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» Visual Storytelling » Combining Type & Images M A G A Z I N E 86

» GREP of the Month: Lookahead

June 2016

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Photography Design


InSide: Table of Contents

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Manual Exposure Conrad Chavez casts an eye on a diverse range of self-published photography books.

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Every Picture Tells a Story Roberto Blake reveals how thoughtful design and photography can combine to create a strong message.

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31

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Mixing Type and Graphics Scott Citron shares his time-tested techniques for choosing the perfect font for any job. InFocus Erica Gamet offers up a set of cool goodies just as summer is heating up. GREP of the Month: Lookahead Peter Kahrel shows how to target a text string by what follows it.

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Best of the Blog A collection of the most important and informative articles from InDesignSecrets 39

The Worst Designed Feature in InDesign

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Free InDesign Script to Export JPGs at a Precise Size

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Don’t Apply Character Styles to an Entire Paragraph

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The Mystery of the Empty Layers Panel

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Adobe Comp Tips: Adding Adobe Stock Images

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Printing Documents with Multiple Page Sizes

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A Script That Adds a Human Touch to InDesign Type

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InDex to All Past Issues

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MAGAZINE

From the Editor in Chief PUBLISHERS David Blatner, Anne-Marie Concepción EDITORIAL Editor in Chief Mike Rankin, mike@indesignmag.com Managing Editor Wendy Katz, wendy@indesignmag.com Contributing Writers Conrad Chavez, Roberto Blake, Scott Citron, Erica Gamet, Peter Kahrel, Keith Gilbert, Chad Chelius, Monica Murphy DESIGN Rufus Deuchler rufus.deuchler.net BUSINESS Contact Information http://indesignsecrets.com/contact Subscription Information indesignsecrets.com/issues Published by InDesignSecrets.com, a division of The Creative Publishing Network, Inc. Copyright 2016 InDesignSecrets.com. All rights reserved. Reproduction and redistribution prohibited without approval. For more information, contact permissions@indesignmag.com. InDesign Magazine is not endorsed or sponsored by Adobe Systems Incorporated, publisher of InDesign. InDesign is a registered trademark of Adobe Systems Incorporated. All other products and services are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners and are hereby acknowledged. Photos on pages 1, 2, 5–15, 17, 30, 31, 38, and 53, courtesy of Fotolia.com

Photography and graphic design have a lot in common. They both offer us ways to bring colors, textures, shapes, and lines together into creative compositions that attract, influence, inform, and delight. Key concepts like contrast, alignment, repetition, and proximity are relevant in both fields. Yet photography and graphic design are distinct domains, with different tools and techniques. Technical expertise in one area does not equate to the other. And rare is the creative pro equally happy using ligatures and light meters. So to help you use photography more effectively in your designs, we’re very excited to bring you three articles on this important theme. First, Conrad Chavez showcases the inspiring designs of four self-published books by photographers. The subject matter couldn’t be more diverse, spanning enigmatic English marshes, parched southern Italian

landscapes, Cold War Soviet apartments, and unfathomable intergalactic realms. Roberto Blake offers a guide to story­ telling with photographic images. His five techniques will help you understand what an image is saying, and how to choose and use photographs to complement any message. Scott Citron has spent decades blending words and photos to create award-winning designs. So his thoughts and examples of how to mix type and images effectively are essential reading. To round out the issue, Erica Gamet is back with another InFocus full of cool goodies for InDesign users. Peter Kahrel’s GREP of the Month shows you how the magical Lookahead expression can match a string of text by what follows it. And the Best of the Blog highlights top new content from InDesignSecrets. Enjoy!

ISSN 2379-1403

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Bert Monroy

Deke McClelland

2016 Von Glitschka

The Essential Event for Photoshop and Illustrator Users

Sharon Steuer

July 10–13 Minneapolis creativepro.com/conference Jesús Ramirez

Keith Gilbert

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Up your game with these famous Photoshop and Illustrator experts! Illustrator Wow! Techniques Color and Image Correx Channels and Masking Logo and Icon Design UI/UX Print and Interactive Design Compositing From Fundamentals to Power User Tricks

June 2016

Mark Heaps

Chris Converse

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Manual Exposure Eye-Opening Self-Published Photography Books

By Conrad Chavez INDESIGN MAGAZINE  86

June 2016

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Self-Published Photography Books

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hen you hear the word “book,” what often comes to mind is a bound volume of text. But for the vast majority of us, we experience our world visually—as pictures, not words. This may be why we are so innately receptive to photography books, where images tell the story. Open a photography book and your emotional response to what you see will be immediate, long before you can put your reaction into words. The digital press has made book publishing more accessible and affordable than ever, even for full-color books. It has certainly been a blessing that anyone can now create a photo book through their web browser using online templates, but the result is often a sameness and predictable uniformity in look and feel, from design to paper stock. Instead, many photographers are inspired to push the design of photography books in different

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directions, creating distinctive volumes that you couldn’t create by pushing buttons on a website. The books that these photographers and designers create are often collectible works of art in themselves. We wanted to find out what role Adobe InDesign has played in the design of selfpublished photography books. When we started looking around, nearly all of the books we encountered were produced using InDesign. Taking a closer look, we found that the design of each book expresses the photographer’s intentions in fascinating and highly personal ways. Each photographer featured in this article not only thought about imagery, layout, and typography, but also asked the question: Is the conventional form of the book the best way to tell the story? Ultimately they found ways to enhance their narratives through thoughtful and sometimes unorthodox design choices, and by close collaboration with book designers and writers.

Weaving a World The Marshes By Josh Lustig & Samuel Wright Designed by Daisy Lumley Tartaruga Press, 2013 104 pages, 165 × 240mm Just outside London is a collection of protected commons known as the Hackney Marshes. Some parts are nature preserves, but none are untouched wilderness, because the sprawling vegetation partially hides the decaying brickand-iron remains of Industrial Revolution infrastructure such as old factories, mills, and aqueducts, as well as dumps of debris from London

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Self-Published Photography Books buildings bombed during World War II. The marshes are now protected natural areas and a place for recreation, including trails and many sports fields. Development pressures constantly threaten these marshes; for example, significant areas were lost to projects related to the 2012 London Olympics. Photographer Josh Lustig shot a series of moody photographs documenting the Hackney Marshes, conveying misty isolation and wild vegetation overtaking abandoned structures. Working with Lustig, award-winning writer Samuel Wright developed fictional stories and characters based on the history of the area as well as the atmosphere of mystery that Lustig’s photographs depict (Figure 1). Lustig, Wright, and book designer Daisy Lumley worked together to make the design of The Marshes an added dimension of the stories Lustig and Wright were telling with photographs and text. Bound among the 52 pages printed on 120gsm (grams per square meter) weight paper stock are 52 pages of

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Figure 1: Samuel Wright wrote the stories for The Marshes.

smaller signatures printed on lightweight 60gsm stock (Figure 2). In addition to the mixed paper types, a loose-leaf sheet of Victorian-style letterpress text is bound into the book (Figure 3). This interweaving of page sizes, printing processes, and typography is an intentional decision to echo and reinforce the weaving of the documentary images with the fictional text. Lumley recalls, “Josh initially came to me with the general idea for the book: the… central visual/written narrative should be interwoven with smaller stories, to reflect the various personas/characters that spend

Figure 2: On one spread in The Marshes, photography and text tell a story that uses a different paper stock and smaller page size.

Figure 3: In addition to photo spreads, The Marshes features a loose sheet of letterpress-printed type.

time on the Hackney Marshes. Josh and Samuel had already established this concept as part of their collaboration.”

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Self-Published Photography Books Composing the text, photographs, and signature sizes involved a period of iteration that explored “ways of telling the stories, and ‘weaving’ the stories together, before deciding on the chosen format. There were lots of sketches and discussions to establish the best option,” Lumley said, including “mapping out the entire narrative” with Lustig. The members of the team were not always in the same city, so they used Skype to collaborate online. Many ideas and sketches for sequencing of text and images were refined and simplified over time during these online meetings. They met in person to lock down the final sequence of pages. Lumley has used InDesign since her training in book design. She set up the different components of the book as multiple InDesign files. During the production of The Marshes, Lumley particularly appreciated specific InDesign features such as “printing thumbnails, and also as a booklet, to create small working copies along the way.” Lumley is comfortable

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working with InDesign, so production went relatively smoothly. The Marshes was the first title published by Tartaruga Press, as a limited edition of 300 numbered copies, and it has garnered numerous positive reviews. Tartaruga Press is a small press run by its founders, Josh Lustig and Max Bondi. Daisy Lumley is a visual designer who works across digital, service, and brand design, working between London and Berlin.

Figure 4: The cover of Julia Borissova’s DOM (Document Object Model) represents a Soviet Khruschyovka apartment building.

Open Houses DOM (Document Object Model) By Julia Borissova Self-published, 2014 48 pages, 15 × 20cm

In her book DOM (Document Object Model), Julia Borissova embarks on an exploration of the concept of “home.” According to Borissova, DOM means “a house, home, a building or a household in the Russian language.” But the title of her book also incorporates the English meaning of DOM as an acronym for Document Object Model, a structure for data in formats such as HTML or XML. That interpretation of the word DOM is expressed in the book, which is part document, part object, and features a model of a home in its photographs. The cover photography (Figure 4) depicts a Khrushchyovka modernist apartment block—the kind that was replicated

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Self-Published Photography Books all over the Soviet Union during the Khrushchev era in the middle of the twentieth century to address a shortage of housing. Khrushchyovka designers pioneered production techniques such as prefabrication so that the apartments could be built quickly in large numbers and at low cost, which is one reason the architecture is plain and uninspiring. And yet for the many who grew up in those buildings, Khrushchyovka represent a real memory of home. As soon the book opens, you notice that the cover and the pages you turn aren’t typical single-sheet pages, but gatefold spreads. On the outside of these spreads you see full-bleed images of a three-dimensional paper model that Borissova constructed from the apartmentblock image on the cover. She created photographs of the model appearing in different environments such as snow, desert, and water, suggesting how the idea of home

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can be transplanted to different places and change over time (Figure 5). Opening each gatefold unveils a layout of manipulated images depicting memories, interior scenes, and artifacts of home (Figure 6). The expanded gatefolds also reveal narrow vertical inset pages of text that describe personal reflections of home that Borissova collected from different people (Figure 7). In addition to all of that, the book also contains a separate

Figure 6: Within the gatefold spreads of DOM, photo collages depict domestic interiors that represent memories of home.

Figure 5: On the outside of the gatefold spreads of DOM are full-bleed photographs of Borissova’s paper apartment model, placed in various outdoor environments.

Figure 7: Inside the expanded gatefolds and alongside Borissova’s photographs are short passages of text in which various people reflect on their own sense of home.

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Self-Published Photography Books 20-page booklet. Borissova created these components in three InDesign documents. When she encountered a design or production obstacle in InDesign, “It was only because I simply didn’t know all the details about the program, but after reading some tutorials I could solve all the problems.” The graphic and text elements of the book suggest a concept of home that is open to shifts and reinterpretation. Some of the interior “memory” images are dreamlike collages that mix family photographs with house interiors that Borissova built out of paper to invoke a theatrical quality, as if they were stage sets. The smaller inset pages form their own kind of collage, in the way they combine different views and memories of home. Several of those views express the notion that “home” can be independent of place, deriving more from family history and tradition than a physical structure. Trees appear on the cover and in the landscape collages throughout the book and in some of the interior scenes of homes.

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These trees evoke a sense of growth and change, the metaphor of a family tree, and the fact that the structure of a Document Object Model is in the form of a tree. Borissova conceived of DOM as a photography project that was later expressed as a book. She first designed the photographs and created the objects that would appear in the exterior and interior views of home. “I imagined this book as some kind of exhibition, as an object which can be transformed quickly and show the images in different ways.” When it was time to print and bind the book, Borissova said the unconventional design did hit a few snags. She had to find a digital book printer that could handle the large gatefold sizes. The mix of wide gatefolds and narrow vertical insets

also posed a problem. As Borissova explains, “because the pages have different sizes no one wanted to sew my book in the printing house,” so she decided to bind the books herself, by hand. Julia Borissova is an award-winning photographer in St. Petersburg, Russia who has frequently exhibited her photography throughout Europe in both group and solo shows, and has self-published several books of her work. Borissova self-published DOM as a limited edition of 100 signed and numbered copies. DOM won first place in The Baltic Photo Biennale in the Fine Art category and has been represented in several solo and group shows and international exhibitions. Borissova sees DOM as a work that can continue to be developed.

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Self-Published Photography Books Visions Unbound Calabria Upon Return By Alessandra Kila Designed by Laura Braun Paper Tiger Books, 2015 38 pages, 12.5 × 17cm To many, the first home they think of is the location where they grew up. In the case of Alessandra Kila, home is Calabria at the southern tip of Italy, the “toe” of the Italian boot, and this provides the basis for her book Calabria Upon Return (Figure 8). The rich history of Calabria extends at least 3500 years, before the Greek and Roman empires. Today the region exists outside the more prosperous or tourist-oriented centers of Italy, and in the late 20th century Calabria became a center of organized crime. Calabria’s struggling economy compels many of its people to leave for other parts of Italy or Europe.

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Figure 8: Calabria Upon Return, by Alessandra Kila, presents photographs of her birthplace: Calabria in the south of Italy.

Kila herself emigrated to London, England. During visits back to Calabria over a period of several years, Kila photographed the land and the people of her birthplace. Kila’s portraits of the people of Calabria range from intimate head shots to small figures composed within the parched landscape of southern Italy (Figures 9 and 10). The earth-toned hue of the book’s cover resonates with the dusty rocks and concrete found in many of the photographs. In some images, that warm

Figure 9: Kila’s book contains several portraits of people in Calabria.

Figure 10: A human figure is almost lost in the landscape of Calabria.

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Self-Published Photography Books color is complemented by the cool blue of the bright Calabrian sky or the waters of the Mediterranean. Kila worked closely with book designer Laura Braun, who turned to InDesign to produce Calabria Upon Return. Inside the book, a poem is printed on a long concertina (accordion fold) insert, a couple of lines per page. Opening the concertina insert reveals folded spreads of images. What is remarkable is that none of the pages of the book are bound. The image spreads are loosely nested within the concertina pages of text, and neither component is attached to the cover (Figure 11). The lack of binding is quite intentional. Braun said that the text and images were created so that “there isn’t one particular image that necessarily goes with one particular bit of text,” so that the pairing of text to image “can be changed by the viewer.” While each reader inevitably reacts to any book in their own way, Kila and Braun take the extra step of letting the reader physically reinterpret

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Kila’s observations by rearranging the loose pages of images within the concertina folds, to combine the images with different text. Or to pull out a photograph completely, and view it apart from the rest of the book.

sorts of printing templates on magnesium and various polymers.” She specifies the material and thickness, and the company sends her the resulting plate. The cover and the book’s unbound pages are kept together by an elastic band, woven through eyelets that hold the band and serve as a graphic element on the cover (Figure 12).

Figure 11: The loose spreads of Calabria Upon Return are evident when seen from the bottom edge of the book.

The cover of Calabria Upon Return is letterpress printed. Braun originally intended to print it using wooden type, but she couldn’t find a complete alphabet of the type she wanted to use. Instead, Braun printed it using a magnesium plate. “The magnesium plate is made from a PDF sent to a specialist company that produces all

Figure 12: On the back cover of Calabria Upon Return, eyelets for the elastic band create an implied line with the logo for Paper Tiger Books.

Laura Braun is a commercial and documentary photographer based in London. Calabria Upon Return was published

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Self-Published Photography Books by Paper Tiger Books, which Braun founded in order to publish photography books by herself, her colleagues, and her friends. The book was offset printed as a limited edition of 300 numbered copies. Braun has also selfpublished other books such as Métier, which documents small businesses in London and the people who run them.

Out of This World Intergalático By Guilherme Gerais Illustrations by Arthur Duarte Text by Rodrigo Grota Avalanche, 2014 182 pages, 20 × 30cm Guilherme Gerais’ Intergalático is an enigma from the moment you first see it. The cover doesn’t even show the title; all you see is what looks like a map of outer space with a moon in the middle (Figure 13). When you open the book, you’re immersed in

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Figure 14: Mysterious landscapes and trails are part of the journey through Intergalático.

Figure 13: The cover of Guilherme Gerais’ Intergalático suggests a cross between a star chart and a game board.

a sequence of black-and-white images without text, as if you’ve awakened to find yourself moving through an unknown landscape that could be on another planet (Figure 14). It doesn’t seem like you’re driving this journey, more like you’re a

passenger on a wild ride through time and space. The title page of the book finally appears several pages into this opening sequence. What Gerais calls a “visual literary essay” continues with recurring themes such as footsteps, pathways and trails, decaying landmarks, signs, and bursts of light. Gerais photographed the images in several countries in Europe as well as in his home country of Brazil. While the cover is color, the pages inside the book are printed in black and white.

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Self-Published Photography Books The photographic sequences are punctuated by graphics created by Arthur Duarte. Complementing the photographs, Duarte’s cryptic drawings include diagrams, maps, and symbols (Figure 15). A repeating theme of circular charts and drawings suggests larger cosmic machinery at work. Encountering one of Duarte’s illustrations after a series of photographs feels a little like reaching a game’s next level. The graphic on the book cover (designed by Duarte) also appears inside the book with pieces set on it like a board game, in a photograph that reinforces the way that many of the book’s images suggest a game or puzzle. Gerais describes his productive collaboration with Duarte: “I showed some references, including music, film, photographs, some graphic novels,

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Figure 15: Duarte’s enigmatic illustrations and diagrams add context and depth to Gerais’ photo story.

Figure 16: Intergalático ends its photographic journey with an inset of smaller pages.

everything I thought that could help him understand the whole concept of the book. After this, I gave him a kind of a list of what I needed for the book…He [quickly got] the ‘spirit’ of the book.” Gerais called Duarte’s contributions “marvelous…He [started his designs] on paper, with pencil, painting, and later he mixed it in computer software such as Illustrator and Photoshop.” Gerais said that Intergalático was developed over a period of “around 4 years. So, throughout this time I had an InDesign file open in my computer”

where he would continuously test ideas and refine the sequence of the book. To prepare the photographs, Gerais says “I used Adobe Lightroom to organize all these files, to import them, and to edit the contrast, levels, curves, and so on.” But the book also included non-photographic file formats which Lightroom does not import, so to manage the entire project Gerais “used Adobe Bridge to organize and manage all these folders, to visualize them in a faster way.”

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Self-Published Photography Books The final book was produced in several InDesign files, for the book and its cover and for additional elements. There is a signature of smaller inset pages, and also a loose postcard (Figure 16). On the challenges of production, Gerais describes working to make the images appear consistent with each other and finding out the best settings and profiles for soft-proofing. “In the book there are analog photographs and digital photographs, with different resolutions, ranging from an iPhone 4s to the Nikon D80… I had a lot of problems balancing these different textures and the right contrast between them. [Visualizing] the ‘final look’ as it would be in the book was quite hard.” Guilherme Gerais is a director of photography for films, based in Londrina, Brazil. He intends to continue developing the ideas behind Intergalático. “I see myself in the beginning of a personal journey, where there are many things to discover, to experiment, and to see. Personally, I see the photobook as the perfect medium to work with all

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these feelings… I like the idea of being an explorer of the human mind, of our nature, our instincts, our limitations. “ Gerais self-published Intergalático through his own Avalanche imprint, as a first edition of 500 copies. The book and some of the photographs in it have been featured in many international exhibitions, and the book has been honored on several lists of the best photo books of 2014.

Staying in Touch with Print These book designers still see tremendous potential in the experience of print. They investigate that potential through design decisions such as using multiple page sizes and paper stocks in the same book, along with loose inserts, innovative binding, or no binding at all. By extending our interaction with the book beyond the purely visual, they create a tactile dimension that isn’t possible to reproduce on ebooks, which are often viewed on a small screen of a single unchanging size and surface.

As Julia Borissova declares, “DOM is a printed book only. For me it’s important most of all to create a book as an object, because I want my work to have a volume and I can [express] my feelings through tactile sensations.” Through their unconventional designs for print, these self-published photography books enhance the dialogue between the photographer and the reader, encouraging exploration and reinterpretation. In a publishing world that is increasingly digital, these book designers create open and interactive narratives expressed in a familiar analog medium.

n Conrad Chavez has provided education and training for digital media and publishing for over 20 years. His work includes the last three editions of the book Real World Adobe Photoshop for Photographers and the video Color Management for Photographers and Designers. He also contributes articles to publications including InDesign Magazine, CreativePro.com, and Peachpit.com, and is a photographer. To learn more about Conrad, please visit conradchavez.com.

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By Roberto Blake

Every Picture Tells a Story

Finding Picture Perfect Images for Design Projects

Visual storytelling is a craft both photographers and designers share. Often these two creative careers overlap, particularly in the world of advertising and marketing, since they are the most practical means of communicating a message in a way that is creative, clear, and has the appropriate context. As someone who has loved both design and photography for more than half my lifetime, I’m fascinated by the parallels between the two, and by how often my knowledge of one can elevate my execution of the other.

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For graphic designers, choosing the right photography—and being able to use and manipulate it appropriately—can pose quite a challenge, especially if you have little or no experience behind the lens. But don’t worry! You can use familiar visual communication principles to your advantage; you just need to understand the combined context of design and photography instead of thinking of them as one or the other. When making photo selections for my graphic design work, I tend to concentrate on five key elements: perspective, composition, sharpness, focal point, and color. In this article, we’ll talk about each of these aspects.

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A Little Perspective Can Change Everything Photography takes advantage of perspective in a unique way. When shooting human subjects, the angle of the photographer in relation to the subject can make all the difference in how the subject is perceived, and therefore in the tone and message the photograph projects. For athletic shots, there is sometimes what is called a “hero shot.” Typically, the camera is angled up at the subject, who fills the frame and thus appears “larger than life” (Figure 1). This technique is also sometimes used for corporate photography to create an imposing figure or communicate a look of authority. Perspective is a subtle but important factor when making distinctions or trying to get the message across. When choosing photos to use in your design, consider what the perspective says to the audience about the subject. If you want to humanize a subject, or it is necessary for the sake of

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the story to diminish them in some way, opt for a higher angle shot that has more of the background visible in relation to the subject. The more important the subject is, the more they will—or at least should—fill the frame with their presence.

Composition and Cropping Make a Real Difference

Figure 1: In this image, the subject is given an air of authority by his size (nearly filling the frame) and the angle, which forces us to look (slightly) up at him. His pose, clothing, and expression contribute as well.

If design and photography have anything in common, it is the importance of good composition. Composition (sometimes referred to in photography as “framing”) is one of the key aspects of what makes a good photo and tells a good story. In design, it is important to make use of the appropriate amount of white space. Photography has its version of white space, but it’s more dictated by intent than in design: photography shot for the intentions of printing and framing a photo will differ dramatically from photography shot with the intention of post-production for editorial or commercial work.

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For example, most professional photographers who shoot portraits prefer to shoot “cropped in,” framing the image exactly as they intend it to be produced and printed. While it could be cropped in post-production, most prefer to avoid this and “get it perfect in camera,” because cropping brings some minor distortion and image degradation (though not noticeable to the majority of people). However, many commercial photographers shoot “loose” (Figure 2), meaning they shoot wider than necessary, with the intention of cropping after the fact. This allows for more options and more room to work with when editing the images for commercial use, while also minimizing the number of shots they have to take. For example, one of the benefits of using a high-resolution professional camera is that you can sometimes crop a full body shot down to a usable head shot, if the client decides after the fact that’s what’s needed.

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Figure 2: Notice the extra space to the left of the model in this image. This can give you some extra flexibility when incorporating this photo into a layout (and save you from having to fake more image area with Photoshop).

Even if the image were included on a fullpage print, as long as it was shot well, on a high-resolution professional camera, the designer who’s editing it can still make the creative decision to fulfill the client’s wishes. If it was necessary to use a specific fullbody image and place text to the side of the subject, shooting loose would allow for this with minor editing, and avoid necessitating the use of tools like content-aware fill to manipulate the image too drastically.

For designers, having the most options available to satisfy the client is an essential part of working effectively. If you are working with a photographer, it is crucial that you communicate your ideas and needs as early in the process as possible. If you are shooting your own photography, you have to keep in mind how you intend to use the images and what your editing process involves, from start to finish. It doesn’t hurt to storyboard and sketch these ideas out, long before it’s time to set up a shoot. After you’ve clicked the shutter and moved on to the next shot, it’s a bit late to think about the bigger picture (pun not intended).

Sharpness and Clarity are Interpreted as Quality Most photographers try to achieve tacksharp images, because the sharpness of the primary subject and focal point (on human subjects, typically the eyes) is one of the ways that photographers judge the quality

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of the work (Figure 3). In design, we often interpret quality in similar ways: crisp readable text, proper kerning and leading, accurate color, and so on. Image quality can make or break a design. And even a well-designed project could be undermined if you skimp on quality photography. Oftentimes, the images you can find for free online were not shot by a professional photographer using high-quality equipment, resulting in a lack of true sharpness. You can fix this by retouching the photo (if you have the Photoshop skills), but in most cases, the overall quality of the photograph will be degraded. Your resulting designs could feel cheap because the photography you chose wasn’t of a high quality. This is a good reason to avoid using random images from the internet in your design work (not to mention copyright considerations). Using high-quality stock images makes things considerably easier when it comes time to edit those images. Having RAW files

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Figure 3: In this image, the tack-sharp details like the model’s eyes and hair contribute to the overall impression of professional quality.

from a photographer tends to work even better. RAW files give you more flexibility in your editing, since they are unprocessed files, captured directly by the camera sensor with all of the data intact. From a design perspective, it’s the equivalent of being able to work with a source file instead of flat files (imagine having a layered AI or PSD file to edit instead of a JPG or PNG).

Working with a photographer or shooting your own images ensures the highest quality results and the most flexibility when it comes to editing. However, when this is not a practical option, stock image sites typically have a variety of high-quality images to choose from. When choosing your images, strongly consider using high-end stock photography from sites like Fotolia, Adobe

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Stock, or GraphicStock, if you intend to convey quality. Another aspect of image quality that you have to consider is grain. Images shot with a lower ISO (ISO 100-800) tend to have less grain or noise, and present a higher overall quality. Images with a higher ISO (1600 or higher), typically have noise and grain that can distract from the image. Depending on the lighting, higher ISO images may also have poor color quality and contrast. You can determine the ISO of an image you are reviewing in the EXIF data of the image file.

Focusing the Message with Subject Isolation As I’ve said before, graphic design and photography have many parallels. Visual balance and having a key focal point are important to both for helping you tell a clear story. In photography, subject isolation (in the form of depth of field) works similarly to white space in design. When your subject in the foreground is clearly in focus while

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the rest of the background softens, this is what is known as “shallow” depth of field (Figure 4). Images with shallow depth of field are ideal for your compositions as a graphic designer for several reasons. If you choose to cut out or mask the subject to place it into other artwork or a solid color background, working with this type of image will be easier than one where everything is in focus. In fact, Photoshop CC specifically has “selective focus” masking to help with this task. Subject isolation also helps with creating more impact and focus. When the subject and background are equally focused, the inadvertent message may be that they are of equal importance. When you have a foreground subject with a background that is very busy, it can feel distracting, since the eye has nothing to focus on, or maybe too much. This is generally true in design as well, which is why designers employ the principles of white space, visual balance, and contrast.

Figure 4: With its background out of focus, this image keeps our eyes fixed on the subject.

Creating Impact with Color and Vibrancy Designers know that color and tonality play important roles in conveying information. By using color theory, social cues, and psychology, designers can use color as a shortcut to framing the way images are perceived by an audience. It is no different when you think of the way color and temperature are used in photography and cinematography. Each light source has its own color or color temperature, varying from red to blue on the spectrum, with red being warm and blue being cool. Examples of warm light sources are sunlight, candles, and tungsten

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bulbs. Examples of cool light sources would be fluorescent bulbs, clear blue skies, and standard camera flashes. These tend to be measured in degrees Kelvin, with warm colors being lower on the numbers scale (1000K) and cool colors being higher on the scale (10,000K). In storytelling, warm colors tend to be more inviting, energetic, and can present optimism and positivity. By contrast, cool and muted colors can imply seriousness or even harshness. Removing color altogether and using flat or even high-contrast black and white images can completely change the tone of the image and what it conveys to an audience, even if you make no other changes to the photograph (Figure 5). Having a sense of what emotional impact you want to create can help you make better editing choices and photo selections and precisely target the impact of your designs. When you are trying to create a sense of hope and high energy, increasing saturation and brightness can help you accomplish

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Figure 5: (Left) The mix of warm and cool colors give our eyes plenty to savor in this tabletop image. (Right) The lack of color in this portrait adds even more emotional depth to the man’s thoughtful expression.

these things (and tends to appeal to a younger audience as well). If you are trying to present an editorial piece that captures a tragedy or disaster, muted colors and lower saturation values are going to help convey that starkness to the audience.

quality or how interesting they are. Instead, each image should clearly help tell the story, drive the call to action, or accomplish the overall goal of the design. By its nature, design is intentional, so having clear intentions behind your choice of images matters.

Developing an Eye for Photography

n

When choosing the photography for your design projects, be sure that above all the images are helping you fulfill your client’s wishes. Ideally, you shouldn’t be justifying your image selections on their aesthetic

Roberto Blake is a graphic designer helping entrepreneurs and small businesses improve their branding and presentations. He also teaches graphic design and Adobe tutorials through his YouTube channel and community. See robertoblake.com for more details. Photography by Roberto Blake.

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By Scott Citron

Mixing Type and Graphics

Choosing the right font for the job every time

This is an example of Helvetica Condensed. Just like a Swiss watch, Helvetica is always on time. Figure 1: Helvetica Neue LT Std Condensed and Condensed Bold. I’ve tracked this type at –15 points and reduced the leading between lines to help pull it all together.

Figure 2: Trajan is a font that’s been so popular that it’s now overused as the go-to movie title font.

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According to the ’50s Sinatra hit, love and marriage go together like a horse and carriage. The same is true for type. The right type adds harmony to a layout—like drinking a chilled Sancerre alongside a meal of Dover sole. Yet despite this relationship, designers often struggle finding fonts that play nice with the graphics on a page. And who can blame them? Go to any type resource and you’ll be blinded by the number and variety of available choices. It’s dizzying. To borrow another musical oldie from Lloyd Price: type’s got personality. Let’s take Helvetica as an example. True to its Swiss pedigree, Helvetica is cool, calm, and collected (Figure 1).

Trajan is another font that practically tells you how to use it—in grammatically correct Latin, no doubt. Unfortunately, some fonts become victims of their own success (Figure 2). Of course, choosing the right font is only half the battle. Once you’ve chosen the font, how do you properly set it? How big is too big? How loose or tight do you kern it? And what about color? Should body text always be black? Is Comic Sans always a no-no? What about Times Roman? Head starting to spin? If so, you’re not alone, my friend. Fortunately, finding the right font for a graphic is often easy, if you first consider how both “feel.” Often, common sense is all it takes to make a good match of text and

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imagery. Here, for example (Figure 3), is a recent cover of Real Simple magazine. In this case, the name says it all. Except for the flourish used for the word The, all the type is set using Interstate Black, a clean san serif from designer Tobias Frere-Jones. FrereJones fans might also recognize the similarity of Interstate to Gotham, another popular san serif from the same designer. It doesn’t take an artistic genius to find any number of

Figure 3: Cover of Real Simple magazine. Clean type combined with the apple image on a pure white background adds up to a layout that’s true to the magazine’s name: real and simple.

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Figure 4: Real and simple can also add up to boring, like in this fictitious example. Apples are symmetric, type placement is symmetric, type weights and styles are too similar. Yawn.

Figure 5: This mockup is bad for other reasons. Many other reasons. Never, ever, ever set a script font in All Caps. Never.

fonts that might work well with this magazine or the apple cover photo. Now let’s take a look at two variations of the fictitious magazine Really Really Simple to further explore this design conundrum. In Figure 4 I’ve used Minion Pro, from Adobe’s in-house type designer Robert Slimbach. Chosen by Adobe as InDesign’s default font, Minion Pro is available in more than 60 different weights and styles and is an excellent and reliable choice for body

text and serious typesetting. Its x-height (the height of lowercase letters like x, u, or v from the baseline to the median) is considered medium, which gives Minion Pro a sturdy feel, particularly at smaller sizes. This serif face isn’t a terrible choice, but it doesn’t feel right when matched with the roundness of the content (and the emphasis on simplicity suggested by the title). On the flip side, Figure 5 is a design nightmare that breaks many of the rules of good

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typesetting and good taste. Among its litany of sins are the use of script and italics for all caps, the use of too many fonts (five) on one page, and the use of “silly” type in a serious publication. Ouch.

Figure 6: Perhaps there’s unintented irony in using fonts named Rockwell and Antique for a book about classic country music.

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My next example is a jacket I designed for a book about country music (Figure 6). Here I relied on the content (country music) to steer me in the right direction. The title font (and author’s name) is in Rockwell Extra Bold. The book’s subtitle is set using Antique 3 from Wooden Type Fonts. To add a bit of texture to the title type, I converted the type to outlines and filled it with an image of aged wood. The guitar was created in Adobe Illustrator from a pixel-based stock image. Rockwell Extra Bold’s thick, chunky, slab serifs give the typeface a wood-type feeling that lends itself to a book about country music. Antique 3 is also a good match because of a slight uneven quality to the letterforms. And, perhaps even more importantly, note how well the curves in the type mirror the outline of the guitar image. Try squinting at the image to see its “essential” shapes—sometimes that can provide some insight into the typographic shapes you’re looking for.

By the way, when in doubt about a font’s “authenticity,” spend some time Googling images from the period you’re trying to re-create. After researching a handful of Civil War-era posters and broadsides, I was confident that Rockwell Extra Bold and Antique 3 would be a good fit. When historical references aren’t available, just use common sense. Comic Sans in the Old West? Hmm, maybe not!

Mixing Type Successfully If figuring out which typeface to pair with a particular image weren’t hard enough, designers must often decide how to make multiple fonts work together on a given page or screen. Here are a few rules which I’ve found helpful through the years: Limit the number of fonts to two: If you find yourself reaching for more than two (or three) different typefaces per page, chances are you’re headed for typographic trouble. Although there are always exceptions to this

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Mixing Type and Graphics

rule, generally and when in doubt, less is more (Figure 7). Keep it in the family: You can never go wrong by staying within the same typographic family. I’ve seen (and designed) beautiful layouts with only one font family. Fonts like Helvetica Neue Lt Std or Minion Pro have so many variations of style and weight that there’s no reason to look anywhere else (Figure 8).

L E A D E R S H I P JCIT (Junior Counselor in Training): entering 10th graders This three-week program is an exciting mix of being a camper and becoming a leader at camp. JCITs explore the true meaning of camp, learn more deeply about Jewish themes and their relevance to the contemporary teenager, and begin transmitting the Alonim experience to others in the camp community. JCITs organize the all-camp carnival, a highlight of every session. The JCIT experience is coordinated by four advisors who provide JCITs with opportunities to gain more self-awareness and independence, engage in more challenging and sophisticated Jewish learning, and give back to the community through meaningful projects.

CIT (Counselor in Training): entering 11th graders

rs ddle ✶ Pe

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Being a CIT at Camp Alonim is an unforgettable eight-week experience that participants carry with them for the rest of their lives. Throughout their summer, CITs act as apprentices in various activities and receive training both to inspire and to care for younger campers. CITs are role models embodying the spirit of Camp Alonim. They work together to design and lead some of our most popular all-camp programs, including Maccabiah. In the educational component of this consequential program, our CITs explore various topics of interest and learn what it means to be emerging leaders in the Jewish community. The CIT experience is well-known for forging lifelong friendships and being incredibly fun.

Party

SEPTEMBER 25-27, 2015 COME ONE, COME ALL!

Figure 7: In this poster I used only two fonts: Archive Antique Extended (headline, subheads) and Helvetica Neue Lt Std Bold Condensed (bullet points).

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Figure 8: In this page from a sales booklet I designed for a Los Angeles day camp, I used only one typeface, Bulmer MT. By varying its size, style, and tracking, I was able to create variety and design cohesion all at the same time.

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Combine a serif with a sans serif: When one font alone won’t do, try combining serif and sans serif fonts (Figure 9). For more tips about artfully mixing fonts, I highly recommend this excellent article by Douglas Bonneville.

Hopefully your typographic antennae are warmed up by now. But as we’ve seen, sometimes choosing which font not to use is easier than choosing which to use. Figure 10 (next page) is a good example. In this magazine feature opening spread,

LIGHt What is to give light must endure burning. —Viktor Frankl

What if you could watch music as it streamed out from a radio tower, like an enormous lightbulb shining in the sky? What if turning on your television made your eyes blink from the bright flash—not from the screen but from the tip of your remote control? What if your microwave heated your food with light, like one of those old toy ovens from your childhood? In fact, all these things— radio, cell phones, microwave ovens, and remote controls—are based on light. They use light that, even though we cannot see it, is nevertheless the same in every way as the light that we can see. We are constantly awash in an astonishing spectrum of light, everflowing and everlasting. Even in the darkest room we cannot escape light, if only because our own bodies radiate it through the very act of living. Of course, humans are mercifully sensitive to only a small portion—less than a thousandth of 1 percent—of the full spectrum of light. Our eyes see the edges of a rainbow fade gradually away to what seems like nothingness. But electronic instruments uncover for us a world far beyond the red (on one side) and violet (on the other). The universe truly is far stranger (and brighter!) than we can imagine. Such Stuff as Light is Made On Light—that is, the light that the physiology of our eyes is tuned to see—is part of a phenomenon called electromagnetic radiation (or EMR) that describes how electricity and magnetism radiate, or travel, from one place to 60

SPECTRUMS

LIGHT

Figure 9: In this spread from David Blatner’s book Spectrums, I chose Swift for the body text and various styles of Franklin Gothic for everything else.

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I struggled for more than a day trying to find the right typeface to kick off this timely article about Syrians seeking refuge on the island of Lesbos. Eventually I settled on a font called Hermes, a typeface I’d never seen or used previously. Originally designed by Heinz Hoffmann in 1908, the font reflects the German grotesks that, according to Font Bureau, “were workhorses of factory printing 100 years ago. Blunt corners suggest the wear and tear of rough presswork.”

A Layout in Need of a Typeface So how does a designer go about finding a font appropriate for the layout? The answer lies in a combination of a little bit of knowledge and a little bit of luck. For the Rewriting A Greek Tragedy article, I began my search at MyFonts.com. If you’ve never been to MyFonts.com, prepare yourself. This website is among the best places to see and try out a dizzying number of typefaces. Fortunately, the people behind

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MyFonts.com have done an amazing job of creating a user-friendly site that caters to all typographic whims. In my particular MyFonts.com search I used the word Greek

as a starting place. I also typed in the phrase Rewriting A Greek Tragedy, so I could see how it would look when MyFonts.com finished its search. Among the many suggestions

REWRITING A

GREEK TRAGEDY

the site offered were lots and lots of typefaces that contained Greek characters, as one would expect. What I didn’t expect was stumbling onto the Hermes font, whose name is based on the Greek god of commerce (Figure 11). Bingo! Whether Hermes was or wasn’t an authentic Greek typeface really didn’t matter. What did matter was a tough, muscle-like quality that seemed simpatico with the gravity of the article. Even better was the realization that I already owned Hermes, as it was among the thousands of fonts I’d collected over the years. Nearly all typographic websites now allow users to type in a word or phrase to see how it would look in a chosen font. If

The little girl in the pink woolen hat gives a halfhearted smile as though she knows she is one of the lucky ones. She has just arrived with some 40 men, women and children on a gray rubber dinghy meant for a dozen passengers. The next day, on a voyage along the same route, a boat would 18

capsize, cutting short the dreams and lives of 37 passengers. But on this overPhoto caption here. Evellore cullaceria voluptatqui dolenia intectatiam anis in plab idipsae ctatibere nem re offic tempore delita dem volest eicidioreium nem aut latibus nietur, conecta con parchil moleser ibuscium qui optatecae expedi di dolorit officia eptatem re invero quos veruptur rendiosa consectusdam sequibus aut

cast winter morning, a group of Syrian and other refugees from the Middle East can breathe a sigh of relief, having made the short but perilous six-mile journey from the western coast of Turkey to the Greek island of Lesbos.

STORY AND PHOTOS BY LEORA EREN FRUCHT hadassah magazine march/april 2016

Figure 10: The opening spread I designed for a feature article about Syrian refugees fleeing to the Greek island of Lesbos, with the headline set in the font Hermes.

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Figure 11: The right font for the job is revealed with a little help from the search function at MyFonts.com.

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you’re a Creative Cloud subscriber you’ll find this same feature integrated into Typekit, for example (Figure 12). If you’re salivating at the thought of owning thousands of fonts as I do (or just having access to tons of fonts through services like Typekit), realize that with such a huge selection comes a price. What good is it if,

Figure 12: You can enter your own custom text to see how it looks in a variety of Typekit fonts.

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despite such a large collection, you have no idea (beyond a few obvious choices) what you really have? Every time I need a typeface I can’t cull through 35,000 fonts. Or even 3,500 fonts. It’s not practical. What’s a designer to do? One approach is to use a powerful font management tool like FontAgent Pro. Among its features, there are four I particularly like (Figure 13), Font Player, Font Compare, Font Data, and Glyph View. Font Player allows me to add a bunch of fonts I’m considering for a project and view them consecutively. Here I’ve selected a font set called Display that contains 229 fonts. Clicking the Play button of the Font Player allows me to step through all 229 fonts one at a time, or play them quickly in rapid succession. When evaluating fonts, my first pass is usually based on pure gut: does the font “feel” right or not? I believe you should trust your instincts. Often I don’t know exactly why a font works, but simply that it does.

Achieving this level of font intuition takes time. But over time you begin to discover how each font has its own personality and voice. Again, use historical references when possible. If you’re creating a ‘60s poster, go online and study the Sixties. Most of the time the right font will reveal itself without too much work. If, after locating an image with the right font, you have no idea of the name of the typeface, there are resources on the web to

Figure 13: FontAgent Pro’s Font Player is a handy feature for quickly previewing a large number of fonts. Click the button on the right to add a font to a Font Player set that can be saved and reviewed later.

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help identify fonts. A couple of places to try are identifont.com and whatfontis.com. Another great (and diverting) website is namethatfont.net. Here you can see examples of common brands like Mercedes Benz or McDonald’s and learn the name of the font used in its logo.

’Cause You’ve Got to Have Pers-o-nality As you can see, choosing the right font for the job can often be approached in a systematic way. First and foremost is understanding the content and the context in which the type lives. Sometimes the answer is clear. A frilly font for a macabre murder mystery probably won’t work well (although there are exceptions!). But if we think of type as having personality, then the task of pairing the right font for the job becomes suddenly not only logical, but more manageable.

n Scott Citron is a New York City-based designer and consultant. He specializes in fine books, magazines, advertising, and corporate identity systems. You can learn more about his work at scottcitrondesign.com.

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By Erica Gamet

InFocus

“Summer’s lease hath all too short a date.” —William Shakespeare Ah, summer! It’s almost here! Time for enjoying the explosion of colorful flowers, sunshine, road trips, and picnics! Or, if you’re like me, a season of sitting inside with the A/C on to keep your allergies under control. The more casual pace of the world around you in summer gives you the freedom to learn something new, change up your workflow, or express your creativity in a new way. The beautiful blooms below are sure to help your creative garden flourish.

Adobe InDesign CC Classroom in a Book Adobe’s Classroom in a Book series has long been the go-to text for trainers and students alike. The recently released InDesign edition

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($50) penned by Kelly Kordes Anton and John Cruise covers version CC 2015 within its 400+ pages. What has consistently set the Classroom in a Book series apart is the project-based approach to learning each task. Each section’s lesson is prefaced by an overview, explaining what the reader will learn and the amount of time the lesson should take to complete. At the end of each section is a list of review questions and answers to help the reader retain what they’ve learned.

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The 15 lessons in the book cover the basics like text, styles, and layout through the more advanced topics of tables, exporting, and digital publishing, all presented via the trademark step-by-step approach. The workbook highlights the newest InDesign features like easier table creation, paragraph shading, and sharing assets and elements between Creative Cloud applications. This latest release features a new web edition of the book boasting interactive quizzes as well as videos. The assets used in the lessons are also available for download via the online portal. Along with the print version, readers get a copy of the ebook, which can easily be updated as the software gets updated. If you’re a teacher or trainer, you may also want to download the instructor notes.

Create Character Styles “With great power comes great responsibility.” Not only good advice for budding superheroes, but also for InDesign users. This is especially true when working with styles. Using text styles gives you power over the consistent look and styling in your files, but it’s often the place where people trip up the most. The style maven’s biggest adversary? Overrides. If you find yourself with overridden text throughout your paragraph-styled text, fear not! The appropriately named Create Character Styles script catches those local overrides and assigns a character style to them.

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Bookraft Solutions’ script ($34.95) gives you tight control over creating those styles, as opposed to other solutions that take an all-or-nothing approach. Searching by document, story, or selected paragraphs, the script’s interface lets you decide which attributes to control with styles. So selecting font style, size, and leading would create a style for text that differs only in those attributes. This precise control over attributes cuts down on the creation of too many character styles. The Create Character Styles script also lets you create blank styles, which are based on the attributes selected, without actually defining anything in the style itself. This feature would be helpful for imported text, for example, containing underlined items that need to be italicized in the final output.

Instant Logo Search Sometimes getting a logo from a client for their project can be like pulling teeth. But, unlike a dentist, I’m trying to make my clients look and feel good, so why do they make me sit and wait? In fact, sometimes I just track down the proper vector artwork on my own

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to get the job done. To that end, I recently discovered a helpful resource called Instant Logo Search. From big names like Starbucks and Amazon to social media leaders to sports teams and software, a simple search by brand name brings up results dynamically as you type. The search result gives you the option to download the SVG or the PNG version, or add the file to your “bucket,” which lets you batch download as SVGs or PNGs. What makes this collection different than, say, Brands of the World, is that the files are maintained through GitHub. This means that people can contribute and make adjustments as needed. Also, suggestions for improvements can be added to the development history. One such feature request was the ability to download both file formats simultaneously. As of this writing, there were just over 500 logos in the repository, and I’m hoping to see the offerings grow in the future.

RichPaste Copying text from Word documents to paste into InDesign often meets with less than satisfactory results. That’s mainly due to the

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fact that InDesign gives you two options when pasting: paste with formatting and paste without. The former often brings in a host of formatting that we would rather not have dirtying up our pristine InDesign files. However, the option to bring in no formatting isn’t ideal because we often need to retain simple formatting like bold and italic. Lucky for us, Indiscripts has gifted us—for free, no less—with a happy medium to the paste options: their RichPaste script. After placing the script in InDesign’s Scripts Panel folder, RichPaste then lives under the Edit menu for easy access. Choosing “Paste with Formatting | RichPaste” brings up the script’s interface, where you can choose which formatting to retain when pasting: italic, bold, underline, and the symbol font. You also have the option to preserve other fonts on import (though you have to manually and correctly type the font’s name). If you don’t wish to see this dialog box every time you paste, check the option to turn it off. While RichPaste has issues when copying from certain programs— for example, I’m often met with odd results when coming from TextEdit—not having to place an entire document to retain control

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over formatting has been a big boon to my workflow. If your workflow consists mainly of text from Word or Pages, you’re likely to find the RichPaste script deftly handles text from these two apps in particular.

Stand Out Stand Out by Denise Anderson brings the author’s method of the same name from her classroom to you in this 250+ page careerfocused volume. With 25 years in the design world, Anderson guides future designers in how to create amazing portfolios to highlight their unique talents and to land the job they want. The book version of the “Stand Out” method delivers hands-on exercises, worksheets, and even links to Pinterest boards that highlight the talent that’s out there. Whether you’re looking to land that dream design job or work freelance for that perfect client, the methods for getting noticed among the crowd are the same. The book is broken down into three distinct sections: Design a Personal Brand, Build a Killer Portfolio, and Find a Great Design Job.

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The first section covers identifying what your brand is—what distinguishes you from your peers—and how to launch a campaign around that. Section two discusses how to choose works that let your talent shine through and even covers technical aspects of producing your portfolio. Anderson covers production, such as file formats, creating an interactive PDF, and choice of materials, and highlights the importance of doing it well, as an important part of your design career. The final section reveals the techniques for meeting the right people, getting your story heard, and crafting a plan to land you that perfect job. All sections include examples from students from Ms. Anderson’s 15+ years in teaching the next generation of designers.

RegEx Crossword If you like working with GREP—and who doesn’t, am I right?— then you’re going to love this next item. Okay, maybe you’re not into GREP and maybe you don’t know what it is. It’s certainly not for everyone, but you should at least familiarize yourself with the concepts of what it can do, at least within the context of InDesign. At its simplest, GREP is used to find patterns of text, and then do something with that found text. InDesign lets you do that within find/change operations and also within paragraph styles. Let’s say you need to find any quoted text and italicize the text instead (while removing the quotes altogether). That’s a job for GREP.

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Well, if you’re intrigued and you’re still reading, then check out the online RegEx Crossword game (RegEx stands for “regular expressions” that are at the heart of GREP). Part crossword, part sudoku, the game features a grid with clues running across and down. Those clues form a pattern, and you need to figure out what letters fit that pattern and fit into the grid as well. For instance, the “down” clue might give you a subset that suggests that the letter should be A, B, or C, and the “across” clue says the first two letters are either AB or XY. Obviously the first square needs to be filled in with “A.” If you’re new to GREP, this might make your head spin a bit, but if you’re looking to up your GREP game in InDesign, the multiple levels and humorous hints RegEx Crossword offers give that left side of your brain a decent workout.

Adobe Spark Page Adobe Spark Page (formerly Adobe Slate) is one of the latest apps in Adobe’s ever-growing stable of creativity apps. Along with Spark Post and Spark Video, it completes the Adobe Spark mini-suite of apps designed to easily create and share stories and graphics. Use

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Spark Page to quickly compose a story with pictures and text, and then publish it to the web. Originally developed for the iPad, Spark Page (free) is now also a webbased creation tool that you access using your Adobe ID. From the Spark projects control center, select the big yellow plus icon, and then select the new page icon. You’ll see a blank title page where you can enter a title and a subtitle for your presentation. From there, you can start adding text or photos by clicking the plus (+) icon. Photos can be added from a variety of sources, including your Creative Cloud libraries. You can also bring images into Adobe Spark Page from Lightroom, Dropbox, your computer, or via a web search for Creative Commons-licensed images. Before getting too far into your story creation, be sure to head up to the top menu bar and choose “Themes” to pick one of the many predesigned themes. If you’re used to controlling every aspect of text (including line breaks), you might feel a little constrained using the prepackaged themes. But the benefit is that the themes have been created to look good across a variety of devices with nary a thought or bit of coding on our part. When entering text, choose

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from H1, H2, pull-quote, numbered, or bulleted list styles. You can further format the text by choosing alignment and font style. When adding items, choose from images, text, links, photo grid, or “glideshow.” That last item creates sort of a cascading and zooming kinetic collage that defies simple description (you just have to see it for yourself ). When you’ve perfected your masterpiece, just name it, make it public (or not), and publish it to Adobe’s host. Spark Page stories are being used by bloggers, entertainers, and companies of all sizes to visually create and share stories, without any need for coding.

Export to Split PDFs The Export to Split PDFs script from Colin Flashman does one simple job quite well. This free add-on lets you export your InDesign file as a PDF, split into blocks. If you’ve ever needed to create a single PDF for every page in your InDesign document, this might be the answer to your prayers. The script lives in the main Scripts panel. Double-click its name to bring up the simple and straightforward interface.

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From the resulting dialog box, choose a location for the finished PDFs. The Export to Split PDFs script doesn’t leave out the important feature of choosing a PDF preset, as many PDF creation add-ons do. Choose one of your presets, and then indicate how many pages per PDF to export. Unless the sections in your file are all exactly the same number of pages, this feature can seem somewhat hobbled. I would love the ability to tell the script where to start the export process. For instance, being able to ignore the first three pages of introductory material would come in handy. The speed of the output, complete with progress bar, and the option to choose my PDF preset have made this my go-to script for creating a series of PDFs for each individual page in my InDesign file.

Adobe Spark Post I spend a lot of time on social media, and not just gawking at celebrities’ Snapchats, either. I manage multiple accounts for myself and clients, as well as create video thumbnails and blog post headers. And, I’ll admit, after spending all day working on clients’ designs in InDesign, my creative well is often running a little dry. But—as someone wise once said—”A picture is worth a thousand words,” so I press on to create distinct eye-catching graphics for all the social flavors. Luckily, I’ve found a beautiful new toy that takes care of much of the creativity for me: Adobe Spark Post (formerly Adobe Post).

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Post is a fun and free iOS app that lets you mix predesigned templates with your own input and save for every use imaginable with a couple of quick taps. You can start with a template from the craft, travel, or business categories, for example, and add your own text. Change up the font, text color, and spacing with just a few taps. The newest version of Spark Post lets you cycle through looks by spinning a virtual “creative dial” and introduces motion by adding type animation. The background photo can come directly from your camera, camera roll, or the wonderful collection of included free photos, and filters can be added and tweaked. In my humble opinion, the killer feature is the ability to choose a layout specifically designed for the individual social platforms, such as a Facebook cover photo, blog post, Instagram snap, and Twitter post, or based on proportions only. When you choose a different layout, Spark Post automatically rearranges elements to fit, and you can save separate versions of each layout. I do have one request: access to

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the full collection of Typekit web fonts would be a welcome feature, available to either Creative Cloud subscribers only or as part of a paid version of the app.

Until Next Time Well, that’s it for now, my little chickadees. I wish you a warm and delightful season of blossoming creativity and cultivation of new ideas!

n Erica Gamet is a speaker, writer, and trainer, focusing on Adobe InDesign and Illustrator, Apple Keynote and iBooks Author, and other production-related topics. With over 25 years experience in the graphics industry, she is a regular contributor to CreativePro.com. After living as a nomad, she recently put down roots in El Paso, Texas, where she hikes and bikes every chance she gets.

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GREP of the Month

(?<=)

Lookahead

Targeting a string by what follows it GREP Level: Medium Many find-and-replace actions involve finding a string and replacing—or applying some formatting to—only part of the found string. But if you find a string and want to apply formatting to just part of it, you have to select the part of the string you’re interested in, do the replacement or formatting, and then find the next occurrence. All this can become very tedious very quickly. Fortunately, GREP offers a way to do conditional finds, such as “find the word Figure only if it’s followed by a digit.” These conditionals are called “lookahead,” and their general format is (?=). In our example of

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finding instances of the word Figure only if they’re followed by a digit, we can use the query Figure(?=\s\d). Note that we include in the lookahead \s (the space after the word Figure) and the digit \d. If you try this, you’ll see that Figure is highlighted, but the space and digits are not. This means that whatever we do now applies only to Figure. For example, if you want to italicize these instances of Figure, just set Italics in the Change Format panel. Now you can click Change All (or the more cautious Change and Change/Find) to process all remaining instances. In lookaheads, you can use other GREP constructs as well. Say you want to capture

instances of the word Figure not only when they’re followed by a digit, but also by the symbol #, which you use as a placeholder, for instance. This is possible by using the character class [\d#], which defines both digits and # as possible characters following Figure: Figure(?=\s[\d#]). If a character class is not suitable, for example, when you use a multi-character placeholder such as #@#, then you can use alternatives inside the lookahead: Figure(?=\s(\d|#@#)). Lookahead has a negative counterpart that lets you match text when it’s not followed by some other text. The format of these so-called negative lookaheads is (?!). For example, to find instances of the word Figure when it’s not followed by a digit, use Figure(?!\s\d). —Peter Kahrel

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Best of the Blogs

Best of the Blog

A collection of the most important and informative articles from InDesignSecrets. If you want to add comments or ask questions, just click the title of the article to view the original post in your web browser. The Worst Designed Feature in InDesign David Blatner | April 27, 2016

Everyone gets frustrated with InDesign sooner or later… even us! (And you know I truly love InDesign.) But a few features in this program go beyond just frustrating and enter a realm called “bang your head on the desk trying to figure out why Adobe did it this way.” Don’t get me wrong—I know no one on the InDesign team designed these features maliciously in order to make our lives miserable. On the contrary, I know that those folks work long and hard to make the best product they can. And I’m sure they had the best of intentions. I suspect the engineers look back at some of these features and think, “Well, it seemed like a good idea at the time.” But whatever the case, Adobe did ship these features and we’re stuck with using them. Or, more likely, not using them. And

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because they’re rarely used, few people complain about them, and so there’s little incentive for the InDesign team to improve them. So perhaps we should have a contest for “The Worst Designed Feature in InDesign,” and the winner (the feature, not the person who suggests it) gets worked on in the next version of the product. Here’s a list of some of the features that I would submit: »» Edit > Place and Link. At first this feature appears so promising, but the whole process of linking and the confusing presentation in the Links panel makes this feature really hard to get excited about. I actually wrote a rather upbeat tutorial on how to use it a few years ago, but I have to be honest: I’ve never once used it in a real job since then. »» Alternate Layouts. I know my friend and colleague Erica Gamet likes Alternate Layouts, and I don’t deny that they could be useful. But the actual design of this feature—how we’re supposed to use it—is so tortured. This is a feature you have to forcibly convince people to use.

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Best of the Blogs

»» Add Fonts from Typekit. I love fonts and I love Typekit, but the way this feature was implemented leaves a lot to be desired. First of all, the primary feature (right at the top of the Type menu) does nothing in InDesign. It is literally just a link to launch a web browser and take you to a web page. Really? Why can’t I do this inside InDesign? Second, about 40% of the time when I open a document that uses Typekit for Desktop fonts that are not currently installed, InDesign can’t figure out what to do, or it claims Typekit isn’t running (when it obviously is), or it doesn’t know that this font is part of Typekit, and so on. Come on, Adobe, I know you can do better than this. »» Gap Tool. Oh my gosh, where to begin? It’s bad enough that this is the only tool that requires people to read the manual or the Tool Hints panel every time they use it. (Did you even know InDesign has a Tool Hints panel? It’s really hidden.) But the fact that you can’t use this tool to specify a numeric gap (e.g., “I want exactly 10mm between these objects”) is, in a word, bizarre. »» Indexing. No one likes indexing a document. And many people today think indexing is passé because people can use electronic search. (If you think that, consider yourself slapped with a wet noodle. Indexing is more than just search. Indexing is about helping your audience find what they’re looking for, even when

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they don’t know how to ask the right question.) Anyway, creating a good index is hard enough, but InDesign makes it torture. I’m not even going to touch XML (because… well, just because). There are plenty of other features that could be made a little bit better, but what InDesign features can you think of beyond this list that could use a massive makeover? (Yes, we all know want features that aren’t in InDesign yet… let’s focus on what is there already, but just need to be made better.)

Free InDesign Script to Export JPGs at a Precise Size Keith Gilbert | May 2, 2016

InDesign has had the ability since at least CS2 to export pages to JPG. But the JPG Export dialog box only allows you to specify a resolution value in pixels per inch. But I often find that I need a JPG at a specific pixel dimension, such as 1000 pixels wide. I encountered this most recently when I needed to export JPGs from InDesign layouts for use with Behance and Adobe Portfolio. When creating images to display your projects on Behance, you should create JPGs no more than 1400px wide, or less if you want the image to appear smaller in your project display. I tired of hauling my InDesign pages into Photoshop to create JPGs. So I

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Best of the Blogs

created three scripts that make this really easy. You can download the (free!) scripts here. There are 3 scripts: »» Export to JPG - all pages.jsx »» Export to JPG - page range.jsx »» Export to JPG - selection.jsx Each script asks you where to save the exported JPG, and then presents a dialog box that is just like InDesign’s File > Export dialog box, except that it has fields for entering either a width or height value in pixels.

By the way, you may have noticed the File > Share on Behance command in recent versions of InDesign, Illustrator, and Photoshop. That command creates JPG images for you, and uploads them automatically to Behance. Unfortunately, it uploads the images as a Behance “Work in Progress,” not a Behance “Project.” And Behance has announced that the Work in Progress feature is going to be turned off this spring. So at this point, if you want to publish your work on Behance, you will need to create images of your work manually, and this script will be a big help!

Don’t Apply Character Styles to an Entire Paragraph David Blatner | May 4, 2016

I just need to make something really clear: Don’t apply a character style to a whole paragraph! That means if your document has character styles with the same names as your paragraph styles, you’re definitely doing it wrong.

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Best of the Blogs

If you have more character styles than paragraph styles, you’re probably doing it wrong:

think to yourself: “Wait, I think I’m supposed to be using paragraph styles here.” Caveats There are, of course, a few exceptions. For example, I sometimes make a single paragraph style for a heading, and I’ll set it to a Black color swatch. But then I’ll need to change the color of one of the headings in the text to red or some other color. So I’ll make a “red” character style and apply it to that whole heading. Now, if I had to make a bunch of headings red, then I would not use a character style! I’d make a paragraph style (probably based on the original black heading paragraph style) colored red. But if it’s just one or two in the document, well, a character style probably isn’t so terrible.

In the image above, every piece of text has both a paragraph style and a character style applied to it. That is bad. Really bad. Please do yourself and everyone you work with a huge favor and stop doing this. Character styles, in InDesign, should only be applied to a character, or a word, or perhaps a sentence or two. As soon as you find yourself applying one to a whole paragraph, you should

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Solutions If you have been using character styles incorrectly (or someone sent you a document that uses them wrongly), follow Anne-Marie’s advice here on how to get rid of the character styles.

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Best of the Blogs

The Mystery of the Empty Layers Panel Mike Rankin | May 9, 2016

Hey folks, it’s time for another InDesign mystery that you can solve for a chance to win an awesome prize! Here’s the scenario: You open an InDesign file for a book project and notice a spelling error on one of the document pages. But when you click on the text with either the Type tool or Selection tools, nothing happens.

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To check if the text frame with the spelling error is locked, you open the Layers panel and see that the text frame isn’t listed there. In fact, no items at all are listed in the Layers panel! It’s empty!

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Best of the Blogs

There’s only one layer in the document. It is unlocked, and if you hide it, all the content on the spread is hidden.

Layers panel. If you want to work with those items in the Layers panel, view the master spread.

Why does the Layers panel appear empty even though you can see content on this spread? The answer is that all of the content on the spread was on the master page. When you’re viewing a document spread, master page items that have not been overridden do not appear in the

And the winner of this contest are… Youri Penders Melise Gerber Both win an activation code for FrameReporter from Rorohiko! Thanks to everyone who entered, and be on the lookout for another contest with a new great prize next month!

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Best of the Blogs

Adobe Comp Tips: Adding Adobe Stock Images Chad Chelius | May 11, 2016

Adobe Comp has quickly become one of my go-to tools when I’m starting a new project. The ability to pull out my iPad and begin building a project is not only a significant time-saver, it also helps me take advantage of creative inspiration by allowing me to get new ideas out of my head right when they come to me. It’s also nice when I’m in an environment when pulling out my computer isn’t convenient or even appropriate (for example, when visiting the in-laws). All kidding aside, Adobe Comp allows users to add headlines, text, shapes, and even pictures to a layout with intuitive gestures. One area that I have struggled with in the past was finding the right images for a new layout. Sure, you can place an image from your computer or mobile device, your Creative Cloud files or libraries, the Adobe Market, or nowadays you can even take a picture on the fly using your device and place it in Adobe Comp.

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Often, however, I’m not that prepared, or just don’t have the resources to capture the content that I need. If my client is 3,000 miles away, I can’t exactly swing by to capture some images. That’s why the integration of Adobe Stock into Adobe Comp is such a great feature which all users can take advantage of. What is Adobe Stock? A little over a year ago, Adobe acquired the stock photo company Fotolia. When this happened, everyone speculated about how Adobe would leverage this acquisition, and we soon got our answer in the form of Adobe Stock. Adobe Stock is a collection of (currently) more than 50 million high-quality photos, videos, illustrations, and vector content that can be accessed by virtually all of the Creative Cloud desktop applications as well as the Adobe mobile apps, including Adobe Comp. You can search this massive library of assets directly from within Adobe Comp by entering keywords related to the content you’re trying to find.

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Best of the Blogs

Using Adobe Stock within Adobe Comp From within Adobe Comp, you can tap the Graphics icon located in the upper right corner of the screen, which displays a list of options for placing graphics into Adobe Comp.

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Tap the Adobe Stock option, and you are presented with an Adobe Stock page where you can type keywords for your search.

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Best of the Blogs

Tap the search button, and Adobe Stock presents you with results for your search. My search for “cycling” returned 51,106 results. Plenty to choose from!

Tap the thumbnail of an image that you’d like to use in your project, and Adobe Stock displays a larger version of the image, as well as other images that were taken within the series (basically images that are similar in nature to the image that you picked). I like this feature because oftentimes I like an image but don’t love it,

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and the related images often include an image or graphic that I like even better.

To purchase or not to purchase? If you’re using Adobe Comp, it’s likely you’re in the beginning stages of the design process and may not be ready to commit to purchasing an image. Part of the beauty of Adobe Stock is how well it’s integrated with the Adobe applications. When you’re viewing an Adobe Stock asset, you’ll notice two buttons in the upper right corner of the screen: Save Preview and License Asset.

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Best of the Blogs

When you press one of these buttons, you’ll be asked to choose a Creative Cloud Library where you want to save the asset. You can always create a new library at this point as well. Save Preview downloads a watermarked low-res version of the asset to use as you wish. License Asset subtracts credits from your balance, or brings up a purchase window where you can purchase the individual asset or enroll in a monthly plan. For this example, I chose Save Preview, and the image is placed in my open document, where it has been scaled and cropped. You can see the watermark on the image in the figure below.

Once you send your project to one of the desktop applications (InDesign, Illustrator, or Photoshop), you can right-click on the image in the CC Libraries panel and choose License Image, which downloads the hi-res version of the image.

The integration of Adobe Stock with Adobe Comp is a powerful feature you can use during the initial phases of your design process. The ability to download a preview of an Adobe Stock image allows you to experiment and explore the impact of different images in your design, without having to leave Adobe Comp—or commit to buying any images. Later on in the design process when things are finalized, you can easily license the image and download the final hi-res non-watermarked version of the image. Give it a try, and let us know what you think in the comments!

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Best of the Blogs

Printing Documents with Multiple Page Sizes Monica Murphy | May 12, 2016

Are you working in an InDesign document that contains multiple page sizes? Perhaps you are creating letterhead and business card design samples and your client just wants to see printouts or PDFs of the business cards. What if you have created numerous design options and the business cards arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t all on even or odd pages? This could make selecting those pages to print rather cumbersome.

The good news is that there is an option in the Print dialog box that is only activated if your document has multiple page sizes. This print option will select all the pages of the same size in the document and automatically generate a range of pages to print.

To Print all the Pages of the Same Size 1. Choose File > Print. 2. Choose to print Spreads or Pages in the General Options section. Note: This will get a little tricky if the spread contains different size pages, as the larger of the two will be selected.

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Best of the Blogs

3. Use the arrows above the Range field to navigate to one of the pages or spreads that is the size of the pages you need to print, or type a page number in the range field. 4. Click the pages icon. 5. The Range field will display all the pages or spreads of the same size. Note: This list of pages can then be edited.

perfectly consistent leading. And this is all a good thing. But once in a while you might need to take a break from perfection and give your design a more organic, human touch. And when you do, you should check out the Humane Type script by Beetroot Design. This free script has two main functions, humanizing body text and titles. When you run the script, you get a palette where you can set the parameters for both functions.

6. Click Print.

A Script That Adds a Human Touch to InDesign Type Mike Rankin | May 18, 2016

Perfection itself is imperfection. - Vladimir Horowitz Most of the time, the level of perfection that computers allow us to achieve is a wonderful thingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and something we take for granted. Effortlessly, we draw perfect circles and squares, set type on perfectly straight lines with perfectly straight margins, and

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Best of the Blogs

With body text you can select a frame containing text and randomize the margins and line spacing, and bend lines.

The script achieves the bending effect by putting each line of type on a curved path.

For title text, you make a selection within a text frame and choose how much you want to rotate, scale, and space your type.

So the next time you want to give your designs some well placed flaws, you can do it perfectly.

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The InDex: InDex Your Key to Our Content Can’t find that article you saw in an earlier issue? Wondering whether we covered that obscure plug-in? Never fear, the InDex is here. The first issue of InDesign Magazine was published in July 2004. Since then, we’ve cranked out thousands of pages on hundreds of related topics. While it’s possible to use Acrobat to simultaneously search all past issues of the magazine for one word or phrase, many readers have clamored for a formal index at the back of each issue. However, with 86 issues to account for, that’s not feasible. Instead, the InDex will live as a PDF you can download for free. If you come across a topic you want to know more about, but it’s in an issue you don’t have, you’re not out of luck. We sell back issues at indesignsecrets.com.

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If the topic you’re looking for isn’t in the InDex, you have one more way to search: that PDF trick we mentioned. To make it work, all of your magazine issue PDFs must be in one folder. Open any issue in Acrobat, and then press Shift+Command+F (Shift+Ctrl+F on Windows). In the Search window that appears, be sure that you click the radio button that says “All PDF Documents in,” and in the dropdown menu below that, choose the folder in which you placed your magazine issues. You’re on your way to finding anything in any PDF!

Click here to download the InDex.

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While this PDF is just for you, you can tell your friends about this great discount: $10 off a 1-year membership Use coupon code: friend at indesignsecrets.com/issues

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Coming Soon! MAGAZINE July 2016

87

t t n e on F gem a n a M

Raleway Rockwell Ext Rosewood STD

Savoye

53

Idm issue 86  
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