Generations Child Care, Inc.

Child Care Providers & Programs Guide •

Main Office NW Rochester ~ 179 Stenson St. 254-8160 Gates, 2400 Chili Avenue ~ 247-3490 Fairport, 52 West Avenue ~ 425-1360 Irondequoit , 250 Empire Blvd ~ 482-1060 NE Rochester , 869 Clinton Ave ~ 613-7550 SW Rochester , 170 Highland Ave ~ 697-0499 Webster, 1085 Gravel Rd ~ 671-0030 www.generations-care.com All SEVEN centers are certified by National Early Childhood Program Accreditation, has a nurse on staff, offers before and after school care, vacation club, and summer camp for children 6 weeks to 12 years of age. Indoor and outdoor age-appropriate play areas, monthly field trips, and a unique intergenerational program.

The Goddard School for Early Childhood Development 131 Sully's Trail, Pittsford, 14534 381-0160 ~ www.goddardschools.com At Goddard SchoolÂŽ, professional teachers support healthy development of children 6 wks.- 6 yrs. We encourage children's lifelong love of learning and offer families the benefit of on-site owners and directors who provide dependable management and open communication, along with corporate care programs (ex: Quality Assurance and Accredited Continuing Education).

JLU Child Care, Inc. JLU Child Care, Inc. 2800 Spencerport Road , Spencerport, 14559 352-0017 ~ info@jluchildcare.com - www.jluchildcare.com Love to learn. Learn to love. JLU provides quality Christian care for children 6 weeks to 12 years. Our engaging curriculum includes Sign Language and Spanish. Nutritious meals and snacks are provided. Credit cards and DSS payments are accepted. Our experienced teachers treat each child as a child of God.

Kango Play Center 1565 Jefferson Road, Suite 180, Rochester, 14623 235-PLAY ~ academy@kangoplay.com - www.KangoPlay.com Kango Academy Child Care offers an educationally based pre-school & enriching day care. With programs in infant, toddler, Pre-School, PreKindergarten, and Full Day Kindergarten, children will learn through play. Hot lunch and healthy snacks provided. Take a tour of our sunlit classrooms at the best indoor playground in Rochester.

Kinderiffic Park Place Daycare 789 Park Avenue, Rochester, 14607 319-5895 ~ www.kinderiffic.com The terrific choice for all your child care needs! Kinderiffic is a NYS licensed center with Toddler and Preschool Programs. We proudly provide quality care in a fun, loving, and nurturing environment. Our small, "home-like" center is conveniently located to I490, our rates are affordable, and we have flexible scheduling options. Discover Kinderiffic!

Margaret's House Child Care Center at RIT 112 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, 14623 475-5176, Voice/TTY ~ www.rit.edu/studentaffairs/margaretshouse Come to visit our center and see our excellent staff in action - a high quality fun-filled environment for children to learn and grow! Infants through preschool, a full-day Kindergarten, and innovative summer program activities for grades 1-4.

Mendon Child Care Center at Mendon Meadows Mall, 53 Assembly Drive, Mendon, 14450 624-2337 ~ www.mendonchildcarecenter.com High quality child care center providing a warm, nurturing environment where children can discover the world around them through active exploration. Full and part-time programs for children 6 wks-8 yrs of age. Before and After School Care available. Developmentally appropriate activities and preschool curriculum followed. Now offering Universal Pre-K programs.

Park Ridge Child Care Center Park Ridge Campus, 1555 Long Pond Road, Rochester, 14626 750-7543 ~ www.unityhealth.org/childcare High quality child care for all members of the community in a safe and nurturing environment. Full and part time infant, toddler, pre-school and school age programs for ages 8 weeks - 12 years. Monday through Friday 6am - 6pm. Developmentally appropriate curriculum. Full time registered nurse on staff.

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Sunshine Daycare, Inc.

1000 E. Henrietta Road, Rochester, 14623 292-2640 ~ www.monroecc.edu/go/childcare High quality early care and education for children 8 weeks - 5 years. NAEYC accredited. Full year, school year and summer programs in a state-of-the-art early childhood facility. Community enrollment welcome!

2400 Oakview Drive, Rochester, 14617 467-1481 Providing high-quality day care for children ages 8 weeks through 12 years old. Experienced and nurturing staff. Developmentally Appropriate Curriculum. Bus transportation to all West Irondequoit schools. NYS Licensed. Also, Summer Day Camp program: 9-week sessions, weekly themes and field trips, fun and games.

Rochester Childfirst Network 941 South Avenue, Rochester, 14620 473-2858 ~ www.rcn4kids.org Rochester Childfirst Network (RCN) is more! A Preschool. An After-School and Summer Day Camp for school age children. A Place for Children with Special Needs. A Resource for Child Care Providers. A Leader in Early Education for over 150 years. Nationally Accredited. Serving Children 18 months to 12 years old.

St. Paul's Child Care 13 Vick Park B, Rochester, 14607 244-4527 ~ www.stpaulschildcare.org St. Paul's Child Care Center is a NAEYC Accredited, non-denominational, not-for-profit program providing quality care for families with children from birth to 5 years old. Our infant room, which has a 4:1 ratio, accepts infants as young as 8 weeks old. The Center is a UPK site. Visit our website or call us today! 357 Fairport Road, E. Rochester, 14445 ~ 381-3341 1924 Maiden Lane, Greece, 14626 ~ 225-8280 174 Pinnacle Road, Henrietta, 14623 ~ 334-7110 211 Tobey Road, Pittsford, 14534 ~ 381-7120 www.storybookchildcare.com We Love Kids! Locally owned daycare serving the Rochester area for over 49 years. From infants to School Age children, we focus on a nurturing environment. We offer low to no cost field trips, parent-teacher conferences, holiday/special events and more! Storybook's children, staff and parents make it a warm, family-orientated environment.

Twelve Corners Day Care & School-Age Program 155 Canal View, Rochester ~ 272-0880 2131 Elmwood Avenue ~ 271-6830 www.twelvecornersdaycare.com Conveniently located in Brighton, both programs are open 6:30am-6pm. Our long-term, caring staff provides a wide variety of activities to get children excited to learn in a small group setting. Our School Age Program offers full school year, holiday and summer camp programs for kids 5-12 years old. Call for more information!

Wolk Children's Centerat the Jewish Community Center 1200 Edgewood Avenue, Rochester, 14618 461-2000 X 272 ~ www.jccrochester.org The JCC's Wolk Children's Center provides a warm, nurturing experience for infants, toddlers and preschoolers. We offer an integrated, play-based curriculum at a facility like no other in Rochester. Flexible registration options for children ages 8 weeks - 5 years.

YMCA of Greater Rochester Programs vary by location. 546-5500 ~ www.rochesterymca.org The YMCA is the #1 Child Care provider in Monroe County and offers enriching, values-based programs in a safe, caring environment. Our licensed full-day child care centers offer programs starting at just 6 weeks and include Preschool, Universal Pre-K and Kindergarten Wrap Around. Before and After School programs reinforce positive values and are offered at YMCA branches and over 150 school locations. Homework help is available, as well as Arts & Crafts, Sports and Games. Resource-based, financial assistance offered for all programs.

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Special Advertising Section

Storybook Child Care

Child Care Providers & Programs Guide •

Richard M. Guon Child Care Center at MCC


Special Advertising Section

Child Care Providers & Programs Guide •

Looking for more Child Care Programs or Informational Articles?

Just a Click Away! Online Parenting Resources

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Child Care Council 595 Blossom Road, Suite 120 654-4720 or 800-743-KIDS, Toll Free ~ www.childcarecouncil.com The Child Care Council is your premier resource for quality child care, early childhood training and Family Child Care Registration for those starting a new child care business venture. Serving Livingston, Monroe, and Wayne counties since 1971. We are your resource for child care needs.

Montessori Programs Greece Montessori School 300 Chesterton Rd., Rochester, 14626 227-4830 ~ Rosa@greecemontessori.org - www.greecemontessori.org Providing the highest quality of Montessori philosophy, serving children 18 months to 7 years. Offering a highly stimulating environment with scientifically accurate didactic materials addressing the needs and senses of the child. Association Montessori Internationale approved and holds a charter for the NYS Board of Regents. Before- and After-School Programs 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Webster Montessori School 1310 Five Mile Line Road (at Plank Rd) , Webster, 14580 347-0055 ~ www.webstermontessori.org Come find out what your child can accomplish at Webster Montessori School! Children are guided to respond to their natural ambition to work and learn. We foster children’s inherent love of learning and develop concentration, motivation, persistence, and self-discipline. Classrooms and childcare for children ages 18 months through 12 years.

Trinity Montessori School 100 Golden Flyer Drive – Rochester, NY 14618 586-1044 ~ lscarafile@trinitymontessori.org ~ www.trinitymontessori.org The largest Montessori school in Rochester, our philosophy inspires a lifelong love of learning for children 21 months through sixth grade. Guiding your child to discover & appreciate their own invaluable gifts & talents, children learn the qualities of self-conviction, reverence and peace, supporting them in becoming all-embracing citizens.

Child Care Providers & Programs Guide •

Child Care Resources

Special Advertising Section

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • May 2012

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Special Advertising Section

Nanny & At-Home Services The Nanny Store

Child Care Providers & Programs Guide •

PO Box 1432, Webster, NY 14580 585-645-0025 ~ www.thenannystore.com The Nanny Store is a locally owned recruiting agency serving the Greater Rochester area with highly qualified nannies whom have passed our rigorous standards. Our services allow us to take the daunting task of finding, interviewing and screening a nanny off of your to-do list. We pride ourselves in taking the time to find out what our families want by creating a personalized care plan during an in home consultation. Whether you are seeking a live in, full time, part time, summer, after school or temporary, The Nanny Store can support your family in a childcare decision.

Preschools & Nursery Schools Allendale Columbia School 519 Allens Creek Rd., Rochester, 14618 381-4560 ~ sscharr@allendalecolumbia.org www.allendalecolumbia.org Allendale Columbia School is an independent, co-educational, liberal arts and sciences school for students in Nursery through 12th grade. We offer a 6:1 student-to-faculty ratio, exceptional programming and a world-class faculty. Our educators treat every student as an individual, providing countless opportunities for enrichment, achievement and personal growth.

Northstar Christian Academy (NCA) Daycare & Preschool

Babies’ brains won’t grow by themselves.

332 Spencerport Road, Rochester, NY 4606 247-8620 www.northstardaycare.com A place where “Children find Learning Fun”. We offer care for 3–12 years old year round. Preschool classes run the school year. Weekly summer camp for all ages. Meals & snacks provided. Call us or stop by for a visit.

Rush Nursery School

Sing to your baby.

50 Ward Hill Road Henrietta, NY 334-0664 ~ www.rushnurseryschool.org For over 50 years we have provided a high quality preschool offering separate classes for 2,3 and 4 year olds, including a 5-day 4 year old program. Morning and afternoon classes available. Classes are taught by certified teachers and include gym, library, field trips and so much more.

St. Mark's Christian Preschool and Daycare

Talk to your baby. Play with your baby.

779 Erie Station Road, W. Henrietta, 14586 334-4130, preschool@saintmarkslutheran.org, www.saintmarkslutheran.org/preschool At St. Mark's Preschool, we aim to provide children with a solid educational foundation in a safe, intimate setting. We offer combined 3 and 4 year old classes Monday through Friday from 9-11:30 a.m. , as well as wrap-around daycare before and after preschool. Come learn with us!

Stepping Stones Learning Center

Call 292-BABY SUPPORT FOR YOU

AND YOUR BABY.

Space donated to the Ad Council as a public service of this publication. ©2011 Ad Council Rochester. All rights reserved.

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41 Colebrook Drive, Rochester, 14617 467-4567 ~ www.steppingstoneslearning.com Join us now on Facebook! SSLC is a fully inclusive early childhood program serving children in unique settings where they learn and grow together and from each other. We operate classrooms for children 2 to 5 where certified teachers utilize a curriculum emphasizing early literacy, pre-academic and pre-Kindergarten skills. We also have an RCSD UPK program and Summer FunSchool. Call for further information.


Child Care Providers & Programs Guide • Special Advertising Section

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Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • May 2012


Calendar

may events

Activities • Exhibits • Theater • Storytelling • Shows • Family Fun • Outdoor Adventures Parenting Programs • and lots more for families to do in & around Rochester!

May 11, 12, A Day Out With Thomas 13, 18, 19 & 20 Mystery on the Rails Tour

A

ll Aboard for Day Out With Thomas! Thomas the Tank Engine is chugging into a station nearby for Day Out With Thomas: Mystery On The Rails Tour 2012. Thomas fans are invited to come spend the day with their favorite No. 1 engine. Storytelling, hands-on arts and crafts, and much more! This is a family event that offers aspiring engineers and their families the unique opportunity to take a ride with the classic storybook engine. Where: Railroad Museum 530 West Ave., Medina, NY 14103 When: May 11, 12, 13, 18, 19 and 20. Multiple trips each day. Cost: $18 For More Info: Visit the museum ticket office, call 1-866-468-7630 or visit www.railroadmuseum.net

SAT

SUN

5&6

RPO Presents: Dr. Seuss' The Sneetches

A work for narrator and orchestra by Spanish composer Lorenzo Palomo. This performance will have a special Seussical twist that your family will truly enjoy. $10-$15. 7pm Saturday, 2pm Sunday. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 60 Gibbs St., Rochester, 454-2100. www.rpo.org

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FRI

SAT

SUN

18, 19 & 20

Rochester City Ballet Dance Mix

Rochester City Ballet presents a choreographer showcase. Much like the groundbreaking Legends of Dance in the spring of 2009, Dance Mix will be an eclectic mix of dance styles and cutting-edge performances. Friday & Saturday 7:30pm, Sunday 2 pm. $36-$60. Callahan Theatre, Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Avenue, Rochester, 389-2170. www.boxoffice.naz.edu

SAT

SUN

26 & 27

Literature Live: Meet Papa Bear

Each Literature Live weekend offers the opportunity to meet, greet, and pose for photos with some of the most popular storybook characters of all time and enjoy related story readings. Today you can meet Papa Bear from the Berenstain Bears. Afterward, check out a book from the Literature Live book cart and continue the experience at home. Included with museum admission. 1-5pm. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. 263-2700. www.museumofplay.


calendar of events • local family-friendly activities calendar guide: Walks & Worthy Causes . . 50

June . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Library . . . . . . . . . . 55 Support Groups . . . 57 Ongoing . . . . . . . . . 58

03 * Thursday

RED WINGS VS BUFFALO. PostGame fireworks, Cinco de Mayo, Pre-Game Autograph Booth. 7:05pm. Frontier Field, One Morrie Silver Way, Rochester, 454-1001. www.RedWingsBaseball.com

6th Annual Wildlife Festival

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Sunday, May 5

06 * Sunday DR. SEUSS’ THE SNEETCHES. See May 5. 2pm. FLY ME TO THE MOON. See May 4. 1pm.

MERCIER LITERACY SOCIAL. Find out why the Mercier Literacy Program is important to our community. Learn about they help more than 300 Rochester children improve their reading skills, and help them continue this effort with your support. 5-8pm. Max Rochester, 25 Gibbs St Rochester 14604. Tcruz@mercierliteracy.com www.mercierliteracy.com

RED WINGS VS BUFFALO. Knot Hole Kid’s Club Game, PostGame Run the Bases with Spikes and Mittsy, Pre-Game Autograph Booth. 1:05pm. Frontier Field, One Morrie Silver Way, Rochester, 14608. 454-1001. www.RedWingsBaseball.com

04 * Friday

07 * Monday

FLY ME TO THE MOON. The first animated giant-screen film at the museum combines the Apollo 11 mission with a twist. Check website for daily show times. 4pm. $3-7 Ages: 5yrs+ Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave. Rochester, 14607. 271-1880. www.rmsc.org

TODDLER BOOK CLUB AT THE STRONG. Readings of classic children’s tales followed by music and movement activities. This month: Sing a Song. 10:30am, 11:30am, & 12:30pm. Free with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester 14607. 263-2700. www.museumofplay.org

____ ____ ____ ____ 05 * Saturday

6TH ANNUAL WILDLIFE FESTIVAL. Celebrate important bird areas throughout the Finger Lakes region. Enjoy live birds of prey, kids games & activities, live music, food, prizes, hiking, canoeing, vendors, wildlife exhibitors and more. 10am-3pm. $3/adult, $1/ School-aged children, Free for kids under 5 Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, 13146. 315-3653588 or visit www.audubon.org DR. SEUSS’ THE SNEETCHES. A work for narrator and orchestra by Spanish composer Lorenzo Palomo. This performance will have a special Seussical twist that your family will truly enjoy. 7pm. $10-$15. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 60 Gibbs St., Rochester, 454-2100. www.rpo.org FLY ME TO THE MOON. See May 4. 2:30pm. ‘I LOVE MY PARK’ DAY. Show your love for our local parks. Volunteers help clean up the gardens, trails, and site perimeter. Stick around for a longball game at 2pm. Snack and tools provided. 9:30-11:30am. Ganondagan Historic Site 1488 Route 444 Victor 14564. 742-1690. www.ganondagan.org

09 * Wednesday GEVA PRESENTS: COMPANY. An award-winning musical from the celebrated composer of Into the Woods, Sweeney Todd and A Little Night Music- Stephen Sondheim. Continues through June 10- visit website for full performance schedule. $20+ Ages: 15yrs+ Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd., Rochester 14607. 232-1366. www.gevatheatre.org SENIOR SOJOURN. Enjoy the changing seasons with senior naturalist Shariee Edersheim as she takes you on an informative walk through the fall foliage. 11am-12pm. $3, $10/family Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Road, Naples 374-6160. www.rmsc.org

FLY ME TO THE MOON. See May 4. 4pm. LILAC FESTIVAL 2012. Ten days of free entertainment, including performances by national recording artists, free children’s entertainment during the week and on the weekends! Daily special events. Continues through May 20. 10:30am-8:30pm. Highland Park, Rochester, 256-4960. http://www.lilacfestival.com STAGES PRESENTS: WEST SIDE STORY. Join A Magical Journey Through Stages as they present this classic story of star-crossed lovers and their inevitable fate. Visit website for complete show schedule. 7:30pm. $12-$15. Stages, 875 East Main St, Auditorium Center, Third Floor, Rochester, 935-7173. www.mjtstages.com FREE • STORY TIME! Young children and their parents/caregivers will have an opportunity to do activities that promote language development and early reading skills in fun ways. Interaction through stories, songs, rhymes and projects. 9-9:45am. Ages: 2-4 yrs Seton Catholic School library 165 Rhinecliff Dr Rochester 14618 473-6604 http://schools.dor.org/seton/

____ ____ 11 * Friday

DAY OUT WITH THOMAS. The 2012 Tour includes a 25-min ride with a full-size Thomas the Tank Engine, meeting Sir Topham Hatt, live music, crafts, Thomas jump tent, giveaways and more. Multiple departures throughout the day. 9am-5:30pm. $18/Ages 2 & up. Medina Railroad Museum, 530 West Ave., Medina. 798-6106. www.railroadmuseum.net

12 * Saturday DAY OUT WITH THOMAS. See May 11. 9am-5:30pm.

FIRST ROBOTICS SHOWCASE. Learn about the FIRST LEGO League and how it combines technology, engineering, cooperation, and hard work to create a robot that is built entirely by student and mentor participants. Meet the team and see this year’s robot. 11am-2pm. Included with museum admission Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave. 271-1880. www.rmsc.org FLY ME TO THE MOON. See May 4. 2:30pm. G. WILLIAM LADUE RECITAL SERIES. A celebration of the talent, passion and dedication of greater Rochester’s accomplished vocal artists. 2pm. Nazareth College, Wilmot Recital Hall, 4245 East Avenue, Rochester. 738-5995. www.empirestatelyrictheatre.org LILAC FESTIVAL 2012. See May 11. 10:30am-8:30pm. LITERATURE LIVE: PIPPI LONGSTOCKING. Each Literature Live weekend offers the opportunity to meet, greet, and pose for photos with some of the most popular storybook characters of all time and enjoy related story readings. 11am-5pm. Free with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 263-2700. www.museumofplay.org

____ STAGES PRESENTS: WEST SIDE STORY. See May 11. 7:30pm.

13 * Sunday DAY OUT WITH THOMAS. See May 11. 9am-5:30pm.

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calendar of events • local family-friendly activities EXHIBIT CLOSING: THE WIZARD OF OZ. Last chance to experience an interactive family journey from Dorothy Gale’s farm to the colorful Land of Oz. Noon-5pm. Free with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 263-2700. www.museumofplay.org FLY ME TO THE MOON. See May 4. 1pm. LILAC FESTIVAL 2012. See May 11. 10:30am-8:30pm. LITERATURE LIVE: PIPPI LONGSTOCKING. See May 12. 1pm-5pm.

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STAGES PRESENTS: WEST SIDE STORY. See May 11. 2pm.

14 * Monday LILAC FESTIVAL 2012. See May 11. 10:30am-8:30pm.

____

TODDLER BOOK CLUB AT THE STRONG. See May 7. 10:30am, 11:30am, & 12:30pm.

15 * Tuesday LILAC FESTIVAL 2012. See May 11. 10:30am-8:30pm. RED WINGS VS LOUISVILLE. Family Four-Pack Night, Pre-Game Autograph Booth. 7:05pm. Frontier Field, One Morrie Silver Way, Rochester, 454-1001. www.RedWingsBaseball.com

____ 16 * Wednesday

LILAC FESTIVAL 2012. See May 11. 10:30am-8:30pm. MAKING AMERICAN MUSIC. Celebrate the can-do attitude, faith and perseverance of the American people during World War II. Performed in the style of a 1940’s weekly broadcast. 7:30pm. $16-$19. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 263-2700. www.museumofplay.org NATURE HIKE. Participants will hike around the woods, grasslands and wetlands experiencing the sights, sounds, and smells signifying that spring is here. Bring your cameras and binoculars. 9-10:30am. $3-$5, $15/family. Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, 13146, 315-365-3588. www.audubon.org RED WINGS VS LOUISVILLE. Wings Wednesday and Pre-Game Autograph Booth. 7:05pm. Frontier Field, One Morrie Silver Way, Rochester, 454-1001. www.RedWingsBaseball.com

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walks & worthy causes! 05 * Saturday 6TH ANNUAL DAYSTAR DERBY. To support New York’s only licensed medical day and respite program for medically fragile infants. 2:30-6:30 pm. $100 Nazareth College Equestrian Meadow 385-6287. www.daystarhome.net

06 * Sunday WALK MS. Raise funds to combat multiple sclerosis. Locations at Genesee Valley Park, Greece Olympia High School, and Canandaigua Middle School. Registration at 9 am. Fundraising encouraged. Various locationssee website for details. 271-0801. www.msupstateny.org

07 * Monday TOAST TO HOPE. Raise money and awareness for breast cancer research and support programs of the American Cancer Society. 5-9pm. $60 Locust Hill Country Club, 2000 Jefferson Rd. Pittsford, 14534. 224-4910. www.cancer.org

11 * Friday MAY GERANIUM SALE. Raise funds for programs at the Rochester Museum and Science Center. Orders must be received by May 7th. Eisenhart Auditorium, Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave. 271-1880. www.rmsc.org ROCHESTER CHILDFIRST NETWORK’S ANNUAL GARAGE SALE. Donate your gently used items to benefit the Children’s Fund, which provides services to underserved children. 8am-2pm. 941 South Ave. Rochester 14620. 473-2858. www.rcn4kids.org

12 * Saturday ARTHRITIS WALK. To raise funds for Arthritis Foundation programs and research. Registration begins at 9:30 am. Walk at 10:30am. Genesee Valley Park 99 Elmwood Ave Rochester 14620. 264-1480. www.arthritis.org

PHOTO COURTESY OF CP ROCHESTER MARCH FOR BABIESCANADAIGUA. To raise funds and awareness to improve the health of babies. Registration at 9am Walk at 10am. Sonnenberg Park, 151 Charlotte Street Canandaigua 14424. 424-3250 www.marchofdimes.org/newyork MAY GERANIUM SALE. See May 11. ROCHESTER CHILDFIRST NETWORK’S ANNUAL GARAGE SALE. See May 11. 9am-4pm. RUN FOR FUN 5K RUN/WALK 2012. Run or Walk participants, along with families and friends help support this fundraiser for CP Rochester. Registration 7:45 8:45am. The event includes a Silent Auction, pie throwing contests, dunking booth. 9am. $3/ under 12yrs-free. CP Rochester’s Winton Campus, 3399 Winton Road S., Rochester. www.cprochester.org/RunForFun

13 * Sunday PINK RIBBON RUN & FAMILY WALK. Annual Mother’s Day event. Registration / pledge forms are available at BCCR or any Wegmans location. 9am. Ontario Beach Park, 1 Beach Ave. 473-8177, www.bccr.org and click on walk/race logo. www.bccr.org ROCHESTER CHILDFIRST NETWORK’S ANNUAL GARAGE SALE. See May 11. 9am-1pm.

20 * Sunday MARCH FOR BABIESROCHESTER. To raise funds and awareness to improve the health of babies. Registration at 9am. Walk at 10am. Ontario Beach Park 4800 Lake Ave. Rochester 14613. 424-3250 ext. 13 www.marchofdimes.org/newyork

June 02 * Saturday STROLL FOR STRONG KIDS. An annual family-friendly event where you can choose to run the 5K race, walk with your family and friends or both. All proceeds from the fundraising for the event benefit Golisano’s Children’s Hospital. This years theme is Super Heroes. 8:30am. University of Rochester River Campus, Elmwood Ave Rochester 14620. www.urmc.rochester.edu ZOOBILATION: 2012. Enjoy champagne, live music & cocktails w/a cause! Fundraiser benefits educational programs, kids’ camps, programs & initiatives, day-to-day operations & more at the Zoo. 5:45pm. $80+/person. Ages: 21+ Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St. 336-7123. www.senecaparkzoo.org


calendar of events • local family-friendly activities 17 * Thursday

18 * Friday

FREE • GREATER ROCHESTER MOTHER OF TWINS CLUB. September -June GRMOTC meets on the third Thursday of each month. 7pm. Laurelton United Presbyterian Church, 334 Helendale Road, Rochester. www.grmotc.com

DAY OUT WITH THOMAS. See May 11. 9am-5:30pm.

LILAC FESTIVAL 2012. See May 11. 10:30am-8:30pm. MONTEZUMA BIRDING VAN TOUR. Hop in the van for an excursion to Montezuma’s birding hot spots where hundreds of thousands of waterfowl can be seen. Participants are encouraged to bring binoculars and cameras. 8-11am. $7.50/child, $10/adult, $30/family Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, 13146. 315-3653588 or visit www.audubon.org RED WINGS VS LOUISVILLE. Buy one get one Thursday- buy one ticket get one free with honey receipt, Legends Card Strip Giveaway (first 1,000 fans 21yrs and over), PreGame Autograph Booth. 7:05pm. Frontier Field, One Morrie Silver Way, Rochester, 454-1001. www.RedWingsBaseball.com

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FLY ME TO THE MOON. See May 4. 4pm. LILAC FESTIVAL 2012. See May 11. 10:30am-8:30pm. RED WINGS VS LOUISVILLE. Pre-Game Autograph Booth, Legends Card Strip Giveaway (first 1,000 fans 21 yrs and over), Post Game Fireworks. 7:05pm. Frontier Field, One Morrie Silver Way, Rochester, 454-1001. www.RedWingsBaseball.com ROCHESTER CITY BALLET DANCE MIX. Much like the groundbreaking Legends of Dance in spring 2009, Dance Mix will be an eclectic mix of dance styles and cutting-edge performances. 7:30pm. $36-$60. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Avenue, Rochester. For tickets, 389-2170. www.boxoffice.naz.edu

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STAGES PRESENTS: WEST SIDE STORY. See May 11. 7:30pm.

19 * Saturday DAY OUT WITH THOMAS. See May 11. 9am-5:30pm.

Lilac Festival 2012 Join your neighbors for one of Rochester's most popular events! Ten days of free entertainment, including performances by national recording artists. Free children's entertainment during the week and on the weekends! Daily special events. Festival runs May 11th through May 20th. Highland Park, Highland Ave., Rochester 14620. 256-4960. www.Lilacfestival.com

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calendar of events • local family-friendly activities FLY ME TO THE MOON. See May 4. 2:30pm. FREE • GREATER ROCHESTER TEEN BOOK FESTIVAL. The 7th annual TBF is open to everyone, but seating preference will be given to teen readers at all sessions. No registration required, check website for this years line up of authors. 9am-5pm. Nazareth College, Shults Center, 4245 East Avenue, Rochester. 14618. 223-9091 http://www.teenbookfestival.org/ LILAC FESTIVAL 2012. See May 11. 10:30am-8:30pm. LITERATURE LIVE: MEET CORDUROY. Beloved literary characters jump off the pages of favorite books at this weekend series that pairs storybook character appearances with readings. 11am5pm. Free with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 263-2700. www.museumofplay.org RED WINGS VS GWINNETT. Pre Game Autograph Booth, Knot Hole Kid’s Club Game, Pre Game Scout Scavenger Hunt, Post Game Fire Works. 7:05pm. Frontier Field, One Morrie Silver Way, Rochester. 454-1001. www.RedWingsBaseball.com ROCHESTER CITY BALLET DANCE MIX. See May 18. 7:30pm. SERENDIPITY WALK. Bring a lunch and sturdy footwear for this guided walk through areas of the nature center that most people never see! Be prepared for varied terrain—up and down, wet and dry. 11am-2pm. $3, $10 per family RMSC Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd., Naples, 374-6160. www.rmsc.org

____ STAGES PRESENTS: WEST SIDE STORY. See May 11. 7:30pm.

20 * Sunday DAY OUT WITH THOMAS. See May 11. 9am-5:30pm. FLY ME TO THE MOON. See May 4. 1pm. LILAC FESTIVAL 2012 - FINAL DAY. See May 11. 10:30am-8:30pm. LITERATURE LIVE: MEET CORDUROY. See May 19. 1pm-5pm. NUMBERS LEAGUE- DISPLAY CLOSING. Last chance to discover Heroic Hot Dog, Curious Cool Cat, Digital Diva, and a host of colorful superheroes brought to life by local Rochester artist Chris Pallace. Included with general museum admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 263-2700. www.museumofplay.org

Greater Rochester Teen Book Fest Saturday, May 19

RED WINGS VS GWINNETT. Minnesota Twins 10th Year Affiliation Anniversary Magnet Giveaway (first 2,500 fans), Pre Game Autograph Booth, Knot Hole Kid’s Club Game, Post Game Run the Bases with Spikes and Mittsy. 1:05pm. Frontier Field, One Morrie Silver Way, Rochester, 454-1001. www.RedWingsBaseball.com ROCHESTER CITY BALLET DANCE MIX. See May 18. 2pm. STAGES PRESENTS: WEST SIDE STORY. See May 11. 2pm. FREE • TEMPLE BETH EL PTO’S HUGE GARAGE SALE. An indoor garage sale featuring Children, Household Items, Great Family Bargains! To raise money for the Parent Teacher Organization and Keshet Preschool. Bag sale begins at 1:30 pm. 8am-2pm. Temple Beth El, 139 Winton Road South Rochester 14610. www.tberochester.org TROLLEYS, DIESELS, AND TRACK CAR RIDE SEASON OPEN. Enjoy a unique ride experience with a 2-mile round trip interurban trolley excursion that connects to a diesel train. The combined ride links the New York Museum of Transportation. 11am-5pm. $5-$7. New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 East River Road, Rush, 533-1113. www.nymtmuseum.org WHIMSICAL ART TRAIL-E EXHIBIT DISPLAY ENDING. Last chance to take a walk on the whimsical side and see imaginative creations of local artists. noon-5pm. Free with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 263-2700. www.museumofplay.org

21 * Monday MONDAY KICKS FOR AGES 2 TO 6. Playful learning activities designed for 2- to 6-year olds. Meetings held one Monday a month. This month: Sing and Dance. 10am-2pm. Free with admission. Ages: 2yrs-6yrs. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 263-2700. www.museumofplay.org RED WINGS VS GWINNETT. Pre Game Autograph Booth, Kids Eat Free. 7:05pm. Frontier Field, One Morrie Silver Way, Rochester. 454-1001. www.RedWingsBaseball.com

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TODDLER BOOK CLUB AT THE STRONG. See May 7. 10:30am, 11:30am, & 12:30pm.

22 * Tuesday RED WINGS VS GWINNETT. Family Four Pack Night, Education Day, Pre Game Autograph Booth. 11:05 am. Frontier Field, One Morrie Silver Way, Rochester. 454-1001. www.RedWingsBaseball.com

____ 25 * Friday

A MEMORIAL DAY TRIBUTE. Principal Pops Conductor Jeff Tyzik will lead the Orchestra as our Military heroes are honored. 8pm. $15-$75. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 60 Gibbs St., Rochester. 454-2100. www.rpo.org

FLY ME TO THE MOON. See May 4. 4pm. SCIENCE ON THE EDGE LECTURE. The Re-Convergence of Music and Science with Mark Bocko and David Headlam, Departments of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Music Theory (Eastman School of Music, University of Rochester). 7:30pm. $8$15. RMSC Eisenhart Auditorium, 657 East Ave. 271-4320. www.rmsc.org

____ 26 * Saturday

BIRDING AND BOATING. Explore the waterways of the Montezuma Wetlands Complex and find out what birds are singing, flying or swimming along the way. Rent a canoe or bring your own. 1:304:30pm. $7.50/child, $12.50/adult, $40 canoe rental. Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, 13146. 315-365-3588 or www.audubon.org FLY ME TO THE MOON. See May 4. 2:30pm. LITERATURE LIVE: MEET PAPA BEAR. Each Literature Live weekend offers the opportunity to meet, greet, and pose for photos with some of the most popular storybook characters of all time and enjoy related story readings. Meet Papa Bear from the Berenstain Bears. 11am-5pm. Free with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 263-2700. www.museumofplay.org

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calendar of events • local family-friendly activities LITTLE BUDDIES MOVIE SERIES. The MVP Little Buddies Series is a familyfriendly film series sponsored by MVP and Genesee Valley Parent. This month’s feature is Eleanor’s Secret. 10am. $5. The Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. 258-0400. www.thelittle.org

____ 27 * Sunday FLY ME TO THE MOON. See May 4. 1pm.

____

LITERATURE LIVE: MEET PAPA BEAR. See May 26. 1pm-5pm.

28 * Monday FLY ME TO THE MOON. See May 4. 1pm.

____

TODDLER BOOK CLUB AT THE STRONG. See May 7. 10:30am, 11:30am, & 12:30pm.

Stages Presents: West Side Story May 11-13, 18-20

June 01 * Friday LITERACY VOLUNTEERS OF ROCHESTER BOOK SALE. Sale items will include: new and used books, CD’s, DVD’s, videotapes, unabridged books-on-tape, and books on CD. 9am-7pm. Literacy Volunteers of Rochester, 1600 South Ave Rochester 14620. 473-3030. www.literacyrochester.org RED WINGS VS COLUMBUS. Pre-Game Autograph Booth, Legends Card Strip Giveaway (1st 1,000 fans 21 & older), Post-game Fireworks. 7:05pm. Frontier Field ,1 Morrie Way, Rochester. 234-7660 www.RedWingsBaseball.com

____ 02 * Saturday

AN EVENING OF ART AND JAZZ. Support the Advocacy Center, a nonprofit that touches the lives of more than 20,000 people each year. 6-11pm. $50 (students $30) George Eastman House, 900 East Ave., Rochester. 271-3361. www.advocacycenter.com

Continued >>>

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calendar of events • local family-friendly activities

library events & activities! 01 * Tuesday DROP-IIN STORYTIME. All ages, no registration required. 10:30am. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7093. www3.libraryweb.org TEEN ADVISORY BOARD. Be a part of the Teen Advisory Board. Grades 7-12. No registration. 6-7pm. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7093. www3.libraryweb.org

02 * Wednesday PRE-K K STORY TIME. Rhymes, songs, games, books and a craft. Older and younger siblings welcome. 10am. Ages: 2-4 years E. Rochester Public Library, 111 West Elm St., E. Rochester. 428-8248. www3.libraryweb.org

04 * Friday FRIENDS OF HPL BOOK SHOPPE BOOK SALE. The public may shop on Friday and Saturday. Hardcover books $1, paperback $0.25, specials marked separately. 12-5pm Henrietta Public Library Community Room, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7093. www3.libraryweb.org

05 * Saturday FRIENDS OF HPL BOOK SHOPPE BOOK SALE. See May 4. 10am-1pm.

07 * Monday BABY STORY TIME. Each 20-30 minute session features stories, songs, finger plays and more with a different theme each week.11:15am Ages: 0-23 mo Irondequoit Public Library-Evans Branch, 45 Cooper Rd., Rochester. 336-6062. www3.libraryweb.org

BABY STORY TIMES. Each 20-30 minute session features stories, songs, finger plays and more with a different theme each week. 10am. Ages: 0-23 mo E. Rochester Public Library, 111 West Elm St., E. Rochester. 428-8248. www3.libraryweb.org CRAFTERNOON. Make a Mothers Day craft. 4pm. Ages: 6+ yrs. Irondequoit Public Library-Evans Branch, 45 Cooper Rd., Rochester. 336-6062. www3.libraryweb.org CRAFTY KIDS STORY TIME. Stories and a craft. Younger siblings welcome with adult. Registration required. 3pm. Ages: 5-10 years. E. Rochester Public Library, 111 West Elm St., E. Rochester, 428-8248. www3.libraryweb.org TODDLERS/TALKERS STORYTIME. Each 20-30 minute session features stories, songs, finger plays and more with a different theme each week. 10:15am. Ages: 2-3 Irondequoit Public Library-Evans Branch, 45 Cooper Rd., Rochester. 336-6062. www3.libraryweb.org

10 * Thursday

15 * Tuesday

EVENING FAMILY STORY TIME. Stories, rhymes, songs and a simple craft. Come in PJ’s - stuffed animals welcome too! No registration required. 6:30pm. Ages: 2+yrs. Irondequoit Public Library-Evans Branch, 45 Cooper Rd., Rochester. 336-6062. www3.libraryweb.org

DROP-IIN STORYTIME. See May 1. 10:30am. Henrietta Public Library.

STORIES ABOUT MY GRANDFATHER, MAHATMA GANDHI. Arun Gandhi will tell stories of his famous grandfather, with whom he lived from age 10 to 12. He will talk about the lessons he learned about peace and nonviolence. Registration is required, space is limited. 7-8:30 pm. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7093. www3.libraryweb.org

12 * Saturday MOTHER/DAUGHTER MAKEOVER. Spend some quality time with your mother and have fun giving each other makeovers. Registration begins required, space is limited. 23:30pm. Ages: 12+ years Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7093. www3.libraryweb.org

08 * Tuesday DROP-IIN STORYTIME. See May 1. 10:30am. Henrietta Public Library.

14 * Monday

PRESCHOOL/PRE-R READERS STORY TIME. Each 20-30 minute session features stories, songs, finger plays and more with a different theme each week. 11:15am, Ages: 4-5. Irondequoit Public Library-Evans Branch, 45 Cooper Rd., Rochester. 336-6062. www3.libraryweb.org

BABY STORY TIMES. See May 7. 10am. E. Rochester Public Library.

TODDLERS/TALKERS STORYTIME. See May 7. Irondequoit Public Library-Evans Branch.

CRAFY KIDS STORY TIME. See May 7. 3pm. E. Rochester Public Library.

09 * Wednesday

TODDLERS/TALKERS STORYTIME. See May 7. Irondequoit Public Library-Evans Branch.

PRE-K K STORY TIME. See May 2. 10am. E. Rochester Public Library.

BABY STORY TIME. See May 7. Irondequoit Public Library-Evans Branch.

PRESCHOOL/PRE-R READERS STORY TIME. See May 8. Irondequoit Public Library-Evans Branch. TODDLERS/TALKERS STORYTIME. See May 7. Irondequoit Public Library-Evans Branch

16 * Wednesday BOOKTALK. Help decide which books are purchased for the library while working on a book related craft. 3:30-4:30pm. Ages: grade 46 Irondequoit Public Library-Evans Branch, 45 Cooper Rd., Rochester. 336-6062. www3.libraryweb.org PRE-K K STORY TIME. See May 2. 10am. E. Rochester Public Library.

21 * Monday BABY STORY TIME. See May 7. Irondequoit Public Library-Evans Branch. BABY STORY TIMES. See May 7. 10am. E. Rochester Public Library. CRAFY KIDS STORY TIME. See May 7. 3pm. E. Rochester Public Library TODDLERS/TALKERS STORYTIME. See May 7. Irondequoit Public Library-Evans Branch.

22 * Tuesday DROP-IIN STORYTIME. See May 1. 10:30am. Henrietta Public Library. PRESCHOOL/PRE-R READERS STORY TIME. See May 8. Irondequoit Public Library-Evans Branch. TODDLERS/TALKERS STORYTIME. See May 7. Irondequoit Public Library-Evans Branch.

23 * Wednesday PRE-K K STORY TIME. See May 2. 10am. E. Rochester Public Library.

29 * Tuesday DROP-IIN STORYTIME. See May 1. 10:30am. Henrietta Public Library.

30 * Wednesday TEEN GAME NIGHT. Hang out with your friends at HPL’s monthly Teen Game Night. No registration. 6:308pm. Ages: 12yrs+. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7093. www3.libraryweb.org

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calendar of events • local family-friendly activities EXHIBIT OPENING: DESIGN ZONE. Hands-on interactive and computerbased activities reveal how video game developers, music producers, roller coaster designers, and others use math to do amazing things. 10am-8pm. Free with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 263-2700. www.museumofplay.org LITERACY VOLUNTEERS OF ROCHESTER BOOK SALE. See June1. 10am-6pm. RED WINGS VS COLUMBUS. Pre-Game Autograph Booth, Legends Card Strip Giveaway (1st 1,000 fans 21 & older) Card and Collectibles Show, Replica Glove Giveaway (1st 1,500 kids 14 & under) Post-game Fireworks. 7:05pm. Frontier Field ,1 Morrie Way, Rochester. 234-7660. www.RedWingsBaseball.com

Design Zone at the Strong Hands-on interactive and computer-based activities reveal how video game developers, music producers, roller coaster designers, and others use math to do amazing things. Exhibit runs June 2nd thru December 3rd. National Museum of Play at the Strong, One Manhattan Square Rochester 14607. 263-2700. www.museumofplay.org

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EXHIBIT OPENING: DESIGN ZONE. See June 2.

____ LITERACY VOLUNTEERS OF ROCHESTER BOOK SALE. See June 1. 10am-6pm.

04 * Monday RED WINGS VS COLUMBUS. Kids Eat Free, Pre-Game Autograph Booth. 7:05pm. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Way, Rochester. 234-7660. www.RedWingsBaseball.com TODDLER BOOK CLUB AT THE STRONG. Readings of classic children’s tales followed by music and movement activities. This month: Summertime Stories. 10:30am, 11:30am, and 12:30pm. Free with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester. 263-2700. www.museumofplay.org

____ ____ 03 * Sunday

RED WINGS VS COLUMBUS. Pre-Game Autograph Booth, Plex from Yo Gabba Gabba! Appearance, Knot Hole Kid’s Club Game, Bishop Clark’s Catholic Schools Day, PostGame Run the Bases with Spikes & Mittsy. 1:05pm. Frontier Field ,1 Morrie Way, Rochester. 234-7660. www.RedWingsBaseball.com

05 * Tuesday RED WINGS VS. NORFOLK. Family Four-Pack Night, Pre-Game Autograph Booth. 7:05pm. Frontier Field ,1 Morrie Way, Rochester. 234-7660. www.RedWingsBaseball.com


calendar of events • local family-friendly activities

meet up!

22 * Tuesday

MOMS CLUB-N NEWARK-PPALMYRA. For location and further information about our activities please email us. 9am. NewPalMomsClub@gmail.com

OPERATION KIDS. This program is geared toward children who will be undergoing surgery and their families. Includes a tour of the Surgical Care Center, Operating Room and Post Anesthesia Care Unit. RSVP required. 7pm-7:45pm. F.F. Thompson Hospital, 350 Parrish Street, Canandaigua, 396-6231. www.thompsonhealth.com

08 * Tuesday FIRST TIME AROUND GROUP. This educational and social monthly support gathering is for first time mothers and their babies. An RN BSN and a RNC certified lactation consultant will be available for questions on breastfeeding and parenting. 10am-11:30am. F.F. Thompson Hospital, 350 Parrish Street, Canandaigua, 396-6497. www.thompsonhealth.com MOMS CLUB OF PENFIELD/ER/BRIGHTON. Offers support and socialization for at-home moms and their children. Meetings are held the second Tuesday of every month. 10-11:30am. For locations and details email penfieldmoms@yahoo.com OPERATION KIDS. This program is geared toward children who will be undergoing surgery and their families. Includes a tour of the Surgical Care Center, Operating Room and Post Anesthesia Care Unit. RSVP required. 7-7:45pm. F.F. Thompson Hospital, 350 Parrish Street, Canandaigua, 396-6231. www.thompsonhealth.com

10 * Thursday MOMS CLUB OF CLARKSONHAMLIN. Support and social opportunities for at home moms. Meets the second Thursday of the month. 10am. Call 502-8805 or visit website for location and details. www.frontiernet.net/~clarksonhamlinmomsclub/

HOLISTIC MOMS ROCHESTER. This month’s topic is Qi Infusions with Ethan Borg. Children welcome. 6:30pm. Christ Episcopal Church, 36 S. Main St., Pittsford. www.holisticmomsrochester.blogspot. com

MOMS CLUB OF PENFIELD/ER/BRIGHTON. Offers support and socialization for at-home moms and their children. Meetings are held the second Tuesday of every month. 10-11:30am. Email penfieldmoms@yahoo.com for locations and details.

WANT YOUR SUPPORT GROUP LISTED IN THIS SECTION? Send information by the 10th of the month prior to the event date to calendar@gvparent.com

SPRING BIRD WALK. Participants will hike around the woods, grasslands, and wetlands searching for spring waterfowl, raptors, and songbirds. Space is limited, registration required. 9-11am. $3/child, $5/adult, $15/family Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, 13146. 315-365-3588 www.audubon.org

____ 08 * Friday

12 * Tuesday

14 * Monday

LITERATURE LIVE: AMELIA BEDELIA. See June 9. 1pm-5pm.

RED WINGS VS. NORFOLK. Buy 1, Get 1 Thursday: Buy 1 Ticket, Get 1 Free (with honey receipt), Pre-Game Autograph Booth. 11:05pm. Frontier Field ,1 Morrie Way, Rochester. 234-7660. www.RedWingsBaseball.com

June

MOMS CLUB OF CLARKSONHAMLIN. Support and social opportunities for at home moms. Meets the second Thursday of the month. 10am. Call 502-8805 or visit website for location and details. www.frontiernet.net/~clarksonhamlinmomsclub/

RED WINGS VS. NORFOLK. Wings Wednesday, Pre-Game Autograph Booth. 7:05pm. Frontier Field ,1 Morrie Way, Rochester. 234-7660. www.RedWingsBaseball.com

07 * Thursday

RESOLVE THROUGH SHARING PARENT SUPPORT GROUP. This support group is for parents who have experienced the loss of a baby during pregnancy, at birth, or shortly after birth. RSVP required. 7:308:30pm. M.M. Ewing Continuing Care Center, 350 Parrish St. Canandaigua. 396-6260. www.thompsonhealth.com

14 * Thursday

10 * Sunday

____

club & support groups 01 * Tuesday

06 * Wednesday

RED WINGS VS. NORFOLK. Post-game Fireworks, Minnesota Twins 10th Season Magnet Giveaway (1st 2,500 fans), Pre-Game Autograph Booth. 7:05pm. Frontier Field ,1 Morrie Way, Rochester. 234-7660. www.RedWingsBaseball.com FREE • STORY TIME! Young children and their parents/caregivers will have an opportunity to do activities that promote language development and early reading skills in fun ways. Interaction through stories, songs, rhymes and projects. 9-9:45am. Ages: 2-4 yrs Seton Catholic School library 165 Rhinecliff Dr Rochester, 14618. 473-6604 http://schools.dor.org/seton/

WXXI PRESENTS: MR. STEVE AT FRONTIER FIELD. Kids and families will enjoy this fun filled day of music by Mr. Steve and a baseball game. Join WXXI for a Mr. Steve concert followed by a meet and greet and then a 1:05pm game between the Wilkes-Barre Yankees and Louisville Bats. 11am-1pm. $10-12 Frontier Field ,1 Morrie Way, Rochester. 234-7660. www.wxxi.org

____ 11 * Monday

MONDAY KICKS FOR AGES 2 TO 6. Playful learning activities designed for 2- to 6-year-olds, one Monday a month. This month: Sunshiny Days. 10am-2pm. Free with admission. Ages: 2yrs-6yrs. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 263-2700. www.museumofplay.org TODDLER BOOK CLUB AT THE STRONG. Readings of classic children’s tales followed by music and movement activities. This month: Summertime Stories. 10:30am, 11:30am, and 12:30pm. Free with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 263-2700. www.museumofplay.org

____ 16 * Saturday

BUGGY BONANZA. Inspect creepy crawlers up close. Meet a museum entomologist and a horticulturalist and learn fascinating facts about insects and plants. Free with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 263-2700. www.museumofplay.org

____ ____ 17 * Sunday

09 * Saturday LITERATURE LIVE: AMELIA BEDELIA. Each Literature Live weekend offers the opportunity to meet, greet, and pose for photos with some of the most popular storybook characters of all time and enjoy related sreadings. 11am-5pm. Free with general museum admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester. 263-2700. www.museumofplay.org

____

RAILROAD DAY. The museums let visitors get ‘up close and personal’ with the exciting world of railroading. Caboose rides and Special Event admission prices apply. 10am-5pm. $5-$7 New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 East River Road, Rush, 533-1113. www.nymtmuseum.org

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calendar of events • local family-friendly activities

Ongoing Events & Exhibits eGames Revolution: Currently at the Strong Pull your gamers away from their consoles and step into the virtual world of video and electronic games. This 5,000 square foot exhibit takes you through the history of eGames from the very first computer-based video game to the highly advanced realistic ones we know today. The exhibit includes more than two dozen operational historic video games, including favorites like the Sega Genesis and Nintendo 64. This exhibit is open during regular museum hours and is included with admission. National Museum of Play at the Strong, One Manhattan Square, Rochester 14607. 263-2700. www.museumofplay.org

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE STRONG

STRASENBURGH PLANETARIUM

ROCHESTER MUSEUM & SCIENCE CENTER

K’NEX. Be an engineer! Build trucks, towers- anything you can imagine with this colorful construction toy.

657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. 271-1880.

657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. 271-1880. www.rmsc.org Check website or call for prices and hours

LIGHT HERE-LLIGHT NOW. Have hands-on fun with light, color, and optics with mirrors, lenses, and lasers. Presented by Bausch & Lomb.

www.rmsc.org/StrasenburghPlanetarium/

Check website or call for prices and hours MUMMIES-SSECRETS OF THE PHARAOHS. Experience the wonders of Mummies and enjoy a cinematic adventure 3,000 years in the making. $8-$10.

ADVENTURE ZONE. Dive to the bottom of Lake Ontario in the Deep Submergence Vehicle simulator. Experiment with wind currents, stream erosion, and more.

MY PLANETS. For children ages 3-5 and the adults with them, this friendly introduction to the planetarium features worlds in our solar system. Saturdays at 10am. $8. Ages: 3-5yrs.

AMERICAN ROCK SALT EXHIBIT. Experience the story of the region's abundant natural resources in a stateof-the-art, multi-media Object Theater located within Expedition Earth.

SATURDAY NIGHT LASER SHOW. Intensely colored beams from argon and krypton lasers fill the planetarium dome with dazzling color patterns that spontaneously dance to classic rock music. Shows change monthly. 9:30pm. $9-$10. Ages: 5+. SATURDAY SUN, MOON AND STARS. This relaxed, enjoyable family show presents prominent constellations and takes the audience on a quick trip to the moon. Show Times: confirm at rmsc.org. $8-$10. 2012: FACT OR FICTION? Many have heard notions about potential disasters in 2012. Taking a skeptical perspective, we'll explore the 2012 phenomenon, how it got started, and how you can check alarming claims for yourself. $6-7. RING OF FIRE. This film explores the fiery Pacific Rim, showing the geological causes of volcanoes and how people have adapted to living in their shadow. Ages 6+yrs. $3-7.

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AT THE WESTERN DOOR. The hundreds of objects displayed show the Seneca’s and Haudenosaunee’s creative response to new technologies and materials introduced following European Contact. DISCOVER OUR WEATHER. Make a cloud, measure the wind, and marvel at the power of lightning! EXPEDITION EARTH. Explore your connections to the natural world in this interactive natural science exhibition. FLIGHT TO FREEDOM. Rochester’s Underground Railroad. Explore stories of courageous African Americans who traveled through Rochester on their way from slavery to freedom. HOW THINGS WORK. Through fun, hands-on investigation, find out how mechanisms such as light switches, thermostats, and traffic signals work.

CAN YOU TELL ME HOW TO GET TO SESAME STREET? See yourself on TV with the Muppets, drive Elmo around Sesame Street in a big yellow taxicab, sell movie tickets at the Circle in the Square Cinema ticket booth, and more.

RACEWAYS. Experiment with momentum, friction, gravity, and acceleration as you send wooden balls looping and racing over ramps.

CELEBRATING AMERICA’S FAVORITE DOLL. The display features more than 500 examples of Barbie and her friends—plus an array of Barbie accessories.

THE ROCHESTER BUSINESS HALL OF FAME. This interactive exhibit celebrates exemplary Rochester leaders who have made outstanding, enduring contributions to business and community in the greater Rochester region.

DANCING WINGS BUTTERFLY GARDEN®. The Dancing Wings Butterfly Garden team has raised the bar by introducing a variety of birds and animals into the garden to create a lively ecosystem that they have dubbed “butterfly garden 2.0.”

NATIONAL MUSEUM OF PLAY AT THE STRONG

eGAMEREVOLUTION. An original, highly interactive exhibit that explores the history of video games and their impact on the way we play, learn, and relate to each other.

One Manhattan Square, Rochester 14607. 263-2700 or TDD 423-0746, www.museumofplay.org Check website or call for prices and hours

ONE HISTORY PLACE. Amid original artifacts and reproductions, children explore mini-environments and get a taste of life as it was a century ago.

AMERICAN COMIC BOOK HEROES: THE BATTLE OF GOOD VS. EVIL. Climb up the side of a building, make your own cape, test your superhero skills, pose for pictures with Spiderman and learn more about your favorite comic book hero. BERENSTAIN BEARS: DOWN A SUNNY DIRT ROAD. Step into the playful world of the Berenstain Bears including Main Street, Bear Country School, Brother and Sister Bear’s Club Houses, and the Family Tree House. NATIONAL TOY HALL OF FAME. The prestigious hall features historic examples of current toy inductees and play stations.

READING ADVENTURELAND. Step into a life-sized pop-up book and follow the Yellow Brick Road into five literary landscapes from children’s books. SUPER KIDS MARKET. Cruise the aisles and fill your cart with a selection of colorful produce that looks so real, you can almost taste it. Departments are filled with highly interactive stations for dramatic role-playing. THE ELAINE WILSON AND STRONG EXPRESS TRAIN. Experience the thrill of old-fashioned train travel as the mini locomotive chugs down the track surrounded by scenic postcards from across America.


calendar of events • local family-friendly activities OTHER AREA ATTRACTIONS CUMMING NATURE CENTER: ACTIVITIES. A 900-acre preserve located 40 minutes south of Rochester. $3 per person/$10 family. 6472 Gulick Rd., Naples. 3746160, www.rmsc.org WHEM ANKH: THE CIRCLE OF LIFE IN ANCIENT EGYPT. This is your opportunity to time travel back into the past at a time when everything from birth to death revolved around the seasons and the river of life - the Nile. The Buffalo Museum of Science, 1020 Humboldt Parkway, Buffalo. 716-896-5200 www.sciencebuff.org CULTURES FOR KIDS. Learn about children from all over the world. $5. Explore & More children’s museum, 300 Gleed Ave., East Aurora. 716-655-5131 www.exploreandmore.org THE HERSCHELL CARROUSEL FACTORY MUSEUM. Currently operates two historic carousels inside its building complex. 180 Thompson St., North Tonawanda, 14120. 716-693-1885 www.carrouselmuseum.org TOUR THE RIEDMAN ROBOTIC MILKING CENTER. Tours available Mon-Sat 11am-2pm. $2-$3. Springdale Farm, 700 Colby Street, Spencerport. 349-2090 www.heritagechristianservices.org

A STEP INTO AFRICA. Opening May 17th this state of the art exhibit, focusing on the Ngorongoro Crater region of Tanzania, is the only one of its kind in the country. The Zoo will offer extended hours on Tuesdays from June 26-August 28 to make it easier for local families to enjoy the new program. Included with regular admission. Seneca park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul Street, Rochester, 14621. 336-7200. www.senecaparkzoo.org FLOWER CITY DAYS. Smart gardeners wait until the Flower Days each spring because they know they will get the best variety and prices on plantings and garden accessories. Over 250 local nurseries and growers put their best stock up for sale at the Market. Sunday May 6, 13, 20, 25, 26, 27, 28; June 3, 8 am-2 pm. Rochester Public Market, 280 N. Union St., Rochester. 428-8820. www.cityofrochester.gov GENESEE COUNTRY VILLAGE & MUSEUM. Meet and chat with the village potter, storekeeper, printer, tinsmith and blacksmith. And don't forget to visit with the legendary cooks as they prepare delicious meals over an open fire. Speak with re-enactors and townsfolk about the clothing styles of the period and visit select pieces from the museum's newly acquired historic clothing collection. Season begins May 12. 1410 Flint Hill Rd., Mumford. 538.6822. www.gcv.org.

PLEASE NOTE: Dates and times for all calendar and ongoing events are subject to change. Please call the numbers provided or visit their website to confirm event information

WANT TO SEE YOUR EVENT

IN PRINT & ONLINE? To submit an event to our calendar e-mail: calendar@gvparent.com or mail to: GVP Calendar 266 Alexander Street Rochester, NY 14607

All entries must be received by the 10th of the month prior to publication in order to be considered. (June events must be submitted by May 10th.) Events printed as space permits.

FOR JUST 15 MINUTES OF YOUR TIME, YOUR FAMILY COULD WIN TICKETS TO ONE OF SEVERAL LOCAL ATTRACTIONS

Rochester abounds with family-friendly places to visit and things to do and see! We want to know the places your family visits the most, and who treats your family the best. Share your own family favorites with other Rochester families so they’ll know where to go to get great service and the best bang for their buck. Gather the kids, click on our website, and tell us your family’s favorites! We’ll publish the winners online in July.

For instructions and ballot go to

www.gvparent.com/favorites Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • May 2012

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Party Planner – Everything to get the party started! Carnival Supplies & Rentals “Imitated, But Not Duplicated” Fully Insured

All Events - Year Round Inflatable Bounces Wet & Dry Slides Huge Obstacle Course Dunk Tank

Fun Foods New Games New Foods Pucker Powder

Not Just a Bounce Company

We stay with our equipment Celebrating 14 Years of Fun

872-1644 • csrs.us

6/15/12

924-0764

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www.GVParent.com


Diamonds Limo Presents “Pizza By Limo”

Featuring Mark’s Pizzeria

receive a 2-hr limo cruise, stop at a point of interest, a 2-liter of Pepsi and the best pizza in town! Only $99! (Sunday-Thursday)

www.diamondslimo.com

533.9050

Fri. & Sat. packages, larger limos, and service outside of Monroe County are available at an additional charge.

Are you planning a party?

‰ ‰ ‰

CHECK OUR PARTY & CELEBRATION GUIDE AND ARTICLES ONLINE FOR GREAT PARTY IDEAS!

‰

www.GVParent.com Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • May 2012

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[ out & about ]

By Natalee Kiesling

Lilacs & More HIGHLAND PARK

Where it's located: 450 Highland Avenue, Rochester 14620

When it’s open: Summer Park Hours: April 1st until October 31st, the park is open everyday from 7am until 11pm

Special Events & Activities: LILAC FEST 2012 May 11-20 Each year the Lilac Fest is regarded as one of the best festivals in the area, and this year promises to continue that tradition. Enjoy all kinds of free entertainment, a variety of vendors and foods to please any appetite. You can also see dozens of marching bands, decorated floats, clowns, dancers and costumed characters in the 2012 Lilac Parade. Visit lilacfestival.com.

N

ot far from the rush of downtown Rochester sits 150 acres of beautiful scenery and outdoor space that is Highland Park. Designed by Frederick Law Olmsted, the Father of Landscape Architecture in America, Highland Park is one of the most famous and popular parks in the area, and serves as the setting for a number of events ranging from the every day to the once in a lifetime.

As you walk through the park you can peruse the more than 1200 lilac shrubs, a collection of Japanese Maples, magnolias in 35 varieties, as well as 700 varieties of rhododendron, azaleas, mountain laurel and andromeda, horse chestnuts, spring bulbs and wildflowers. There's also a pansy bed with 10,000 plants that is designed into an oval floral "carpet" that displays a new pattern with each passing year. While you're there, you can visit one of the many facilities and attractions on the grounds to learn even more about this historic park, commemorate a special event, or reflect and remember events and people from the past.

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The Lamberton Conservatory serves as a place to exhibit plants and flowers from far off lands that normally wouldn't thrive in the Rochester climate and it has become known to some as a tropical respite to Rochester's chilly winters. The Lilac Arches along with the Warner Castle and Sunken Garden have become popular locales for photographers and are frequently used as a back drop for wedding photos, or even small receptions and ceremonies.



Natalee Kiesling is the Community Editor for Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine.

PROUD MARKET PLANT SALE May 26 (rain or shine), 8 am until supplies last Hosted by the Rochester Civic Garden Center, this annual event is not to be missed by even the most inexperienced gardeners. Find your favorite plants, trees, shrubs and vegetables or discover new and hard to find perennials and annuals, all at a great price. For more info visit http://rcgc.org or call 4735130. MOVIES IN THE PARK Throughout the summer If you're looking for more casual fun, head down to the Highland Park Bowl in the summer for Free Movies in the Park. Beginning at dusk, you and your family can enjoy old favorites like Ferris Bueller's Day Off, recent blockbusters like Shrek Forever After, and even Oscar winners like The King's Speech, all out in the fresh air under the stars.

For more information: www.monroecounty.gov/parkshighland.php or call 753-PARK (7275).



Genesee Valley Parent May 2012