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TLL An Overview

gumawang.jati@gmail.com


Digital natives A digital native is interacting with digital technology from an early age, has a greater understanding of its concepts. They have grown in a world where digital technologies have spread so rapidly during the last years A digital native understands the value of digital technology and uses this to seek out opportunities for implementing it with a view to make an impact. Today’s students are no longer the people our education system was design to teach. The future students think and speak differently …. Their thinking pattern have changed They have spent their life surrounded by and using computers, videogames, digital music players, smart phones and all other gadgets of the digital age.

Marc Prensky –”Digital natives, Digital Immigrants” 2001


How digital native learn Look at this video, how did he learn in realizing his dream?


Technology Literacy Technology can be applied as a tool for • • • • •

Innovation Collaborating Diversity Literacy Global awareness

If you apply your content to technology literacy, the student will learn how to use it as a tool to become authors, mentors and experts with their products.


Our students must be: Critical thinkers and problem solvers Globally aware Self directed Good collaborators

Technology literate Flexible and adaptable Innovative Effective communicators

(Teaching English?)


English Teachers Provide more pedagogical innovation Give us a platform to better understand teaching effectiveness and what personalization offers learners Discover more effective ways of assessment Re-image curriculum and what it might mean for the 21st Century learner.


Students opinion about technology Can create our own multimedia It is easy and fast Give our opinion on Blogs, wikis, mail, sms,podcast Can work at home

Can be more independent and competitive in the world Can have a better life quality Makes education more interactive and fun It helps knowing more about contents It makes us more independent

Enjoy more our class


Unlimited information at our reach

It allows us to work with several things at the same time Can share with anyone our inventions, projects and thoughts

Can work 24x7x365 Can correct mistakes


Future Technology Watch the video, what do you think of a future schools


How do we learn?

This vital process of structuring or giving meaning to new information is demanding as well as time-consuming, so we must try to give our students as much help as we can. Learning activities that involve students in using the new ideas will aid clarification.


Advice for teacher (hal ini sering diabaikan oleh guru)

Students need activities which encourage them to process new material. • Activities that make students use – and hence develop a personal restructuring of – the ideas you are trying to teach them will make them learn more efficiently than passive activities such as listening.

For information to be stored in the LTM it must be used and recalled often. • A teacher cannot expect to teach an idea in September and, without referring to it again, have the students remember it in June.


A common error is to see the teacher’s role as mainly to present information to students. With or without computer To send information is one thing, but to get students to understand this information by making their own meaning of it is quite another.


Classroom management Important issues; • Teacher–student relationships • Formal authority; • This depends on the teaching situation. • If the students are not cooperative, the students will only accept the teacher authority if they apply it with confidence.

The teacher never get a second chance to make a first impression. showing a genuine interest in each student’s work, and making a point of using praise – especially in recognising a student’s individual contributions or attempts to learn, regardless of their previous attainment or innate ability. having a professional approach to your teaching and its organisation, • e.g. well- planned and organised lessons, good time-keeping, tidy appearance, etc. choosing teaching methods which allow students to make personal contributions, and reacting positively to their contributions


Teachers will gain their students’ respect by being effective teachers; showing a genuine interest in each student’s work, and making a point of using praise – especially in recognising a student’s individual contributions or attempts to learn, regardless of their previous attainment or innate ability.

having a clear set of rules and applying them fairly and consistently using the students’ names showing ordinary polite respect for students by saying ‘please’ and ‘thank you’ having a professional approach to your teaching and its organisation, • e.g. well- planned and organised lessons, good time-keeping, tidy appearance, etc. choosing teaching methods which allow students to make personal contributions, and reacting positively to their contributions showing an interest in students’ attitudes, feelings and needs: • ‘What do you think of the new library, then?’ • ‘Are you worried about the mock exams?’ • ‘Are you clear on that now, or would you like me to go over it again?’


The three schools of learning


The three schools of learning

The cognitivist school: learners must construct their own meaning

• The cognitivist school believes that learning by doing, and help students make their own sense of what they are studying, and enable them to make use of their learning in real life.


Constructivist principles include: Use teaching strategies that require all students to make a construct. • Project using several digital media Check and correct. • Learning is a trial-and-error process, so set activities that require students to check for their own and each other’s learning errors. What the learner does is more important than what the teacher does. • Teaching is just a means to the end; it’s the learning that counts! • This is why school’s inspectors are trained to observe learning, not teaching.

Make learning fun! • Enjoyable tasks create more participation, concentration, persistence, and more cognitive engagement. We learn by doing. • This is a commonly heard principle.


The behaviourist school: rewards and motivation

Learners require some reward or ‘reinforcement’ for learning Reinforcement should follow the desired behaviour as soon as possible Learning proceeds step by step rather than happening all at once, and is strengthened by repeated success


The humanistic school: meeting the emotional needs of learners

Most teachers have found their own learning to be a reasonably straightforward process. • For many students though, learning is a process filled with pain, anxiety and frustration. Thirty per cent of students leave school without a degree of any grade. • -------

Learners should be self-directed Students should take responsibility for their own learning • Learners are encouraged to take responsibility for its effectiveness.


Self-assessment is preferable to teacher assessment • Self-assessment or self-evaluation encourages the self-reliance and self-direction that humanistic theorists prize.

Learning is easiest, most meaningful and most effective when it takes place in a non-threatening situation • Learners should be motivated by a desire to succeed, to explore, to develop and to improve, not by a fear of failure.


The following cycle uses humanistic principles to encourage students to improve their own learning or performance on a course.


As modern school teachers, we need to be aware of;

What teaching and learning software are available • How do they relate to the 3 schools of learning

What are the strengths and weaknesses of these software What purpose each of them can serve How each should be used in practice.


Video watching What do you think about this video?

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