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INSIDE

AUGUST 2014

Vol.21 Number 8

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Helping Kids Get Ahead

in this issue 8 | P ublisher’s Note 20 | Parenting KIDS Kicking Off Kindergarten 22 | Parenting ALL AGES Get In the Game - The Role of Sports Parents 24 | Book Nook Beach Reads 26 | Parenting TEENS & TWEENS Teens and Politics 28 | Parenting ALL AGES Chores Make the Grade 46 | Calendar of Events • Family-Friendly Events • Summer Fairs and Festivals • Noteworthy in our Community • Library Events • Ongoing Events & Exhibits

more features

14 Onward & Upward

ENTS AND EDUCATORS CAN HELP CHILDREN TRANSITION TO A NEW SCHOOL

GUIDE INSIDE AFTER SCHOOL ACTIVITIES GUIDE PAGES 30-45

this month's contributors KAREN HIGMAN is a Rochester-based freelance writer and a consultant to local non-profit agencies. [Page 10] JOHN BOCCACINO is monthly contributor to Rochester

// HOW PAR-

& Genesee Valley Parent Magazine. He reported on sports and local news for more than 6 1/2 years with the Democrat and Chronicle newspaper. He is currently the Director of Sports Information for Keuka College. Boccacino is a Brighton native who currently resides in Webster. [Page 14] Freelance journalist

31 Talent Show //

NURTURING YOUR CHILD'S BUDDING INTERESTS

on the cover 151 Things to do This August Back to School Issue 10, 14, 20, 28, Helping Kids Get Ahead Transitioning to a New School Kicking Off Kindergarten The Benefits of Chores Nurturing Your Child's Budding Interests

CHRISTA MELNYK HINES is a family communication expert, wife and mom. She and her two sons plan to celebrate the first day of school with a trip to the ice cream counter. [Page 20] DENISE YEARIAN is the former editor of two parenting magazines and the mother of three children.[Page 22]

DEENA VIVIANI is a Rochester-based Young Adult Services Librarian who writes reviews for VOYA and the RACWI Newsletter. [Page 24] MYRNA BETH HASKELL is a monthly contributor to Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine who lives in Salt Point, NY. She is the author

46 31 10 14 20 28 31

of LIONS and TIGERS and TEENS: Expert advice and support for the conscientious parent just like you. [Page 26] LARA KRUPICKA is a parenting journalist and mom to three girls. She learns as much from sharing housework with her kids as they learn from her. [Page 28]

MALIA JACOBSON is an award-winning health and parenting journalist and mom of three. Her latest book is Sleep Tight, Every Night: Helping Toddlers and Preschoolers Sleep Well Without Tears, Tricks, or Tirades. [Page 31]

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PUBLISHER'S NOTE

By Barbara Melnyk

are you ready for school? WHAT’S ON YOUR MIND?  Email our Publisher, Barbara: mail@GVParent.com Email our Editor, Jillian: editor@GVParent.com

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H

ere we are in the final days of summer. The past month, even with some rainy days, has been fantastic and I hope you and your family had a chance to get out and connect with everything great about Rochester. But before you know it, summer will be over and we will be back into the school year cycle. To help get into the new year, this issue is packed with great information to make the start of your child's school year fantastic. Is your child transitioning to a new school? Our local and PMA award-winning writer, John Boccocino, brings you insight from area experts and school officials on how to help your child through the transition. Also to assist your child on the road to success, check out Karen Higman's article on helping kids get ahead both academically and by teaching 'grit'. But what will your kids do once the school bell rings at the end of the day? Some kids may be involved with in-school extra-curricular activies, but there are many more options for beyond in-school activities. This month's issue features our annual after-school and weekend activity guide which is packed with more than 48

opportunities for kids to explore the arts, enrichment, sports, and more. In addition, be sure to check our website for even more programs and ideas. Alas, summer will be over soon, but there is still plenty to do to fill up your days. Our calendar is packed with more than 151 area events and activites so there is no limit to what you can enjoy. Grab the kids, the keys and head out for a fun-filled day!

Barbara

Staff

PUBLISHER Barbara Melnyk mail@GVParent.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Jillian Melnyk editor@GVParent.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Cynthia Goldberg Ken Stevens MAGAZINE LAYOUT & DESIGN Jillian Melnyk graphics@GVParent.com CALENDAR EDITOR Sandy Citarella calendar@GVParent.com DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Sandy Citarella Basic subscription rate: $25/year. Send subscription inquiries and changes to address below. Copyright 2014, by GVP, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. Distribution of this magazine does not necessarily constitute an endorsement or necessarily reflect the opinions of this publication.

HOW TO CONTACT US:

Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine P.O. Box 25750 Rochester, NY 14625 p: 585-348-9712 f: 585-348-9714 www.RocParent.com

MEMBER OF PARENTING MEDIA ASSOCIATION


Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • August 2014

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helping kids get ahead By Karen Higman

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i

t is a natural instinct for parents to want to help their children succeed and to give them assistance when they are struggling. For very young children, that often means helping them with simple daily tasks such as getting dressed or tying their shoes. Mothers and fathers generally don’t worry about this component of parenting, realizing that it is just a matter of time before their children master these skills themselves.

It is, however, an entirely different story when it comes to deciding how much extra help to give a child academically or with an extra-curricular activity such as sports or music. Part of the parenting puzzle is figuring out what children should do on their own, how long you should let them work before offering assistance, and what type and level of external support is helpful versus harmful.

Early Academic Expectations

All parents want their sons and daughters to do well in school, but “doing well” is defined differently by everyone. Does that mean that they achieve high marks on their report card or that they learn the material well and retain it even if the grade they receive is less than an “A”? In some families, the expectation is that children will do “the best they can,” be involved in other extra-curricular activities, and have lots of friends. It is never too early for parents to think about realistic academic expectations for their child and how those expectations will be communicated to their son or daughter, realizing that this process will evolve over time. Recently in a New York Times article entitled, “Fast Tracking to Kindergarten?," author Kate Zernike explored the incredible growth of academic-based enrichment programs, especially for toddlers and elementary school children. Although there has long been a market to help high school students improve their grades, study skills, and test scores as they contemplate college, double-digit market growth is occurring with children as young as ages 2-5 who are getting a head start on kindergarten by acquiring math and reading skills. But there are other reasons to seek

The entire learning progression is starting early and instilling a love of learning and a sense of self-confidence in academics will set your child up for a positive pattern which leads to success in school.

college admissions such a process, ranging service. Acfrom helping them cording to write their college Susan Steapplication essay ron-Herto selecting which bison, – SUSAN STERON-HERBISON, colleges to apply to Director DIRECTOR OF FIVE SYLAN LEARNING CENTERS THROUGHOUT and coaching them of five Sylan ROCHESTER AND BUFFALO through the process. Learning CenAccording to their profesters throughout sional organization, the IndeRochester and Buffapendent Educational Consultants lo, parents cite the boost Association, educational consultants are in self-esteem that these types of able to provide more individualized attenacademic enrichment programs give their tion than a high school guidance counselor very young children, which they believe is and “match your child’s strengths to their critical to overall academic success. “The dream colleges.” entire learning progression is starting Research indicates that the ratio early,” explains Steron-Herbison, “and of guidance counselors to students in a instilling a love of learning and a sense of public high school is 434 to 1. Satisfied self-confidence in academics will set your parents credit educational consultants child up for a positive pattern which leads with helping to relieve the stress that often to success in school.” occurs between high school students and their parents during the college application Setting a Child Up process. But this assistance comes with a for Success price which is usually between $85-$150 As a child ages and goes to middle and per hour, with the national average for the high school, the expectations often increase entire package hovering around $3,500. Is if the parents or children have their sights the money worth it at the end of the college set on attending college – especially a highprocess? Dave Roberts, Associate Director ly competitive college. The stories of what of Freshmen Admissions for St. John Fisher parents have been known to do to “help” College, says that it could be for a highly their child get into the “right” college are competitive school, but many colleges focus endless and include Debbie Stier, mother on an applicant’s high school transcript, of a teenage boy who last year took the his test scores, and overall resume which SAT exam seven times HERSELF in “the should include extracurricular activities." hopes of inspiring and motivating her son.” An education consultant can’t change the Stier then wrote about the experience in a facts of a student's resume, although she book released earlier this year entitled, The may help to better highlight an applicant's Perfect Score Project: Uncovering the Secrets of the strengths. SAT. Another attractive option for some Although Stier's action may seem families is enrolling their high school extreme, well-meaning parents across student (generally age 16+) in a pre-college Western New York are enrolling their course which enables her to explore her children in SAT prep classes, hiring eduinterest in one or more academic areas and cational consultants — the newest trend in even live at a college for a week or more college-bound help — and paying for their during the summer. These courses, which kids to attend intensive summer courses on can be credit or non-credit, advertise the college campuses, all to give them a leg up advantage that your child will have by on the competition. Educational consullearning more about his own academic tants are independent professionals who asabilities and potential, having a “test run” sist high school students with navigating the CONTINUED >>> Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • August 2014

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As parents, we are still our children's best role models, teachers, and supporters. The best advice may still be the most basic: •E  ncourage students to take the most challenging academic courses they can. • S upport their learning, from not letting them over-schedule their time to creating a good environment at home to study. •H  elp them to see the big picture, whether the end goal is getting into college or learning to read at the next grade level. • T each them that if at first they don’t succeed, try, try again.

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at college life, meeting peers who share similar academic and personal interests, and giving him more motivation when he returns to high school in the fall. The cost for these programs vary greatly depending on the institution and whether or not your teenager is living on-campus during the session, but expect to pay several thousand dollars for the program.

Got Grit?

Aside from the enrichment opportunities and additional help that you can buy, what else can you do as a parent to help your child get ahead? “Grit” is the newest buzzword in education circles, but it really means what used to be called “stick-to-itiveness,” which is defined as “the quality that allows someone to continue trying to do something even though it’s difficult.” Dr. Angela Duckworth, a psychology professor at the University of Pennsylvania recently won a McArthur Foundation “Genius Grant” for her research which indicates that “grit” is the greatest indicator to student success in the long term. According to Duckworth, “grit is a better predictor of success than IQ or other measures when it comes to achievement." Since many educators and parents believe

that persistence is undervalued in our current education system, in part because it may be hard to measure, the schools that are making “grit” the centerpiece of their curriculum are getting attention. This change in teaching style and culture translates into valuing the students’ struggle and risk-taking more than just getting the correct answer. Is it possible to teach the quality of “grit” at home? Certainly, and it starts with explaining to your young children that mistakes and failures — in the classroom or on the playing field — are normal parts of learning. Give children examples of successful people they admire who were persistent, like Steve Jobs who created many versions of the Mac before he found one that worked.  Karen Higman is a Rochester-based freelance writer and a consultant to local non-profit agencies.


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onward and upward HOW PARENTS & EDUCATORS CAN HELP CHILDREN TRANSITION TO A NEW SCHOOL

By John Boccacino

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oing back to school should be an exciting, adventure-filled experience. From sharing stories of their summer vacations to catching up with old friends and making new friends, the start of the school year symbolizes a hopeful and optimistic time in a child’s life. However, many children will find themselves in a new school 14

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in the fall — whether it's because of a move to a new town, or because they're moving up to elementary, middle or high school. How can parents and educators help children who are leaving behind the surroundings of their old school — with familiar faces and educators — and are facing an entirely new school atmosphere, where they

will not only have to make new friends, but learn to navigate their way through a new building with new teachers and new challenges to overcome? Parents of these children will play a pivotal role in ensuring that the transition to a new school goes smoothly, as will the school counselors, teachers and other on site support staff.


New Beginnings

Mary Testa has been involved in child counseling since 1996 and owns and operates her own Rochester area private practice, Mary Testa Counseling. She says that listening to your child’s concerns and presenting the move with a positive vibe will go a long ways to allay their fears. “Be sensitive to the fact that a child’s world is a lot smaller than our world. They have comfort and security in familiar situations,” says Testa, who sees patients as young as 10 years old. “If the parents have a great attitude and are upbeat and put on a good face about the move, the child will feed off of that, reflect that positive attitude and will be excited for the new school. Children can be worried about losing their old Be sensitive to friends, but in the fact that a child’s this day, there world is a lot smaller are so many than our world. They ways to keep in have comfort and security touch with old in familiar situations." friends while still making new – MARY TESTA, OWNER/THERAPIST friends.” AT MARY TESTA One of the COUNSELING first steps that counselors such as Testa and Carol I. Reinhardt, a clinical psychologist for more than 35 years, recommend is having parents set up visits with the child’s new school before the school year commences. This will allow the child to roam and become familiar with the layout of the new school, while also allowing parents and child the chance to meet the principal and teacher(s) who are entrusted with educating the child in the fall. “Most schools will allow for tours and visits with the teachers and staff. It is important for both the parents and the children to learn as much about the new district as possible,” Reinhardt says. “Some school districts have meetings set up where the children can meet their new teacher prior to the start of the school year. Many schools have peer support groups, where new students are assigned to an incoming student, so they have a familiar face and a friend once the first day of school arrives. It is important to have someone who can show the new child the ropes around the school.” Testa, Reinhardt and Catherine Liebel, a school counselor at Twelve Corners Middle School in Brighton, all recommend enrolling the child in fun activities, such as drama club or youth sports, to help them feel more comfortable in their new environment while potentially making new friends for the upcoming school year. “Students often express concern and sadness over leaving friends, teachers and former schools behind. This sadness can sometimes be a block to fully giving the new school a chance,” Liebel says. “The idea of making new friends probably causes the most anxiety for kids. Consider enrolling them in a local summer day camp, sports program, youth group or encourage them to join a school club. This will help them meet kids from their new community.” Lieb says that at her school, new students are matched up with a peer helper or two. The helpers assist the new student in navigating the building, sit with him or her during lunch and introduce them to other students. All three counselors also recommend having an open

CONTINUED >>> Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • August 2014

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new building. Moving up and honest conversation with from elementary to middle the child about the nature school, or from middle of the move and why Most schools to high school can he is changing school will allow for tours and present some of the districts. Once the visits with the teachers same anxiety as school year has and staff. It is important moving into a new started, if there for both the parents and district, says school is any sense of psychologist/confrustration with his the children to learn as sultant Charlotte new surroundings, much about the new Harvey, who works these counselors district as possible." with the lower say the best practice – CAROL I. REINHARDT, school (nursery school is to keep the lines of CLINICAL through fourth grade) communication open PSYCHOLOGIST and middle school (fifth to and discuss any difficulties eighth grade) students at the the child may be encountering Harley School in Brighton. in their new school. During the annual moving up day ceremonies, which are for students transiMoving Up tioning from fourth to fifth grade and from When it comes to switching buildings witheighth to ninth grade, teachers will stand in the same school district, many schools up and address these sometimes anxious conduct moving up ceremonies, where, as students. To make sure the incoming class a class, all of the students will get familiar feels more comfortable with the other stuwith the classrooms, the teachers and the

“

dents, these teachers will share something personal about each child going through a moving up process. That act, Harvey says, goes a long way toward making the classes feel a tight bond heading into the upcoming school year. For students who transfer into the school, a photograph is taken of the new child and posted in a heavy foot traffic area, so members of the school community can get to know the newest additions. There is also a parent council that is in charge of communicating some of the upcoming social activities at the school. Before the year starts, members of the council will call the families of incoming students and arranges get-togethers where the new students can meet some of their classmates. For select grade levels at the school, there are team building field trips during the first weeks of the school year. Eighth graders will spend four days in the Adirondacks learning about their classmates, and sharing in this community building CONTINUED >>>

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experience helps foster a tight-knit, family atmosphere, says Hassan Jones, head of the middle school. “Building our community and welcoming new students to our school is the responsibility of everyone in the school,” Jones says. “Our school is really good at establishing relationships with the families of our students, and we also communicate very well. We will have lunches for all of the new students where we bring them together, and they realize they’re not the only new students here. We’ll have open forums and discussions to make sure that everything is going well in their transition.” Additionally, once the school year starts, there is new student orientation and a fall orientation, where, on the day prior to the start of the school year, students are engaged in a school-wide scavenger hunt that both gets them interacting with their peers and helps them feel more at ease with their new surroundings. “When the entire class goes through the same transition together, it’s easier on everyone, because they’re all going through the same questions as their friends,” says Harvey. “The great thing about the Harley School is we have tradition, and our students have been going through a daily routine since the first day they started going here. Those routines and traditions are quite helpful as the students are going through these transitions because they’re moving up together.” Terry Smith, head of the lower school at Harley, adds that there are two shadow days during the spring of each school year. During each of these shadow days, half of the fourth graders will follow their fifth grade peers around school, attending classes and homeroom and also participating in group bonding activities. On the other shadow day, the other half of the fourth graders will tag along with their fifth grade counterparts. “Our students don’t have to overcome that many obstacles when it comes to moving up,” Smith says. “We have strong cross-divisional connections that foster comfort and familiarity more so than in other schools, where, to move up, you have to leave your old school building and learn all about a physically different building.”  John Boccacino is monthly contributor to Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine. He reported on sports and local news for more than 6 1/2 years with the Democrat and Chronicle newspaper. He is currently the Director of Sports Information for Keuka College. Boccacino is a Brighton native who currently resides in Webster.

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PARENTING KIDS

By Christa Melnyk Hines

kicking off kindergarten

HELP YOUR KINDERGARTENER SCORE A SMOOTH TRANSITION INTO SCHOOL

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or many parents, kindergarten signals an important transition from the all-consuming baby and toddler years. Suddenly, your "baby" is expected to make more choices on her own, stay focused over a longer period of time, learn new skills and navigate a social circle with less oversight from you. Plan ahead to pave the road to a happier kindergarten transition for all.

Visit the school. Before school begins, attend school orientations and meet the teacher to help your child grow familiar with his new learning environment.

Calm kindergarten jitters. Build excitement and optimism for school. Shop together for a new backpack or lunchbox, school supplies and new clothes. "Even if parents are feeling nervous, they should do their best not to portray that to their child," says Kathy Weller, a kindergarten teacher. "Be

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very upbeat about the upcoming new experience."

and Kindergarten Rocks by Katie Davis.

Recognize friendly faces.

Tackle a few skills.

Before school starts, arrange play dates with future classmates. A few familiar faces on the first day may help calm any nervous butterflies.

While knowing his colors, the ABCs and how to count to ten will give your child a head start, work on other skills like tying his shoes and knowing his full name, phone number and birthday.

Read together. Reading to your child teaches valuable listening skills and creates an opportunity to help your child prepare for the kindergarten experience. Check out books like The Night Before Kindergarten by Natasha Wing

Plan transportation. Avoid transportation snafus by sticking to a plan and keeping your child (and the teacher) informed. If your child will ride the bus and is nervous,

listen and reassure her. Drive the route ahead of time. Also, seek out a "bus buddy" for your child, whether a responsible older neighbor child or another bus-riding classmate. On the first day of school, arrive early at the bus stop. Introduce yourself and your child to the driver. Assure your child that you (or whomever you've designated), will be waiting for her when the bus returns after school.

Get good eats and sweet dreams. Make sure your new kindergartener gets plenty of rest and


eats healthy meals, which will help him better manage the stress of the transition and stay focused during school. Wake up a little earlier to avoid a rushed first day.

Team up with the teacher. Share insights about your child's strengths with the teacher to help her understand what motivates and interests your child. "Parents should approach school with the idea that the teacher has their child's best interest at heart," says Dr. Holly Schiffrin, an associate professor of psychology at the University of Mary Washington, who specializes in child development and parenting practices. "Parent should convey that they are on the same team as the teacher (even if they have different ideas about how to assist their child)."

Reflect on the day. Having a hard time getting your child to discuss his day? "Keeping a daily journal of his day (with mom's help) is a fun way to get your child to talk about school," says kindergarten teacher Wendy Hughes. "Ask your child to tell you some funny or interesting things that may have happened that day."

Manage adversity. Every child is bound to have a rough day. Encourage her to resolve her own problems and take responsibility for her actions. "Ask your child for her input and perspective, genuinely listen, acknowledge and empathize, and then shift the focus towards reaching solutions as a family and in unison with your teachers and school," says parent coach Tom Limbert, author of Dad's Playbook: Wisdom for Fathers from the Greatest Coaches of All Time. "Focus on giving your child the tools, morals and lessons she will need when not in your presence, which will now be more and more often."

Mark the occasion. Celebrate your child's first day of school with a special outing after school like a frozen yogurt, dinner out or a playdate at her favorite park. Who knows? You may find that initial celebration turns into an annual first-day-of-school tradition for your family.  Freelance journalist Christa Melnyk Hines is a family communication expert, wife and mom. She and her two sons plan to celebrate the first day of school with a trip to the ice cream counter. Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • August 2014

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PARENTING ALL AGES

By Denise Yearian

get in the game THE ROLE OF SPORTS PARENTS

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hildren who participate in sports programs have the opportunity to maximize their potential physically, mentally, emotionally and socially. But it doesn’t just happen. Although good coaching and league administration are important, nothing can replace knowledgeable, interested and supportive parents. So how can moms and dads help their children make the most of their athletic endeavors? First, know the rules of the game.

“The more parents know about the sport their child is playing, the calmer and more at ease they will be,” says Brooke de Lenche, author of Home Team Advantage: The Critical Role of Mothers in Youth Sports. “Parents may not realize that some of the rules for that given sport have been modified due to age and developmental level. So as they sit on the sidelines, they may wonder why a call was or wasn’t made.” Parents should also be aware of the developmental milestones for the activity so they can ascertain if their child is physically and mentally ready to take on the sport. Developmental milestones are paramount for Anthony Aglio. When his daughter Maci started playing soccer at age 6, he had two goals in mind: to keep her focused on the game and to help her learn which direction to move the ball. At age 8, she is now working on a new set of goals. “Maci is learning to use her left foot and to dribble

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the ball without looking at it,” reports Aglio. “We’re also working on trying to get the ball from her opponent rather than waiting for it to come to her.” Therein lies another dimension of sports parenting, to help your child set goals for himself. But according to Stan Waite, basketball and soccer coach for YMCA Youth Sports Programs, those goals need to be realistic. “The more goals your children set and reach for themselves, the more successful they will be and the more fun they will have,” he says. Experts agree the coach may be a good source for providing drill pointers. But for Michele Rafetto, collaborating with her kids’ coaches has even greater value. “I want to know who is coaching my kids and make sure they are in a safe environment and are being instructed in an appropriate way — that the coaches aren’t too tough on them and that they are giving lots of positive

reinforcement,” says the mother of four. One of the best ways to do this is to volunteer. Ask if the team needs an assistant coach or administrator, offer to spearhead a fundraising event or sign up to bring snacks for the kids after the game. “A great way for parents to be involved is to offer to be the team journalist,” says de Lenche. “Bring your camera and start taking pictures of the kids at practices and games. Then create an online photo album for the entire team. This can encourage communication and unity among team members, their families and coaches.” Communication is a key role in sports parenting, especially when it comes to talking with your children about life lessons such as winning well, dealing with defeat, cooperation and perseverance. “Maci and I often talk about cooperation and how players have to work together to protect the goal and how

it’s important to pass the ball to other players, particularly if they are near the goal,” says Aglio. “We also talk about how we need to be patient with everyone because we all make mistakes.” But Maci’s biggest lesson has been one of perseverance. “Sometimes I have to remind her that things aren’t going to come so easily and she has to practice,” Aglio continues. “I tell her, ‘You aren’t going to be able to dribble the ball right away, you have to practice.’ Perseverance is something we really talk about, especially on the way home.” “One of the most important things I’ve learned is to listen to my kids’ frustrations and excitements,” says Rafetto. “Sometimes they don’t want you to solve their problem, they just want you to listen.” Raffeto also believes talk must be accompanied by action. “My husband and I try to be good role models for our kids and live out what we say to them,” she continues. “We work out


a regular basis and try to eat healthy and encourage our kids to do the same. When we’re in the stands, we keep a positive attitude and cheer everyone on, even the other team if they have made a good play.” “Being your child’s cheerleader is the biggest role of a sports parent,” says Waite. “Try to make it to as many games and practices as you can, offer encouragement and support and look for little ways

to let him know you are his greatest fan.” “We always make Saturday game days special and do something afterward that Maci enjoys — a trip to McDonalds, a movie or swimming,” Aglio concludes. “We just want her to know we’re proud of her and are behind her the whole way.”  Denise Yearian is the former editor of two parenting magazines and the mother of three children.

developmental milestones for children in sports PRESCHOOL. Many children at this age are beginning to get involved in organized sports. To see if your child is ready, assess his basic skills such as running, throwing and tracking objects in motion. Also consider his attention span. Is he focused enough to learn from group instruction? Most children aren’t ready to participate in organized sports until they are around 4 or 5. Even then practices should be short and allow time for free play. Programs should focus on the fundamentals of skill development and emphasize fun over competition. EARLY ELEMENTARY. By now, most children have had at least one experience with an organized sport. The emphasis should continue to be on skill development and having fun, not on competition. This is a good time to analyze what you want your child to get out of sports participation. Ask him and he will more than likely say to have fun, be with his friends and learn a new skill. Make sure this philosophy lines up with your child’s coach and league’s instruction. Let him sample different sports activities until he finds one he truly enjoys. LATE ELEMENTARY. At this age, children are beginning to get a grip on coordination and have a better concept of team effort. This is also a time when relative age factor comes into play and those who mature

physically and mentally may seem to have an advantage. If not handled properly, it may put extra pressure on the mature child to perform, which could lead to burnout. Children who mature later may have to work harder on skill development and may not initially get their coaches attention, but given time and encouragement they often catch up with their counterparts. It is important to continue to emphasize the process not the results, and to praise effort instead of outcome. This is especially important as competition elevates. Look for programs that adhere to this philosophy and make sure the entire team has an opportunity to participate in play, regardless of skill level. MIDDLE SCHOOL. This is a time when children are beginning to master skills and techniques. This can also be a time when league politics, controlling parents and abusive coaches may dominate an activity, though it can also happen earlier. If the child feels as if he has lost control over his activity or is being pressured by others, he may be in danger of burnout. Kids at this age are better able to understand and handle the pressure of competition, but performance and self-esteem issues are closely tied now and can affect how youth feel about themselves in other facets of life. They may also need encouragement and information to deal with the awkwardness of changing bodies and minds. Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • August 2014

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BOOK NOOK

By Deena Viviani

beach reads

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hether you’re spending the last month of summer vacation on Miami, Malibu, or Charlotte Beach, tote along a hot new novel to relax away the day in the sun!

MORE READS

Life’s a beach with these picture books: At the Beach Written by Anne Rockwell & Illustrated by Harlow Rockwell and Lizzy Rockwell Duck & Goose Go to the Beach By Tad Hills Ladybug Girl at the Beach Written by Jacky Davis & Illustrated by David Soman Otto Goes to the Beach By Todd Parr Pete at the Beach By James Dean Scaredy Squirrel at the Beach By Mélanie Watt These Seas Count! Written by Alison Formento & Illustrated by Sarah Snow

Half a Chance

By Cynthia Lord Scholastic, 2014, hardcover, $16.99, Ages 8-12 At least Lucy has her camera and dog when her father leaves the family in a small New Hampshire lake town before flying off on a photography assignment. Fortunately her new neighbors turn out to be friendly and soon are helping Lucy enter a photography contest and introducing her to a pair of loons. Maybe she can make this feel like home after all. A lovely summer story from the author of Rules.

The Gollywhopper Games: The New Champion

By Jody Feldman Greenwillow, 2014, hardcover, $16.99, Ages 8-12 What kid wouldn’t want to enter the Gollywhopper Games for a chance at fame and fortune? Cameron, that’s who. But his older brother submits both of their names and soon they are going head-to-head in games, stunts, puzzles, and brain teasers! Fans of the first Gollywhopper Games will love this sequel and new readers can jump right in. A middle grade adventure with brains and fun.

Nightingale’s Nest

By Nikki Loftin Razorbill, 2014, hardcover, $16.99, Ages 10-14

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Little John’s father insists he spend his summer tending rich people’s trees to earn a few bucks. It’s not fun but at least it gets him out of the house and away from his sad mother. Then he meets Gayle, a foster girl who reminds him of his little sister, and she has the singing voice of a bird. Little John tries hard to honor Gayle’s strange wishes, do right by his family, and honor his sister’s spirit. This pitch-perfect middle grade novel has voice, symbolism, heart, and a lovable main character.

Camp” class about the written word for the summer, Gloria gives up her cell phone and internet, ready to start fresh and experience life for four weeks. Free from the online chatter, she finds new friendships and truths about her Kentucky hometown that she has always been desperate to leave. A true coming-ofage novel with lyrical writing and a satisfying ending.

We Were Liars Breakfast Served Any Time

By Sarah Combs Candlewick, 2014, hardcover, $16.99, Ages 12-18 Committed to a “Geek

By E. Lockhart Delacorte, 2014, hardcover, $17.99, Ages 12-18 The summer she was fifteen, Cady hit her head in the rocky surf off Martha’s Vineyard and forgot most of


that year. Two years later she returns to the island with her cousins and friend Gat and tries to piece together the past. This novel is extremely compelling and the final chapter is satisfying if not heartbreaking. Don’t leak any spoilers!

Panic

By Lauren Oliver HarperCollins, 2014, hardcover, $17.99, Ages 15-18 How far would you go for $50,000? The summer after their senior year, Heather, Natalie, and Dodge participate in their town’s traditional contest for their shot at the cash. But the dares are dangerous and more is at stake than any of them knows. A fast read for fans of darker fiction by the best-selling author of the Delirium trilogy.

16 Things I Thought Were True By Janet Gurtler Sourcebooks Fire, 2014, paperback, $9.99, Ages 15-18

Morgan, a Twitter-obsessed eighteen-year-old who’s reputation crashed and burned when her embarrassing video

went viral, finally learns the identity of her father. With two new friends from her summer job, she embarks on a road trip to meet him for the first time. Pick up this book for the three-dimensional characters, clever tweets, and sweet romance.

The Voice Inside My Head

By S. J. Laidlaw Tundra, 2014, hardcover, $17.99, Ages 15-18 Luke feels abandoned by his sister when she leaves their troubled home for an internship in Honduras. Worse? She disappears, presumed drowned. Refusing to believe she’s dead, Luke travels to Central America and learns more about his sister’s life on the island and why she left home. The rich setting of Utila Island is perfect for a mystery that keeps the reader guessing.  Deena Viviani is a Rochester-based Young Adult Services Librarian. Read more reviews on her blog www. deenaml.livejournal.com or send her a note at DeenaViviani@hotmail.com – she loves to hear from readers!

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PARENTING

TEENS & TWEENS

By Myrna Beth Haskell

teens and politics ENCOURAGING TEEN INTEREST & INVOLVEMENT IN GOVERNMENT

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ost teens are quite savvy with their cell phones – checking out the latest posts on Instagram, sending Snapchats, texting at lightning speed, or using GPS to find a friend’s house. They are completely in tune with the latest apps and online trends, tapping into the most obscure social networking sites before the rest of the population catches on. What if teens were just as interested and up to date with the latest in political news? Could you imagine a world where teens cared more about their state senator’s position on education reform than their friend’s Instagram collage? In the 1960s, millions of young people across America became involved in politics due to their opposition to the Vietnam War. Since then, teens don’t seem to be as universally involved in politics. How can parents and educators encourage teens to become involved and passionate about the political and economic issues affecting our country?

The Youth Demographic (Voting Statistics) Most experts agree that a knowledge of civic responsi-

bility, US political history and issues, as well as registering to vote as soon as one turns 18, all contribute to a lifelong interest in government and politics. However, the youth vote and youth registration rates (voters ages 18 to 29) still lag far behind other age groups. According to CIRCLE (The Center for Information & Research on Civic Learning and Engagement at Tufts University), 45% of registered youth aged 18 to 29 voted in the 2012 presidential election, while all other age groups voted at turnout rates of 60% and higher. In New York, the youth turnout vote was 42.4% as compared to 63.4% of registered voters over 30 years of age (2012 Election: www. civicyouth.org). According to Campusvoteproject.org, “Despite

widespread reports of overwhelming youth engagement in the 2008 election, young voters only made up about 19 percent of the electorate.” What keeps young people from the polls? “Young people don’t vote right away because they don’t see the importance,” explains Mary Ellen Balchunis, PhD, assistant professor of political science at La Salle University in Philadelphia. “Once they get their first paycheck, see the taxes taken out, have car payments, pay health insurance premiums, and have families with children in day care, they begin to realize that it is important who is in government.”

Mary A. Evins, PhD, campus coordinator of the American Democracy Project and associate professor of history at Middle Tennessee State University, points out, “Some eighteen-year-olds express that they aren’t ready to vote yet, and some see voting as a chore and an inconvenience.”

What Educators Can Do “As a college professor, I know how to get young people involved in politics,” says Balchunis. She reports that having discussions about issues that directly affect teens is key, such as staying on their parents’ health insurance or lowering

WANT TO SHARE YOUR IDEAS? UPCOMING TOPIC: How does a parent cope with empty nest once all of their children are off to college/the work force? Send your full name, address, & brief comments to: myrnahaskell@gmail.com

or visit: www.myrnahaskell.com

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interest rates on student loans. Balchunis regularly invites political figures to visit her classroom or to speak on campus. As a candidate for US Congress, Balchunis has also worked with teens on the campaign trail and understands that teens will want to get involved if they can do something they are good at. “Have teens volunteer at a campaign and help with the social media,” she suggests. “They are better at it than most of the adults in the campaign!” My daughter’s US government teacher helped her students get registered to vote. She passed out registration forms and hand-delivered them to the county board of elections office. Many of these students were then eligible to vote for the school budget in May. “Finding a connection to political education in every course and every subject and preparing our students for political competence are tasks for all educators,” Evins advises. “Programs for civic learning must be embedded in every level of education,” she continues.

What Parents Can Do Young people should develop an interest in government and politics before they turn eighteen so that voting is something to look forward to. I used to take my kids to the polls with me at a young age so they could experience the democratic process first-hand. They also knew that their father and I valued and regularly exercised our right to vote in all types of elections – school, local, and national. Evins instructs parents to have thoughtful dialogues about community, state, national, and global issues on a regular basis. She also advocates visiting sites of local and state governance and planning family vacations to the state capital or to Washington D.C. to experience the legislative process and to see important monuments. “Parents who include civics education as part of regular family activities will help children grow naturally into understanding what their responsibilities are as good citizens,” she adds. Balchunis recommends, “Share the newspaper with them and watch the news with them.”  Myrna Beth Haskell is a freelance writer and monthly contributor to Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine who lives in Salt Point, NY. She is the author of LIONS and TIGERS and TEENS: Expert advice and support for the conscientious parent just like you (Unlimited Publishing LLC). Visit www.myrnahaskell.com.

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PARENTING ALL AGES

By Lara Krupicka

chores make the grade

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rian Pacilio was a typical teenager: busy with sports, school, and friends. But he was not too busy to help with dinner dishes, do some of the laundry, take out the trash, and keep his bathroom "hotel ready." That's because for Brian's mom, Cheryl, it was about more than getting help with housework. It was about helping her son too.

Chores can be an important part of kids' lives. Not only do tasks at home teach life skills and allow kids to contribute to the running of the household, they also yield benefits that support your child's academic life. Here are a few ways chores benefit kids' brains at different ages:

Preschool For young children, household tasks can give them real-life experience with the skills of sorting, matching, and patterning . Have your preschooler help sort laundry into light and dark piles. Then ask him to match up socks out of the clean laundry pile. Let him put away the silverware from the dishwasher, which requires parceling out each type of utensil. Preschoolers can also help set the table, an exercise in patterning -- Fork, plate, cup, knife. Fork, plate, cup, knife. Amy Payton, an occupational therapist, says, "Learning to clean up at home also

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translates to school. Hanging their jacket on a hook. Having a place for their shoes and backpack." Keep organization simple for this age and they'll have the tools for following the expectations at preschool.

Elementary School Once children reach elementary school age, they're ready to take more responsibility. As Tara Aaronson, author of Mrs. Clean Jeans' Housekeeping with Kids says, "Chores give kids a sense of responsibility that follows through into other areas of their lives, especially school." She also encourages parents to, "invest the time now and you'll be rewarded with a child who takes pride (if not joy) in carrying his share of the home cleaning load." Housework is a brain booster for grade schoolers as they practicing math skills and learning how to plan. Most grade schoolers can help cook meals by working alongside Mom or Dad. They'll get

hands-on experience with fractions as they measure out ingredients and, with some input from an adult, can learn the science behind different aspects of cooking and baking (yeast recipes work well for science lessons). For younger elementary age children, focus on estimating and comparative sizes. For those families with garden space, school-aged children can be involved in the planning, planting, and maintaining of a garden. Planning out the division of space for different plants and measuring planting depth and distances provide a mental workout. "[Gardening] is a great multi-step chore," says Payton. "Look at it as step-by-step sequencing. Have them plan out the tools needed. It can even involve research." Kids can learn soil properties and gardening conditions, making it a great science-related chore as well.

Junior High & High School Finding time for chores in the tween and teen years can be a challenge. But parents shouldn't give up because of busy schedules. In fact, as her

children grew older, Cheryl Pacilio added responsibilities, rather than reduced them. She tied her son's allowance to his chores as a way to motivate him and train him in real world economics. Jobs like mowing the lawn and vacuuming can be good for teenage brains -- the downtime from thinking about schoolwork while getting tasks done can be both refreshing and energizing. Chores at this age also develop other skills important to kids' academic lives such as learning how to prioritize and work on time management. Payton points out the benefits of learning to plan related to housework, in particular laundry. A teen might say, "I want to wear my favorite jeans on the weekend, but I forgot to wash them..." The big idea at this age is to progressively assign more responsibility. As Pacilio notes, "The value of chores is in creating full-functioning members of a society." Are your kids new to housework and you're not sure where to start? Aaronson suggests starting slow. "Begin by creating a chores list with


Suggested Chores By Age PRESCHOOL. • Put dirty clothes in hamper • Help set the table • Put toys and games in proper boxes or bins • Help unload the dishwasher • Damp-mop any spills • Fill the pet's water dish ELEMENTARY-AGED • Make the bed • Squeegee the shower • Feed and exercise pets • Clean pets' bowls and cages • Simple cooking tasks such as rinsing vegetables • Put dishes in dishwasher • Wipe down interior of microwave • Take out trash and recycling TWEEN • Pour beverages for meals • Help hand-wash dishes • Make lunch for school • Unload the dishwasher • Disinfect kitchen and bathroom countertops TEEN • Prepare meals • Clean coffeemaker thoroughly • Mow lawn • Vacuum house (adapted from Mrs. Clean Jeans' Housekeeping with Kids)

just one or two chores for each schoolage kid." Sharing household duties shouldn't be looked at as a burden or a punishment. Parents need to remember chores won't hamper kids' success at school, but instead will build on it. Pacilio advises, "I would encourage parents to look at chores as necessary teaching opportunities. To let your child leave the house still a child is to thwart his adulthood and cripple a society. Chores are the tools you use to create a good employee, an appreciated neighbor, and most importantly, a good spouse and parent himself."  Lara Krupicka is a parenting journalist and mom to three girls. She learns as much from sharing housework with her kids as they learn from her.

Find us on the web www.RocParent.com

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After School Activity Guide Looking for enrichment programs and what to do with the kids after-school or on the weekends? Here is an array of activities for children after the final bell rings. After School Programs & Child Care Art Instruction Dance Programs Drama & Theater Enrichment, Special Learning & Tutoring Music Programs Sports & Athletics Classes and Programs

Bright Raven Gymnastics

12 Pixley Industrial Pkwy., Rochester, 14624 247-0800 www.brightravengym.com Serving Rochester for 45 years! Programs offered for ages 2 to 22 at every ability level in a bright, air-conditioned, state-of-the-art facility. Highly qualified staff has trained USAG State/Regional champions and National qualifiers. All programs have a low student-instructor ratio.

YMCA of Greater Rochester

www.rochesterymca.org Various locations| 546-5500 YMCA sports provide a values-oriented atmosphere where children of all ages can build self-esteem, learn the rules of fair play, develop coordination and have fun! Programs include swim lessons, soccer, basketball, lacrosse, floor hockey, swim team, gymnastics, flag football and more. Programs vary at each facility; call the branch nearest you for more information. Financial assistance is available for all YMCA programs.

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PLUS... CHECK OUT OUR ONLINE AFTER-SCHOOL & WEEKEND ACTIVITIES DIRECTORIES AND ALL OF OUR FAMILY-FOCUSED DIRECTORIES ONLINE FOR MORE GREAT RESOURCES AND ARTICLES

www.RocParent.com for you 24/7!


AFTER-SCHOOL & WEEKEND ACTIVITY GUIDE

talent show NURTURING YOUR CHILD’S BUDDING INTERESTS

By Malia Jacobson

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atching kids develop their unique talents is one of the joys of parenthood. What’s more fun than having a front-row seat as tiny dancers pirouette and sashay, aspiring actors put on plays, and future rock stars belt out warbling solos? But effectively nurturing a child’s talent takes more than applause and praise. All parents want to foster a child’s developing skills without overwhelming him. But when does “encouragement” turn into pushing? And how should parents react when kids resist an activity, or when they drop a once-enjoyed pursuit? A child’s interests and talents are as unique as his fingerprint. With that in mind, experts say that the best way to encourage a child depends on his temperament. Whether kids lean toward creative pursuits, athletic endeavors, or have interests all over the map, parents can nurture their abilities while promoting self-esteem and teaching valuable lessons in commitment and responsibility.

TALENT TYPE: THE SUPERSTAR

When a child shows exceptional talent in a specific area, it’s easy to go overboard. “Very quickly, a child’s life can become centered around that one thing, which can be a recipe for burnout, " says Thomas Hobson, Director of Child Life at Le Bonheur Children's Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee. If a talented child begins to resist a favorite pastime, a break may be in order. Time will tell whether your child has the interest and dedication to progress to an elite level. In the meantime, keep things in perspective; interests can shift, change, even disappear as kids mature. For now, keep the focus on fun. "Aim for encouragement that’s specific and activity-focused to communicate that your child’s worth is not tied up in his performance," says Michelle P. Maidenberg, PhD, therapist and president of Westchester Group Works in Harrison, New York. I can tell you worked really hard on that painting! is better than What a good boy! This painting makes me so happy! Expose your gifted child to a number of activities. This intense interest may be a passing phase, so look for ways to expand his horizons or apply a skill in a new way. For example, an exceptionally agile gymnast may enjoy tennis, and a strong swimmer may like soccer. CONTINUED >>> Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • August 2014

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AFTER-SCHOOL & WEEKEND ACTIVITY GUIDE TALENT TYPE: THE SOLO ARTIST

If your child clams up or clings to the wall during team activities, solo pursuits may be more her style for now. Don’t force team sports on a resistant child; instead, help her enjoy her interests and develop new ones in settings where she feels comfortable. Choose one-on-one or smallgroup lessons like art and music classes, or motor skills activities that emphasize individual skills instead of team skills, like swimming, gymnastics, martial arts, and tennis. Or buddy up; sign her up for a class with one close friend. Having a pal nearby might make an activity more enjoyable. A child who prefers individual activities won’t necessarily miss out on social growth. "Cooperation, sharing, and respect for others can be fostered through participation in semi-organized activities like library storytimes," says Karen L. Peterson, PhD, child development professor at Washington State University Vancouver.

TALENT TYPE: THE DABBLER

Swimming? Absolutely! Skiing? Sounds great! Martial arts? Hi-yaaah! Enthusiastic kids jump into new activities with gusto. But taking on too many activities at once can make it difficult to develop a strong commitment to any of them, says Hobson. Committing to an activity or a class — even for a short time — teaches responsibility and helps kids develop the competence that leads to satisfaction and self-esteem. So how can parents up the commitment factor? First, don’t overwhelm kids with too many choices, says Hobson. "Offer two of three choices suited to a child’s interests, and let the child select one activity at a time. Discuss what he would like to get out of the chosen class. Does he want to learn to dribble a basketball? Play a certain game? Do a somersault? With a goal, kids are more likely to stick with the class,” he says. If a child wants to bail on a team sport, parents have a great opportunity to talk about personal responsibility. “With team sports, it’s not just about you, it’s about other people,” says Hobson. He may decide that he doesn’t like soccer or basketball, and that’s fine — but he should continue to attend games and support the team.

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AFTER-SCHOOL & WEEKEND ACTIVITY GUIDE TALENT TYPE: THE DODGER

"When kids want to quit a favorite pastime or just can’t seem to muster up enthusiasm about any activity, parents should try to uncover the source of the resistance,” says Maidenberg. “Often, a child doesn’t want to participate in something if they don’t feel confident or capable.” Have an open conversation to find out what’s going on. A resistant child may be responding to an overstimulating environment or a social conflict rather than the activity itself. To see whether this is the case, take the pressure off by enjoying an activity outside of a class setting. Playing soccer at a local park or putting on a dance recital at home can help build confidence and willingness to try. Kids may need a couple of weeks to warm up to a new class, says Pio Andreotti, PsyD, clinical supervisor of child psychology with New York’s Long Island College Hospital. “Allow the child to observe first and then slowly encourage them to join when she feels ready,” he says. With the right activity and the right encouragement, self-esteem can flourish, says Maidenberg. “If an activity makes a child feel confident, valued, and encouraged, that’s what leads to growth.”  Malia Jacobson is a nationally published health journalist and mom. Her latest book is Sleep Tight, Every Night: Helping Toddlers and Preschoolers Sleep Well Without Tears, Tricks, or Tirades.

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CALENDAR

AUGUST EVENTS

Activities • Exhibits • Theater • Storytelling • Shows • Family Fun • Outdoor Adventures Parenting Programs • and lots more for families to do in & around Rochester!

New York State Fair

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Aug 21Sept 1

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he Great New York State Fair is back! This annual event is a treat for the entire family. More than two dozen new attractions, events and activities will be at the Fair this year, including the Discover the Dinosaurs and the Great Lakes Shipwrecks exhibits, the all-new Wade Shows Midway, Fair mascots Pop and Candy, and much more. Advance sale tickets available, 12 and under free.

WHERE: Empire Expo Center, 581 State Fair Blvd., Syracuse, 13209 / WHEN: Thursday, August 21Monday, September 1, 8am-10pm / FOR MORE INFO: Call 1-800-475-FAIR or visit www.nysfair.org

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SAT

8&9

wednesdays

Escape the heat and experience fun-filled days for the whole family! Investigate the world of flight – from planes and helicopters to birds and insects, learn all about the ability to fly high. Test your paper airplane skills and learn what makes butterflies so special. Meet live birds and talk with their handlers. Friday and Saturday, August 8-9, 12-4pm. Included with admission. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. 271-4320. www.rmsc.org

Enjoy the cool breezes and the sounds of a different band each Wednesday evening. Bring your chair or blanket for comfortable seating. Pack a picnic supper or frequent one of Charlotte’s many restaurants. Refreshments are available in the park. Every Wednesday, 7-9pm, Ontario Beach Park, 4800 Lake Ave., Rochester 14613. 865-3320. www.ontariobeachentertainment.org

Summer Science Festival: Wegmans Concerts Aerodynamic Adventures by the Shore

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SUN

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Red Wings vs Scranton-WB (Yankees) Meet Former NY Yankee and Atlanta Braves star David Justice. He will sign autographs between noon and 12:45pm and 1:10-2 pm. Super Hero Day with free Comic Book Grab Bags to the first 750 kids. Knot Hole Kids' Club Game. After the game, kids can run the bases with Spikes & Mittsy. 1:05pm. Tickets vary by seat. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Way, Rochester 14608. 454-1001. redwingsbaseball.com


CALENDAR OF EVENTS • LOCAL FAMILY-FRIENDLY ACTIVITIES calendar guide: September����������������54 Library����������������������56 Fairs & Festivals��������58

01 * Friday FREE * Animal Tales Drop-In Storytime Snuggle up on a fluffy pillow and enjoy an animal-themed story or two and a humane education component. Great way to introduce the wonders of animals to the little ones of the family. Held every Friday in the Learning Center. 11:30am. Lollypop Farm, 99 Victor Rd., Fairport 14450. 223-1330 x173. www.lollypop.org Rhinos vs Charleston Battery It’s Summer Fun Night. Pre-game concert and raffle prizes for trips to area attractions. Enjoy postgame fireworks. Tickets vary by seat. 7:35pm. Sahlen’s Stadium, 460 Oak St, Rochester. 454-KICK (5425). www.rhinossoccer.com R

Laura Ingalls Wilder Days Celebrate the writings of one of the most popular writers of 19th-century frontier life, and learn more about Laura’s ties to Western New York. $17.50/adult; $11.50/ youth (4-16); $14.50/senior or student with ID; Free/members. 10am-4pm. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd., Mumford. www.gcv.org Summer Science Festival: Fitness Futures See Aug 1.. Included with admission. 12-4pm. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. 271-4320. www.rmsc.org R

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03 * Sunday Laura Ingalls Wilder Days See Aug 2. $17.50/adult; $11.50/ youth (4-16); $14.50/senior or student with ID; Free/members. 10am-4pm. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd., Mumford. www.gcv.org

A Trip to Mars and Saturn

Ends Aug 30: Could there have been life in our solar system? Journey through space to discover signs of past life. At the end of the show, preview the summer night’s sky with the Planetarium’s mighty star projector. Recommended for ages 6 years to adult and lasts for 60 minutes. Tickets are $7 for adults, $6 for seniors, college students with ID, and ages 3–18. The Strasenburgh Planetarium, 657 East Avenue, Rochester. 697-1945. www.rmsc.org

Trolley and Diesel Rides Enjoy a 2-mile round trip trolley excursion Summer Science Festival: Fitness that connects to a diesel train, linking the NYMT with the Rochester Futures Create your own sports & Genesee Valley Railroad team logo and test your endurMuseum’s country depot and railance on an obstacle course while learning about the heart and why a road equipment collection. $10/ adult; $8/youth 3-17 & seniors. healthy heart rate is so important. Included with admission. 12-4pm. 11am-5pm. New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 East River Rochester Museum & Science Rd, Rush. nymtmuseum.org Center, 657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. 271-4320. www.rmsc.org R

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02 * Saturday Animal Birthdays: African BlackFooted Penguin The entire flock of these penguins are celebrating! “Happy Birthday” song and treats for the birthday animals at 2pm. Touch table station. Bring a gift to the party - check the website for suggestions. Included with admission. 1-3pm. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St Paul St, Rochester 14621. 336-7200. www.senecaparkzoo.org FREE * GGH Kids: Sun Prints Use the sun’s rays to make your own art. Suggested for ages 4-12, but “kids” of all ages are welcome! 11am. Grossmans Garden & Home, 1801 Route 250 (1 mile north of Route 441), Penfield, 14526. 377-1982. www.grossmans.com

04 * Monday Detective Week Begins today and continues through Aug 8. Be a super sleuth, investigate a crime scene, and try to find the culprit. Make a disguise, see if you can crack a code, and test your brain power with tangrams and mind games. Included with general admission. 10am-5pm. The Strong National Museum of Play, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. 263-2700. www.museumofplay.org

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History in Plain Sight Rochester History Series: Part 3. Learn about Rochester’s architects and builders against the backdrop of Mount Hope. $7/person; Free/members. 11am. Mount Hope Cemetery, Cemetery Office, South Entrance (opposite Distillery Restaurant);1133 Mt. Hope Avenue, Rochester 14620. 461-3494. fomh.org

Wegmans Concerts by the Shore Enjoy the cool breezes and the sounds of THE INVICTAS. Bring your chairs or blankets for comfortable seating. Refreshments are available in the park. Bring a picnic supper or frequent one of Charlotte’s many restaurants. 7-9pm. Ontario Beach Park, 4800 Lake Ave., Rochester 14613. 865-3320. www.ontariobeachentertainment.org

Detective Week See Aug 4. Included with general admission. 10am-5pm. The Strong National Museum of Play, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. 263-2700. www.museumofplay.org

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07 * Thursday Detective Week See Aug 4. Included with general admission. 10am-5pm. The Strong National Museum of Play, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. 263-2700. www.museumofplay.org FREE * Gazebo Concert Series: Fairport Fire Department Band Bring your lawn chair, sit by the canal and enjoy the music of the 9-time New York State Champions. In the event of rain, concert will be cancelled. 7-8pm. Vincent Kennelly Park Gazebo, Fairport Village Landing. 223-5050. www.fairportlibrary.org R

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06 * Wednesday Detective Week See Aug 4. Included with general admission. 10am-5pm. The Strong National Museum of Play, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. 263-2700. www.museumofplay.org

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05 * Tuesday

FREE * Hochstein at High Falls: The Jane Mutiny Part of the noontime outdoor summer concert series. Bring your own seating & lunch, or pick up a lunch at the many area restaurants. Serving up alternative blues. Rain location: High Falls Center 12:10pm. Granite Mills Park at High Falls, 60 Browns Race, Rochester 14614. 4544403. www.hochstein.org

08 * Friday FREE * Animal Tales DropIn Storytime See Aug 1. 11:30am. Lollypop Farm, 99 Victor Rd., Fairport 14450. 223-1330 x173. www.lollypop.org Detective Week See Aug 4. Included with general admission. 10am-8pm. The Strong National Museum of Play, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. 263-2700. www.museumofplay.org R

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CALENDAR OF EVENTS • LOCAL FAMILY-FRIENDLY ACTIVITIES

DinoSAUR TRAIN "DINOlymics" August 9: 10am - Noon In celebration of the Classic in Jurassic special, WXXI is hosting Dinolympics on Saturday, August 9 from 10am to 12pm at WXXI Studios (280 State Street). Enjoy heart-healthy activities and a morning of fun-filled games and activities to get your little ones moving – including threelegged races, marble feet fishing, bean bag tossing, and much more. There will be fun prizes and giveaways. The event is free and open to all families, but registration is required. To make your reservations, call (585) 258-0200.

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National Silver Ball Tournament It’s time when the Swamp Frogs, the Pondfeilders, and Grangers and other vintage nines gather at Genesee Country Museum for three days of ginger matches, played by 1866 rulesno gloves or protective equipment allowed. Included with admission. 10am-4pm. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd., Mumford. www.gcv.org R

Summer Science Festival: Aerodynamic Adventures From planes and helicopters to birds and insects, learn all about the ability to fly high. Test your paper airplane skills and learn about what makes butterflies so special. Meet live birds and talk with their handlers. Included with admission. 12-4pm. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. 271-4320. www.rmsc.org R

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09 * Saturday Animal Birthdays: Meercat Lookout, Malik and Tracker are celebrating! “Happy Birthday” song and treats for the birthday animals at 2pm. Touch table station. Bring a gift to the party - check the website for suggestions. Included with admission. 1-3pm. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St Paul St, Rochester14621. 336-7200. www.senecaparkzoo.org FREE * GGH Kids: Seed Mosaics Get creative with seeds and make a work of art. Suggested for ages 4-12, but “kids” of all ages are welcome! Ages: 4-12. 11am. Grossmans Garden & Home, 1801 Route 250 (1 mile north of Route 441), Penfield, 14526. 377-1982. www.grossmans.com R


CALENDAR OF EVENTS • LOCAL FAMILY-FRIENDLY ACTIVITIES National Silver Ball Tournament See Aug 08. Included with admission. 10am-4pm. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd., Mumford. www.gcv.org R

Rhinos vs Orange County Blues Rochester International Soccer Tournament Finale - 24 area national teams compete for the Copa Rochester Title. Tickets vary by seat. 7:05pm. Sahlen’s Stadium, 460 Oak St, Rochester. 454-KICK (5425). www.rhinossoccer.com R

Summer Science Festival: Aerodynamic Adventures See Aug 8. Included with admission. 12-4pm. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. www.rmsc.org R

The Revolutionary War Tour Tour guides recount the story of the American Revolution through the lives of veterans buried in Mount Hope Cemetery. The approximately 2-hour presentation highlights the actions of the war that took place in New York State. Refreshments will follow. $7/person; Free/members & children under 16. 12pm. Mount Hope Cemetery, North Gatehouse (opposite Robinson R

Dr.); 791 Mt. Hope Avenue, Rochester 14620. 461-3494. fomh.org R

10 * Sunday

with general admission. The Strong National Museum of Play, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. 263-2700. www.museumofplay.org Red Wings vs Durham Kids Eat Free (The first 500 kids 12 & under receive a hot dog, soda & snack item). Pre-Game Autograph Booth. Season Seat Holder Redemption Game. Tickets vary by seat. 7:05pm. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Way, Rochester. 454-1001. redwingsbaseball.com R

National Silver Ball Tournament See Aug 8. Included with admission. 10am-4pm. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd., Mumford. www.gcv.org Trolley and Track Car Rides Enjoy a 2-mile round trip trolley ride connecting to an open-air track car ride, linking the NYMT with the Rochester & Genesee Valley Railroad Museum’s country depot and railroad equipment collection. $10/adult; $8/youth 3-17 & seniors. 11am-5pm. New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 East River Rd, Rush. nymtmuseum.org R

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11 * Monday Berenstain Bears Week Begins today and continues through Aug 15. Shake paws and take pictures with the Berenstain Bears from 11 am to 2 pm, make bear ears, join a Bear Country picnic and tea party, and more. Included

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12 * Tuesday Berenstain Bears Week See Aug 11. Included with general admission. The Strong National Museum of Play, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. 2632700. www.museumofplay.org Red Wings vs Durham Fan 4-Pack (Get four reserved seat tickets, four hot dogs, four 12-oz. drinks, and a yearbook for only $32/$36 day of game - save $15 off regular prices). Pre-Game Autograph Booth. Tickets vary by seat. 7:05pm. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Way, Rochester. 4541001. redwingsbaseball.com R

13 * Wednesday Berenstain Bears Week See Aug 11. Included with general admission. The Strong National Museum of Play, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. 2632700. www.museumofplay.org Garden Vibes Concert Series The Eastman House presents live music in the Terrace Garden by Samantha Fish. Bring blankets, chairs, and a picnic, or buy from catered concessions on-site. Gates open at 5pm. . Advanced tickets available. $10 adults; $6 members; $5 youths (ages 13-18); and free to children ages 12 and under.. 6-8pm. The George Eastman House, 900 East Avenue, Rochester, NY 14607. www.eastmanhouse.org R

Red Wings vs Durham Wings Wednesday (Look for the discount coupon in preceding Tuesday’s D &C). Pre-Game Autograph Booth. Tickets vary by seat. 7:05pm. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Way, Rochester. 454-1001. redwingsbaseball.com R

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CALENDAR OF EVENTS • LOCAL FAMILY-FRIENDLY ACTIVITIES FREE * Wegmans Concerts by the Shore Enjoy the cool breezes and the sounds of KRAZY FIREMEN (German & Big Band). Bring your chairs or blankets for comfortable seating. Refreshments are available in the park. Bring a picnic supper or frequent one of Charlotte’s many restaurants. 7-9pm. Ontario Beach Park, 4800 Lake Ave., Rochester 14613. 8653320. www.ontariobeachentertainment.org R

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14 * Thursday Berenstain Bears Week See Aug 11. Included with general admission. The Strong National Museum of Play, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. 263-2700. www.museumofplay.org FREE * Hochstein at High Falls: High Falls Business Jam Session Part of the noontime outdoor summer concert series. Bring your own seating & lunch, or pick up a lunch at the many area restaurants. House bands with a mix of genres and combos from the area High Falls businesses. Rain location: High Falls Center. 12:10pm. Granite Mills Park at High Falls, 60 Browns Race, R

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Rochester 14614. 454-4403. www.hochstein.org FREE * Next to New Means Deals for You The Saint Anne Church annual Next to New Sale will be held from Thursday through Saturday, August 14-16 in the Social Hall. This high quality sale includes children’s games and toys, arts and crafts & clean home goods, . 9:00 AM to 6:00 PM. Saint Anne Church, 1600 Mt. Hope Ave., Rochester, NY 14620. 271-3260. www.ourladyoflourdessaintanne.org/next-to-new-sale R

Red Wings vs Durham Meet Baseball Hall of Famer Fergie Jenkins. Fan 4-Pack (Get four reserved seat tickets, four hot dogs, four 12-oz. drinks, and a yearbook for only $32/$36 day of game - save $15 off regular prices). Pre-Game Autograph Booth. Knot Hole Kids’ Club Game. Tickets vary by seat. 7:05pm. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Way, Rochester. 454-1001. redwingsbaseball.com R

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KIDS' MARATHON August 9: This is an opportunity for young runners and walkers to participate in a marathon that is modified just for kids! Beginning on August 9th, kids will gradually walk or run a total of 25 miles in a 5-week period, either on their own or through our weekly clinics. The last mile will proudly be run at the Victor Race/Fun Run on Sept. 10, and a parent can run the last mile with their child. For complete information and registration forms, visit the Southeast YMCA, Victor YMCA, or www.rochesterymca.org/southeast. Free T-shirt included. Proceeds benefit the YMCA Invest in Youth Campaign.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS • LOCAL FAMILY-FRIENDLY ACTIVITIES 15 * Friday FREE * Animal Tales DropIn Storytime See Aug 1. 11:30am. Lollypop Farm, 99 Victor Rd., Fairport 14450. 2231330 x173. www.lollypop.org Berenstain Bears Week See Aug 11. Included with general admission. The Strong National Museum of Play, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. 2632700. www.museumofplay.org R

Red Wings vs Syracuse PreGame Autograph Booth. “The Wings Salute The King Nite,” the annual Elvis tribute. Post-game fireworks. Tickets vary by seat. 7:15pm. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Way, Rochester. 454-1001. redwingsbaseball.com R

Summer Science Festival: Radical Reptiles Meet different live reptiles each day. Investigate the world of these interesting cold-blooded creatures. Learn about the similarities and differences between a reptile and an amphibian while meeting local animal professionals. Included with admission. 12-4pm. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. 271-4320. www.rmsc.org R

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16 * Saturday FREE * GGH Kids: Recyclable Wind Chimes Music is in the air when you craft your own wind chimes from recycled materials. Suggested for ages 4-12, but “kids” of all ages are welcome! Ages: 4-12. 11am. Grossmans Garden & Home, 1801 Route 250 (1 mile north of Route 441), Penfield, 14526. 377-1982. www.grossmans.com Red Wings vs Syracuse PreGame Autograph Booth. The ZOOperstars! perform during the game. Free Team Photos (1st 5,000 fans). Post-game fireworks. Tickets vary by seat. 7:05pm. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Way, Rochester. 454-1001. redwingsbaseball.com R

Serendipity Walk (MODERATE PACE) Enjoy a guided walk and have an adventure exploring areas of the property that are typically not accessible to the public. Experience different types of terrain, including wet areas. Proper footwear is encouraged. requested donation: $3/ person, $10/family, Free/members. 10am-12pm. Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Road, Naples, NY 14512. 374R

6160. http://www.rmsc.org/ CummingNatureCenter Summer Science Festival: Radical Reptiles See Aug 15. Included with admission.. 12-4pm. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. www.rmsc.org R

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17 * Sunday Diesel Day: Trolley and extended Diesel Rides Learn what makes a diesel go, and how they are able to generate so much power. See several different types of diesel locomotives under power, and take a ride in a real caboose! $10/adult; $8/youth 3-17 & seniors. 11am-5pm. New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 East River Rd, Rush. nymtmuseum.org Red Wings vs Syracuse Family Bulletin Day. Pre-Game Autograph Booth. Kids can Run The Bases with Spikes & Mittsy after the game. Tickets vary by seat. 6:05pm. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Way, Rochester. 4541001. redwingsbaseball.com R

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18 * Monday Nonsense Week Begins today and continues through Aug 22. Make a whimsical oversized – or undersized! – hat to take home, create a Dr. Seuss-inspired craft, enjoy silly Seuss stories, read poems and tongue twisters, and more. Included with general admission. 10am-5pm. The Strong National Museum of Play, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. 263-2700. www.museumofplay.org Red Wings vs Syracuse Kids Eat Free (The first 500 kids 12 & under receive a hot dog, soda & snack item). Pre-Game Autograph Booth. Season Seat Holder Redemption Game. Tickets vary by seat. 7:05pm. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Way, Rochester. 454-1001. redwingsbaseball.com R

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19 * Tuesday Nonsense Week See Aug 18. Included with general admission. 10am-5pm. The Strong National Museum of Play, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. 2632700. www.museumofplay.org R

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CALENDAR OF EVENTS • LOCAL FAMILY-FRIENDLY ACTIVITIES 20 * Wednesday Herschell Carrousel: Free Wednesday The Carrousel Museum has a series of Free Wednesdays, sponsored by local businesses, scheduled for the summer of 2014. On each Free Wednesday, admission to the museum will be free from Noon until 4 PM. Rides will be 50 cents each. 12-4pm. The Herschell Carrousel Factory Museum, 180 Thompson Street, North Tonawanda, NY. www.carrouselmuseum.org Nonsense Week See Aug 18. Included with general admission. 10am-5pm. The Strong National Museum of Play, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. 263-2700. www.museumofplay.org R

FREE * Wegmans Concerts by the Shore Enjoy the cool breezes and the sounds of THE GATESWINGERS and THE HOT FLASH DANCERS. Bring your chairs or blankets for comfortable seating. Refreshments are available in the park or bring a picnic supper. 7-9pm. Ontario Beach Park, 4800 Lake Ave., Rochester 14613. 865-3320. www.ontariobeachentertainment.org R

21 * Thursday

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Nonsense Week See Aug 18. Included with general admission. 10am-5pm. The Strong National Museum of Play, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. 263-2700. www.museumofplay.org R

22 * Friday FREE * Animal Tales DropIn Storytime see August 1. 11:30am. Lollypop Farm, 99 Victor Rd., Fairport 14450. 2231330 x173. www.lollypop.org Nonsense Week See Aug 18.. Included with general admission. 10am-9pm. The Strong National Museum of Play, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. 263-2700. www.museumofplay.org R

Summer Science Festival: Build It, Break It See how tall you can make a structure built completely out of cups. Take apart old electronics to make something new and learn about the science behind bridge building. Meet members of local FIRST Robotics teams. Included with admission.. 12-4pm. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave., R

FIND MORE! FOR MORE CALENDAR EVENTS AND PLACES TO GO, CHECK OUR WEBSITE WHERE YOU WILL FIND: Access to events by month and day Review events by selection of library, storytimes, free events, sports, outdoor fun and more... New events posted weekly

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CALENDAR OF EVENTS • LOCAL FAMILY-FRIENDLY ACTIVITIES Rochester 14607. www.rmsc.org R

23 * Saturday Family Fun: Build a Fairy House Have fun while learning how to construct a fairy house using all natural materials. Bring your camera because the houses will become part of the nature center! This is a project for children of all ages. Requested donation: $3/ person, $10/family, Free/members. 10am-12pm. Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Road, Naples, NY 14512. 374-6160. www.rmsc.org/ CummingNatureCenter GCVM Presents: Victorian Day Victorian Day will feature a fashion show, games of croquet, free carriage rides, cake tastings and a Mad Hatter tea party ‘mad-hatted’ guests welcome. $17.50/adult; $11.50/ youth (4-16); $14.50/senior or student with ID; Free/members. 10am-4pm. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd., Mumford. www.gcv.org R

FREE * GGH Kids: Grass Weaving Learn how to weave grass into a neat project to take home. Suggested for ages 4-12, but “kids” of all ages are welcome! Ages: 4-12. 11am. Grossmans Garden & Home, 1801 Route 250 (1 mile north of Route 441), Penfield, 14526. 377-1982. www.grossmans. com R

Lost Secrets Tour Professor Emil Homerin leads an examination of symbols, inscriptions and funerary art that expressed views of life, death and immortality in the 19th century. Refreshments following the tour. $7/person; Free/members & children under 16. 12:30pm. Mount Hope Cemetery, Cemetery Office, South Entrance (opposite Distillery Restaurant);1133 Mt. Hope Avenue, Rochester 14620. 461-3494. fomh.org R

Red Wings vs Scranton/ WB Spikes Salsa & Francesco Rinaldi Night - with label buy 1 get 1 free. Seneca Park Zoo Nite &Jersey Auction. Sports Card & Collectibles Show. WWE Hall of Famer Tito Santana ($15 for autographs) Go Green Night plus the The ZOOperstars! Fireworks. Tickets vary by seat. 7:05pm. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Way, Rochester. 454-1001. redwingsbaseball.com R

Rhinos vs Harrisburg City Islanders Fan Appreciation Night with giveaways to all the fans in attendance. Also honoring student athletes at the High School girls & boys soccer night. Tickets vary by seat. 7:05pm. Sahlen’s Stadium, 460 Oak St, Rochester. 454-KICK (5425). www.rhinossoccer.com Snakes and Friends Day Docent-run touch table stations highlight unique attributes of reptile and amphibians along with their roles in the environment. Part of the Zoo’s Conservation Education Days. Included with Admission.. 10am-4pm. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St., Rochester 14621. www.senecaparkzoo.org R

Summer Science Festival: Build It, Break It See Aug 22.. Included with admission.. 12-4pm. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. www.rmsc.org R

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24 * Sunday Red Wings vs Scranton-WB Meet Former Yankees and Braves star David Justice - autographs 12-12:45pm & 1:102pm. Super Hero Day & free Comic Book Grab Bags (1st 750 kids). Family Bulletin Day. Knot Hole Kids’ Club Game. Run The Bases with Spikes & Mittsy after the game. Tickets vary by seat. 1:05pm. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Way, Rochester. 454-1001. redwingsbaseball.com Trolley and Track Car Rides See August 10.. $10/adult; $8/youth 3-17 & seniors. 11am-5pm. New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 East River Rd, Rush. nymtmuseum.org R

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25 * Monday Red Wings vs Scranton/WB Kids Eat Free (The first 500 kids 12 & under receive a hot dog, soda & snack item). Pre-Game Autograph Booth. Season Seat Holder Redemption Game. Tickets vary by seat. 7:05pm. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Way, Rochester. 454-1001. redwingsbaseball.com R

noteworthy

in our community volunteers needed

Heritage Christian Stables, a therapeutic horsemanship program for children and adults with disabilities, is looking for volunteers to assist in its next session, which runs from Sept. 8 – Nov. 29. The Stables needs both horse leaders and side walkers. Horse leaders are responsible for the horse during the lessons, helping to lead the horse and rider around the ring. Side walkers work with the rider during the lesson, providing support as needed. Lessons are offered Monday through Friday at various times throughout each day and evening. Volunteers need to commit to a weekly schedule for the session and are required to attend an initial orientation followed by hands-on training. VOLUNTEER ORIENTATION: 5:30–6:30pm, Wednesday, Aug. 13 at the stables, 1103 Salt Road in Webster. VOLUNTEER TRAINING: 2–4pm, Saturday, Aug. 16 at the Stables, 1103 Salt Road in Webster. For more information or to register for orientation, contact Kim Kennedy at (585) 340-2016 or kkennedy@heritagechristianservices.org.

to the trees!

Thousands of local children with paralysis and other physical challenges will soon experience the independence and joy of climbing a tree, with the construction of a fully accessible wooden tree house at Rochester Rotary Sunshine Campus. Rochester Rotary announced that it will build a fully accessible wooden tree house at the campus, the first of its kind in the Finger Lakes region. When constructed, the tree house will feature wheelchair-accessible ramps, wide platforms, sensory equipment for enhanced learning, a cabin enclosure and tree-top views for campers. Built between eight existing trees at the campus, the tree house will gradually rise to a maximum height of 12 to 14 feet above the ground. Rochester Rotary Sunshine Campus is a resource for children and adults across the Finger Lakes region. The facility hosts summer camps held by Rochester Rotary as well as by the American Diabetes Association, Camp Haccamo, Camp Joy, Heritage Christian Services, Mary Cariola Children’s Center, the Muscular Dystrophy Association and Reach for the Stars. The tree house is being designed and built by The Tree House Guys LLC, a nationally renowned firm that has constructed accessible tree houses across the country. Groundbreaking on the tree house is planned for October 2014, with the grand opening expected in July 2015. For more information, contact Tracey Dreisbach, executive director of Rochester Rotary, at 585-546-7435, ext. 215 or Tracey@rochesterrotary.org. Donations also can be made online at sunshinecampus.org.

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CALENDAR OF EVENTS • LOCAL FAMILY-FRIENDLY ACTIVITIES FREE * PajamaRAMA Storytime! Jump into your cozy jammies, bring your favorite stuffed friend and come to the Hundred Acre Woods for bedtime stories, songs and treats! Last Friday of every month. 7pm. Barnes & Noble Webster, 1070 Ridge Rd, Webster 14580. 8729710. R

27 * Wednesday FREE * Food Truck Rodeo Dozens of food trucks converge at the Rochester Public Market for an evening of local food, local brew and local music. Hear the Contemporary sound of the group, Goodness. 5-9pm. Rochester Public Market, 280 N. Union St, Rochester. 4286907. www.cityofrochester.gov/ foodtruckrodeo FREE * Wegmans Concerts by the Shore Enjoy the cool breezes and the sounds of RUBY SHOOZ (50’S Show Band ). Bring your chairs or blankets for comfortable seating. Refreshments are available in the park. Bring a picnic supper or frequent one of Charlotte’s many restaurants. 7-9pm. Ontario Beach Park, 4800 Lake Ave., Rochester 14613. 865-3320. www.ontariobeachentertainment.org R

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29 * Friday FREE * Animal Tales DropIn Storytime see August 1. 11:30am. Lollypop Farm, 99 Victor Rd., Fairport 14450. 2231330 x173. www.lollypop.org

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Red Wings vs Buffalo Pre-Game Autograph Booth. Free Stan Musial Bobbleheads (1st 2,000 fans) featuring Stan in his 1941 Red Wings uniform. Post-game fireworks. Tickets vary by seat. 7:15pm. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Way, Rochester. 454-1001. redwingsbaseball.com R

Summer Science Festival: Supersonic Space Find out how much you would weigh on other planets! Watch rocket launches and recreate constellations using K’NEX. From stars and constellations to astronauts and rockets, discover some of the amazing aspects of outer space. Included with admission. 12-4pm. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. www.rmsc.org R

30 * Saturday

31 * Sunday

Edgerton Model Railroad Club Layout Tour Historic preservation in miniature. The last Saturday of each month the P.A.L. Model Railroad Heaven is open for visitors. Since 1950 the four O Gauge train layouts, depicting each season in Rochester, have been meticulously updated & maintained. 11am-2pm. Edgerton Recreation Center, 41 Backus St., Rochester, 14608. 428-6769. edgertonmodelrailroadclub.com

Trolley and Diesel Rides See August 3. $10/adult; $8/youth 3-17 & seniors. 11am-5pm. New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 East River Rd, Rush. nymtmuseum.org

Red Wings vs Buffalo PreGame Autograph Booth. Fan Appreciation Nite...Free Snow Brushes (1st 500 fans) and 2015 Magnetic Schedule Giveaway. Post-game fireworks. Tickets vary by seat. 7:05pm. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Way, Rochester. 4541001. redwingsbaseball.com

Holiday Special Tour of Mount Hope Cemetery Two hour leisurely walk of approximately one mile on paved roads and uneven terrain. Refreshments following the tour. $5/person; Free/members & children under 16. 2pm. Mount Hope Cemetery, North Gatehouse (opposite Robinson Dr.); 791 Mt. Hope Avenue, Rochester 14620. 461-3494. fomh.org

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Summer Science Festival: Supersonic Space See Aug 29. Included with admission.. 12-4pm. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. www.rmsc.org R

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SEPTEMBER 01 * Monday

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06 * Saturday FREE * GGH Kids: Bug Hotels Don’t let the title fool you. Learning about bug habitats can be fun. Suggested for ages


CALENDAR OF EVENTS • LOCAL FAMILY-FRIENDLY ACTIVITIES 4-12, but “kids” of all ages are welcome! Ages: 4-12. 11am. Grossmans Garden & Home, 1801 Route 250 (1 mile north of Route 441), Penfield, 14526. 377-1982. www.grossmans.com Susan B. Anthony & Women’s Rights Tour Victoria Schmitt explains the women’s right movement as told through the lives of Susan B. Anthony and other Rochester suffragettes during this 2-hour walking tour. Refreshments following the tour. $7/person; Free/members & children under 16. 10am. Mount Hope Cemetery, North Gatehouse (opposite Robinson Dr.); 791 Mt. Hope Avenue, Rochester 14620. 461-3494. fomh.org R

The Civil War Tour During this walking tour, hear about the Civil War as told against the backdrop of Mount Hope Cemetery with a focus on local involvement. Refreshments following the tour. $7/person; Free/members & children under 16. 1:30pm. Mount Hope Cemetery, North Gatehouse (opposite Robinson Dr.); 791 Mt. Hope Avenue, Rochester 14620. 461-3494. fomh.org R

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07 * Sunday Trolley and Track Car Rides Enjoy a 2-mile round trip trolley ride connecting to an open-air track car ride, linking the NYMT with the Rochester & Genesee Valley Railroad Museum’s country depot and railroad equipment collection. $10/adult; $8/youth 3-17 & seniors. 11am-5pm. New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 East River Rd, Rush. nymtmuseum.org R

08 * Monday

Labor Day events

Visit us online at www.RocParent.com for our listing of area Labor Day events! 13 * Saturday Animal Birthdays: Bornean Orangutan Denda and Kuman are celebrating! “Happy Birthday” song and treats for the birthday animals at 2pm. Touch table station. Bring a gift to the party - check the website for suggestions. Included with admission. 1-3pm. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St Paul St, Rochester14621. 336-7200. www.senecaparkzoo.org Geology at Mount Hope Cemetery Geologist, Bill Chaisson, will share the history of the Rochester terrain as it existed hundreds of years ago, where it can be seen first hand. Refreshments following the tour. $7/person; Free/members & children under 16. 12:30pm. Mount Hope Cemetery, North Gatehouse (opposite Robinson Dr.); 791 Mt. Hope Avenue, Rochester 14620. 461-3494. fomh.org

Boardwalk Arcade

Now-Sept 7: All summer long, journey through seaside amusements and play a variety of carnival games. Win tickets and prizes. Laugh at your distorted reflection in silly fun-house mirrors and then step right up to an oversized beach cut-out for an unforgettable photo opportunity. Young children can dig right in for creative play with beach toys right at the Boardwalk Arcade shoreline. Admission: age 2 and older $13.50, under age 2 free, members free. Strong National Museum of Play, One Manhattan Square, Rochester. 263-2700. www.museumofplay.org

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Over the Rainbow Weekend Skip down the Yellow Brick Road to meet Dorothy and friends, create rainbow works of art, and more. Included with general museum admission fees. 11am-4pm. The Strong National Museum of Play, One R

14 * Sunday Over the Rainbow Weekend See Sept. 13. 1pm-4pm. The Strong National Museum of Play, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. www.museumofplay.org

20 * Saturday Beyond the Bump Whether you’re pregnant or have a little one already, you won’t want to miss! Seminars, demos by experts, connect with other new and expectant moms and more! 10am-5pm. Double Tree Hotel, 1111 Jefferson Road, Rochester 14623. www.beyond-the-bump.com

PLEASE NOTE:

Dates and times for all calendar and ongoing events are subject to change. Please call the numbers provided or visit their website to confirm event information.

WANT TO SEE YOUR EVENT IN PRINT & ONLINE?

To submit an event to our calendar e-mail: calendar@GVParent.com NEW:  Submit your calendar events online at www.RocParent.com/calendar/calendar-submit All entries must be received by the 10th of the month prior to publication in order to be considered. Events printed as space permits.

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CALENDAR OF EVENTS • LOCAL FAMILY-FRIENDLY ACTIVITIES

librarY PROGRAMS & ACTIVITIES

Wednesday Afternoons at the Movies: Each week, the Children's Center of the Central Library of Rochester and Monroe County will be showing a FREE movie! You won’t want to miss any of these awesome movies! For more information, contact: The Children's Center of the Central Library of Rochester and Monroe County, 115 South Ave, Rochester. 428-8150. www.libraryweb.org, or go to www.rocparent.com

784-5300. brightonlib.wordpress.com FREE * Wednesday Afternoon at the Movies The Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles A quartet of mutated humanoid turtles clash with an uprising criminal gang of ninjas. Rated PG. 2:304pm. Children's Center of the Central Library of Rochester and Monroe County, 115 South Av., Rochester, NY 14604. 428-8150. www.libraryweb.org R

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01 * Friday FREE * Friday Make and Take Craft Create a different crafty project to take home. All supplies will be provided while they last. 1-4pm. Children's Center of the Central Library of Rochester and Monroe County, 115 South Avenue, Rochester, NY 14604. 428-8150. www.libraryweb.org R

04 * Monday FREE * How to Catch a Mouse: Simple Machines at Work Don't get caught at home! Escape for an exciting balloon demonstration. Artist Larry Moss will explain how simple machines work, using balloons as models, and then build a better mousetrap. For all ages. 10:30-11:30am. Kate Gleason Auditorium, Central Library of Rochester and Monroe County, 115 South Av., Rochester, NY 14604. 428-8150. www.libraryweb.org FREE * Movie Mondays Beat the heat, beat the boredom, and enjoy a light and healthy snack and a good family movie at the library! call the library and receive a list of movies. For all ages. Adult supervision required for children under the age of 13. 4-5:30pm. Walworth-Seely Public Library, 3600 Lorraine Drive, Walworth 14568. 315986-1511. www.walworthlibrary.org

Library-Evans Branch, 45 Cooper Road, Rochester, NY 14617. 336-6062. www.libraryweb.org FREE * Wegmans ZooMobile Summer Reading Finale Meet some Seneca Park Zoo animals in this hands-on program about animals and their habitats. (Children under 5 must be accompanied by an adult.) 1-2pm. Hamlin Public Library, 422 Clarkson Hamlin Townline Rd, Hamlin NY 14464. 9642320. www.hamlinny.org/Library R

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05 * Tuesday FREE * Tree House Tuesday: Earthquake in the Early Morning This program will shake you up! We’ll explore the science of earthquakes with crafts and other activities. For children going into grades 2-4. Registration is required. 2pm. Wood Library, 134 North Main St., Canandaigua, NY 14424. 394-1381. woodlibrary.org

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FREE * Sing, Sign, and Play During this fun and interactive class we will use books, songs, and other playful activities to teach caregivers and tots some simple and useful ASL signs. Ages 0-23 months with caregiver. Registration required. 11:30am. Irondequoit Public R

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06 * Wednesday FREE * Creature Feature Wood Library welcomes back their special friends from the Wildlife Defenders. They will be bringing some of the animals from their wildlife education program for everyone to meet and learn about. 11:30am. Wood Library, 134 North Main St., Canandaigua, NY 14424. 394-1381. woodlibrary.org FREE * Fizz, Boom, STORYTIME! Storytime with a science twist based on the Summer Reading theme. For all ages with a caregiver. 10am. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave, Rochester 14618. R

07 * Thursday FREE * Baby and Toddler PlayTime Parents are invited to bring their babies and toddlers to the Children's Center's Secret Room to enjoy a variety of fun and early literacy activities with other young children. 11am-noon. Children's Center of the Central Library of Rochester and Monroe County, 115 South Av., Rochester, NY 14604. 428-8150. www.libraryweb.org R

FREE * Ice Cream Social For children who have completed the summer reading program. Choose from several different kinds of ice cream and a buffet of toppings! You’ll need a ticket obtained by turning in your summer reading game board! 1pm. Irondequoit Public LibraryEvans Branch, 45 Cooper Road, Rochester, NY 14617. 3366062. www.libraryweb.org R

FREE * Movie Day Take a fantastic journey across the univers with this fun kid movie. Popcorn and drinks will be provided. 2pm. Hamlin Public Library, 422 Clarkson Hamlin Townline Rd, Hamlin NY 14464. 964-2320. www.hamlinny.org/Library FREE * Munchtime at the Movies Eat your lunch at the library while you enjoy a movie on our "Big Screen". This week: Despicable Me 2! Noon. Wood Library, 134 North Main St., Canandaigua, NY 14424. 394-1381. woodlibrary.org R

08 * Friday FREE * Friday Make and Take Craft Creating a different crafty project to take home. All supplies will be provided while they

last. 1-4pm. Children's Center of the Central Library of Rochester and Monroe County, 115 South Avenue, Rochester, NY 14604. 428-8150. www.libraryweb.org R

11 * Monday FREE * Have to Have a Habitat with Wegmans ZooMobile The Wegmans ZooMobile is coming from the Seneca Park Zoo to present a few different animals and explain why they live in the area they do. 10:30-11:30am. Kate Gleason Auditorium, Central Library of Rochester and Monroe County, 115 South Av., Rochester, NY 14604. 4288150. www.libraryweb.org FREE * Movie Mondays See Aug 4. 4-5:30pm. WalworthSeely Public Library, 3600 Lorraine Drive, Walworth 14568. 315-986-1511. www.walworthlibrary.org R

FREE * Sing, Sign, and Play See Aug 4. 11:30am. Irondequoit Public Library-Evans Branch, 45 Cooper Road, Rochester, NY 14617. 3366062. www.libraryweb.org R

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12 * Tuesday FREE * Lost! ... But Found, Safe and Sound This program will teach children how not to get lost, how to stay comfortable until help arrives if they do get lost, and how they can be found more quickly. Come meet the dog- and- handler teams from this area and learn what you can do to stay safe. 10:30am. Wood Library, 134 North Main St., Canandaigua, NY 14424. 394-1381. woodlibrary.org R

13 * Wednesday FREE * Wednesday Afternoon at the Movies The Jungle Book. Bagheera the Panther and Baloo the Bear have a difficult time trying to convince a boy to leave the jungle for human civilization. Rated G. 2:30-4pm. Children's Center of the Central Library of Rochester and Monroe County,


CALENDAR OF EVENTS • LOCAL FAMILY-FRIENDLY ACTIVITIES

115 South Avenue, Rochester, NY 14604. 428-8150. www.libraryweb.org R

14 * Thursday FREE * Baby and Toddler PlayTime Parents are invited to bring their babies and toddlers to the Children's Center's Secret Room to enjoy a variety of fun and early literacy activities with other young children. 11am-noon. Children's Center of the Central Library of Rochester and Monroe County, 115 South Avenue, Rochester, NY 14604. 428-8150. www.libraryweb.org FREE * Munchtime at the Movies Eat your lunch at the library while you enjoy a movie on our "Big Screen". This week: Wall-E! Noon. Wood Library, 134 North Main St., Canandaigua, NY 14424. 3941381. woodlibrary.org R

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15 * Friday FREE * End of Summer Reading Party Celebrate your successful reading over the summer! Just Clowning Around will help with balloon hats and face painting. Games, crafts, and prizes! 2:30-3:30pm. Kate Gleason Auditorium, Central Library of Rochester and Monroe County, 115 South Av., Rochester, NY 14604. 428-8150. www.libraryweb.org R

16 * Saturday FREE * Summer Reading Finale Summer Reading comes to a close with out annual Finale and Ice Cream Social! Join us for music, games, food and fun! Raffle Prize winners will be announced at 1PM 12-2pm. Walworth-Seely Public Library, 3600 Lorraine Drive, Walworth 14568. 315-986-1511. www.walworthlibrary.org R

18 * Monday FREE * Movie Mondays See Aug 4. 4-5:30pm. Walworth-Seely Public Library, 3600 Lorraine Drive, Walworth 14568. 315986-1511. www.walworthlibrary.org R

20 * Wednesday FREE * Make a CD Scrapbook Use old CD’s colorful paper, and other embellishments to make a scrapbook to hold your memories. For Grades K-6, Registration required. 11am. Irondequoit Public Library-Evans Branch, 45 Cooper Road, Rochester, NY 14617. 336-6062. www.libraryweb.org FREE * Wednesday Afternoon at the Movies Despicable Me. When a criminal mastermind uses a trio of orphan girls as pawns for a grand scheme, he finds their love is profoundly changing him for the better. Rated PG. 2:30-4pm. Children's Center of the Central Library of Rochester and Monroe County, 115 South Avenue, Rochester, NY 14604. 428-8150. www.libraryweb.org R

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23 * Saturday FREE * EMMIE THE READING DOG Emmie, an adorable Shetland sheepdog, loves to hear stories! Bring your own book or pick one from the library. No registration required. 10:30am. Irondequoit Public Library-Evans Branch, 45 Cooper Road, Rochester, NY 14617. 336-6062. www.libraryweb.org R

27 * Wednesday FREE * Wednesday Afternoon at the Movies Despicable Me 2. Gru is recruited by the Anti-Villain League to help deal with a powerful new super criminal. Rated PG. 2:30-4pm. Children's Center of the Central Library of Rochester and Monroe County, 115 South Avenue, Rochester, NY 14604. 428-8150.

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CALENDAR OF EVENTS • LOCAL FAMILY-FRIENDLY ACTIVITIES

AUGUST 8 – 14 PAGEANT OF STEAM - AUG 6-9. See August 6. WALNUT HILL CARRIAGE DRIVING COMPETITION AUG 6-10. See August 6. GREATER ROCHESTER GERMAN FESTIVAL - AUG 8-9 German food, drinks, dancing, crafts and cultural displays and children’s activities. Fri: 6-11pm, Sat: 7-11pm. Spencerport Fireman’s Field, Spencerport. 426-7835. www.rochestergerman.com

PAGEANT OF STEAM AUGUST 6 - 9

AUGUST 1 – 7 LIVINGSTON COUNTY FAIR JULY 30 - AUG 2. See July 30. PHELPS SAUERKRAUT FESTIVAL - JULY 31 - AUG 3. See July 31. MONROE COUNTY FAIR JULY 31 - AUG 3. See July 31. 2014 LIMA CROSSROADS FESTIVAL - AUG 2 Pancake Breakfast, vendors, children’s activities, car cruise and show, games, contests, and the annual bed race. 9am-10pm. Main St., Routes 5 & 20, Lima. Limafest.org PARK AVE SUMMER ARTS FEST - AUG 2-3 A 1.25 mile route filled with unique shopping, food & entertainment, arts & crafts, as well as three stages of musical acts. Parking in area lots & on side streets. No pets. 10am6pm. Park Avenue (Alexander to Culver), Rochester, 473-4482. www.rochesterevents.com

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22nd ANNUAL GLORIOUS GARLIC FESTIVAL - AUG 2-3 Browse the 30+ vendors, tour the vineyards and see the winery. Enjoy live music, cooking demos, great food and award-winning, hand-crafted wine. Free admission & parking. 11am-5pm. Fox Run Vineyards, 670 State Rte 14, Penn Yan. 800-636-9786. www.foxrunvineyards.com PAGEANT OF STEAM AUG 6-9 Display of antique farm equipment dating back to early 1900’s, parades, tractor pulls, flea market, live music, displays, demos & food. 8am-8pm. Pageant Fair Grounds, Gehan Rd. off Rt. 5 & 20 E, Canandaigua. 315-331-4022. www.pageantofsteam.org WALNUT HILL CARRIAGE DRIVING COMPETITION AUG 6-10 Pittsford countryside comes alive with the magic and romance of an earlier era - a time when the Horse and Carriage reflected the quality of life and influenced the pace and scope of occupational and social activities. 8am-5pm. Walnut Hill Farm, 397 West Bloomfield Rd, Pittsford. 385-2555. www.walnuthillfarm.org

FINGER LAKES RIESLING FESTIVAL & CANANDAIGUA ROTARY PIER FESTIVAL AUGUST 9-10 Benefiting the Canandaigua YMCA & charities of the Canandaigua Rotary. Riesling wine and NYS craft beer, seminars, cooking demonstrations, an arts & crafts fair, live music and local farmers market. Festival events Sat & Sun 10am-5pm. Activities for children of all ages. Sat 4pm free concerts, Flint Creek & Taran. 9:30pm fireworks. Canandaigua City Pier and the New York Wine & Culinary Center, 800 S. Main St, Canandaigua. 899-3226. rieslingfestival.com BROCKPORT SUMMER ARTS FESTIVAL - AUG 9-10 Events will include the popular Duck Derby; over 100 artists and craftspeople, great music and food and activities for kids. 10am-6pm. Main Street, Brockport. www.brockportartsfestival.com CARIFEST - AUG 9 Featuring some of the Caribbean’s finest in food, music, and arts and crafts. The annual costume parade highlights the traditional carnival spirit of the Caribbean. The parade starts at 11am at Liberty Pole Way, continuing down Main Street, Rochester. 1-10pm. Riverside Festival Site, Court St. and Exchange, Rochester. www.rwifo.com

WAYNE COUNTY FAIR - AUG 11-16 Exhibits, Farm animals, food vendors, rides and live entertainment. Fun for the entire family. No pets. $5, ages 6-16: $3; ages 5 & under: FREE. 10am-10pm. Wayne County Fair Grounds, 250 W. Jackson St. Palmyra. www.waynecountyfair.org UKRAINIAN ARTS & CRAFT FESTIVAL - AUG 14-17 The Festival has offers tradition Ukrainian foods, dance, Arts and Crafts. The Ukrainian Stage offers a variety of entertainment including Traditional Ukrainian Folk Dancers and Singers. St. Josaphats, 940 Ridge Road East, Rochester. 266-2255. rochesterukrainianfestival.com

AUGUST 15 – 21 WAYNE COUNTY FAIR - AUG 11-16. See August 11. UKRAINIAN ARTS & CRAFT FESTIVAL - AUG 14-17. See Aug 14. MOUNT MORRIS ITALIAN FEST - AUG 16-17 Arts, crafts, traditional Italian food, live entertainment. This 2-day event sponsors the famous local “IDOL” contest! Main St, Mount Morris. www.mountmorrisitalianfest.com NEW YORK STATE FAIR - AUG 21-SEPT 1 New York State’s largest annual event; an exciting mix of big-name entertainment, mouth-watering food, captivating exhibits and thrilling attractions. Continues through September 1. 8am-10pm. advance sale tickets available, 12 & under free. Empire Expo Center, 581 State Fair Blvd., Syracuse. 800475-FAIR. www.nysfair.org

AUGUST 22 – 28 NEW YORK STATE FAIR - AUG 21-SEPT 1. See August 21.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS • LOCAL FAMILY-FRIENDLY ACTIVITIES

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Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent August 2014  

Rochester NY's Premier Parenting Resource since 1994!

Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent August 2014  

Rochester NY's Premier Parenting Resource since 1994!

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