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M A G A Z I N E 87 July 2016

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InSide: Table of Contents  5

Font Management Want to take charge of your font library once and for all? Mike Rankin has the plan.

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Why Fonts Matter In an excerpt from her book, Why Fonts Matter, Sarah Hyndman shows how to design more effectively with type.

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Top 10 Type Tips Nigel French shares his most important hints and techniques for working with type. PePcon 2016 Recap Renee Brisson-Khan shares thoughts and highlights from the seventh edition of the Print + ePublishing Conference. What's New With InDesign CC 2015.4 Steve Werner brings the news about the latest update to InDesign. InFocus Erica Gamet brings together an all new collection of cool goodies for working and playing with type.

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Best of the Blog  A collection of the most important and informative articles from InDesignSecrets 50

InDesign Basics: Where Is the Color Picker?

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Scaling an Object to an Exact Size

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A Fix for Problems With Layer Visibility Overrides In Placed Illustrator Files

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How to Avoid InDesign Smart Guides Problems

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Adobe Reduces InCopy CC Subscription Fee

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Calendar Wizard Script Upgraded

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Mystery of the Unused Style Contest Answer and Winner!

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5 Terrific Adobe Typekit Slab Serif Fonts

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Adding Colors to Your InDesign Documents With Adobe Capture

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InDex to All Past Issues

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MAGAZINE

From the Editor in Chief PUBLISHERS David Blatner, Anne-Marie Concepción EDITORIAL Editor in Chief Mike Rankin, mike@indesignmag.com Managing Editor Wendy Katz, wendy@indesignmag.com Contributing Writers Nigel French, Sarah Hyndman, Steve Werner, Erica Gamet, Alan Gilbertson, Ilene Strizver, Colin Flashman TEMPLATE DESIGN Rufus Deuchler rufus.deuchler.net

Somewhere back in the ’80s, when I got my first computer, I had 12 fonts to choose from. At the time, that seemed like plenty. Picking the right font for a document took me all of 30 seconds. Everything worked as intended, and simply I got on with the rest of my day. A complete font collection from a simpler time. Image: Wikipedia.

BUSINESS Contact Information http://indesignsecrets.com/contact Subscription Information indesignsecrets.com/issues Published by InDesignSecrets.com, a division of The Creative Publishing Network, Inc. Copyright 2016 InDesignSecrets.com. All rights reserved. Reproduction and redistribution prohibited without approval. For more information, contact permissions@indesignmag.com. InDesign Magazine is not endorsed or sponsored by Adobe Systems Incorporated, publisher of InDesign. InDesign is a registered trademark of Adobe Systems Incorporated. All other products and services are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners and are hereby acknowledged. Photos on pages 1, 5, 9, 15, 18, 39, and 42 courtesy of Fotolia.com ISSN 2379-1403

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But over the years, my font collection soared from a dozen fonts to more than 8,000 (I may have a digital hoarding problem). Along the way, I encountered something that psychologists and economists call the Paradox of Choice. It’s the idea that having too many options actually makes you less satisfied with your eventual choice. Whether you’re searching for a toilet brush or a sans serif, browsing an enormous number of

options sucks up time and energy and causes stress. So organization is key to staying sane in the presence of a huge font library. On top of that, add the problems that arise with fonts—from duplicates and conflicts to corruption and crashes—and you quickly see the need for a font management strategy. And in this issue’s feature article, I cover the options, from “going commando” to enlisting the aid of a dedicated font management application. Also in this font-focused issue, we have top type tips from Nigel French, an excerpt from Sarah Hyndman’s book, Why Fonts Matter., and an InFocus full of goodies for working and playing with type. Plus, we have the details of InDesign CC 2015.4 and a recap of PePcon 2016. And as always, the Best of the Blog has the top new articles from InDesignSecrets. Enjoy!

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Font Management Take charge of your fonts once and for all By Mike Rankin INDESIGN MAGAZINE  87

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Font Management hey say the things you own end up owning you.* And if that’s the situation with your fonts, then it’s high time you take control with a strategy (and maybe some software) for font management. Fonts are the single most important communication technology in the world. I know that’s a bold claim, but consider this: the invention of written language (and a few melting glaciers) is what allowed us humans to develop civilization and flourish on this planet. Along the way, we’ve used many tools to express written language, from reeds and tablets to quills and scrolls, from Gutenberg presses and Smith Coronas to Linotype machines and laser printers. And here in the 21st century, when digital devices have supplanted manual and mechanical ones, fonts are indispensable *OK, in this case, “they” is an imaginary person named Tyler Durden from the novel and film Fight Club. Still, it’s a good quote.

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for capturing and conveying information and ideas in written language. Without fonts, there would be virtually no reading or writing in print or on screen. Fonts make language visible, and enrich our messages with their own visual character and associations. Maybe someday we’ll communicate through a universal language of emoji, and will make complete sense to everyone. But for now, my motto is In Fonts We Trust. Given all that, it’s no wonder that our computers are awash in font files. If you’ve been using the same machine for a few years, you probably have hundreds or thousands of those little buggers—many of vague and questionable origin, quality, and legal status—tucked into every digital crack and crevice. Here’s a fun experiment for you: search your hard drive right now for font files with the name “Helvetica.” If you’re like me (and especially if you’re using a Mac), the results might show that you have

hundreds of Helveticas (Figure 1). Where the heck did they all come from? Are they all the same? Do they all even work? Are you legally allowed to use them all? And how can you be sure you’re always using the right one for a particular document, project, or client? These are the questions that can be answered with a thoughtful approach to font management.

Figure 1: What the Helvetica? A good font management strategy can help you avoid a mess like this.

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Font Management A Multi-Faceted Problem The first step in managing your fonts is to understand the nature and scope of what you’re dealing with. Fonts are software. And like any kind of software or digital documents, fonts can have significant problems. Here are some of the more common troubles you can encounter with your fonts. Version Confusion Like other software, fonts have versions (Figure 2), and it can be hard to keep track of which version of a font you need for a particular use. The wrong version of a font might have subtle but significant differences that can cause problems like character substitution and text reflow in your documents. Platform Incompatibility While modern fonts work on both Mac and Windows, you can still encounter fonts in older file formats that are not cross-platform

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or copied across various platforms and networks (Figure 4). Corrupted Cache Files Both Mac and Windows platforms use font-caching technology to gather and reference information about your many

Figure 2: Every font has a version number that you can see in the Finder or Windows Explorer, and in font management applications.

compatible. If you have an incompatible font, you won’t be able to use it unless you can convert it with an application like TransType.

Figure 3: The two parts of a Macintosh PostScript Type 1 font. The LWFN file (LaserWriter font), contains the font outline shapes for printing. The FFIL (Font File) contains the bitmap and font metrics information to draw characters onscreen.

Incomplete or Damaged Font Files Some fonts are composed of multiple files (Figure 3), and if you lose any of the pieces, you won’t be able to use the font. Also, though it is uncommon nowadays, font files can become corrupted, especially if they’re transferred uncompressed via FTP or email,

Figure 4: It’s easy to kill a Mac PostScript font. Just put it uncompressed on an FTP server. The resource fork will be stripped out, and you’ll be left with a zero K empty shell where your font used to be. Some services like Gmail understand this problem, and won’t allow you to attach uncompressed Mac PostScript fonts to an email.

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Font Management font files in one place. Normally, font caches are a wonderful efficiency tool, saving your computer much toil. But since they’re constantly being accessed and edited, cache files are prone to corruption. When that happens, you need to replace the cache files for your fonts to work as expected. On the Mac side, there are several applications that can remove font cache files, including the free and highly-regarded FontNuke. Duplicate Fonts Fonts can seem to multiply like rabbits, and having many copies of the same font files makes a mess of your hard drive, uses up disk space, and wastes your time and effort dealing with them. Conflicting Fonts Every font file has both an internal and an external name. When different active font files have the same internal name, lots of bad things may ensue (Figure 5, next page). Applications can stall or crash. The wrong

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Bi Sheng: The Father of Font Management Font management is nothing new. Fonts are simply tools for creating type, and the need to keep these tools organized and in good working order has existed for as long as we’ve had printed type. In fact, you could argue that the idea of font management was born almost a thousand years ago, shortly after a Chinese commoner named Bi Sheng invented moveable type using pieces of baked clay. Bi Sheng needed a way to keep his thousands of carefully-carved characters safe and organized, so he labeled each one, and placed them in wooden cases, grouped into sets of rhyming characters. Fast forward to today, and probably the only baked clay in your workplace was used to make your coffee mug, but the idea is basically the same: you need to make it easy to find and use the right fonts, and to keep them all in good condition. So the next time you make an effort to manage your font files, remember that you’re really just taking another step in a journey that has spanned the globe for almost a millennium. Xièxiè 谢谢 (thank you), Bi Sheng.

font may appear in a font menu. Documents or web pages can become unreadable. Text can reflow. And you may be unable to activate a needed font.

Crappy Fonts It’s a simple fact of life: there are loads of lousy fonts out there. Poorly designed from an artistic and/or technical perspective,

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Font Management What’s the difference between a “font” and a “typeface”?

Figure 5: A font conflict waiting to happen. The designer of this Brady Bunch font obviously started with Arial, and never bothered to change the internal name. Activate this font at your own risk.

these fonts are to be avoided if you want your workflow to go smoothly and your output to look good. Font License Violations Unless you made them, you don’t own the fonts on your computer. You may have permission to use those fonts under a set of conditions set forth in a legal document called the font license. Even free fonts have

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Want to be a true type nerd? A good place to start is to use the terms “font” and “typeface” correctly. It’s true, many perfectly normal humans use these terms interchangeably. But the two words do refer to separate things, and real type aficionados know the difference. Here’s the deal. Historically, a font was a set of characters cast in metal or carved in wood, with a specific size (e.g., 10 pt), weight (e.g., bold), and style (e.g., italic). Today, fonts are digital files on your computer, but the concept is the same. Thus, a font is a tool for creating type. Typeface refers to the design of a set of characters. It can also be used to refer to a group of related fonts (aka a “family”). So Gotham is a typeface. Gotham Light is a font. If you’re talking about a file on your computer, you’re talking about a font. That’s why this article is about “font management” and not “typeface management.” Got it? Great! You are now officially a type nerd.

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Font Management licenses you need to comply with (Figure 6). If you violate the terms of the license, you leave yourself open to being sued by the license holder—and you invite bad karma for disrespecting the effort and wishes of the font maker. So with all these potential pitfalls, it behooves you to at least think about how to manage your font files. There are many ways to solve the problem of font management, but most folks choose one of two main approaches: going manual, or using commercial font management solutions.

Manual Management The simplest (but most labor-intensive) approach is to do everything manually, aka “going commando.” The main benefit of this method is that it costs you nothing. The downside is, you’re on your own. It’s up to you to organize your font files into folders (or use shortcuts or aliases), and manually activate and deactivate them by moving the folders on your hard drive. To avoid

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Figure 6: There’s important stuff in those text files that accompany your fonts. Read ‘em or weep.

versioning snafus, you have to keep track of which fonts go with each document or project. You need to be aware of where you got your fonts, and the licenses that accompany each font file, so you can stay in compliance. And it’s also up to you to troubleshoot problems with your fonts and cache files, and fix those problems. It’s not impossible, but it does require thought and effort, if you want to do it well. Here are some tips to get you started down the right path, should you choose to go it alone.

Stay Up to Date Regardless of whether you’re using Mac or Windows, one important piece of general advice is to make sure you’ve fully updated your operating system and other key software. By installing all latest fixes and updates, you can head off known issues related to the handling of fonts.

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Font Management OpenType to the Rescue Next, whenever possible, replace old fonts with modern OpenType versions. These are cross-platform compatible, and the pro versions contain many alternate glyphs that you may need to use when working with various languages, or to create more refined typography. Corruption is less likely than with older font files. And you also won’t have to worry about missing pieces, since all the components of an OpenType font are contained in a single, compact file. De-clutter Another helpful step when you’re manually organizing your fonts is to remove fonts that you’ll probably never use from your computer. Of course, don’t disturb the fonts your operating system needs to function, and back up the fonts you remove, so you can get your hands on them if you ever need to. While you’re cleaning house, take the time to hunt down and delete exact duplicates of font files. Again, don’t delete anything

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without knowing you have a backup. In Windows, you can also select a font and choose Hide to keep it from appearing in your font menus (Figure 7). Note that this does not deactivate the font, so you can still open documents that use hidden fonts without any trouble. By clearing out font clutter, you can make your system and applications run more smoothly. Plus, you’ll find the fonts you want faster while you’re working, without the endless scrolling up and down bloated font menus. Resources for Going Solo If you’re on the Mac, and you choose to fly solo, you should not do so without consulting Font Management in OS X, by Kurt Lang. This single web page currently has over 31,000 words of nitty gritty details and expert advice, spanning OS X Panther 10.3 through El Capitan 10.11. There are also valuable sections on Microsoft Office fonts, dealing with font emergencies and

Figure 7: It’s simple to de-clutter your Windows font menus, by using the option in the Fonts Control panel to hide the fonts you don’t intend to use.

troubleshooting, as well as information on required system fonts, and advice on font management software. You can also download the guide as a PDF. Extensis, the makers of Suitcase Fusion (detailed below), also provides free downloadable guides on best practices for font management in both Windows and Mac OS X. You do need to provide your email address to download the guides, but that is a small price to pay for the extensive information provided (the Windows guide is over 50 pages long, covering every aspect of working with font files in Windows).

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Font Management Fast Facts For Four Font File Formats PostScript (Type 1) Renowned for high quality, but ancient by digital standards, PostScript fonts were created by Adobe in 1984 and helped usher in the DTP revolution. Drawbacks include a lack of cross-platform compatibility, a limited number of glyphs (228 maximum), and the fact that you needed to keep track of separate printer and screen font files. Still, the fact that a 30-year-old font will work just fine with your modern applications is mindblowing, and a testament to the durability of PostScript technology. TrueType The most common font format found on Mac and Windows computers was a joint

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effort by Apple and Microsoft to develop an alternative to PostScript. Screen and printer information are contained in one file. Early TrueType fonts earned a bad reputation in prepress circles. However, modern TrueType fonts are cross-platform compatible and fine for professional work. A close relative, the TrueType Collection (.TTC) combines multiple TrueType fonts in a single file. Dfonts The name is short for Datafork TrueType font. These are modified TrueType fonts made for Mac OS X. They do not work on other operating systems, but they can be converted into other formats.

Dfonts that are embedded in PDFs will not cause problems in print workflows. Since Mac OS X 10.6, Apple has been phasing out dfonts and replacing them with standard TrueType fonts. OpenType This is the modern standard font file format most used by graphics professionals. One compact file contains both the printer outlines and the bitmap screen information. The printer outlines in an OpenType font can be in either PostScript format or TrueType format, and you can tell which kind of outlines a font has by the file extension. Fonts with PostScript outlines have the .OTF extension, and fonts with

TrueType outlines have the .TTF extension. OpenType fonts are cross-platform compatible, and they support advanced typographic features by having many more available characters than earlier font formats. Over 65,000 glyphs can be contained in one OpenType font, but in reality, many of these fonts have the same 228 glyphs you’d find in a PostScript font. OpenType fonts can have either Std or Pro at the end of the font name. Std means the font contains the standard range of Latin characters. Pro means that the font contains more characters for working with other languages (and may cost more than a Std version).

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Font Management Using Font Management Software If the thought of spending significant time and effort to fully understand the care and feeding of your fonts doesn’t appeal to you, then consider enlisting the aid of some font management software. Most font management apps and utilities are relatively inexpensive, especially when you consider how much time and trouble they may save you in the long run. And many smaller offerings are free. Let’s start by taking a look at a font management app that virtually all Mac users have (since it comes with Mac OS X), Font Book. Font Book: The Mac’s Built-In Font Manager Font Book has been around for more than a decade, debuting with Mac OS X 10.3 in 2003. Font Book does not have all the features you’d find in commercial font management solutions, but if you’re a Mac user just looking for

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something that allows you to test, preview, and organize your fonts, Font Book might be enough for you. Font Book lets you create your own customized collections, which are simply groups of fonts gathered together for a specific purpose. You can organize your font collections by style, project, or client, for example. You can put one font into as many collections as you wish, which eliminates the need for duplicate fonts. Also, in the main window of Font Book, you get easy access to three standard collections (Figure 8).

Figure 8: The three standard collections displayed in Font Book.

All Fonts (as you might guess) encompasses all the fonts on your machine. Computer contains all the fonts that are in the System > Library > Fonts folder. User displays all the fonts installed in the Fonts folder inside your user Library folder. If that folder is empty, you won’t see a User collection in Font Book. Other than organization, the main benefit of putting fonts into collections is that you can then enable and disable any number of fonts with one click (and without having to move the font files). Font Book will prevent you from disabling any fonts that are needed by Mac OS X. Some of Font Book’s other useful features include the ability to search and find fonts that fit various criteria, including family, style, kind, language, filename, manufacturer, and designer (Figure 9, next page). Font Book also has a feature that lets you make Smart Collections, which are groups of fonts that are dynamic and automatically populated, based on criteria you choose (Figure 10, next page).

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Font Management In Font Book, you can click on a font to see a preview as well as extensive information about the font (Figure 11). Right-click on a font to get a menu of options that allow you to locate the font on your computer, validate that it is in working

order, and resolve any problems with duplicate versions of the font (Figure 12). Font Book is also integrated with the Mac Finder, so you can select a font, press the spacebar to preview it, and then click the button in the preview window to install the font in Font Book (Figure 13, next page). Or you can just double-click a font in the Finder to open it in Font Book, where you can validate and activate it with another click. Dragging and dropping fonts into Font Book immediately validates and activates them.

Figure 11: Previews in Font Book offer a wealth of information about the selected font.

Figure 12: A contextual menu in Font Book with options for managing the selected font.

Figure 9: The search options in Font Book allow you to target fonts by several different criteria.

Figure 10: A dynamic Smart Collection of handwriting fonts in Font Book.

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Font Management What about free fonts? Everyone’s favorite price is “FREE,” but can you really get something worth using for no money? The answer is, yes, well, sometimes. There actually are some very good free fonts, offered by reputable sites and talented type designers. But there is also a whole lot of trash out there that isn’t worth the time and trouble to download, even if it is technically free. Many so-called free fonts are not free for use in commercial work. Some free fonts have horrible defects, like poor spacing or missing glyphs. Other free fonts come with strings attached, like having to re-tweet a sales pitch or give your email address. Some free fonts are outright ripoffs of commercial fonts. That said, you can find some gems amongst the garbage. Here are a few sites where you can download high-quality freefor-commercial-use fonts (be sure to check the license terms before using any font): Font Squirrel, Behance, The League of Moveable Type, exljbris, and GoogleFonts.

TT OTF

Figure 13: You can get a QuickLook preview of a font in the Mac OS Finder, simply by selecting the font and pressing the spacebar.

The Big Three: Suitcase, Font Agent Pro, and Font Explorer X If you’re a Windows user, or a Mac user seeking more from a font manager than Font Book provides, then there are three powerful solutions to choose from: Extensis Suitcase Fusion, Font Agent Pro by Insider Software, and Monotype’s FontExplorer X. They all cost roughly the same amount of

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Font Management money and offer a range of useful features for individual users and groups (summarized below). You can figure out the best fit for your needs by checking out the feature lists and downloading fully-functioning demo versions to kick the tires. If you try more than one demo version, be sure to fully uninstall one before installing another. Suitcase Fusion Manufacturer: Extensis Cost: $119.95. Upgrades from version 5 or 6 are $59.95. TeamSync subscriptions: $8.00 per month per user (includes Suitcase Fusion 7 and all future upgrades for two machines per user). Extensis also offers Universal Type Server for groups. Support: Mac 10.9 and later and Windows 7 and later Features: »» Intelligent auto-activation for Adobe CS6 and Creative Cloud apps, and QuarkXPress via FontSense technology

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»» Organize fonts into sets and smart sets »» Archive and restore your font collection via Dropbox or Google Drive »» Sync your fonts on two machines (a single license of Suitcase allows for two installations) via TypeSync »» Sync fonts to teams of users and control font access with TeamSync. »» Find fonts based on visual characteristics via QuickMatch »» Prototype, preview, and compare fonts via QuickComp »» Integration with Extensis’ WebINK Web fonts service, Google Fonts, and Adobe Typekit »» Fontspiration for finding new fonts and typographic techniques »» FontDoctor for diagnosing and fixing common font problems »» Suitcase Attaché for managing fonts in Microsoft Office applications

FontAgent Manufacturer: Insider Software Cost: $99 for standard version, $59 annual subscription for Sync version Support: Windows (10, 8, 7, Vista, and XP), Mac (10.8 and later) Features: »» Auto-activation of fonts for Creative Cloud apps and QuarkXPress »» Organize fonts into sets and smart sets »» Find fonts in your collection or the Web via keyword search »» Comes with more than 1350 downloadable fonts; Plus version has an additional 750 fonts »» Font Player for creating font sets and specimen books, via a fun and intuitive slideshow method »» Mac version comes with a separate app called Smasher 3 for clearing Apple and Adobe font caches and breaking up suitcases of PostScript screen fonts (also available separately for $49)

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Font Management »» Workflow Center offers one-click access to common font management tasks. »» FontAgent Sync allows you share fonts among users, sync fonts across computers, and archive your fonts in the Cloud »» Workgroup solutions include FontAgent TeamServer (for 10 or fewer users), FontAgent Enterprise Server, and FontAgent CloudServer FontExplorer X Pro Manufacturer: Monotype Cost: $99, $49 upgrade for users who purchased FontExplorer after April 1, 2015 Support: Windows (7, 8, and 10) and Mac (10.8 and later) Features: »» Auto-activation of fonts for Creative Cloud apps and QuarkXPress »» Organize fonts into sets and smart sets »» Clear system and application font caches »» Sort fonts by features and languages

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»» Preview features allow you to try different fonts on any website, or overlay different fonts on your documents »» Font Tile View provides previews of selected character sets »» Create customizable font sample books »» Monotype also offers FontExplorer X Server for groups of Mac and Windows users »» Integration with Fonts.com subscription fonts, Monotype’s SkyFonts subscription and syncing service, and Google Fonts »» Import font sets from other font management systems »» Purchase fonts directly through the application »» Manage fonts for large workgroups with FontExplorer X Server »» Unicode 7 support

with a little thought and effort, you can clean house, develop some good habits, and take charge of your fonts once and for all. Much of the work can be done on your own, but if you really want to get the most out of your fonts with the least amount of time and trouble, check out the major font management applications. They can help you keep even the largest libraries of fonts organized and in tip-top shape, so you can stop worrying about fonts and focus on designing and building great things.

n Mike Rankin is the Editor in Chief of InDesign Magazine, and CreativePro.com and the author of several Lynda.com courses, including Font Management Essential Training.

Fare Thee (Fonts) Well If you’re like many InDesign users, you might be a bit overwhelmed at the thought of taming a huge collection of fonts. But

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By Sarah Hyndman

Why Fonts Matter

Going deep into human perception and psychology to explore the impact of our font choices. Editor’s Note: Fonts aren’t people, but they sure do have personalities. And voices. They speak to us in ways that can enhance or undermine the meaning of our text. Understanding what messages your font choices are sending is an essential step in achieving great typography. The following article is comprised of excerpts from Why Fonts Matter, by Sarah Hyndman. It explains the psychological effects of fonts on the reader, for the purpose of helping you use type more effectively.

of the words they spell out, and before we even read them. Type triggers our imaginations, evokes our emotions, prompts memories, and links to all of our senses (Figure 1). We automatically recognize attributes from the physical

Type is evocative

This article features exceprts from Why Fonts Matter, Gingko Press Inc. 2016

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There is more to type than just being an invisible transmitter of words. The different shapes and styles of the typefaces themselves stimulate responses independently

Figure 1

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Why Fonts Matter

world, like how loud it looks, whether it is heavy or light, fast or slow, or what it would feel like to touch. We have also learned a great deal from our shopping experiences, which include knowing whether something is expensive, aimed at children, or how it might taste. It is easy to measure how readable a font is, but it is less straightforward to measure how it makes people feel. As a result, there is less public-domain research in this area, and much of what we know as designers comes from personal observation and experience.

No, far from it. Type appears right in front of your eyes and is clear for you to see. It is your choice not to pay attention to it consciously and to focus on reading what the words actually say. The type itself is still transmitting plenty of information, but it is communicating it directly to your subconscious (Figure 2).

How do fonts influence you? Spoiler alert! Before reading this chapter, take the challenge in this short film: typetasting.com/ movie.html.1 Is type a conspiracy? Does it coerce you with secret messages hidden from view? 1 ‘Monkeying around with the gorillas in our midst: Familiarity with an inattentional-blindness task does not improve the detection of unexpected events’ by Professor Daniel J. Simons, 2010, i-Perception. www.youtube.com/watch?v=IGQmdoK_ZfY

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Figure 2

Through the looking-glass Typefaces/fonts prime you with a great deal of information and set the scene for the words you are about to read. They give words a backstory, a personality, clue you in to whether or not you can trust them, whether they will be serious or lighthearted, academic or childish. Generally, well-set type is designed so that you “look past” the typeface and focus on the words themselves—unless, of course, the font does not match, like somebody with a bad haircut or a miscast actor in a film. At any time, you can choose to become consciously aware of the messages the fonts themselves are communicating. In Figure 3 (next page), the red words simply give the name of each typeface, whilst the blue words in “mirror writing”2 suggest what they could be saying directly to your

2 ‘Through the Looking-Glass’ by Lewis Carroll, 1871. In the reflected version of her own house, Alice finds a book with the poem ‘Jabberwocky’ written in ‘mirror writing’, which she could only read by holding it up to a mirror.

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Why Fonts Matter

subconscious brain. Hold the book up to a mirror to reveal what the blue words are spelling out.

Type karaoke Play the game of Type Karaoke by simply saying what you see. Try it out on friends, family or, for an energetic response, with a group of children (Figures 4 and 5). Type can function as a human-voice transmitter and convey the tones and qualities of your voice visually. We each have a unique voice that communicates a great deal about us, like our gender and age. It charts where we come from, whom we know, and where we have lived along the way. Could your voice look like the traditionally British and approachable Gill Sans, or the more intellectual Caslon? Graphic designer Ellen Lupton describes typography as “what language looks like.” 3 If you imagine that your voice is the typeface, 3 Thinking with Type by Ellen Lupton, 2010, Princeton Architectural Press.

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Figure 3

then your vocal range is created by the sizes, styles, and weights of fonts within that typeface family and by how they are arranged on the page. Even a simple text message can be written expressively, from speaking very s l o w l y to SHOUTING. How do you feel when you receive a text or email written in all upper-case letters? Clive Lewis and Peter Walker see the printed word as a visual code for speech that creates a permanent record of both (a) how the words sound when spoken, and (b) what they mean.4 4 ‘Typographic influences on reading’ by Clive Lewis and Peter Walker, 1989, British Journal of Psychology

Figures 4 and 5

In her famous 1930 essay5, Beatrice Warde compares typeface legibility to the human voice and suggests that if three pages were set in Fournier, Caslon, and Plantin typefaces it would be like “three different people delivering the same discourse—each with impeccable pronunciation and clarity, yet each through the medium of a different personality.” 5 ‘The Crystal Goblet’ by Beatrice Warde, 1930, World Publishers.

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Why Fonts Matter

Visual onomatopoeia We all recognize instinctively that type mirrors qualities from the physical world, and understanding is consistently similar from one person to the next. A bold font with more ink coverage on the paper looks loud, and if it is large enough to fill the field of vision, then it appears so close that it comes across as extremely loud. A small word looks a long way away and sounds distant and quiet. The arrangements of the letters on the page are easily read, like musical inflection, and you will match your tone of voice to this as you read.

Type designer Jürgen Weltin says of his 2003 typeface Balega6 that with its contrasting curves and sharp edges it would ring with the “fat sound of a Jimi Hendrix guitar.” 6 ‘Balega’ by Jürgen Weltin, 2003, https://www.fonts.com/font/ linotype/balega.

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I always imagine that Gill Sans, designed in the 1920s, would speak with a “BBC English” accent. It would pronounce words and use grammar correctly, but have a friendly and relaxed tone, a few notches down from the formality of the Queen’s English. It is the typeface used for the BBC logo and is reminiscent of 1930s “keep calm” England.

Fonts reveal YOUR personality Fonts are like typographic selfies. You are drawn to typefaces that reflect your values and aesthetics, and you dislike them when they do not. Your loyalty can be called into question if a brand you pay allegiance to changes its logo typeface to one you no longer identify with. This is illustrated by the outcry from Gap customers when the logo font was changed to Helvetica bold, which

Figure 6

they thought looked “cheapy, tacky, ordinary” (Figure 6). You interact with fonts through the brands you surround yourself with. You identify with the values of the newspaper you choose to read, the brands you put in your shopping basket, the clothes you wear and the car you drive. You are curating the fonts that surround you in your everyday life through the logos on the products you buy and collect. Designers understand how important typefaces are when creating brand identities, and that a successful one can become highly recognizable from its lettering alone. You know from a single letter whether a cola is Coca-Cola or Pepsi, a TV channel is BBC or ITV, a browser is Yahoo or Google.

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Why Fonts Matter

Non-verbal communication When somebody is speaking, we take less than 10% of the meaning from the actual words they say. More than 90% of the meaning is communicated by their tone of voice and through visual clues like their facial expressions, body language, and the clothes they are wearing.7 Your clothes, like your possessions, transmit clues about your personality, financial status, social group, background, etc. They tell the world who you are, or who you want to be today.8 You make judgments about others within the first seconds of meeting based purely on appearances. “Didot is like a person who dresses up to look classy and knows just where to stop with the make-up.” –Gwenäelle Barillon 7 Silent Messages: A Wealth of Information About Nonverbal Communication (Body Language) by Albert Mehrabian, Professor Emeritus of Psychology at UCLA, 2009, kaaj.com. 8 You Are What You Wear: What Your Clothes Reveal About You by Dr. Jennifer Baumgartner, 2012, Da Capo Lifelong.

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Fonts convey non-verbal information in a similar way to clothes. Your choice of font tells the world how serious you are, and it clues the reader in to your emotions or your intentions before they have started to read. Just like noticing when somebody is dressed inappropriately or their words do not match their body language, if you use a mismatching font, you may find your credibility is called into question. Graphology Handwriting analysis has been considered a science for many years. We each have our own individual style which, according to the British Institute of Graphology, reveals the “pattern of our psychology expressed in symbols.”9 Graphology has been used as an evaluation tool in a range of situations, including screening potential employees, assessing the suitability of a marriage 9 British Institute of Graphology, britishgraphology.org. Mehrabian poses the theory that when we talk 7% of what we communicate is through our words, 38% by our tone of voice and 55% by our body language.

partner, and forensic graphology, which is the study of ransom notes and blackmail demands. Today a great deal of what you write is done by tapping on a keyboard, where the fonts you select, and how you use them, replace your personal handwriting style. Your choice of fonts may not be as individual to you as your handwriting but, as already shown, it still reveals a great deal about you—and this can be analyzed (Figure 7, next page). Use fonts and influence people If you want to really connect with your audience, then it is important to consider who they are when you choose a font. This is like speaking in the right tone of voice; for example, you would not talk to your boss in the same way that you would talk to young children. In the business world, using type styles appropriate to the sector can help you to speak the same language, although this is not to suggest that you actually go as far as imitating the client’s corporate font. If you

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Why Fonts Matter

are not sure what these are, then look up some companies in the sector and see what type styles they use. To continue the parallel with clothes, fonts can act like an interview suit if you are writing a CV or a letter to a potential client and need to be appropriate both for the industry and the occasion. This is not the time to parade your individuality with an outlandish outfit or a “personality” font. (Earlier in this book I mentioned that a student found his grades improved when he used a more suitable font.) Influence yourself Fonts influence what you read: you know whether what you are about to read will be intellectual, informative, silly, or important. Fonts set the tone and create a mood that can range from calm to energizing. They prime you to know whether what you are about to read will be entertaining or educational, and just how believable it might be.

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Could you use this to your own advantage? Could you use fonts to influence yourself? Copywriter Michael Everett changes his typeface depending on the tone of voice he wishes to write in, because he finds it helps him to use the right language style for a project. For short and snappy car advert slogans, he writes in the modern, geometric Futura. He uses Times New Roman for long and informative editorial articles when he wants to write in a more intellectual style. He creates his invoices in the open and easy to read Century Gothic; I wondered whether he was instinctively choosing an “easy-to-do” font to make his invoicing feel like less of a chore. Try this out for yourself. Open a document or an email, and see how different fonts change the tone of what you’re writing. A typeface like Century Gothic could help you to explain something difficult with clarity. Garamond or Book Antiqua could help you

Figure 7

to feel like you’re tapping into your knowledge and wisdom, whilst a solid style like Bookman Old Style bold might help your words to flow more assertively as you write.

n Sarah Hyndman is a London-based graphic designer and founder of Type Tasting. She is involved in researching the connections between type and perception. Sarah creates her own experiments and surveys and also works on collaborative studies with the Crossmodal Research Laboratory at the University of Oxford. Her work has been featured by AIGA, CNN, FT, and Wired.

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Nigel French shares his most important hints and techniques for working with type.

Top 10 Type Tips In most layouts, typography is the base, the the rock, the foundation on which all else is built. Here are ten type tips — really more suggestions for best practice — that will help elevate your typography and by extension, your whole designs. These tips are rooted in print typography, but most are equally applicable to screen. Some are preventative, some cosmetic; some will cause a huge difference, others facilitate subtle improvements. There’s no hierarchy—they are all equally important, and I’ve just listed them as I thought of them.

1 Know the difference between Metrics and Optical Kerning

InDesign’s automatic kerning ensures that the space between characters appears optically even. For most of your text, automatic kerning is all the kerning you’ll need, but there are two types: Metrics and Optical. What’s the difference, and which is best?

Metrics uses the kern pairs that are part of the font’s design. The quality of Metrics kerning therefore depends on the quantity— and quality—of these kern pairs. Some fonts have thousands; others have none. The price of the font is usually an indication, but not always. Optical kerning adjusts the spacing between the characters based upon the character shapes. Because this will usually involve more adjustments between more pairs, the end result is typically tighter when compared to Metrics kerning, but because this varies from font to font, you have to compare the two kerning methods

July 2016

• The letters of a script typeface need to connect in a comfortable way that emulates handwriting. If the font is a good one, the type designer will have taken special care to make sure this happens. For this reason, metrics wins out over Optical kerning with script faces. • Monospaced fonts have no kerning metrics. Each character occupies the same

Metrics vs. Optical Metrics vs. Optical Metrics

Optical

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to know. There’s no right or wrong answer: the method you feel looks best is the one to use for that typeface. That said, there are times when one method is preferable to the other.

Metrics kerning uses the font’s kerning pair to ensure that the strokes of script types connect.

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Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

set width, and the letter shapes have been designed to take this into account. Using Metrics kerning with monospaced typefaces honors the original intent of having a monospaced font: if you apply Optical kerning, the font ceases to be monospaced. • For the same reason, if you’re using lining numbers, where the figures are designed to have the same set width (so they can be aligned in tables), then metrics kerning is the way to go. • For those rare occasions when you mix two or more typefaces in the same word or phrase, no kern metrics will exist. In such cases choose Optical kerning. • If you’re using a proportionally spaced font with no kern metrics, then use Optical kerning to improve the readability of the type.

2 When to use (and when to not use) Optical Margin Alignment

The easiest thing you can do to improve the quality of your type, especially if you’re using justified alignment, is turn on optical margin alignment (OMA). Select the text with either the Type tool or Selection

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tool, choose Type > Story and check the box. With justified text, any punctuation and hyphens at the end of the line are pushed beyond the right edge of the text frame, avoiding the optical holes that these small characters would otherwise create at the end of the line and strengthening the flush right edge. The size should theoretically correspond to the size of your type, but you can adjust this to your taste. OMA is an object-level format, so to automate its application, include it in an object style that you apply to your text frames. While you’ll get the most benefit from OMA when working with justified type, it will also strengthen the flush left edge of left aligned type. Because there are times when you don’t want certain types of paragraph optically aligned, there is the option in the Control panel menu and in Indents and Spacing to turn off OMA. This is useful when you’re working with bulleted lists.

3 Choosing the right amount of leading

There is no magic formula for choosing the right amount of leading, just a few common sense guidelines to consider. Firstly, avoid

Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Metrics kerning honors the intent of monospaced fonts and lining numerals. Below: When combining fonts in the same word or phrase, Optical kerning delivers the better result.

JANE DOE DESIGNER JANE DOE DESIGNER

Metrics

Optical

12345 09876

Metrics

12345 09876 Optical

POVERTY POVERTY Metrics

Optical

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auto leading — as indicated when the leading value is in brackets. While convenient, having your leading expressed as a percentage of your point size can cause problems, especially with display type. While the default amount of 120% works OK for body text, it is proportionally too much for anything above 14 point and fails miserably when you have display type in all caps because the absence of descenders makes the lines look even further apart. Also, because auto leading is technically 120% of the largest character on the line, there’s the potential for inconsistent line spacing when one character is — intentionally or otherwise —  bigger than the rest. (The Apply The pistachio — a member of the cashew family — is a small tree originating from Central Asia and the Middle East. The tree produces seeds that are widely consumed as food. ¶ Pistacia vera often is confused with other species in the genus Pistacia that are also known as pistachio. These other species can be distinguished by their geographic distributions (in the wild) and their seeds which are much smaller and have a soft shell. ¶ Pistachio is a desert plant, and is highly tolerant of saline soil. It has been reported to grow well when irrigated with water having 3,000– 4,000 ppm of soluble salts. Pistachio trees are fairly hardy in the right conditions, and can survive temperatures ranging between −10°C (14°F) in winter and 48°C (118°F) in summer. They need a sunny position and well-drained soil. Pistachio trees do poorly in conditions of high humidity, and are susceptible to root rot in winter if they get too much water and the soil is not sufficiently free-draining. Long, hot summers are required for proper ripening of the fruit. They

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Leading to Entire Paragraphs preferences makes this impossible, but personally I don’t use this because there are times when you need to adjust the leading of a paragraph line-by-line.) Rather than use auto leading, take charge of the exact amount of space assigned to each line by choosing an absolute leading value. As a rule of thumb this should be between 1–3 points more than the size of body text. If working with a wide column, increase the leading to improve readability, likewise if your type reverses out of a solid color. Typefaces with a high x-height, like Helvetica, benefit from a bit more leading; those with a low x-height, like Jenson look

The pistachio — a member of the cashew family — is a small tree originating from Central Asia and the Middle East. The tree produces seeds that are widely consumed as food. ¶ Pistacia vera often is confused with other species in the genus Pistacia that are also known as pistachio. These other species can be distinguished by their geographic distributions (in the wild) and their seeds which are much smaller and have a soft shell. ¶ Pistachio is a desert plant, and is highly tolerant of saline soil. It has been reported to grow well when irrigated with water having 3,000–4,000 ppm of soluble salts. Pistachio trees are fairly hardy in the right conditions, and can survive temperatures ranging between −10°C (14°F) in winter and 48°C (118°F) in summer. They need a sunny position and well-drained soil. Pistachio trees do poorly in conditions of high humidity, and are susceptible to root rot in winter if they get too much water and the soil is not sufficiently free-draining. Long, hot summers are required for proper ripening of the fruit. They have been known to thrive in warm,

better with less. As type gets bigger, so the relative size of the leading should decrease. But don’t take these guidelines as truth— use them as a starting point and then adjust to your taste.

4 How to get good looking justified text

We’ve all seen amateurish justified type with gaping holes between the words. While the danger of justified type is gappy text with an inconsistent type color or density, it only takes a few tweaks to ensure your justified type looks professional. To start with, give the text a fighting chance. Justification works by varying the

Word spaces are highlighted to show how the above settings result in a more even type color. The default Justification settings often leads to uneven spacing throughout a paragraph (left). By adjusting the Word, Letter, and Glyph Scaling settings (right), you can achieve more even spacing (center).

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width of the word spaces (and potentially the letterspacing). InDesign can’t perform miracles—there should be sufficient words and characters on the line to allow this variation to be as subtle as possible. As to what is the right number of characters per line, I prefer to have a wide range and not be too prescriptive. An old rule of thumb is two alphabets, or 52 characters, but this may not be feasible in magazine publishing. Anything less than 40 characters per line can be trouble. You can use the Info panel to count the characters per line. Second, you’ll get a more even type color if you allow hyphenation. While some people avoid hyphenating at all costs, hyphenation is an acceptable compromise if done well and much preferable to the alternative of gappy text. Because InDesign’s default hyphenation settings allow far too many hyphens, I change these to limit hyphenation to words with at least 7 characters and set the Hyphen Limit to 1 to

prevent consecutive hyphens, which create a ladder on the right side of the text frame. I deselect the boxes that allow hyphenation across a column or the hyphenation of the last word of a paragraph. While I prefer not to hyphenate capitalized words, depending on their frequency in the text, this may not always be possible. You should be prepared to intervene when InDesign doesn’t hyphenate the way you want. A discretionary hyphen (Cmd+Shift+-) will cause a word to break at the point of insertion, or, if inserted at the beginning of the word, will prevent a word from breaking. Note that hyphen breaks should be before a consonant. InDesign’s default justification settings only use the adjustment of the word spaces, but allowing a modest amount of variation in the letter spacing and in the glyph scaling, shares the burden across three variables, with the overall result of a more even type color.

“Farewell! I leave you, and in you the last of human kind whom these eyes will ever behold. Farewell, Frankenstein! If thou wert yet alive, and yet cherished a desire of revenge against me, it would be better satiated in my life than in my destruction. But it was not so; thou didst seek my extinction that I might not cause greater wretchedness; and if yet, in some mode unknown to me, thou hast not ceased to think and feel, thou wouldst not desire against me a vengeance greater than that which I feel. Blasted as thou wert, my agony was still superior to thine; for the bitter sting of remorse will not cease to rankle in my wounds until death shall close them for ever. — Mary Shelley, Frankenstein

Using Optical Margin Alignment

TITANIC SINKS FOUR HOURS AFTER HITTING ICEBERG

Auto Leading

Em Space = size of the type

En Space = 1/2 an em

Third Space = 1/3 of an em

Sixth Space = 1/6 of an em

Quarter Space = 1/4 of an em

Thin Space = 1/8 of an em

Hair Space = 1/24 of an em

TITANIC SINKS FOUR HOURS AFTER HITTING ICEBERG

Manual Leading

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The Highlight H&J Violations Composition preference is useful for highlighting spacing problems, or more precisely where InDesign can’t do what you’re asking of it, either because your column measure is too narrow or your justification settings too strict. While a small amount of yellow highlighting is often unavoidable, if you find your page a sea of yellow when you turn this on, it’s time to make some changes.

¶ ¶

appropriately. It’s obvious stuff but barely a week goes by when I don’t see some expensive-looking brochure or poster that has a single opening quote where there should be an apostrophe. And while I admit to being more uptight than most about em dashes, en dashes, and the like, each mark is designed to communicate something specific; if we’re using the wrong punctuation, then we’re failing to communicate clearly. And communication is our business. So be sure you know your accents and diacritical marks, be consistent with the spacing around your em dashes, and know the difference between a lower case x and a multiplication sign. And…don’t forget to spell check and proofread!

5 Know your spacing characters

While there’s never a time to use multiple consecutive spacing characters, there are times when you want spacing characters of different widths. InDesign has a space width for every occasion from the widest, an em space which will correspond to the size of your type, down to a hair space. There are also special types of spaces like a nonbreaking space that will keep two words from being separated across a line, a figure space used align numbers in tables, and a flush space and punctuation space which are useful in different ways when working with fully justified text.

6 Sweat the details

At the risk of repeating stuff that you already know, I’m going to say that fiddly small details really matter. To be taken seriously we need to make sure that we we’re using quote marks and apostrophes

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Eliminating consecutive paragraph returns is just one of the text clean up chores you can speed up with predefined searches and/or the FindChangeByList script.

7 An ounce of prevention— practicing good type hygiene

Prevention is the best cure when it comes to keeping your type consistently spaced and formatted. The simplest thing you can do to prevent spacing problems creeping into your document is to work with hidden characters shown (Type > Show Hidden Characters). And then there is the inevitable clean up. No matter what state it’s sent to you in, it’s your responsibility as designer to clean your text by purging any extra carriage returns, multiple spaces, and other unnecessary formatting that will only cause problems later

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on. To make this quick and painless, there are several predefined queries that you can use, or for an even more automated blink-ofan-eye approach, use the FindChangebyList script that comes with InDesign. While either of these approaches is sufficient for most documents, if you have specific Find/ Change routines that you need to apply consistently, you can customize the text file associated with the FindChangebyList script. See Cari Jansen’s article in issue 84 for details of working with this script and other text clean-up techniques. A useful tool for diagnosing spacing problems is the Story Editor, which gives you a different — and often illuminating perspective — on your text. You can see all your text, including overset text, and egregious formatting is easier to spot. As well as deleting unnecessary formatting, Find/Change is also useful for automating the conversion of local formatting to character styling. It’s common for text files to contain local formatting in the form of italics and bold for emphasis. This necessary formatting may be lost when applying paragraph styles unless it has been applied via character styles, which are retained when overrides are removed from text, and which provide full control over how you choose to give emphasis within the text. Once the local formats have been converted to character styles — if for

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example, you want to change from bold to italic as your preferred method of giving emphasis within a paragraph — all you need do is edit the style definition.

8 Avoiding runts, widows, and orphans

When fixing composition problems it’s best to use a light touch—otherwise it’s all too easy to end up with a “solution” that looks worse than the problem it fixes. Firstly, don’t bother fixing widows (last lines of paragraphs stranded at the top of a page or column) or orphans (first lines of paragraph stranded at the bottom of a page or column) until text content is finalized. While the text is being edited, the text flow is subject to changes, which can make your widow and orphan control either unnecessary or undesirable. Also, if rewriting is an option, sometimes a subtle rewording of the text can have a big impact on how a paragraph is composed. Only resort to tracking to fix widows and orphans when there’s no other choice. Before you worry about widows and orphans, start with the more global approach of fixing runts (short last lines of paragraphs) as this will affect the overall text flow. Adding a simple GREP Style to your body text keeps a specified number of characters at the end of a paragraph together through the application of a No

Break character style. I like to set this at 9 characters—this will still allow single words of 10 or more characters at the end of paragraphs, but that’s OK as they will be longer than the first line indent of the paragraphs that follow.

Once the runts have been fixed, you can address widows and orphans by targeting longish paragraphs, especially those with relatively short last lines and applying negative tracking to reduce the length of the paragraph by one line. Use a light touch—the objective is to make sure your adjustments are imperceptible and that the letterspacing remains visually consistent. Set the Tracking/Kerning increment to the smallest amount possible: 1/1000 of an em, and avoid applying more than -10, as the difference will be noticeable to your reader.

9 Take advantage of OpenType features

Not much has changed regarding InDesign’s support for OpenType features, but InDesign CC now offers Contextual Controls that make it easier to access OpenType fractions

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and contextual alternates. Because many of the OpenType features are buried, they are frequently under-used, so make sure you’re taking full advantage of the capabilities of your font. Features like ligatures, real small caps, real superior and inferior characters can add flair to your work and help it stand out from the competition. Fonts vary in the extent to which they exploit the potential of the OpenType format, so when you’re auditioning typefaces for a job, the availability of such OpenType features as oldstyle numerals, alternate characters, and fractions should be considered.

10 Use a grid

Some designers love them, some hate them. Working with a grid takes practice. It imposes constraints, but constraints can also spark creativity. If you’re the kind of designer who experiences Options Paralysis without a clear brief, then grids may be for you. There are two types of a grid: a baseline grid, which ensures the baselines of your type cross align, and a layout grid that divides your page into a specified number of rows and columns. Just how many rows and columns is up to you. The more grid fields, the more flexibility, but also the more complexity. The layout grid takes the guesswork out of where to put things, helps ensure that every element on your page relates to

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some other element, aids consistent and harmonious spacing between and around elements, and suggests ways in which you can effectively incorporate white space into your layout. To use a baseline grid, first turn on the grid. Next, set your Grid Preferences. The increment should correspond to your body text leading. Thirdly, align paragraphs to your grid in the Indents and Spacing Options. Here are a few things to keep in mind: For the grid to work, the total amount of spacing per paragraph (Leading + Space Before + Space After) must equal your grid increment or a multiple thereof. If you’re finding this too restrictive consider halving the grid increment—for example if your body text leading is 12, make the grid increment 6. You are the boss of the grid, not the other way around. If certain paragraphs don’t fit on the grid, then don’t force them. Also, there is the option of aligning only the first line of the paragraph to the grid. This is useful for caption paragraphs where the full grid increment would result in loose leading. The first baseline of such paragraphs will cross align with adjacent columns, there­after the leading will do its own thing. With a little bit of math you can ensure that every third or fourth line of the caption comes back into alignment with body text.

film flirt office waffle fjord

Adobe Caslon Pro No Ligatures

film flirt office waffle fjord

Adobe Caslon Pro Ligatures

picture picture castle castle spring spring Discretionary Ligatures

10 5/16 x 8 3/16 10 5/16 × 8 3/16 Fractions

From Ibiza to the Norfolk Broads From Ibiza to the Norfolk Broads Contextual Alternates

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Looking for digital publishing that...

There is also the option of using a custom baseline grid. While this is handy when working with paragraphs of differing sizes, purists might argue that a well-conceived grid should be able to accommodate any size of paragraph. Also, don’t lose sight of the purpose of the grid: to keep the spacing consistent; if you’re finding yourself using multiple custom baseline grids, you might want to rethink your grid strategy.

n Nigel French is a graphic designer, photographer, author, and teacher living in Lewes, UK. He is the author of InDesign Type and Photoshop Unmasked, both from Adobe Press, as well as several titles in the lynda.com online training library, including InDesign Typography.

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Be thorough, but tread lightly

It’s true; there are so many rules for type! Following them will guard against bad typography, but it’s no guarantee of good typography. Follow the guidelines but stay flexible—sometimes you’ll need to break the rules, but you’ll be able to do that more convincingly if you’re aware of why and how you’re breaking them. Keep in mind that we all have different tastes and different workflows, some of these points you may disagree with — I’d be interested in hearing why — and some may not be relevant to the kind of work you’re doing. Take what you need, adapt as necessary, but whatever you do, use a light touch.

View the course online >> http://ajar.pro/incourse

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By Renee Brisson-Khan

PePcon 2016 Recap

Thoughts and highlights from San Diego, site of the seventh edition of the Print + ePublishing Conference

Conference manager Marci Eversole helps to keep things running smoothly at PePcon from kickoff to conclusion.

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The 7th annual PePcon: Print and ePublishing conference took place in San Diego, the City of Motion. Originated by Anne-Marie Concepción and David Blatner, this year’s conference once again brought together the best in the business to speak on the industry’s most relevant topics. With attendees from five continents and countries as far away as Nigeria, the crowd varied from the novice to the expert, all with one common element: InDesign. As a four-time PePcon veteran, I was asked a number of times what keeps bringing me back. I have a simple answer: the experts and the community. I can’t think of another conference that is not only InDesign-focused, but that incorporates ever-changing and evolving topics in

publishing and workflows and continually keeps itself relevant to our industry. With two days of regular conference sessions flanked by two days of in-depth workshops, this conference once again delivered a wealth of knowledge and best practices for a range of InDesign skills and levels. It’s humbling, yet invigorating, to suddenly find yourself surrounded by a crowd of talented people with specialties in a wide variety of roles and functions. No matter where you sit or whom you talk to, you inevitably find yourself walking away with a new piece of information, a clever tip, or a promising idea to help you be better at what you do. No matter if you’re an introvert or a social butterfly, you soon realize that PePcon isn’t just a conference; it’s a community.

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PePcon 2016 Recap

Finding What You Need We all come looking for different solutions, which are as varied as our roles, so it’s quite amazing to realize that PePcon can and does deliver to all. When I asked a number of new attendees what brought them, the answer was the same across the board: “I heard this was the conference to be at for InDesign and publishing.” Sessions were jam-packed with information and tips that will change how we each work for the better. While the sessions were always informative, their tone was kept light and fun as speakers encouraged crowds to cheer loudly to compete with the rooms next door. We absorbed nuggets of information and tips sure to change our workflows. Questions were encouraged, and nowhere are speakers more accessible—all part of the atmosphere that bears out the CreativePro motto “Always Be Learning.” The official conference began with an unlikely yet fitting connection: Magic and Design. Jonathan Levit’s thought-provoking

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PePcon hosts David Blatner and Anne-Marie Concepcion, with speaker Keith Gilbert (center)

opening keynote address reminded us that while what we do may be mysterious to clients, behind the curtain it’s all about dedication, discipline, and practice. The keynote set the tone—and attendees over the two days were reminded—that it’s all about developing muscle memory, learning shortcuts, and practicing fundamentals until they become second nature. It’s also about drawing from the best and interpreting and adapting their ideas to our own work to create something new, and finding ways to capture the processes we use to make them repeatable. It

all seems so basic, yet at the core it’s what transforms good work into great work. Sessions varied even more than in past years, with the additions of web content publishing and Adobe’s updated CC libraries. The theme of mobile workflows emerged early on the first day with an Ignite session by newcomer speaker Joseph Angelo Todaro and an afternoon session by Theresa Jackson. Productivity apps and cloud tools to connect remote teams and increase

Jonathan Levit’s keynote address showed that successful magicians and designers actually have a lot in common.

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efficiencies drew crowds in the early morning sessions with MEI and Pagination, showing the move toward mobile tools that connect various workflows and content repurposing. New this year was the change to the Ignite sessions, moved from an evening event to a daytime slot. All seven topics resonated with the audience, and presenters delivered unexpected topics ranging from the evolution of our design industry to a love of Adobe Bridge that just had to be shared.

The second day’s session by Mark Heaps seemed a continuation of his talk last year, “The Client Whisperer.” Mark’s engaging talk this year focused on how designers can better understand an audience and design better presentations. His examples of beautifully designed slides did a terrific job of demonstrating that PowerPoint is not a dirty word and that it’s not the tool that makes the presentation—it’s the designer who has the power to inspire action in an audience. Audiences laughed as tired clichés flashed up on the screen, and were inspired by a

tableau of work that made us rethink the traditional presentation. For the eBook publication professionals, a healthy mix of basic and advanced skill sessions were available, including basic CSS/ HTML, iBooks Author, fixed layout ePubs, and essential eBook troubleshooting and fixes. On the app publication front, new and seasoned veteran speakers helped audiences navigate the many choices available. A newcomer to the PePcon stage, Michela Di Stefano, delivered a comprehensive overview of publication options and the

Theresa Jackson explored the potential for integrating mobile and touch apps into your workflow.

Joseph Angelo Todaro showed how Adobe Muse takes the pain out of creating responsive websites.

Keith Gilbert revealed his passion for Adobe Bridge during his Ignite session.

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PePcon 2016 Recap

Mark Heaps dished out expert advice for designing presentations.

questions a designer must ask to help guide their clients. Longtime veteran Keith Gilbert delivered the essential app-building basics, while presenter duo Chad Chelius and Justin Putney showed innovative ways to add custom interactivity to digital publications. Interactivity was another underlying theme of the conference. Speakers Kat Topaz and Scott Landis took to the stage with dynamic samples of content-driven apps and user interfaces strategically thought out to engage their audiences. It seemed like more than a third of the sessions involved apps in some way.

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With so many options, the repeated topic of workflows came as no surprise. Whether it was about moving content from InDesign to HTML, from RGB to CMYK, or from XML and data to InDesign, sessions were packed with attendees looking for new ways to handle the content and data they now need to push out to multiple streams in print and digital formats.

Kat Topaz and Scott Landis recounted how they converted a print quarterly for an NBA team into a continuously-published mobile app.

Suppliers and Service Providers

Erica Gamet and David Blatner shared a laugh, while dispensing great tips.

Attendees all signed up for the sessions, but when they walked out of those sessions, they found another gem of the conference: the exhibitors. Just outside the session rooms was a collection of some of the most knowledgeable and helpful service providers in the industry. No matter which type of publisher or designer you were, there was someone there with interesting products to help you get your job done faster and better.

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place to find tools to work smarter and offer more for clients. Knowing what is possible allows each of us to expand what we think we know and view new possibilities.

The Community That is PePcon For some attendees, the most valuable part of the conference was connecting with top-notch suppliers and service providers.

Seeing firsthand how these proactive and forward-thinking providers are developing to help teams connect, share assets, collaborate, and publish through multiple channels offers powerful encouragement to the rest of us. New attendees were introduced to scripts and extensions from providers like Rohoriko and In-Tools, who have long made our industry a less frustrating space. Learning of the functions of extensions and complementary products like XMPie’s powerful personalization software or Em Software’s connectivity to Word and Google docs leaves me no doubt that this is the

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The feeling of camaraderie that happens at PePcon is truly something special, and kudos to the organizers, because they really go out of their way to foster that spirit. It begins before you even arrive, with the conference’s Connect discussion board that enables attendees to post and answer questions. Attendees eagerly shared how they started in design, asked specific workflow questions, and even made plans to meet up for a baseball game with other attendees. The networking event is another great example of the PePcon spirit and a perennial favorite. The event achieves its purpose, because the next day you see people in line at lunch you now recognize, and you strike up a conversation. You are no longer a face

Fun is a key element of PePcon, as evidenced by speakers Mark Heaps, Nigel French, and Ron Bilodeau enjoying a big laugh.

Russell Viers was on hand to share his best Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign tips.

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in the crowd; you know people and feel more comfortable. When traveling from session to session, you inevitably find at least three people passionately discussing a topic at the Meet the Speaker table, asking questions and discussing options. It isn’t just at the speaker table where you find this either; it’s common to see attendees, speakers, and programmers alike in the main areas with computers side by side, sharing ideas, demonstrating techniques, or getting opinions on a file. It’s a collaborative environment—people want to help and share, and that is a rare thing I appreciate every time I attend. The second night’s event provided the opportunity for designers to see presentations by some of the industry’s most talented scripters and programmers. One demonstrated fun uses for scripts while singing and playing on a ukulele, another showed adjustments to PostScript with beautiful results, and others demonstrated useful scripts developed to work smarter. It

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the sponsors reflect those changes with ever-evolving products and services to help. I don’t yet know exactly where or when the next PePcon be, but I sure hope to be there!

n

A rooftop luncheon gave attendees a great view of their San Diego surroundings.

was the first time I was able to attend this particular event, and I can say it changed how I thought of scripts and gave me a deeper appreciation for the incredible potential of scripting.

Renée Brisson-Khan is a sales design consultant and a Creative Director in the Xerox Canada Creative Services team where she specializes in designing and deploying branded sales tools for print, interactive, and exhibit environments. Check out her LinkedIn profile and RBK Artworks to learn more.

Serving Your Needs, Answering Your Questions It’s no wonder that PePcon has grown to be one of the industry’s most recognized conferences. The speakers bring with them experience, knowledge, and the newest techniques. Sessions change every year to reflect the industry’s developments, and

The Meet the Speaker table offers attendees a chance to spend some one-on-one time with their favorite PePcon pros.

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By Steve Werner

What’s New With InDesign CC 2015.4

Small changes to reduce eyestrain and ease the process of working with swatches, Adobe Stock, and PDF

Don’t worry, there’s nothing wrong with your calendar. It is indeed June 2016, and Adobe is releasing a new version of InDesign CC 2015. You may also be experiencing a bit of déjà vu, since this is the fifth release of InDesign CC 2015 since the first version came out about a year ago. The theme of these many updates seems to be small, structural changes in the program. This time around, the tweaks include the size of the type in the interface, GPU performance (on a Macintosh), and the ability to sort swatches. Now let’s take a look at everything that’s new with InDesign CC 2015.4.

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Easier Interface Viewing The first new feature is driven by two forces: many more people are viewing InDesign on HiDPI or Retina displays, and all of us are aging. The InDesign user interface has always had small type and interface items (“widgets”), and in recent versions, this has become a bigger source of complaint. InDesign CC 2015.4 brings a major redesign of over 100 panels and hundreds of dialog boxes with larger type and widgets. The space between items is enlarged both vertically and horizontally.

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What’s New With InDesign CC 2015.4

Some of you may remember the Control panel from InDesign CC 2014. It’s 992 pixels wide (see Figure 1). The top is a portion of the Control panel from InDesign CC 2014. Below is the same panel in InDesign CC 2015.4 (the rocket icon indicates the presence of a GPU processor on my Mac, described below)—now 1080 pixels wide. That’s an increase of almost 10%!

Improved Stability on a Shared Network InDesign users who work on a shared network connection have encountered InDesign shutdowns when their connection is temporarily disrupted. If these folks attempted to save a document, InDesign

Figure 1: The display of user interface elements like the Control panel is significantly larger in InDesign CC 2015.4.

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went into “protective shutdown” mode, and their work could be lost if they saw the dreaded “The network connection has been lost…” message. In InDesign CC 2015.4, things are different for documents smaller than 100 MB. Users can still work on a file or make changes if the network connection is temporarily lost. If they choose to save the document, they can save it to a new location. When the network connection is restored, InDesign will let the users save the file (with changes) to their original network location.

GPU Performance and Animated Zoom (Mac Only)

acceleration will be turned on by default (but can be disabled with a keystroke). The requirements are: »» The computer must have greater than or equal to 1GB of dedicated VRAM (2GB recommended), and must support OpenGL version 4.0 or greater. »» The computer must have a native Retina display or a connected HiDPI (Retina) monitor. If the requirements are met, you’ll see the option available in a new GPU Performance preference panel, and the rocket icon appears on your Application Bar (Figure 2).

On a Macintosh with an appropriate GPU and a built-in or connected Retina monitor, InDesign CC 2015.4 can use the built-in GPU to speed many operations—scrolling, zooming, panning, moving objects between pages, and so on. By default, if the conditions described below are met, GPU Figure 2: The new GPU Performance preference

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With such a GPU installed on a Mac, an Animated Zoom feature similar to those in Illustrator CC and Photoshop CC is turned on by default (but can be turned off ). Using the Zoom tool, click and scrub right to zoom in; click and scrub left to zoom out. Alternatively, if you click and hold the Zoom tool, you can zoom in continuously at your cursor point. Pressing the Shift key returns the Zoom tool to Marquee Zoom mode. I’ll go into more detail about these features in an upcoming blog post.

Sorting Swatches You can now sort the swatches in the Swatches panel in two ways from a new Sort submenu on the panel menu: »» Sort by Name: Swatches are sorted alphabetically »» Sort by Color Value: First swatches are sorted in the following order: CMYK > Lab Color > Mixed Ink > RGB. Then all swatches of a particular color mode are sorted on their color value. For example,

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RGB colors are sorted by their RGB values (Figure 3).

Also, the controls in the dialog box are now divided into four panes (Figure 4):

Figure 4: The new option to specfiy a language in PDFs exported from InDesign.

Adobe Stock Enhancements

Figure 3: The new sorting options in the Swatches panel

Setting Document Language for Exported PDFs The InDesign CC 2015.3 update in March 2016 introduced an accessibility feature when exporting a Print PDF file. It provided an option to set the default document language. This is an accessibility requirement. In 2015.4, the same control is added to the Export to Interactive PDF dialog box.

The ability to download Adobe Stock photos into InDesign was added in InDesign CC 2015. However, if you downloaded an unlicensed Stock image, it wasn’t easy to figure out how to license that image. Two new methods are now available: First, a new on-object button appears on the image, which you can click to begin the licensing process (Figure 5, next page). Alternatively, in the Links panel, a new shopping-basket icon indicates an unlicensed Stock image. Right-clicking such an image displays a License Image option.

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What’s New With InDesign CC 2015.4

Previously, if you viewed Adobe Stock images on the Adobe Stock website (), your only options were to download to the desktop or to a CC Library. Now, when viewing an image, a pop-out menu gives you three choices: License and Open In (to license the image immediately), Open Preview In, and Find Similar. In the first two choices, clicking the “Id” icon will place the image into an InDesign layout.

Figure 5: Now you can start the process of licensing an Adobe Stock image by clicking on it in your InDesign layout.

Smaller Changes Finally, there are a few smaller changes you might notice: »» The Start workspace, introduced in English, French, German, and Japanese, is now available for all languages. »» Before sharing a CC Library with another user, the author can now mark the CC Library as a Read-Only Library. When inviting a collaborator, you can choose between Can Edit (previously the only choice) and Can View to limit the recipient’s options. The viewing collaborator

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can receive updated content, but not change it. »» When you create a new document, the three intents—previously Print, Web, and Digital Publishing—are now Print, Web, and Mobile (the page sizes for the latter are for phones and tablets, as before). »» On a Mac only, for security reasons, when plug-ins are stored in non-standard locations, they will be required to be stored inside the application package. »» Mini Bridge has been removed.

The changes that come with InDesign CC 2015.4 aren’t going to change your life or your workflow in any major way. But Adobe has provided a user-interface that’s easier on the eyes, plus a few other solid refinements to hold us over till the next major version is released.

n Steve Werner is a longtime writer for InDesign Magazine and InDesignSecrets, and presents training and consulting in the San Francisco Bay Area.

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By Erica Gamet

InFocus

An all-new collection of cool goodies for working and playing with type Summer is in full swing (just ask my allergies) and everything is in bloom. As a kid in Colorado, summer meant time spent in the mountains amongst wildflowers, so my mind naturally turns to bouquets of handpicked flowers this time of year. I always relied on field guides to tell me what was what and listened to the advice of other flower-gatherers for where to find the best blooms. Think of this month’s InFocus as your field guide to colorful type-inspired buds and blooms. Some of the items might seem simple, as a daisy in a wildflower bouquet, while some are distinctive, like a tiger lily. As creative professionals, we work with words and type most days. It’s our job to bring

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these words meaning and depth through the way we present the typography. Here’s my type-inspired bouquet for you.

Working Hard Whether you want to create your own font, easily license pro fonts, or be inspired by the masters of type, these goodies will help you on your typographical tiptoe through the tulips. App.typography As more and more digital publishing options have come into being, one of the more confusing aspects for creators has been font licensing and use. In the pre-digital days, it was pretty straightforward: buy the physical

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font, use the font. Even as we moved into the desktop publishing realm, the model worked more or less the same. Then solutions for web fonts came along, and things became slightly more involved. And now, with the explosion of digital publishing—where the fonts themselves travel along with final product—comes even more complexity in discerning just what you can and can’t do with a font. In an attempt to streamline the licensing and use issues across digital platforms, Hoefler & Co recently rolled out their App.typography licensing system. Whether you’re developing an app or creating digital publications, the App.typography subscription extends your existing font licenses based solely on number of product titles. As a publisher, this means that if you own an H&Co font for print, you can use that font—and any of its styles—to create the various flavors of eBooks, without regard to delivery platform or number of downloads. Starting at $299 a year for a single app or imprint, the service extends to any Hoefler & Co fonts already in your collection as well as to any future purchases. Having this blanket approach to font licensing will certainly go a long way to helping content creators navigate the murky waters of digital publishing.

and Indiscripts, you can now dip your toes into the world of font creation. Or at the very least, single glyph creation. The IndyFont script runs from within InDesign, so you can enjoy the comfort of working in a familiar environment. There are two flavors of IndyFont: the full version (€59) allows for the creation of an entire font, and the free version can contain one glyph only. The latter might sound limited, but it’s perfect for tasks like creating custom bullets or for turning a company logo into its own glyph. Creating a one-glyph font involves running the script from within InDesign and adding the glyph’s elements to the template document that the script creates (Figure 1). The elements must be vectors with no stroke and filled using only the [Black] or [Paper] swatch. Figure 1: Creating a single-glyph font with IndyFont

IndyFont If you’ve ever wanted to make your own font—or even just insert a custom character now and then—the task might have seemed foreign and overwhelming. Thanks to Theunis de Jong (aka Jongware)

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InFocus

Using the guides and sample font characters for reference, paste and manipulate those elements within the space allotted and in relation to the baseline. When perfected, the font can be exported in OpenType format, ready to use in InDesign, or any other app that supports OpenType fonts. The process is similar for the paid version of IndyFont, where there are tools in place for adding ranges of glyphs to quickly generate an entire font. The full version also offers a slew of typographic editing features, such as creating skewed and horizontally scaled glyphs, crafting custom ligatures, and quickly creating sets of OpenType variants like swashes and small caps. Font Candy Making graphics with text and images is nothing new to designers: we do that all day long. Sometimes, though, it’s precisely because we’ve done it all day long that making a quick graphic for fun or for our own use seems like it will sap us of our last drop of creativity. Having apps that allow us to do just that with ease —especially on a mobile device—can be a godsend. Font Candy from Easy Tiger Apps is just one such app. Available on iOS and Windows Phone for free, Font Candy—and the premium Font Candy+—focuses less on the typography and more on the effects. There are a handful of fonts available in the free version, with Font Candy+ offering 40 additional fonts.

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Both versions let you choose from a selection of social media post sizes and image filters and give you the ability to mask images using the text (Figure 2). Some shapes and pre-made sayings are available in both, with optional artwork like banners, bursts, and decorative items available as in-app purchases for $1.99. Font Candy+ delivers all of these extras for $2.99. The premium version gives you even more image control, including blend modes and an eraser, as well as removing all watermarks and ads. Your finished creations can be saved to your device, sent to social media, or even printed as a postcard or T-shirt design! Figure 2: Font Candy lets you adjust opacity on type as well as images to create a mask.

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Helvetica/Objectified/Urbanized: The Complete Interviews With over 100 hours of interviews shot for the Design trilogy—consisting of films Helvetica, Objectified, and Urbanized—much of that content hit the cutting room floor. Interviews with design legends like Michael Bierut, Hermann Zapf, Erik Spiekermann, Massimo Vignelli, and Jonathan Hoefler had to be cut short, reworked, and otherwise crafted in such a way that will always leave viewers wanting more. Well, fear not, lovers of type, because the films’ director Gary Hustwit has delivered up your heart’s deepest desire in book form. Helvetica/Objectified/Urbanized: The Complete Interviews (Figure 3) is a massive 736-page tome that collects the interview transcripts in their entirety for every typophile’s reading pleasure. Helvetica/Objectified/Urbanized came to life via a Kickstarter campaign in 2013 and comes in paperback ($45) or eBook format ($12). Whether you want to use the collection of design wisdom as reference or merely for inspiration, you’ll have each interviewee’s full thoughts to ponder. Figure 3: Helvetica/Objectified/Urbanized: The Complete Interviews contains the transcripts from all interviews in the Design Trilogy films.

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Fontself Maker Let’s face it—we all want to have at least one font that is uniquely ours. Uniquely us. No? Just me, you say? Well, I must not be alone, because a recent Kickstarter-backed project set out to make such a dream a reality. Fontself Maker ($50, Fontself ) is a handy extension for Illustrator CC that lets you create a font from your own handdrawn—or otherwise hand-crafted—letterforms. Any shape you create can become a character. Creating your font requires only a simple drag and drop action. If you’ve drawn out your entire alphabet, just select the entire set of letters and drag them onto the window marked A-Z, and the entire alphabet will be mapped properly (Figure 4)! Do the same for

Figure 4: Drag and drop an entire alphabet on the Fontself Maker extension panel in Illustrator, and the letters map to the appropriate place.

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numbers, punctuation, and special characters. The most recent version allows you to create guides, adjust the letter spacing, and move the baseline for individual characters. A simple save, and then—as if by magic—your shiny new OpenType font is ready to use in your designs. Features to be included in future versions include alternates, ligatures, color, and kerning. Now if you’ll excuse me, I’m off to create the world’s most illegible font, based on my own handwriting.

Hardly Working What’s the point of a beautiful typographical garden if you can’t sit back and enjoy it now and then? Enjoy the lighter side of your type obsession with these fragrant diversions. The Rather Difficult Font Game I’m convinced that all I need to do is play font-guessing games and I will become a type aficionado. Or at least be able to pick out a typeface by name on the first guess. So far that’s not the case, but that doesn’t keep me from playing games that help me identify fonts. I recently stumbled on the web version of the self-proclaimed “Rather Difficult Font Game.” It’s fairly straightforward, in that a piece of text is displayed and you have to choose the correct typeface used from a list of four options. The iOS version for iPhone and iPad ($2) offers a little more variety in the gameplay. You are awarded higher points the faster you

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respond, and you can choose from three levels of difficulty. If necessary, you can scale up the letters for closer inspection, and even isolate just the sample word by rotating the game to landscape mode. In addition, the mobile version offers The Terminology Game, wherein you test your knowledge of type anatomy and other minutiae of a typographic nature (Figure 5). And, if you’re so inclined, you can even brag about your ability to tell the difference between Hoefler Text and Adobe Garamond Pro on Apple’s Game Center. Fontli

Figure 5: The mobile version of the Rather Difficult Font Game tests your knowledge of typefaces as well as type terminology.

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Finally, there’s a place for all type nerds to geek out over beautiful photos of amazing typography, freeing up precious Instagram space for well-styled food photography and duck-faced selfies! Fontli (Figure 6) is being called Instagram for Fontophiles, and that’s a lovely thing. Available for free for iOS, Android, and Windows Phone, the app is more than just a way to appreciate typography in the wild. Fontli’s typecentric focus brings together lovers of type in print, signage, illustration, and calligraphy to form a social network revolving around the common love of type on display.

Figure 6: Assign photos of typography into one of Fontli’s premade categories.

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Users can tag their photos by typeface; then others can find photos also sporting the same typeface. In addition, Fontli provides designer and foundry info for that particular typeface. The SOS section calls on the community to help identify particularly elusive typefaces. This feature is a huge aid for a type tenderfoot like myself. Of course, I’d be afraid to ask what typeface is gracing my beautifully-framed shot, only to be told, “That’s Helvetica, Erica.” Ah. So it is. Typography SCRABBLE What started out as a “wouldn’t it be nice” concept a few years ago has turned into a Hasbro-approved reality. I’m talking about the Typography SCRABBLE game ($50), now in its third edition. When first created, the Typography version was released as a luxury edition with a walnut cabinet, a magnetized playing board, and metal tile racks. This new edition is more laid-back but nowhere near pedestrian, more closely resembling a deluxe version of the original SCRABBLE game. It comes packaged up in a solid wood storage box, complete with drawer to keep the wood tiles and racks organized (Figure 7, next page). Version number three includes tiles featuring 12 new fonts, cheery colors on the bonus spaces, and a sleek new minimalist layout to the game board. Other than the look, however, the game is exactly the same one that we all know and remember. Some type

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purists might have trouble getting past the fact that a few of the typefaces are scripts and you might be forced to spell out words in all-cap script (ouch). But while you’re contemplating all sins typographic, I’ll just be over here plotting out my next triple-letter “Q” scoring coup.

Gather ye rosebuds while ye may I hope you’ve enjoyed the romp through the fields of type and have your eye on what would go in your ideal type-infused bouquet. Until next time, enjoy the rays of typographical sunshine that make your designs blossom!

n Erica Gamet is a speaker, writer, and trainer, focusing on Adobe InDesign and Illustrator, Apple Keynote and iBooks Author, and other production-related topics. With over 25 years experience in the graphics industry, she is a regular contributor to CreativePro.com. After living as a nomad, she recently put down roots in El Paso, Texas, where she hikes and bikes every chance she gets.

Figure 7: The Typography SCRABBLE game features a sparse game board and 12 different fonts on the letter tiles.

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Best of the Blog

Best of the Blog

A collection of the most important and informative articles from InDesignSecrets. If you want to add comments or ask questions, just click the title of the article to view the original post in your web browser. InDesign Basics: Where Is the Color Picker?

InDesign’s Eyedropper Tool

Mike Rankin | May 27, 2016

This is the first in a series of articles for new InDesign users, highlighting basic information and techniques. We all had to start somewhere, so why not start right here! Q: In Photoshop, I can double-click on the Foreground or Background color to open the Color Picker and then click anywhere in the image to see what color something is and grab that color to use it elsewhere. But I can’t figure out how to do the same thing in InDesign. Where is this Color Picker functionality? A: In InDesign CC 2015, there are a few places where you can find the kind of functionality that Photoshop’s Color Picker gives you. But ironically, InDesign’s Color Picker is not one of those places! Here’s where you can find color sampling in InDesign:

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InDesign’s Eyedropper tool allows you to click to sample colors from the current document, with some limitations. Since it is object-based and not pixel-based, clicking with this tool on a gradient-filled object will sample the entire gradient, not the specific color you click on. And if a frame with no fill is overlapping the object you want to sample, you have to move that no-fill frame (or hide it) before you can sample the color of the underlying object. The Eyedropper tool can sample both CMYK and RGB colors, depending on what you click on. Once you sample a color, clicking again with the Eyedropper will apply that color where you click. If

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you want to sample colors continuously, click and drag. If you want to sample another color, press and hold the Option key (Mac) or Alt key (Windows) while clicking (or dragging) with the Eyedropper. RGB Swatch Dialog Boxes When you’re working with RGB swatches, you can also get Photoshop-like color picking in the New Color Swatch and Swatch Options dialog boxes. Note: This functionality was added in InDesign CC 2014, so if you’re working with an older version, you won’t have this option. In either dialog box, you’ll see a button that looks a lot like the Eyedropper. But it works very differently. In fact, it works almost exactly like the Photoshop Color Picker. Click and drag it to sample colors from anywhere on your screen, not just from the current

document, and not even just from InDesign. When you release your mouse button, the color at your cursor will be sampled in RGB.

If you need to convert to a different color mode, you can select it from the Color Mode pop-up menu in the dialog box.

This method does not have the same limitations as the Eyedropper tool. Clicking on a gradient will sample the specific

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Best of the Blog

color at your cursor. You can also sample colors from objects that are underneath frames with no fill.

saying their last goodbyes, is 2 inches wide. We want to scale that up to exactly 3-1/3 inches, keeping the proportions the same.

Scaling an Object to an Exact Size

Alan Gilbertson | June 2, 2016

One of the most useful (and least obvious) features of InDesign’s input fields is that no matter what units a field is currently displaying (points, millimeters, inches), you can type in a new value using any of the units InDesign supports, and let InDesign do the conversion for you. InDesign can even do simple math using mixed units. You can enter 1”+3mm-2p any time you need to know how many points equals 2 picas shorter than 1 inch plus 3 millimeters. Try doing that on your calculator! (The answer is 56.504, in case you were curious.) This versatility can come in handy when you need to scale a placed image or graphic to an exact size. Let’s say you have placed an image and cropped it just the way you want, but now you need to scale it to a specific size. This example, which seems to be (but probably isn’t) two doomed guys

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Image: Adobe Stock

You could use the mouse, and Ctrl/Command+Shift-drag a corner, but that can be finicky. Sometimes it just won’t land on the exact number you need. “But wait!” you cry. “I can change the width and height in the Control panel!” Not so fast, young grasshopper. The problem is, if you enter new values for Width and Height…

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… only the size of the frame changes, not the contents:

That’s not very useful. Our two guys are now in even worse trouble than they were before. Let’s undo that, and move one icon group to the right, to the Percent Scale fields.

Entering a new value here will scale frame and contents together, and you don’t have to calculate the percentage increase. Instead, type the exact dimension with its units, 3.333” in this case (3.333in works, too), into the first field. The height and width are locked in sync, so everything will stay proportional.

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This time, we get the result we’re looking for: the container and contents both scale, and the crop doesn’t change.

This applies whether the content is a graphic or text. (Don’t forget the units, though. If you just enter a number without specifying the unit, InDesign assumes you mean “percent.”) This also works in other situations where you need an exact size that isn’t the default unit. For instance, InDesign stubbornly insists that type is measured in points, but you can enter an exact height for type in millimeters or inches in the Character panel (or anywhere fine point sizes are sold). Note: While typing something like “10cm” for type size will convert that measurement to points, it won’t necessarily give you text that is 10cm large (because of the vagaries of font design,

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x-height, etc.). If you need a specific size for text, you can use the script in this post.

A Fix for Problems With Layer Visibility Overrides In Placed Illustrator Files

A New Preference to Control Layer Visibility Overrides But a couple versions back (in CC 2015.1), a new checkbox quietly appeared in InDesign’s File Handling preferences.

Mike Rankin | June 6, 2016

If you’ve ever used InDesign’s Object Layer Options feature to change the appearance of placed Illustrator files, you probably stumbled on a rather annoying problem. If layers were added or removed in the Illustrator file after it had been placed, InDesign really didn’t know what to do, so it discarded any layer visibility overrides you had set. You would get an alert, but there was no fix other than manually going back to Object Layer Options and resetting things the way you wanted them.

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When enabled, this preference tells InDesign to ignore any new layers in the Illustrator file and keep them hidden. In other words, leave things in InDesign as they were, thank you very much. It’s a small but significant change for the better, especially for folks who commonly use Object Layer Options to set layer visibility overrides. Unfortunately, this preference currently affects only Illustrator files. If you adjust the visibility of layers in placed Photoshop files, and then change the layers in the PSD, you’ll encounter the same problem as always.

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How to Avoid InDesign Smart Guides Problems

in the vicinity, the selected frame might snap to them before it snaps to the column edge.

Mike Rankin | June 9, 2016

InDesign’s Smart Guides are (usually) a wonderful thing. They let you arrange and align objects in your layout precisely, without ever having to spend time fussing with rulers, page guides, or the Control panel. But sometimes Smart Guides can act pretty dumb. In particular, you can see InDesign Smart Guides problems when you aren’t careful about the size and position of page objects. When that happens, you’ll have trouble aligning objects, because they’ll try to snap to everything but the thing you intend. Smart Guides also take master page items into account. So be careful when you’re setting up frames for things like running headers and footers. Smart Guides Problems For example, when you’re drawing a new frame (or moving an existing one), you might want to quickly snap it to a column edge. But if you have Smart Guides turned on, and other page items are

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Likewise, if you’re sloppy about arranging frames (and the content within them), you can have trouble snapping to the centers of things like placed images and columns.

they get in your way. You can quickly turn off Smart Guides with the keyboard shortcut Command/Ctrl+U. As long as Snap to Guides is still enabled, you’ll have no problem snapping to something like a column edge. Then, if desired, press Command/Ctrl+U to turn Smart Guides back on. Note that on the Mac you can also leave Smart Guides turned off and invoke them on the fly by dragging an item, and then holding the Control key as you continue to drag. Solution 2: Adjust the Document View Another fix is to simply zoom or scroll to show just the items you’re working with in the document window. When the whole page is visible, then every edge and center of every frame is a potential Smart Guide. But if you move most of the objects out of view, you’ll have a much cleaner path to the snap that you want. Solution 3: Approach From a Different Angle If you run into traffic while moving a page item, take an alternate route. For example, if you’re dragging an item from left to right and it keeps bumping into Smart Guides, try moving the item to the other side of the screen and coming from right to left.

Solution 1: Toggle Smart Guides Off If you’re trying to snap to a column edge, page edge, or page guide, you don’t need Smart Guides, so turn them off temporarily when

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Solution 4: Clean Up the Layout It pays to be tidy as you work, especially when you’re setting up master page items. Pay attention to their size and position. Have them match the width of columns if appropriate. Don’t place items that are almost aligned on your master pages. And don’t leave unused items hanging around. Usually it only takes a few seconds of effort to create a more user-friendly layout, and avoid annoying smart guides problems.

Adobe Reduces InCopy CC Subscription Fee

Typically, in a publication production team, editors outnumber designers by a far margin. Spending $49.95/month each for one or two designers to use InDesign CC and the other Creative Cloud apps is a bit of an “ouch.” But adding to that $19.95/seat every month multiplied by five or ten editors so they could use InCopy was a real, bottom-line obstacle. How to Get the Reduced InCopy CC Subscription Fee To see the new pricing (and subscribe), go to the Creative Cloud Membership and Pricing Plans page on Adobe’s website. At first, it looks like InCopy is still $19.99/month:

Anne-Marie Concepcion | June 10, 2016

L

Last week, Adobe quietly came to their senses and adjusted the InCopy CC subscription fee to $4.99/month (annual plan paid monthly), down from $19.95 month, where most of the other single Adobe app subscriptions price out. This move smooths the way for publishers considering an InDesign/InCopy workflow, and gives existing customers a break in their budgets (once they renew their monthly or yearly license).

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But as soon as you choose it from the menu, the price change appears:

Woo-hoo! In case you’re wondering, that works out to $59.88 a year, a very reasonable price for a program that used to cost $259.00/seat for a perpetual license. It also brings it more in line with Adobe’s special “Photography” package, which is $9.99/month for Photoshop and Lightroom. If you want InCopy CC for just a single month or three (perhaps while you’re testing it out), it’s $7.49/month, also reasonable. I know many IT and purchasing departments who aren’t even aware that InCopy is available as a single subscription (Adobe doesn’t push this option very hard), and instead they’re having the company foot the bill for a full CC subscription for each editor. Yikes! If you suspect your company may be doing the same, please

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print out this post and tape it to their computer monitor. Again, that URL with the pricing info is https://creative.adobe.com/plans.

Calendar Wizard Script Upgraded Colin Flashman | June 13, 2016 Regular readers may be familiar with a free script previously showcased here called Calendar Wizard by Scott Selberg. The script was last mentioned in this post, and it is certainly one of the

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must-have scripts for Adobe InDesign. A link can be found on our page of great free scripts that every InDesign user should have. And now Calendar Wizard has been updated, and offers several enhancements over previous versions.

List Calendar The list calendar has the dates arranged in a one- or two-column layout with room to write events that fall on particular dates.

The ability to save and load settings This is an enormous time-saver when you’re making several calendars, or if there were errors in your initial calendar. The script’s interface has many options, and keeping your previous options definitely saves time. Two new varieties of calendars Along with the usual type of calendar, Calendar Wizard can now generate two new designs: »» List Calendar »» Line Calendar

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Calendar Wizard list style

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Line Calendar

Enhanced customization options

The line calendar has the dates arranged in row/month configuration for “at a glance” reference.

Calendar Wizard now allows for more customization than the previous versions, including options such as: »» Customized holidays »» Customized page and margin sizes The script also features an improved user guide, along with direct contacts for help, and how-tos for using the script. While Calendar Wizard is still free for personal and non-profit use, commercial use requires a license. The cost is US$20 for a single user. Considering the complexity and flexibility of the script, that is an absolute bargain for what is arguably one of the most useful JavaScripts for Adobe InDesign.

Mystery of the Unused Style Contest Answer and Winner! Mike Rankin | June 15, 2016

Calendar Wizard line style

It’s time to reveal the solution—and the winner—for this month’s InDesignSecrets contest, the Mystery of the Unused Style!

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Here’s the scenario: You’re working with a simple, one-page document to create some presentation slides. On the document page, there is one text frame with some styled text in it.

So you right-click on the style and choose Delete Style.

But then a dialog box pops up asking you to choose another style to replace the soon-to-be-deleted style wherever it is used.

it In the Paragraph Styles panel, you notice an unused style that you want to get rid of.

Why does InDesign say this unused style is still in use? The Answer First of all, a big thanks to everyone who entered the contest. I love reading your emails, and bonus points for the folks who even take the time to send screenshots! Now for the solutions. Yes, there is more than one explanation that fits (and a bunch of other worthy guesses).

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Solution 1: An Empty Paragraph  This one is kind of tricky because hidden characters are not showing in the screenshot I provided. So you can’t tell if there is an extra empty paragraph at the end of the text frame.

been. I tried to give a subtle hint for this one in the question, Why does InDesign say this unused style is still in use? OK, maybe too subtle. Other Interesting Explanations There were several interesting explanations that didn’t quite work, but are definitely worth mentioning.

If there were an empty paragraph formatted with the style, you would be prompted to replace the style if you tried to delete it. But, as in our example, the style would not show up in a Find/ Change (because there are no characters or white space of any kind formatted with the style). Solution 2: Tracked Changes  This one could really get you to pull your hair out, if you didn’t realize Track Changes was enabled. The scenario I was thinking of here was that someone had placed text from Word, and brought in the Normal style. If Track Changes were enabled before the text was edited and reformatted, then InDesign would have to say the Normal style was still needed, so you could reject the changes and go back to the way the text had

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Based On Styles.  A lot of folks wrote that one of the other paragraph styles was based on the Normal style. This is a great explanation, and it would be true, except that I clearly said in the post that none of the other styles in the document were based on the unused style. Object Styles.  Another explanation that several folks sent in really should be right, but it isn’t. They said that the Normal style was used in an object style. This certainly sounds reasonable. But interestingly (or perhaps horribly), InDesign will indeed allow you to delete a paragraph style used by an object style with no warning at all, if the object style is not currently in use. InDesign will silently replace the deleted style with default formatting, [No Paragraph Style]. This is startling because that’s not how things usually work when there are similar dependencies (like in the based-on explanation above). Or for another example, if you try to

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delete a color swatch that is used in a text style, you get a warning, even if the text style is not applied anywhere. The fact that this explanation doesn’t work seems more like a bug than an intended behavior to me. Next Style.  Another great idea. Some folks wrote in that the Normal style was set as the Next Style in one of the others. This is a really smart guess, but just like with the object style example, if you delete a Next Style that is not used anywhere else, it will be immediately replaced with [No Paragraph Style]. Not good. I’m a lot happier when InDesign prevents me from doing something stupid. Linked Text.  Finally, honorable mention goes to the folks who guessed that the preference for creating links when placing text and spreadsheet files was turned on, so there was a live link back to the Word doc. This would not cause you to get a warning when you tried to delete the unused style that came in with the text. However, it would cause the Normal style to come back from the dead when you update the link to the Word doc. Whew, that is definitely the longest contest explanation ever. And the winner of this contest is… Michael J. Bartels

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Michael wins a free one-day pass to the 2016 CreativePro Conference, either Deke McClelland’s full-day Channels and Masking class on Sunday July 10th, or the full-day Illustrator Conference on Monday July 11th with an amazing lineup of Illustrator stars: Bert Monroy, Von Glitschka, Sharon Steuer, Mark Heaps, and Michael Ninness. Thanks again to everyone who entered, and be on the lookout for another brain buster with a cool prize next month!

5 Terrific Adobe Typekit Slab Serif Fonts Ilene Strizver | June 16, 2016

Slab serifs are one of the hottest typestyles in use today. These sturdy, full-bodied designs, with their thick, squared off, slab-like serifs, can be seen anywhere from magazines, newspapers, and book covers to posters, logos, packaging and branding, websites, and much more. They are most commonly used for headlines and display usage, but can occasionally be found used for text. The good news is that more and more of these workhorse type designs are available from Typekit via Adobe’s Creative Cloud service. Typekit is a subscription font service that brings thousands of fonts from foundry partners into one library for quick browsing, easy use on the web or in applications, and endless typographic inspiration. Most Creative Cloud subscriptions include a Typekit Portfolio plan with access to their full library of fonts, while a few

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Creative Cloud options include a Typekit Free plan, with a subset of the fonts available. We explored the Typekit Library and have selected five slabs worthy of consideration. They range from classic designs to contemporary interpretations, and were selected for their strength of concept and execution as well as their practicality and usefulness.

excellent texture, and slightly dark color allow it to behave flawlessly in a continuous text setting, even in the most demanding editorial applications. The energetic character inherent to slab serif fonts makes Adelle an excellent choice for subheadings and headlines. This superfamily also includes Adelle Condensed, making this an extremely practical typeface worth considering for any project calling for a wide range of versions.

Adelle Adobe Typekit Slab Serif Fonts: Adelle

Adelle is an award-winning slab serif typeface family designed by Veronika Burian and JosĂŠ Scaglione of TypeTogether. Although originally conceived specifically for intensive editorial use in newspapers and magazines, its personality and flexibility make it a real multiple-purpose typeface. The unobtrusive appearance,

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Clarendon Text

be readable when used between 8 and 12 pt. The Bold weights are also clear and attractive at display sizes. Clarendon Text is the first version of this classic typeface to include small caps, fractions, and five different styles of figures. Factoria

Clarendon Text, designed by CanadaType, is a contemporary remake of this truly classic slab serif typeface. It is a widely usable text type suited equally well to advertising, books, publications, and corporate literature, where large amounts of reading matter call for distinction and style without sacrificing readability. Clarendon Text has been reworked to make it more contemporary and easily read. The shapes of certain letters including a, g, q, and t were revised for better readability when used for body copy. The original a, g, q, and t are available as alternates for display uses, or those designers who like to make use of the traditional Clarendon. Clarendon Text was designed to

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Born out of its sister sans serif typeface, Industry, Factoria is a striking geometric square slab designed by Mattox Shuler of Fort Foundry. It was designed with a tall x-height for better legibility at mid-to-smaller sizes, but also presents a strong, powerful

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appearance at large sizes. This hard-working industrial slab can jump from the side of a building into a sports magazine with ease. The lighter weights exhibit a clean, no-nonsense vibe, while the thicker weights exude strength and character. Factoria includes eight weights ranging from Thin to Ultra with corresponding italics.

weights are perfect for display and titling. Lexia even includes an Advertising weight that can be used to make impact on billboards and other large-scale applications. Sutro Deluxe

Lexia

Lexia is a slab serif font designed by Ron Carpenter for Dalton Maag, and contains a wide range of weights and styles. It has traditional proportions to give it the best functionality possible. This typeface family is perfect for conveying punchy messages on a massive scale, or simply communicating clearly at text sizes. For designers working with tough composition issues, one of Lexia’s great benefits is its extended range of weights and styles. The midweights provide excellent legibility for text, while the extreme

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Sutro Deluxe is a square-serif Egyptian chromatic family designed by Jim Parkinson. Sutro Deluxe consists of the Primary, or main font, in addition to the four secondary fonts—Fill, Inline Fill, Inline, and Shaded Inline—which exist solely to support the Primary font. This chromatic font family (chromatic being another term for multi-layered) can be stacked or layered in different combinations and colors to achieve various effects. This bold slab serif with a double drop shadow was originally conceived as a simple black

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and white display alphabet. But, according to Parkinson, “it seemed unfinished, begging for something more. So I decided to add several layers of fill and detail to try and make it more interesting.” The result is this eye-catching, five-layer chromatic font family. The original unadorned, 10 weight Sutro adds to the extreme versatility of this contemporary superfamily. While the slab serifs designs described above are a great place to start a font exploration when you’re considering this kind of design, they aren’t the only ones that Typekit has to offer. Check out their complete collection of slabs and find your own favorites!

Adding Colors to Your InDesign Documents With Adobe Capture Erica Gamet | June 20, 2016

There are so many options for getting colors into an InDesign document, whether they’re imported or created right within InDesign. With the introduction—and recent coming of age—of the Creative Cloud, those colors can come from a wide range of sources. Having Creative Cloud as a central repository makes quick work of finding color inspiration in one place and having it immediately available in InDesign. In this post, I’ll cover using Adobe Capture to grab colors from anywhere and bring them into your InDesign documents.

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Using the Adobe Capture Mobile App Recently, Adobe combined its separate capturing apps into one app, logically named Capture. One of those apps-turned-feature is called Colors. Using the Colors feature, you can extract colors from within an image. To get started, open the Capture app, tap on the Colors menu at the top, and then click the plus icon near the bottom. The app immediately launches into camera mode, but you can change the capture mode by tapping the picture in the lower right corner (it will be a thumbnail of the last photo you took). You then have the option to capture from the device’s camera roll, a Creative Cloud asset, Adobe Market item, or even a preview image from Adobe Stock. Once you’ve loaded an image to work with, Capture samples five colors from that image to create a color theme. But you’re not stuck with whatever colors the app first chooses. You can move the selector points around the image, choosing colors that you want in the color theme.

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Tip: Remember, you’re selecting only one pixel from the image as your target color, so move the points slowly and deliberately. You might be surprised what colors are hiding in your image!

In InDesign, the color theme will be immediately available to you in the CC Libraries panel and in the Adobe Color Themes panel under My Themes.

Once you’re satisfied with the theme’s palette, tap the shutter button. The next screen lets you name the theme, assign it to a Creative Cloud Library, and choose whether to make the theme public or private. Making it public puts it on Adobe’s Color site for other users to access. You’ll also get a URL that you can copy to share the theme with others.

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From either place, you can apply colors to items in your document, or add colors to your Swatches panel.

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If you choose to make your color theme private, only you and your collaborators can access it. You can also view—and reuse— the image used to create the theme’s palette.

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The InDex: InDex Your Key to Our Content Can’t find that article you saw in an earlier issue? Wondering whether we covered that obscure plug-in? Never fear, the InDex is here. The first issue of InDesign Magazine was published in July 2004. Since then, we’ve cranked out thousands of pages on hundreds of related topics. While it’s possible to use Acrobat to simultaneously search all past issues of the magazine for one word or phrase, many readers have clamored for a formal index at the back of each issue. However, with 87 issues to account for, that’s not feasible. Instead, the InDex will live as a PDF you can download for free. If you come across a topic you want to know more about, but it’s in an issue you don’t have, you’re not out of luck. We sell back issues at indesignsecrets.com.

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If the topic you’re looking for isn’t in the InDex, you have one more way to search: that PDF trick we mentioned. To make it work, all of your magazine issue PDFs must be in one folder. Open any issue in Acrobat, and then press Shift+Command+F (Shift+Ctrl+F on Windows). In the Search window that appears, be sure that you click the radio button that says “All PDF Documents in,” and in the dropdown menu below that, choose the folder in which you placed your magazine issues. You’re on your way to finding anything in any PDF!

Click here to download the InDex.

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While this PDF is just for you, you can tell your friends about this great discount: $10 off a 1-year membership Use coupon code: friend at indesignsecrets.com/issues

Coming Soon! Coming Soon!

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