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M A G A Z I N E 83 March 2016

Plus‌ Animated FX Overprinting Demystified Awesome Add-Ons

CC Libraries


InSide: Table of Contents

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Creative Cloud Libraries Steve Werner takes you on a deep dive into the amazing new realm of CC Libraries.

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Overprinting Options Colin Flashman helps us understand why and when to use overprint and multiply to get the best results in print.

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InStep: Tumbling Tricks Mike Rankin shows how to create a fun and flexible animated effect for many occasions. Supercharge Your Workflow Erica Gamet shares a bunch of add-ons that can help you get your work done faster and easier without sacrificing quality. GREP of the Month: Character Equivalents David Blatner shows how to target all manner of accented characters with POSIX codes.

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Best of the Blogs  A collection of the most important and informative articles from InDesignSecrets, InCopySecrets, and EPUBSecrets 57

Create a Valentine’s Day Pattern Using Conditional Text

61

Making an Animated Route Map

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Understanding the First Baseline Position of Text

68

Outlining Fonts, the 2016 Edition

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New Contest! The Mystery of the Perplexing Preview

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Working With Text in Adobe Comp CC

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InCopySecrets: Helping Spell Check to Deal With Other Languages

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An Easier Way to Apply Gradients to Table Cells

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Publish Online Project of the Month: The Cyberfolio of Michel Allio

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InDex to All Past Issues

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MAGAZINE

From the Editor in Chief PUBLISHERS David Blatner, Anne-Marie Concepción EDITORIAL Editor in Chief Mike Rankin, mike@indesignmag.com Managing Editor Wendy Katz, wendy@indesignmag.com Contributing Writers Steve Werner, Colin Flashman, Erica Gamet, Chad Chelius, and Kelly Vaughn DESIGN Rufus Deuchler rufus.deuchler.net BUSINESS Contact Information http://indesignsecrets.com/contact Subscription Information indesignsecrets.com/issues Published by InDesignSecrets.com, a division of The Creative Publishing Network, Inc. Copyright 2016 InDesignSecrets.com. All rights reserved. Reproduction and redistribution prohibited without approval. For more information, contact permissions@indesignmag.com. InDesign Magazine is not endorsed or sponsored by Adobe Systems Incorporated, publisher of InDesign. InDesign is a registered trademark of Adobe Systems Incorporated. All other products and services are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners and are hereby acknowledged. Photos on pages 1, 5, 22, 34, 35, 44, 55, 56, and 91 courtesy of Fotolia.com

Ever since I was a kid, I’ve always loved Our second feature is a must-read, whether libraries. I’m not talking about the InDesign you’re a Creative Cloud subscriber or you’re feature; I mean those places in the real world somehow still running InDesign 2.0 on a where you can go to find inspiring creative Bondi Blue iMac. Prepress master Colin works, to collaborate on projects with other Flashman dives deep into the details of people, to share, and be connected to a overprinting, as well as transparency, and community. blend modes to help you ensure you always Actually, come to think of it, those words get the print results you expect. do describe a feature you’ll find in the latest Then we come back from print to digital version of InDesign: Creative Cloud Libraries. publishing with an InStep by me on how to Maybe that’s why I like CC Libraries so much— make tumbling animated effects. They’re and why I think they’re the most interesting really fun, flexible, and perfect for anything service currently offered by Adobe as part from party balloons to autumn leaves to of the Creative Cloud. The features of CC snowflakes and more. Libraries go way beyond what you could do Next, Erica Gamet checks in with a with traditional InDesign libraries, so we got supercharged collection of add-ons and Steve Werner to put together a detailed look InDesign features to speed up your workflow. at them. Steve covers all you need to know to And as always, we top it off with a cool new get started using this fascinating new tool. I GREP of the Month, and the Best of the Blogs. hope it inspires you to give them a try. Enjoy!

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by Steve

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CC Libraries Integrated with Creative Cloud services like Adobe Stock and apps like Photoshop and Illustrator, CC Libraries offer some amazing advantages over traditional InDesign libraries. INDESIGN MAGAZINE  83

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Creative Cloud Libraries

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nly a year ago, in the February 2015 release of InDesign CC 2014, a new kind of library was introduced to Adobe InDesign—called a CC library (short for Creative Cloud library). This CC library lives side by side with the traditional and familiar InDesign object library feature, which lets you store and reuse almost any kind of object you can create in InDesign. And CC libraries are in some ways similar… but in other ways very different. Different in a way that may excite you, or frustrate you, or, more likely, both. The first version of CC libraries was pretty rudimentary, but Adobe enhanced it further with the release of InDesign CC 2015, in June of that same year, and even more with the November release of InDesign CC 2015.2. The result is that CC libraries are beginning to become not just interesting, but actually quite useful. Unfortunately, the great majority of InDesign users (yes, I’m talking about you!) haven’t even tried the new CC library

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feature. In fact, your only encounter with it may be when the CC Libraries panel pops open unexpectedly if you create a new style or a new swatch color! So it’s time you were more formally introduced.

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What’s New and Useful with CC Libraries Most of you are probably asking: Why would I want another library format? You might not even use the regular InDesign object libraries. So here’s a list of what’s new and perhaps useful about them (and, need I say, things that InDesign libraries can’t do) to make them worth your trying out. Note: From here on, I’m calling object libraries “InDesign libraries” because they work only with InDesign documents; CC libraries work with many Adobe apps. Here’s what CC libraries can do: »» Accept any InDesign objects to be reusable in other documents, and these

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»» »» »»

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graphic assets are stored in two formats: as InDesign snippets, and also as PDF for use in Illustrator and Photoshop Are accessible from any computer or mobile device to which you have access with your Adobe ID or viewed in a web browser (because they’re stored as Cloud files as well as locally on your computer) Are found in Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop as well (virtually identical panels, with all the same content!) Accept color swatches, color themes, and paragraph and character styles (which can be applied in Illustrator and Photoshop as well as InDesign) Work with free Adobe mobile apps Allow for entries/objects to be edited and updated by their original applications Accept license-free artwork from the Creative Cloud Market and purchasable photos from Adobe Stock, all managed within the panel Can be shared with others and used in collaborations with colleagues

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Creative Cloud Libraries The CC Libraries Panel By default, in InDesign CC 2015, the CC Libraries panel is added to your existing workspaces. You can include it in any workspace you create. If you don’t see it, choose Window > CC Libraries to open it. The CC Libraries panel is empty until you add assets to it. By default, it then creates a new library called My Library, which you can rename from the panel menu. You can create as many new libraries as you like, using the menu beside My Library at the top. To make it easier to search and find your assets later on, you should create and name libraries based on the projects you’re working on. Tip: Organize the CC Libraries panel in its own vertical dock, to the left of your regular panels. That way you can let it grow long to reveal more items, or drag it wide to view Adobe Stock images at large size. You can also create a new CC library by migrating an existing InDesign library: when

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an InDesign library is open, click the Migrate button ( ) to migrate all the assets to a new or existing library. Alternatively, select items in a library, right-click, and choose Migrate Selected Item(s) to CC Libraries. To view a library, choose its name from the library menu; you’ll see I’ve named mine “Kerala Travel Guide” to match the name of the project (Figure 1). When you show items in list view, a label indicates the creator of graphics assets (Id for InDesign, Ai for Illustrator, Ps for Photoshop) or the file type (JPEG, SVG, PDF). Assets that InDesign can’t use are grayed out, like the Brushes category you see to the right. You can switch between list view and icon view at the top of the panel.

Adding Assets to a CC Library As I said earlier, you can add a wide variety of helpful assets to your CC libraries. For example, you can add frames, paths, text on a path, or any other InDesign object

Figure 1: Use the CC Libraries panel controls to add and use assets in a library.

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Creative Cloud Libraries (or group of objects). But you can also add paragraph and character styles, colors, and color themes—separate from any particular InDesign objects. By the way, my examples in this article come from a travel guide I’m creating about the Indian state of Kerala (Figure 2). As we go along, you’ll see me working with a number of personal photos as well as other assets to demonstrate all of these types of imports. Adding an InDesign object You can select any InDesign object (a text frame, graphic frame, group of objects, and so on) and drag it into a CC library. The CC Libraries panel displays InDesign objects with an “Id” icon in list view, or with a tool tip saying “Created in Adobe InDesign” in icon view. You can also select an object and click the Add Graphic icon at the bottom of the panel. Note that if the InDesign object includes a link to an external graphic, the graphic

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Figure 2: Pages from the Kerala Travel Guide

Generally ranging between elevations of 820–3300 feet, the eastern portions of the Nilgiri and Palni Hills include such formations as Agastya Mala and Anamala. Kerala’s western coastal belt is relatively flat, and is crisscrossed by a network of interconnected brackish canals, lakes, estuaries, and rivers known as the Kerala Backwaters. Lake Vembanad, Kerala’s largest body of water, dominates the Backwaters; it lies between Alappuzha and Kochi and is more than 77 square miles in area. Around 8% of India’s waterways (measured by length) are found in Kerala. The most important of Kerala’s forty-four rivers include the Periyar, the Bharathapuzha, the Pamba, the Chaliyar, the Kadalundipuzha River, the Valapattanam and the Achankovil. The average length of the rivers of Kerala is 40 miles. Many of the rivers are small and entirely fed by monsoon rains. These conditions result in the nearly year-round water logging of such western regions as Kuttanad, 193 square miles of which lies below sea level. As KeraCoconut trees can be found throughout Kerala. la’s rivers are small and lack deltas, they are more prone to environmental factors. The rivers also face problems Elephants such asare sand mining and pollution. The state experiences decorated in several natural hazards such as landslides, floods, lightning and droughts. The Kerala’s culture is derived from Kerala is wedged between the Lakshadweep Sea and the Western Ghats. Lying gold2004 decorative Indian Ocean Tsunami also affected the state. both a Tamil-heritage region known between north latitudes 8°18’ and 12°48’ and east longitudes 74°52’ and 77°22’, coverings for as Tamilakam and southern coastal Kerala experiences the humid equatorial tropic climate. The state has a coast a parade at an Karnataka. Later, Kerala’s culture was of length 370 miles and the width of the state varies between 22 and 75 miles. annual festival at elaborated isupon through centuries of of Kerala’s notable biodiversity concenGeographically, Kerala can be divided into three climatically distinct regions: the a ShivaMuch temple. contactGhats. with neighboring trated and protected in the Western Almost a and overseas eastern highlands (rugged and cool mountainous terrain), the central midlands cultures.are Native arts include fourth of India’s 10,000 plant species foundperforming in the (rolling hills), and the western lowlands (coastal plains). Located at the extreme (a 2000-year-old Sanskrit state. Among the almost 4000koodiyattom flowering plant species southern tip of the Indian subcontinent, Kerala lies near the center of the Indian officially recognized (1272 of which are endemic totheatre Keralatradition, and 159 threattectonic plate; hence, most of the state is subject to comparatively little seismic by UNESCO ened) are 900 species of medicinal plants. as a Masterpiece of the and volcanic activity. Pre-Cambrian and Pleistocene geological formations comOraltropical and Intangible Its 3629 mi² of forests include wet ever-Heritage of Hupose the bulk of Kerala’s terrain. manity), kathakali—from green and semi-evergreen forests (lower and middle katha (“stoThe eastern Kerala region consists of highmuch mountains, gorges andforest deep-cut 20th century, of the remaining cover is now protected from clear-fellry”) andand kalidry (“performance”)—and its elevations—1339 mi²), tropical moist decidvalleys immediately west of the Western shadow.for Forty-one of Kerala’s ing. Kerala’sGhats’ faunarain are notable their diversity and high rates of endemism: 102 offshoot Kerala natanam, Kaliyattam uousspecies forests (mid-elevations—1583 mi² and 39 mi², west-flowing rivers, and threespecies of its east-flowing region. 453 The species of birds, 202 of mammalsones (56 originate of which in arethis endemic), (North Malabar special), koothu (akin respectively), and montane subtropical and temperate Western Ghats form a wall of of mountains interrupted only near Palakkad (hence freshwater fishes, 169 species of reptiles (139 of them endemic), and 89 species to stand-up comedy), mohiniaattam forests (highest elevations—39 mi²). Altogethalso known Palghat), where the Gap breaks through to provide access by extensive habitat(shola) of Palakkad amphibians (86 endemic). These are threatened destruc(“dance of world’s the enchantress”), Theyyam, er, 24% of Kerala is forested. Two of the Ramto the rest of India. The Western Ghats rises on tolandslides, 4920 feet above sea tion, including soilaverage erosion, salinization, and resource extraction. semi-autobiographical The God of Small Things is set in the Kottayam A kathakali artist Great shot at bestseller thullal NSSasthamkotta padayani. Kathakali and Hornbill Molevel, while the highest peaks reach aboveKerala’s 8200 feet. Anamudi, the highest peak Eastern windward mountains shelter tropical moist forestssar andConvention tropical listed wetlands—Lake town of Ayemenem, have gained international recognition. Bannerghatta hiniattaminare widelyasrecognized Indian National the Vembanad-Kol wetlands—are Kerala, in South India, is at an elevation 8842 feet. Justarewest of the mountains lie the dryofforests, which common in the Western Ghats. Here, sonokelingand (Dalbergia Malayalam cinema carved a niche for itself in the Indian film industry. It has This is the Classical DanceReserve. traditions from Park. Kerala. 562 mi² of the vast Nilgiri Biosphere midland plains comprising central Kerala, dominated by rolling hills andand valleys. latifolia), anjili, mullumurikku (Erythrina), Cassia number amongwell the as more been bird producing both parallel and mainstream cinema of great acclaim for years. Other forms of religious of orKerala. tribal in nature. These include chavittu Subjected cultivation inart theare morestate than 1000 species of trees in Kerala. Other plants include bamboo, wild black to extensive clearing for Directors like Adoor Gopalakrishnan, John Abraham, G. Aravindan have been nadakom and oppana that combines dance, rhythmic hand clapping, and ishal vopepper, wild cardamom, the calamus rattan palm (a type of climbing palm), and some of the great names in the Indian parallel cinema. Kerala has also given birth calizations. Margam Kali is a traditional group dance form traceable back to 17th aromatic vetiver grass (Vetiveria zizanioides). Living among them are such fauna to numerous acclaimed actors such as Bharath Gopi, Prem Nazir, Mammotty, century, originally performed during Syrian Christian festivals. However, many as Indian Elephant (Elephas maximus indicus), Bengal Tiger, Indian Leopard Mohanlal, Suresh Gopi, Murali, Oduvil Unnikrishnan, Cochin Haneefa, Thilakan of these art forms are largely performed for tourists or at youth festivals, and are (Panthera pardus fusca), Nilgiri Tahr, Common Palm Civet, and Grizzled Giant and Nedumudi Venu. as popular among most Keralites. Contemporary art and performance styles Kolla Varsham or Malayalam Era,viper, which is assumed to have been not established Squirrel. Reptiles include the King Cobra (Ophiophagus hannah), python, including by King Udaya Marthanda Varma in 825 CE, serves as the official calendar of those employing mimicry and parody are more popular. and Mugger Crocodile (Crocodylus palustris). Kerala’s birds are legion—Malabar Kerala’s Kerala. The MalayalamDarter, calendar used to plan ac- music also has ancient roots. Carnatic music dominates Keralite Trogon, the Great Hornbill, Kerala Laughingthrush, andisSouthern Hillagricultural and religious traditional tivities. In Kerala’s popular is rice and is tradi- music. This was the result of Swathi Thirunal Rama Varma’s popularMyna are several emblematic species. lakes,most wetlands, anddish waterways, fishcurry. such The sadhya (feast) boat race during renditions known as sopanam of the genre in the 19thAcentury. Raga-based tionally served on green banana leaves. Such dishes as idli, payasam, ization pulisherry, as kadu (stinging catfish) and Choottachi (Orange chromide—Etroplus maculatus) Onam holiday. puttukadala, or PuttuPayarPappadam, puzhukku, rasam, and sambaraccompany are typical.kathakali performances. Melam (including the paandi and panchari are found. variants) is a more percussive style of music; it is performed at Kshetram cenKeralites—both men and women alike—traditionally don flowing and unstitched tered festivals garments. These include the mundu, a loose piece of cloth wrapped around men’s using the chenda. Melam ensembles comprise up to 150 musicians, and performances may last up to four hours. Panchavadyam is a different form waists. Women typically wear the sari, a long and elaborately wrapped banner of cloth, wearable in various styles. Presently, North Indian dresses suchofaspercussion Salwar ensemble, in which up to 100 artists use five types of percussion instrument. Kerala has various styles of folk and tribal music. The popular music kameez are also popular among women in Kerala. of Kerala is dominated by the filmi music of Indian cinema. Kerala’s visual arts Elephants are an integral part of daily life in Kerala. Indian elephants are loved, from revered, groomed and given a prestigious place in the state’s culture. range They are of-traditional murals to the works of Raja Ravi Varma, the state’s most renowned painter. ten referred to as the ‘sons of the sahya.’ Elephant is the state animal of Kerala and

Culture

Geography

Flora and fauna

KERALA: Land of Paradise:

A TRAVEL GUIDE EXPLORE

India

is featured on the emblem of the Government of Kerala. Malayalam literature is medieval in origin and includes such figures as the 14th century Niranam poets (Madhava Panikkar, Sankara Panikkar and Rama Panikkar), and the 17th century poet Thunchaththu Ezhuthachan whose works mark the dawn of both modern Malayalam language and indigenous Keralite poetry. Paremmakkal Thoma Kathanar and Kerala Varma Valiakoi Thampuran are noted for their contribution to Malayalam prose. The “triumvirate of poets” (Kavithrayam), Kumaran Asan, Vallathol Narayana Menon, and Ulloor S. Parameswara Iyer, are recognized for moving Keralite poetry away from archaic sophistry and metaphysics, and towards a more lyrical mode. In the second half of the 20th century, Jnanpith awardees like G. Sankara Kurup, S. K. Pottekkatt, Thakazhi Sivasankara Pillai, M. T. Vasudevan Nair and O. N. V. Kurup have made valuable contributions to the Malayalam literature. Later, such Keralite writers as O. V. Vijayan, Kamaladas, M. Mukundan, and Booker Prize winner Arundhati Roy, whose 1996

is not added. You must embed the graphic before adding the InDesign object. By the way, the CC Library assigns a generic name to each InDesign object you add, such as “Artwork 5,” which is then

Tourism Kerala is situated on the lush and tropical Malabar Coast. Kerala is one of the popular tourist destinations in India. Its culture and traditions, coupled with its varied demographics, has made Kerala one of the most popular tourist destinations in the world. National Geographic’s Traveller magazine names Kerala as one of the “ten paradises of the world” and “50 must see destinations of a lifetime.” Travel and Leisure names Kerala as “One of the 100 great trips for the 21st century.” Until the early 1980s, Kerala was a relatively unknown destination; except for Kovalam, which was in the Hippie circuit and was a major destination of Hippies. Aggressive marketing campaigns launched by the Kerala Tourism Development Corporation, the government agency that oversees tourism prospects of the state, laid the foundation for the growth of the tourism industry. In the decades that followed, Kerala’s tourism industry was able to transform the state into one of the niche holiday destinations in India. The tagline Kerala – God’s Own Country has been widely used in Kerala’s tourism promotions and soon became synonymous with the state. In 2006, Kerala attracted 8.5 million tourist arrivals, an increase of

displayed beside the thumbnail. It’s often a good idea to rename it to something more recognizable, which you can do by double-clicking on its name.

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Creative Cloud Libraries Adding a paragraph or character style Unlike traditional InDesign libraries, CC libraries can save text formatting—whether or not you have used paragraph or character styles. There are three ways to add text formatting to a CC library: »» You can select any styled text in an existing InDesign document (or even just place your cursor in the text) and then click the Add Paragraph Style button or the Add Character Style button in the CC Libraries panel. If your text has a paragraph or character style applied to it when you add it to a CC library, the library remembers it. However, if any local formatting is applied on top of the style, the CC library will give the style a generic name, such as “Paragraph Style 1.” »» Open the Paragraph Styles or Character Styles panel. Select the desired style name(s) in the panel. Click the “Add selected style to my current CC library” button ( ). If you’ve selected a style group, all of the styles within it are added.

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»» When you create a new paragraph or character style, you have the option— which is turned on by default—to add the style to the current CC library (Figure 3). You can select which library to save the style to, and when you click OK, InDesign adds it to both the style panel and the selected CC library. Note: Illustrator and Photoshop use as much of your InDesign-generated styles as they understand, and ignore the rest. Adding colors You can add colors to your CC libraries, either from a selected object (or text) or from the Swatches panel, and then use those colors elsewhere in InDesign, or in any other app that has a CC library feature. To add a color from a selected object, click the Add Fill Color icon in the CC Libraries panel. Or, if your object or text has a stroke applied, you can click the Add Stroke Color icon.

Figure 3: By default, when you add a new style or swatch, it is added to your current CC library. This option is sticky, so your most recent setting will stay current until you change it again.

Alternatively, you can add colors from the Swatches panel to your CC library (so that you can use them in other documents or apps). Select one or more solid color swatches (gradients don’t currently work), and click the “Add selected swatch to my current CC library” button in the Swatches panel. If you’ve selected a swatch group, all of its component colors are added. Tip: To prevent the CC Libraries panel from flying open whenever you add a new style or color swatch (which may not even have anything to do with your current CC library), deselect Add To CC Library. This option is sticky; best to leave it unchecked until you really need it.

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Creative Cloud Libraries Adding a color theme: A color theme is a group of exactly five colors which can be saved, reused, and shared. Very much like with individual colors, you can click “Add this theme to my current CC library” to add any color theme to the Color Themes section of your CC library (Figure 4).

Figure 4: After creating a color theme with InDesign’s Color Theme tool, you can click this button to add it to your current library.

For more about working with color themes, see the “Adding Color Themes” sidebar in “What’s New in InDesign CC 2015.2,” InDesign Magazine December 2015.

Using CC Library Assets in InDesign Once you have added assets in your CC library, you can begin to use them in your InDesign documents (or, as I said, in

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Illustrator, Photoshop, and so on). You can place graphics, apply paragraph or character styles to text, or assign colors to text or objects. In this section, we’ll talk about how to use library assets imported from

InDesign CC, Illustrator CC, or Photoshop CC. You can also use the library to work with Adobe Stock photos, but I’ll explain that in a later section.

Adding assets in Illustrator CC and Photoshop CC The CC Libraries panel looks almost exactly the same in Illustrator CC or Photoshop CC as in InDesign, except that in the former two, it’s called the Libraries panel. In Photoshop CC, you can drag a layer to add it to a library. By default, it will name the new asset by the layer name (Figure 5). In this example, the asset name is initially Background; I’ll rename it Great Hornbill after the name of the bird in the picture. There are a few differences in how Illustrator CC and Photoshop CC handle libraries. Here are links to Adobe’s Help files for Illustrator and Photoshop.

Figure 5: I’m adding a Photoshop image to my library by dragging a layer to Photoshop’s Libraries panel.

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Creative Cloud Libraries Placing a graphic There are two ways you can place graphics from a CC library into an InDesign document: by right-clicking on one or more selected items and choosing a Place command from the context menu, or by dragging the assets onto the page. In either case, you’ll see InDesign’s normal “place gun” cursor, which lets you click or drag. If the graphic originated in InDesign, the only option when you right-click is Place Copy. InDesign recognizes the snippet file (IDMS) and copies it into the document; that is, you get one or more editable InDesign objects. Dragging and dropping produces the same result. In other words, the assets are not linked to the CC library. This means that if you later edit the InDesign asset in the library (I’ll explain how that works later), it will not update on your document pages. However, CC library assets that originated in Illustrator or Photoshop are handled very differently. If you right-click on one of these,

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you can choose between the Place Linked or Place Copy commands: »» A place linked graphic is not linked to your hard drive or a server and doesn’t have a normal file path; rather, it’s linked to a named CC library, and marked by a cloud icon both in the Links panel and on the corner of the graphic itself (Figure 6). »» A place copy graphic is embedded as a copy of the asset. It shows no icon on the graphic, but appears in the Links panel with an “embedded” icon ( ). (This is basically the same as placing a linked graphic and then choosing Embed Link from the Links panel menu.) If you drag one of these graphics onto your page, it will become linked to the library. If you want an unlinked, embedded copy, hold down Option/Alt when you dragplace the graphic. Of course, the great thing about linked graphics is that when you edit them once, every instance gets updated wherever it

appears. Note that you can edit a CC library asset only in its original application (again, more on that in a moment). If the links are out of date, you’ll see the out-of-date cloud icon in the Links panel and on the graphic (Figure 6 again). Character and paragraph styles Working with paragraph and character styles is a bit simpler than understanding how graphics are handled.

Figure 6: Clockwise from bottom left: a link to a local drive or server, a link to a CC library asset, an embedded image, and an out-of-date link to a CC library asset.

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Creative Cloud Libraries If you want to move paragraph or character styles from a CC library to your Paragraph Styles or Character Styles panel, first ensure no text or text frames are selected on your page when you select the styles in the appropriate section of the CC Libraries panel. (You can select more than one by clicking on one and then Command/Ctrl-clicking on others— or Shift-click to also select all the items between.) Then right-click the selection, and choose Add to Paragraph Styles or Add to Character Styles. If you want to apply a single CC library paragraph or character style to text, first select the text in your document. (You can either select a text frame with the Selection tool or select text with the Type tool.) Then just click on the style in the CC library. InDesign both applies the formatting and adds the style to the Paragraph Styles or Character Styles panel. Note that style hierarchies included in styles—such as Based On or Nested

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Styles—are honored. For example, if you created a nested style as part of a paragraph style, both the paragraph style and included character styles will be added to the appropriate panels. Colors and color themes You may want to apply colors in a CC library to objects or text. If so, first select the object or text in your document, and then choose the fill or stroke proxy (at the bottom of the Tools panel, or the top of the Swatches or Color panel). Finally, to apply the color, just click any color from the Colors or Color Themes section of a CC library. Or, you may want to add a color or color theme from a CC library to your Swatches panel in your current document: »» When you apply a CC library color to any object or text on your page, InDesign automatically adds that color to your Swatches panel. Or, you can select one or more colors in the CC library,

right-click one of them, and then choose Add To Swatches. »» In the Color Themes section of a CC library, click on a color theme, right-click, and choose Add Theme To Swatches. The color theme will appear as a color group containing the same swatches. Or, click on the color theme to enlarge the swatch display in the library. Then, right-click the swatch you want to add, and choose Add To Swatches. Only that swatch will be added to your Swatches panel.

Adding Images You may want to add artwork and photographs to your project, either for free from the Creative Cloud Market or by purchasing a subscription to Adobe Stock. I wanted to add both artwork and photographs to my Kerala Travel Guide. Creative Cloud Market The Creative Cloud Market was added as a free service for Creative Cloud members

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Creative Cloud Libraries back in 2014, but many users still don’t know it exists. The Market contains assets licensed to Creative Cloud members to use, royalty free, in their design projects. It appears in the Creative Cloud desktop application (found in the menu bar on a Mac or the taskbar in Windows). Click on Assets, and then on Market. There’s a drop-down menu to search for particular types of artwork. These include PSD files for placement or user interfaces; vector shapes, which are saved as SVG files; icons and patterns, which are often PNG or SVG files; and Photoshop brushes. I had my best luck by searching for a topic in the search field at the top. For example, for my travel guide, I was looking for vector art of an elephant, so I used “elephant” as a search term (Figure 7). If you find something you like, click the download button, and select the library where you want to save the art. There is one major problem with the vector art: it is currently all saved in the SVG

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format—and InDesign CC doesn’t currently read SVG. We’re all hoping this will change in the future, but in the meantime, when

Figure 7: When you search the Creative Cloud Market, you can select royalty-free art, which you can save to a CC library.

you place an SVG file from a CC library into your InDesign document, you get a bitmapped PNG image. Fortunately, it’s pretty easy to convert an SVG graphic to vector art that InDesign can read: double-click the asset in the CC Libraries panel, which opens it in Adobe Illustrator. Now select all the artwork, and click the Add button in Illustrator’s Libraries panel to create a new CC library asset. You can now close the original SVG graphic without saving, and delete the old SVG from the CC Libraries panel if you want to. When you switch back to InDesign, you can use the vector art document properly. Adobe Stock One of the enhancements that came with the InDesign CC 2015.2 update in November 2015 was the integration of the Adobe Stock service into Creative Cloud libraries. Creative Cloud members get access to over 45 million photos, illustrations, vector graphics, and videos (though you typically have to

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Creative Cloud Libraries pay an extra fee for the rights to use the high-quality images). You can search Adobe Stock from within the CC Libraries panel. I was looking for pictures of the Chinese fishing nets that are an iconic feature of the Kerala backwaters. At the top of the panel, I chose Adobe Stock from the field’s menu, and searched for “Kerala fishing” (Figure 8). To see the results clearly, it’s a good idea to enlarge the panel as much as possible. I found an image I liked a lot, clicked the download button, and saved it to my Kerala Travel Guide library. Alternatively, you can choose File > Search Adobe Stock to open your web browser to the Adobe Stock website, where you can see the pictures larger. You can download a preview image from the website to your selected CC library. I dragged the downloaded file from the library into my layout to use as a cover image. Initially, it appears as a low-resolution place linked image with a watermark (Figure 9). I can leave it in that format while

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Figure 9: A downloaded but unlicensed Adobe Stock photograph can be placed with a watermark at low resolution.

Figure 8: You can search Adobe Stock in the CC libraries panel. If you’d like to download a preview, you can save it to your current CC library.

creating proofs or even applying effects in InDesign. I chose to buy that image, so I rightclicked the thumbnail of the image in the

CC Libraries panel and chose Buy Image. (You’re actually licensing the image, not buying it.) You’ll be prompted that you’re using one of your monthly quota of images. Within a short time, the watermark goes away. The low-resolution image is replaced by a high-resolution image (Figure 10, next page).

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Creative Cloud Libraries For more information, see Using Adobe Stock and Designing with Adobe Stock at InDesignSecrets.com.

Adding Assets Using Mobile Devices In the past few years, Adobe has released a number of free mobile apps designed to capture or create artwork, colors, and other assets. They integrate with Adobe desktop apps and use their file formats. In many

cases, CC libraries provide the connective tissue between desktop and mobile applications. For example, I used the Adobe Capture CC app on my iPad to add color themes and shapes to the project. See Take Your Design Workflow Mobile with Adobe Capture CC and Adobe’s Mobile Creative Apps at CreativePro.com for more information on mobile workflows.

Managing CC Libraries As you start to work more with CC libraries, you’ll find there are a number of maintenance tasks you’ll need to perform with your libraries and library assets, such as renaming them, deleting or editing assets, or viewing them in a web browser.

Figure 10: Once you’ve licensed an Adobe Stock photograph, it’s replaced with a high-resolution version with no watermark.

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Renaming and deleting libraries It’s easy to rename a library: just select the library from the CC Libraries drop-down menu. Click the panel menu, and choose Rename [library name]. When the name is highlighted, retype it, and click Rename.

Similarly, to delete a library that you no longer need, select the library from the menu and choose Delete [library name] from the panel menu. You’ll be asked to confirm the deletion. Moving, copying, duplicating, renaming, or deleting assets Sometimes library assets need to be moved, copied, renamed, deleted, or duplicated: »» To duplicate one or more library assets, select the assets. Right-click, and choose Duplicate (for one asset) or Duplicate Selected Items (for more than one). The duplicate is named the same and placed in the same library (yes, this works). »» To copy or move library assets to another library, select the assets. For one asset, right-click, and choose Copy To or Move To. If you select more than one asset, right-click, and choose Copy Selected Items or Move Selected Items. Then in the submenu, select the new library name to copy or move the assets.

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Creative Cloud Libraries »» To rename an asset, right-click an asset in a library, and choose Rename. You can also just double-click the asset name. The name is highlighted. Type the new name, and then press Enter or Return. »» To delete one or more assets, select the items, right-click, and choose Delete or Delete Selected Items. The assets are deleted immediately. Remember that CC libraries are shared across “the cloud,” so if you delete something in InDesign, it will disappear in all the places you use that library (other apps, and so on). Editing and Relinking an Asset Whether and how assets can be edited depends on what kind of assets they are: »» To edit a color, double-click the color swatch (or right-click on the color and choose Edit). The InDesign Color Picker appears, and you can select a color, and click OK. Note that editing a color swatch inside a CC library does not change any instances where you’ve used that color

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in your InDesign documents. To change those, you must use the Swatches panel. »» To edit an InDesign asset (that is, library items that were originally InDesign objects), double-click it, or right-click and choose Edit. InDesign will open the

Editing linked files created in Illustrator or Photoshop InDesign CC 2015.2 sports an Edit Original command in the Links panel, even when the graphic is stored in a CC library. Choosing that option launches Illustrator so you can edit the graphic. If you do the same with a Photoshop library graphic, you’ll get a warning that “this item isn’t directly editable in InDesign.” You’ll have to manually open Photoshop and rightclick the file in the library to edit it.

library item as a new, temporary InDesign document. After you make your changes, simply save and close the temporary file. The asset in the library is automatically updated. »» Similarly, to edit an Illustrator or SVG graphic, you can double-click it in the CC Libraries panel (or right-click and choose Edit). Illustrator CC should launch and open the graphic for you. Again, this is just a temporary file that you can edit. When you save the graphic and close it, it is automatically updated in the library. Of course, if you have placed this library item in your InDesign document as a linked graphic, you’ll be prompted to update it in the Links panel. »» For some reason, InDesign’s CC Libraries panel cannot currently force Photoshop to edit images. So, until Adobe fixes this, to edit a Photoshop asset (or other bitmapped asset like a JPEG), you’ll have to open Photoshop yourself, open its Libraries panel, double-click the asset,

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Creative Cloud Libraries and edit it in Photoshop. When you save, and if this is a place linked graphic, you’ll be prompted to update it wherever it’s placed. »» Unfortunately, you cannot edit paragraph and character styles in a CC library. Instead, you’ll need to create a new style and add it to the library. Then, if necessary, delete the previous style. Similarly, color themes cannot be edited, so you’d need to replace them instead. I mentioned updating graphics that are linked to CC libraries, but sometimes you need to relink your graphics—changing them to link to another library graphic. You can do this in the Links panel (not the CC Libraries panel). First, select the graphic to be relinked, and then click the Relink From CC Libraries icon or choose Relink From CC Libraries from the panel menu. Now, in the CC Libraries panel, you’ll be prompted to select a graphic to relink. Select a different graphic, and click the Relink button (Figure 11).

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Figure 11: To relink a graphic to another CC library graphic in the Links panel, click the Relink From CC Libraries icon. Then, in the CC Libraries panel, select the replacement graphic.

Searching for assets The more you use CC libraries, the more assets you add, and the harder it is to find them again! Using more libraries (for example, a different library for each project or client) can help you organize your assets. Another option is to use the search field at

the top of the CC Libraries panel—yes, the same search field that can be used to search for Adobe Stock can also be used to search for assets in libraries. Click the small triangle to the right of the search field, and choose Current Library or All Libraries.

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Creative Cloud Libraries When you’re searching for assets, remember that you can type almost anything that may appear in the name or description of the item. For example, if you don’t remember the name of the paragraph style, but you know that it uses the Franklin Gothic font, you can just type “Franklin,” and the CC Libraries panel will display all the character and paragraph styles that use that font. Working with library assets in a web browser Another way to work with a CC library is to view it in your Creative Cloud Files area on the web. The Files area includes libraries, files that you’ve uploaded, and artwork created in mobile devices. Some commands (like those for sharing or collaborating) open your web browser to this area automatically. For example, an easy way to view your library assets is to use the Creative Cloud Desktop application. Choose Assets > Files > View On Web. You can also view it by logging in to your account at

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Adobe.com and clicking the Libraries link in your profile. When viewing your libraries in a web browser, the categories are summarized at the upper left. Clicking on a library opens thumbnails of its contents (Figure 12). At the upper right are commands for working with assets: you can choose viewing and sorting options; find commands to move, copy, rename, and delete assets; or use

Figure 12: You can also access your CC library assets in a web browser.

the sharing and collaborating commands described below.

Sharing Assets and Collaborating Similar to cloud services like Dropbox or Google Drive, the Adobe Creative Cloud provides the ability to share a link to a library (or other Creative Cloud file) or to collaborate in working with your assets with other colleagues. But let’s get clear about Adobe’s terminology: Sharing lets users download a read-only copy of a folder, or individual assets, but leaves your assets unchanged. Collaborating gives a colleague full access to edit or share the assets. Sharing assets Public sharing of assets ensures that you retain complete control over your content. Recipients get read-only access to your assets, which means they cannot upload, update, or delete them. When working with individual files on disk (or in the cloud), the

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Creative Cloud Libraries shared assets are accessed using a unique short adobe.ly URL that you send via email or copy/paste to share. At any time, you can turn off the URL to revoke access. When it comes to sharing a CC library, select the library in the CC Libraries panel, and choose Share Link from the panel menu. You’ll get switched to your web browser, and see the Send Link window. If your asset is not already public, you must check Create Public Link. Then a public link and URL are created (Figure 13). Specify the

Figure 13: You can send a read-only copy of your CC library assets to colleagues to view or download.

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email addresses you want to send the link to, or copy the link provided. If for some reason you want people to be able to see your assets but not download them, click Advanced Options, and deselect Allow Downloads. Clicking the short URL opens the shared file or folder in a web browser. Recipients don’t have to be Creative Cloud members to view or access publicly shared files and folders. If you want to stop sharing the library, choose Share Link again from the CC Libraries menu. The web interface opens, and in the Send Link window, choose Remove Public Link. Collaborating Sharing a library of assets is interesting, but what’s really cool is that you can collaborate with colleagues on a library! As I said, collaborating means you’re giving editing rights, too, so they can view, edit, use, rename, move, or delete the contents of a shared

library. Be careful whom you choose—the CC Libraries panel doesn’t have an undo feature. Collaborators will need an Adobe ID; if they don’t have one already, they can create one when they accept the invitation. Inviting colleagues. To invite colleagues to collaborate on a library, select the library in the CC Libraries panel, and choose Collaborate from the panel menu. You’ll be transferred to the Libraries section of My Assets (as described above in “Working with library assets in a web browser”). An invitation window appears where you can enter an email address and optional message to the person you’re inviting to share a library (Figure 14, next page). After doing so, click Invite. You can then invite additional colleagues as well. When someone accepts your invitation (see below), you’ll receive a notification and the activity will show in the Home tab of the Creative Cloud desktop application. In the Libraries category of your Creative Cloud files, the library now appears in the Shared

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Creative Cloud Libraries section, and a small Share icon appears beside its name. Accepting an invitation. If you’re logged in with your Adobe ID in the Creative Cloud desktop application, you’ll see an Updates And Requests banner at the top of the application. Click the banner, and click the Accept button. You’ll also receive an invitation email, sent by Adobe Creative Cloud, with a link you can click to accept (Figure 15). All invited members of the Shared Library can now perform all the functions I’ve described above. Managing a shared library. You can manage collaborators to a shared library by choosing Collaborate from the CC Libraries panel menu. The Collaborators window in the web interface displays the status of your invitations. The person who initially shared the library is the “owner.” Collaborators who haven’t yet accepted the invite have “Invited” displayed next to their names/email IDs. To remove a single user, click the X icon next to the user, and click Remove Access (if

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Figure 14: When beginning a collaboration, this dialog box creates an invitation to those you want to include.

Figure 15: Your invitee will receive a link to begin the collaboration process.

the collaborator has accepted the invitation) or Remove Invitation (if the collaborator hasn’t accepted the invitation yet). Or, to take back the whole thing so that you’re no longer collaborating, delete all the users of the library. On the flip side, if you are a collaborator on someone else’s shared library, and would like to stop sharing it, select the name of the library in the CC Libraries panel, and choose Leave Library from the panel menu. Important limitations. Adobe has restricted the file space allocated to a paid Adobe ID to 20 GB. A free membership is limited to 2 GB. Shared assets take up space in each participant’s storage quota, including free members. That would limit the ability to share many large files with free members. For more information about collaborations, view the Collaboration FAQ.

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Creative Cloud Libraries Take it for a spin! While the Creative Cloud library feature is still evolving, its advantages over old-fashioned InDesign libraries are clear (and will only grow in the future). So why not kick the tires? When you have a new project or a point in your schedule with a little time to experiment, give CC libraries a try. Once you see them in action, chances are you’ll wonder how you ever got along without them. Steve Werner is a longtime writer for InDesign Magazine and InDesignSecrets, and presents training and consulting in the San Francisco Bay Area.

The Conference for Photoshop and Illustrator Users July 10–13 Minneapolis creativepro.com/conference Bert Monroy Deke McClelland Von Glitschka Sharon Steuer Jesús Ramirez Mark Heaps Colin Smith Chris Converse Keith Gilbert

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By Colin Flashman

Overprinting Options

Multiply? Overprint? Darken? What’s the difference? And how do you choose the method that will give you the results you want in your print job? As a prepress operator, I regularly inspect artwork supplied by clients to make sure that it’s fit to print. And I often notice that they’ve used the Multiply blending feature to make an object overprint its background, when simply applying an overprint from the Attributes panel would have done the job. By itself, this is not a big issue, but it’s important for InDesign users to understand that the Multiply feature is not the same as the overprint attribute. The purpose of the overprint attribute is to enable an object assigned with a specific color to overprint (that is, print on top of the objects behind it without “knocking out” the colors underneath it). Multiply, on the other hand, is a

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blend mode that uses a mathematical formula to determine the color of an object’s contents based on the colors underneath the object.

Because It’s Convenient! I understand that the Multiply option is convenient in certain circumstances. For example, if a logo needs to overprint, but the logo is an Illustrator file, you can’t apply the overprint attribute to it. But you can apply a Multiply or Darken blend to the image to achieve an overprint-style effect. Of course you could always open the Illustrator file and set the appropriate overprints where required, but that is time-consuming in

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Feature: Overprinting Options

comparison to applying a quick fix in InDesign. In Figure 1, you can see how the Multiply setting determines that the entire graphic will overprint—including the white items depicting the mouth, eyes, and borders of the arm. In contrast, while manually applying overprints may be time-consuming, it provides the artist with more control over what should and should not overprint.

Pros and Cons of Overprint In general, I prefer using the overprint attribute rather than a Multiply blend mode. But there are pros and cons of each, so I’ve prepared a list of issues that you should be aware of. Acrobat level 4 flattening on line art may lose quality If any blend effect (such as Multiply or Darken) has been assigned to a bitmapped line art image to make it behave like an overprint, an unwanted consequence can

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Figure 1: A: An Illustrator logo placed into InDesign. Note that both overprint checkboxes are grayed out. B: The same logo with a Multiply effect applied. Note that the white portions of the logo have disappeared.

A

B

occur if you are exporting to PDF with Acrobat 4.0 compatibility. I have written about this before, but it bears repeating: this operation turns high-resolution line art scans into CMYK scans that then get treated as halftone images in a RIP, losing any definition that was in the original high-resolution line art scan. Worse, it loses even more quality if any resampling is applied within the PDF export setting (Figure 2, next pages). Considering that print workflows based on the latest Adobe PDF Print Engine can process PDF/X-4 jobs natively

without flattening artwork or converting to PostScript, this should not be a widespread issue. However, it is worth noting that two of the six default PDF export settings in InDesign—PDF/X-1a: 2001 and PDF/X-3: 2002—do use Acrobat 4.0 Compatibility and will resample these kinds of images. The two functions compete— and both lose While it is possible to apply both an overprint and a transparency setting to the same object… just don’t. Doing so can create

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Feature: Overprinting Options

Figure 2: A: A multiply effect applied to a high-resolution line art logo in InDesign and a PDF export setting that will flatten the PDF. B: The output PDF in Acrobat; the image has been downsampled and converted to CMYK. C: Overprint-only applied to the same logo and a PDF export setting that will maintain transparency. D: The output PDF in Acrobat; no downsampling has occurred. (Continued on next page)

A

B

C

D

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Feature: Overprinting Options

Figure 2, continued: E: A multiply effect applied to a line art logo and a PDF export setting that will maintain the transparency. F: The output PDF, with no loss of resolution in the image.

E

F

colors that shouldn’t be there. Take the example of a red solid meant to overprint a 30% yellow background (Figure 3, next page). Everything is fine until the red spotcolor visibility is hidden in the separations preview, and suddenly the 30% yellow background has increased to 51%. This is because a Multiply effect and overprint are applied at the same time. If the multiply effect is removed, the color returns to normal. Likewise, if the multiply effect

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remains but the overprint is removed, the color returns to normal. Default Black Overprint can create colors that weren’t intended This issue is similar in nature to the previous one. Here, the 50% black box has to overprint the 30% yellow background. Several instances using different variations on colors, blends, opacities, and tints have been created, and in most instances the methods

all worked. An exception was where the color of the 30% yellow increased to 41%. Why? The Attributes panel shows no overprints present, so the earlier behavior of Multiply and overprint being applied at the same time isn’t happening, right? Well, no… One look at the handling of black within the Preferences dialog box reveals that the [Black 100] color is set to overprint (Figure 4, page 27–28).

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Feature: Overprinting Options

Figure 3: A: A spot-color vector within InDesign with both an overprint and Multiply effect applied above a 30% yellow background. Note the position of the cursor and the separations preview values. B: The same image, with the spot-color channel hidden; a denser yellow appears, instead of a consistent 30% yellow background. C and D: The same image when overprint or multiply is turned off.

A

B

C

D

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Feature: Overprinting Options

Figure 4: A–C, the desired output, using three separate methods. D: Notice the unwanted higher yellow component in the separations preview. (Continued on next page)

A

B

C

D

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Feature: Overprinting Options

Figure 4, continued: E: The Appearance of Black panel in the Preferences dialog box. F and G: The solution and outcome

F

E

G

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Feature: Overprinting Options

To maintain the Multiply effect but fix the increased yellow background in this example, there are two solutions: either turn off the Black Overprint option in the Preferences panel, or make a new black swatch with a different name (for example, “knockout black”). More information on the “knockout black” workaround can be found here. Use Darken instead Darken is another blend mode that can behave in a similar way to both the Multiply blend mode and the overprint attribute. It does have one important difference: when applied to an object above another object, the color will change to the darkest elements of both objects but go no further. Take the maroon box and gray boxes in Figure 5. The gray box needs to be 40% where the two boxes overlap. The maroon color has a 40% black within the color breakdown, whereas the gray is a 20% black. If the overprint attribute is applied to

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Figures 5: A An overprint in this instance will lighten the color, while B shows that Multiply will darken the color, instead of C, which achieves the desired color.

A

B

C

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Feature: Overprinting Options

the gray box, the red in the overlap is unexpectedly lighter, at 20%,—not the desired result! However, if the overprint attribute is removed and the Multiply blend effect applied, the maroon now becomes darker, but again, that is not the desired result— the maroon should stay the same color. To achieve this, the Multiply blend effect is removed and the Darken effect is applied, and suddenly the overlap matches the maroon box, as intended. In situations such as this, where the overprint attribute cannot be applied or yields an unusual result, then the Darken blend mode may be more appropriate.

Blend opacities make a difference Using the last example, the gray color is a tint of the [Black]. However, if the gray is made of 100% Black and the opacity of the Darken effect is turned to 20%, the gray is 20% but the overlap now mimics the Multiply effect (Figure 6). To make sure it

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Figure 6: Reduced opacity and the Darken blend mode achieve a similar effect to using the Multiply blend mode and lowering the tint value of a swatch (as shown in Figure 5b).

isn’t an earlier “black overprint” issue, the fill is changed to the “knockout black” color, but the result is the same.

The math can be confusing Take two objects with the same Multiply opacity of 100% and fill of 50%. If these two images are overlapped, what is the resulting color? The Separations Preview panel indicates 75% (Figure 7a, next page). Assuming that InDesign is taking the 50% fill from the object on the bottom, and then adding 50% of the 50% fill of the object above to give 25%, therefore creating 75%. Using that logic, if both of the 50% values are changed to 40%, the fill color of the overlap should

be 56%… but the Separations Preview panel says it is 64% (Figure 7b, next page). So that observation for working out the overlap color is incorrect. The correct formulas to determine all blend modes can be found here. Be warned, it is not for the faint of heart. It is worth highlighting this because it is not uncommon for designers to create logos using Multiply effects to generate overlap colors. However, if color precision is key, it is worth creating the colors from known swatches rather than using the blend effects. This is especially true if the logo is to be made from spot colors… and this provides a segue to the next issue.

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Feature: Overprinting Options

Multiplying spot colors David Blatner has written about InDesign’s problems displaying spot colors involved with overprinting or transparency effects, and how the high-resolution preview does not necessarily provide an accurate representation of what a finished printed product will look like. Instead, turning on Overprint Preview is the key to getting a more accurate onscreen representation. Figure 8 (next page) demonstrates this phenomenon in action. It features a solid spot background with the same spot color used for the type. The type has a Multiply blend effect applied, and when viewed with the high-resolution preview, the type can be seen. However, when the separations preview is turned on, the type disappears, and this is how the end result would appear as a PDF. Overprint Preview also shows other features that are not necessarily visible in high-resolution preview, such as blend effects that do not work with spot colors.

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A

B Figure 7: Both objects have a multiply effect, but the mathematics to determine the overlap color value are inconsistent using an initial observation.

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Feature: Overprinting Options

Unexpected intervention from RIP software Despite all best intentions of creating the artwork carefully, sometimes issues may arise when a third party is printing the artwork.

Some Raster Image Processing (RIP) software used by printing businesses to impose and prepare printers’ plates or digital prints can override the blend and overprint settings in PDFs created using any software, including Adobe InDesign. So it is very

important to communicate with your printer and have a clear understanding of how overprints will be handled. If you get proofs, make sure to ask if they accurately reflect the overprint settings used in the final job.

Figure 8: A demonstrates how the high-resolution preview makes it appear possible to multiply a solid fill of a spot color above a solid fill of the same spot color. B shows how it appears with Overprint Preview (or Separations Preview) turned on—and this, sadly, is how it will print or export to PDF.

B

A

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Feature: Overprinting Options

What to do The purpose of this article is not to try and force users to stop using Multiply when an overprint attribute would work just as well, but rather to highlight the issues that can arise by using Multiply for a task it was not intended to do. Here are a few takeaway points for you to remember: »» Try to use the overprint attributes instead of Multiply or Darken where appropriate. »» If a transparency blend effect is required, use either the blend effect or overprint; do not use both at the same time. »» Be conscious of unwanted colors produced by InDesign’s black overprint preference. »» To make a color lighter, know that adjusting its opacity directly influences the colors underneath the adjusted color. »» Rely on the Overprint Preview rather than the high-resolution preview. »» Clearly communicate with your print provider to determine how PDFs need to be prepared for their purposes.

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With those rules in mind, you’ll be far better prepared to create well-built color documents, ready to print.

Colin Flashman is a prepress operator at Openbook Howden Design & Print in Adelaide, Australia. He is also host and founder of the website and youtube channel Colecandoo, an amateur javascripter, and is a contributor to InDesignSecrets and InDesign Magazine. Colin will also be a presenter at this year’s PePcon: The Print + ePublishing Conference in San Diego, California.

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By Mike Rankin

InStep: Tumbling Tricks

Create a cascade of animated… anything. Recently, I wrote a few articles at InDesignSecrets on how to make holidaythemed graphic effects. One of the effects was falling snow, which I created with InDesign’s animation tools and then posted to Adobe Publish Online. You can view the falling snow animation here. In it, snowflakes of different sizes slowly drop around the title “Happy Holidays,” curving and turning as they go to create a glimmering winter wonderland. This is a cool effect, but what’s even cooler is how you can easily adapt it to

1. Choose your theme

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create all kinds of other fun and festive looks for different holidays, seasons, and special occasions. For example, you can create some gently falling leaves to enhance a project in autumn. Or try a blustery day effect with some umbrellas floating on the wind. Or drop a bunch of celebratory balloons any time you want to mark a birthday, anniversary, or achievement. There are endless variations and themes you can play with, and they all start with the steps I’ll show you in this article.

Start by choosing the theme of your project, and decide what kind of graphics you want to use to illustrate that theme. In this example, I’ll use a theme of “celebration” and illustrate it with balloons.

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InStep: Tumbling Tricks

2. Create the graphics

You can use native InDesign objects, but you’ll have more flexibility if you use placed graphics. Why? Because once you’re finished creating the effect, it’s easy to switch from falling balloons to falling leaves, snowflakes, or anything else just by relinking to a different set of image files. In this case, I used a piece of stock art as a starting point. It contains a bunch of colorful balloons in vector format.

In order to animate the balloons individually, I needed to separate them into different files. So I opened the file in Illustrator and copied a balloon of each color that I wanted (blue, green, pink, purple, and yellow) into separate Illustrator files.

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InStep: Tumbling Tricks

3. Place the graphics

4. Add some type

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Place the graphics into your InDesign document. In my example, I created a new document using the Digital Publishing Intent with an iPad page size. Then I placed each of my Illustrator balloon graphics, and positioned them on the pasteboard above the page.

I wanted a static element for the balloons to fall past, so I added a text frame with the word Celebrate in a festive script typeface called Savoye.

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InStep: Tumbling Tricks

5. Position the graphics

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To create a random cascading effect, it’s necessary to vary the starting positions of the graphics. All you have to do is move them with the Selection tool.

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InStep: Tumbling Tricks

6. Add a custom animation

Using the Pen tool, draw a curved path from one of the graphics to the pasteboard below the page.

Then select the path and the graphic and, in the Animation panel, click the Convert to Motion Path button.

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InStep: Tumbling Tricks

Repeat this process to add custom animations to all the graphics, using paths that curve in different ways.

Vary the Duration value to make the graphics move at different speeds, and make sure all the animations are set to Loop.

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InStep: Tumbling Tricks

7. Duplicate the graphics

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Create as many copies of the graphics as you like by selecting each one and Option/Alt-dragging them to other positions above the page.

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InStep: Tumbling Tricks

8. Vary the graphics

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Add some variety to the graphics by rotating them and resizing them.

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InStep: Tumbling Tricks

9. Vary the animations

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Add more variation to the animations. Use the Direct Selection tool to reshape some of the motion paths, and set varying Rotation values in the Animation panel. Use the EPUB Interactivity Preview panel (Window > Interactive > EPUB Interactivity Preview) to see the results and guide you in making further tweaks.

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InStep: Tumbling Tricks

10. Arrange the stacking

Use Object > Arrange > Send to Back (or Bring to Front) to make graphics move in front of or behind the type as desired.

11. Set the timing

In the Timing panel, select all the animations, and click the Play Together button so they all play at the same time. Also confirm that the Event is set to On Page Load for all animations.

12. Export the document

Export your document to Fixed-Layout EPUB or Publish Online. And remember, to create a new variation (like to change those falling balloons into falling leaves), just use the Links panel to relink to a new set of graphics. It’s as easy as falling down!

order

Mike Rankin is the Editor in Chief of InDesign Magazine and author of several Lynda.com courses, including InDesign FX.

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By Erica Gamet

Supercharge Your Workflow

Put the pedal to the metal with these cool add-ons. When talking about workflow automation in InDesign, you undoubtedly know about styles, and maybe have even ventured into GREP, data merge, or XML. But those tools are generally reserved for tasks that require heavy lifting. What about those tasks that seem small and insignificant, but that also seem to eat up much of our workday? There are plenty of quick solutions that make the workflow process quicker and easier and that let you focus on your design and layout. Some are found right within InDesign and are simple to implement. Others are standalone helpers that can make your workflow fly!

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Let’s take a look at some of the best ways you can save yourself time, get your work done faster, and look like a star to your client or boss!

Opening, Saving, and Navigating Unless you’ve somehow hit the “layout lottery” and work only on the same file every day, you probably spend a lot of time opening and saving files. And you more than likely burn precious time traipsing through your computer’s files and folders, shuffling, renaming, and organizing them. (Don’t ask me how I know this.) It’s a tedious job, but if you want to supercharge this file organization process, a third-party productivity tool might be just what you need.

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Feature: Supercharge Your Workflow

What better place to start than with app launchers? It should come as no surprise that app launchers’ main purpose is to launch apps. What might not be as obvious is that these productivity helpers also open often-used files, perform calculations, and give the user’s workflow a boost. While having an app easily accessible from the Mac’s Dock or Windows Start menu is helpful, launching an app with a keyboard shortcut is better. For example, as a trainer, I need to maintain different versions of InDesign, and launching each one via a shortcut sure beats trying to distinguish CC 2014 from CC 2015 from CS6 based on those little icons alone. App launchers have grown to be sort of a mission control for everything you need your computer to do. LaunchBar ($30; Mac-only; from Objective Development) is a powerhouse application that does so much more than I could possibly cover here. Workflow-wise, its strengths lie in quickly opening apps and documents, working with clipboard

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items, and navigating through recent items regardless of file type. Opening apps with LaunchBar is as easy as recalling user-defined abbreviations and viewing folders—and their deeply-nested contents. The app also learns your usage and preferences, and adjusts search results accordingly. The clipboard functions include remembering your clipboard history as well as merging clipboard items to paste each one as a single item. Launchy (donationware; Windows and Mac; from Launchy.net) is a cross-platform application whose main function is launching apps and files. If you’re looking for a more slimmed-down launcher, Launchy delivers with graceful simplicity. Sometimes you don’t need all the bells and whistles; you just need to be able to glide deftly from Word for some text, out to InDesign to style that text and create a PDF, and then over to your email to send a proof to your client. Launchy serves up access to all these functions with hot-key access to its search

window (Figure 1). From there, type part of the name, or enter a custom command, and you’re instantly presented with your quarry.

Figure 1: Start typing a file or app name in Launchy to quickly jump to that item.

Automating Tasks No one likes to repeat themselves, and there's a lot of that when it comes to workflow. Doing the same thing over and over can be crazy-making. Luckily, there are products whose main goal is to automate some of the repetitive tasks creative pros like ourselves have to deal with. Keyboard Maestro ($36; Mac-only; from Stairways Software) lets you conduct your

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Feature: Supercharge Your Workflow Figure 2: Set macros in Keyboard Maestro and trigger them with keyboard shortcuts.

Mac’s functions to keep your workflow humming along. This full-featured productivity enhancer works with macros you create to launch other apps (Figure 2), work with your clipboard history, use shortcuts to enter everything from dates to URLs, even control iTunes! Keyboard Maestro can perform recorded actions for those tedious tasks we spend too much time doing. Set an action to open a folder of images, open each image, and then manipulate the image by rotating and cropping that image. Knowing what it’s like to perform a task like that over and over, the advantage to a tool like Keyboard Maestro is glaringly obvious. Automator (Free; Mac-only) (Figure 3) does just what you think it might: it automates. Built into Mac OS X, Automator runs actions, much like those in Photoshop, to save you from doing the same process over and over ad nauseam. I honestly haven’t used it much since its introduction back in 2005, but I love hearing how my fellow creatives are using it. Whether it’s batch

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Figure 3: Set up workflows in OS X’s Automator.

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Feature: Supercharge Your Workflow

converting images to a standard file format, or setting up a watched folder that automatically creates an email, complete with a PDF proof generated in InDesign, Automator wields a mighty production sword. Like an old friend you’ve reunited with on Facebook, I’ve recently been looking to “friend” Automator again. You can set up a series of actions that can be invoked either through Automator itself or through a particular app’s Services menu. There are quite a few actions prebuilt into the OS, and many apps come bundled with others as well. Action sets are created within Automator and fall into categories such as workflow, service, and folder actions. Workflow actions are run from within Automator itself, as they often encompass a variety of tasks across multiple apps. Service actions are context-based, depending on which application they are launched from. Folder actions are applied to a watched folder and activated when something moves into that folder. For example, you

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can set up a watched folder that creates an iPhoto album whenever photos are placed into the folder. Since Apple’s productivity software, like Keynote and Pages, hooks right into iPhoto for its media, Automator would play a key role in creating albums that are quickly sorted and accessed from within those apps. You can also purchase third-party Automator action packs, including Creative Cloud-specific ones. Automated Workflows offers software-specific “action packs” for Illustrator, FileMaker Pro, InDesign, and more. Their InDesign bundle automates bulk packaging, printing, and saving; merging multiple documents; placing text into frames while assigning paragraph styles; and automatically placing images into defined frames. Default Folder X ($35; Mac only; from St. Clair Software) takes control of opening and saving files where and how you need them. As the name suggests, you can set up and easily recall any one of many default

folders (even on an app-by-app basis). If you consistently need to save InDesign files to your Works in Progress folder, you can set that behavior as the default, eliminating the time it takes to drill down through a folder hierarchy. Even better, Default Folder surrounds all your Open or Save dialog boxes with a host of extra features that let you navigate to folders, rename files, or even manage your directories without switching to the Finder. It even knows what folders you currently have open in your Finder window and lets you open or save files into them (Figure 4).

Figure 4: Assign a default folder for each application with Default Folder X.

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Feature: Supercharge Your Workflow

Working With Text Working in InDesign, we all deal with text at some point. So. Much. Text! If you’re among those who have to enter that text directly into InDesign, you know some of the pitfalls that come along with the task. For me, I find that if I’m keying in type, it’s often words and phrases that I use again and again, whether I’m working on a new software workbook or an annual report for a client. Luckily, there are options to keep you sane, and consistent, while entering text. InDesign’s Autocorrect Autocorrect is a substantial list of commonly misspelled words and their properly spelled versions that will—as the name suggests— autocorrect to the right version for you. And it’s built right into InDesign! It’s off by default; you can toggle it on in InDesign’s Preferences dialog box. You can choose to turn on auto capitalization there, as well. I generally activate Autocorrect only sparingly, as my “typos” tend to be overlooked,

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due to the fact they are actual words… just not the ones I meant to use. What I do use autocorrect for is sort of a shorthand dictionary. For instance, when I get tired of typing software titles with intercaps (I’m looking at you, InDesign) or spelling out Peritoneal Mesothelioma and other medical terms, I turn to Autocorrect to do the heavy lifting via text shortcuts. To add a new text shortcut, open Preferences for Autocorrect (Figure 5), click the box to enable it, and then click Add. In the Misspelled Word field, enter the phrase you want to type, and put the full phrase in the second box. You can’t use special characters in the short phrase, so you’ll have to work with acronyms or easy-to-remember phrases (like “prms” for Peritoneal Mesothelioma). Some special characters, including diacritics, cannot be typed in the dialog box for the correction, so you’ll have to copy and paste them in. Note that InDesign’s Autocorrect is an all-or-nothing prospect in that it’s either on

Figure 5: InDesign’s Autocorrect window.

or off. I tend to use it in short bursts, when I know I’m going to be typing in all my medical terms or computer software names. If you want it on all the time, but don’t want it correcting everything, you could always manually remove all of the built-in options by shift-selecting them in the dialog box, and then choosing Remove. You can learn more about Autocorrect here and even learn how to insert special characters in this article.

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Feature: Supercharge Your Workflow

Text snippet software If you need more control over text snippets—and want to access them in any application—you’ll probably want to look into third-party software for this task. On the Mac, the go-to application for system-wide text snippets is TextExpander ($45; from SmileSoftware.com). At its most basic, it lets you create a whole dictionary of snippets that will expand wherever and whenever you need. As an InDesign user, this can save you a ton of time if you find yourself typing the same thing over and over. If that repetitive text is a long phrase, hard to spell, or otherwise trips you up, TextExpander (Figure 6) can make these task so much easier. TextExpander also lets you use special characters, which means it’s even easier to create triggers that won’t actually appear in your text. For instance, if you need to insert our previous example of Peritoneal Mesothelioma, you could assign it a shortcut of #PM. When using text-expanding

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shortcuts, I find that it helps my production to use a standard naming scheme. If I’m working on a medical brochure, I’d use the pound/hash sign (#) and maybe a 2- or 3-letter code for each medical term. TextExpander is about more than just putting text snippets into your text. It also helps productivity by suggesting snippets, lets you put clipboard contents into a snippet, and inserts variables like date and time as you work. On the Windows side, Breevy ($40; from 16 Software) is a solid choice for text expansion. Its main purpose is to provide an easy way to expand text where you need it, and to provide shortcuts for operations on your computer. Like TextExpander, Breevy comes with a built-in autocorrect dictionary, and lets you create your own collection of shortcuts (Figure 7). Breevy integrates with Dropbox, allowing syncing in both directions, giving you access to your shortcuts, no matter what computer you’re using (so long as you have

Figure 6: Text Expander.

Figure 7: Breevy’s main control window.

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Feature: Supercharge Your Workflow

Breevy on each machine, of course). And because many people live in the Mac and Windows worlds simultaneously, Breevy even has the ability to import and sync your TextExpander snippets.

Automating Adding Items to InDesign Files Of course, text isn’t the only thing that needs to be added to InDesign. We InDesign users spend a lot of our time bringing in assets from elsewhere. Using apps to speed up this process is a big plus to our workflow. Clipboard managers Clipboards on both Windows and Mac are great for picking up an item in one place and dropping it in another. The biggest limitation to that process is that the built-in clipboard can handle only one item at a time—and you have to remember what exactly it is that you last copied to it. If you do a lot of copying and pasting of text,

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images, and other items, you might really appreciate a standalone clipboard manager. There are many options available for clipboard management on the Mac, all packed with features you may or may not need. Some simple ones are even built in to other apps I’ve talked about, such as LaunchBar and Keyboard Maestro. The top two standalone clipboard contenders are Paste ($10; Dmitry Obukhov) and Copy’em Paste ($15; from Apprywhere), both found on the Mac App Store.

Paste (Figure 8) features a beautiful visual interface, complete with color-coding and app icons for easy visual recognition. Once an item is copied—via normal copying methods—it lives in Paste’s clipboard history (which you can set from 10 items to unlimited). Retrieving an item is as easy as invoking your own custom keyboard shortcut or clicking the menu bar icon. You can then scroll through the items in reverse chronological order or do a text-based search. Paste ignores copied items from Figure 8: Paste manages clipboard items visually.

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Feature: Supercharge Your Workflow

privacy-sensitive apps like Keychain and password managers, but you can always customize these rules to fit your requirements. Copy’em Paste (Figure 9) isn’t as visually appealing, but excels in both speed and access to copied items. After copying an item, you can assign it a name and a shortcut—as well as a Favorite status—for ease of retrieval. Ditto (free) is consistently ranked as the best clipboard manager on the Windows platform. Items copied are automatically saved to Ditto’s multi clipboard, whether they’re text, HTML, or images, with custom formatting being retained. Activated via a global hot key, Ditto (Figure 10) lets you search image thumbnails or by text, and to paste an item you can either click it or drag and drop it into the receiving app. Not only can Ditto work over a network, but multiple computers’ clipboards can be synced—great if you’re working on more than one machine. One caveat: Many of the clipboard managers fall a bit short when it comes to

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Figure 9: Copy’em Paste’s list of recently copied items.

Figure 10: Ditto clipboard management utility for Windows.

copying objects out of InDesign. For example, Keyboard Maestro and Copy 'Em Paste convert InDesign objects to PDF, while the Paste app simply ignores the command

altogether. This may be due to the InDesign application architecture, as copying images and shapes from Word works as expected. When pasting an image into InDesign, it actually performs a Place command, creating a link. If the file gets moved, you’ll be left with a missing link, but the Paste app updates the location for all future paste actions. Remember, the goal here is saving time, so evaluate your copy/paste workflow needs before deciding on a clipboard manager. Adobe Bridge Adobe Bridge is a lot like SPAM® (the meat product, not the messages in your inbox that seem to breed like rabbits): you either love it or hate it. Bridge—and InDesign’s built-in Mini Bridge—is Adobe’s digital asset management tool that comes as part of Creative Cloud/Creative Suite. While Bridge is often handy to photographers with its batch-editing, watermarking, and naming functions, it can be a vital part of an

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InDesign workflow as well. A big plus with Bridge (Figure 11) is its ability to visually sort through and select items to be placed within InDesign. This is especially helpful when dealing with EPS or AI files saved without a preview. Bridge will show you what the content looks like, saving you from having to place a file just to find out it wasn’t the file you were looking for. If you’ve launched Mini Bridge within InDesign (which still requires you to launch the full version of Bridge in the background, for reasons I can’t fathom), you can easily search for image files based on keywords. Also, if you’ve set up collections in Bridge, you can search those collections from within Mini Bridge. Bridge’s Smart Collections work a lot like a Smart Playlist in iTunes, in that you set criteria based on metadata, and the collection will be populated automatically. After setting the location parameter, which can be as inclusive as your entire computer, you define your collection based on color profiles, keywords, date created, and

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Figure 11: The Adobe Bridge window.

document type, among other data. Back in Mini Bridge, you can view your collections by name, search individual folders, or even search only in recently-accessed folders. I won’t tell you which side of the Bridge

divide I’m camped in, but I will say that for those people with large amounts of assets, Bridge—and its little cousin Mini Bridge— makes it easier to work those assets into an InDesign workflow.

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Feature: Supercharge Your Workflow

Automation Within InDesign One of the greatest underlying features in InDesign is its arsenal of automation features. From text styles to data merge to GREP and XML, InDesign is brimming with features that do much of the gruntwork in the production process. Learning to leverage those automation assets will speed up your workflow and ensure consistency across your work. Much of the automation is just about getting each process done quicker, and that’s where the following features come in.

lets each of us customize its keyboard shortcuts to our liking, adding ones where none existed and changing ones that make no sense to us. To customize your shortcuts, go to the Edit menu, and choose Keyboard Shortcuts near the bottom. In the resulting dialog box (Figure 12), click the New Set button and give it a name (you can't modify the Default set). Then, to add or change an item’s shortcut, you’ll first need to choose from the list

in the Product Area menu, and then select the item in the Commands list. Don’t know in which Product Area a particular feature lives? No problem: Click the Show Set button in the dialog box and up comes a text editor with a long list of every shortcut in InDesign, categorized into product areas for your convenience. Finally, to apply a keystroke, in the New Shortcut field, simply key in the shortcut as you’ll use it (for example, press the F2 Figure 12: Editing InDesign’s keyboard shortcuts.

Shortcuts If you aren’t using keyboard shortcuts, I can only ask, “WHY?!”. Seriously, shortcuts are your friends; they can save you from that repetitive stress injury you’re about to get by going to menus all day long. If you learn to use the shortcuts for those actions that you perform regularly—or that live nested deep within menus and submenus—you’re doing yourself a favor. Happily, InDesign

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key, and not F and then 2). If that keyboard shortcut is assigned to another action, it will warn you. Clicking Assign will assign the shortcut (and strip it from the other item if previously assigned). If you’ve made any additions, you’ll have to save your new keyboard shortcut set before clicking OK.

Migrating Shortcuts When you update to a new version of InDesign, your shortcuts will make the trip, too. Starting with InDesign CC 2015.2, settings are synced by default when updating. If you don’t want them to update, deselect Advanced Options > Import Previous Settings And Preferences after you’ve clicked Update in the Creative Cloud app. In prior versions of InDesign CC, click the Sync Settings buttons in the lower left corner of the application window, or manage what settings get synced in InDesign’s preferences.

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Quick Apply Not every item can—or should—have a shortcut. For starters, remembering all those key combos would be a chore in itself. That’s where InDesign’s Quick Apply feature steps onto the main stage. With a simple keystroke of Command+Return or Ctrl+Enter, the Quick Apply feature springs to life in the form of a floating panel. That panel may well have a very long list of items, which doesn’t seem like it would be a timesaver. That’s because by default, Quick Apply is displaying all of InDesign’s styles—paragraph, character, table, cell, and object—scripts, and menu commands. If you start typing a portion of the name of the item you’re searching for, the list will grow shorter as you type. But if you’re typing something as common as “text,” your list isn’t going to feel very short. You can narrow Quick Apply’s search criteria by clicking the downward-pointing triangle (Figure 13) to bring up the search menu, and then making sure only your desired categories are selected.

Figure 13: To make using Quick Apply even quicker, deselect any categories you don't want to include.

So, now we’ve narrowed our search to, say, text, cell, and object styles: what’s next? Typing “text” now will bring up all styles with “text” in the name. Selecting the one you want is as easy as using your arrow keys to navigate to it, and then pressing Return or Enter. Being able to access all your styles at once from one panel is a huge timesaver over having four or five individual styles panels open and cluttering up your workspace. However, turning off and on each category is not practical if you’re constantly jumping between searching for styles, then scripts, then menu commands. If you have all of the options enabled, you can still search within just one category by adding

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a shortcut prefix (shown in parentheses in Figure 13, previous page) to your search term. For instance, if I don’t want to scroll through my huge list of scripts in the Scripts panel (and I often can’t remember the specific name, anyway), I can input “s:break” to find my elusive BreakFrame.jsx script. I can never find that sucker in the Scripts panel! Selecting it in the Quick Apply list and pressing Return or Enter will run that script. Similarly, selecting a style in this way will apply that style. And this is really cool: pressing Command+Return or Ctrl+Enter on a style opens the Style Options dialog box for that style so you can edit it.

Winning the Race Against Time I hope the timesavers I’ve described above provide solutions for your individual workflow issues—or at least spark a search for the tool that will meet your workflow needs. Once, I tried to estimate how much time I would save by using all of these productivity

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boosters. I took note of how often I opened a file or saved one, how much time I spent on repetitive tasks, and how much time I spent going to the menu for something I could have used a shortcut on. I divided, multiplied, carried the one… but eventually the math was too much for me and I gave up. I couldn’t stand the irony of spending so much time figuring out how much time I had saved! Suffice it to say that even using just a few of these items can give you the ability to speed up your workflow, which will save you time, frustration, and mistakes.

Erica Gamet is a speaker, writer, and trainer, focusing on Adobe InDesign and Illustrator, Apple Keynote and iBooks Author, and other production-related topics. With over 25 years experience in the graphics industry, she is a regular contributor to CreativePro.com. After living as a nomad, she recently put down roots in El Paso, Texas, where she hikes and bikes every chance she gets.

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GREP Level: Easy Intellectually, I understand that there is a difference between a, á, and à. As an American, I can’t actually pronounce the difference, but that’s my problem. And, of course, then there’s å, â, and ä (which are relatively common), and ã, ặ, ậ, ắ, ằ, ẳ, ẵ, ẩ, ầ, ấ, ả, ạ, ặ, and ǻ (which are mystifying). But GREP is usually extremely precise in its pattern matching, so if you search for a you will find just that one character, no more and no less. That’s sad, because sometimes you want to search for “any a, no matter the accent.” You could do that with the code [aáàåâäãặậắằẳẵẩầấảạặǻ] but that would

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be insane, especially if you had to search for several characters, each of which may or may not have an accent. Fortunately, InDesign adopted some of the POSIX codes (which isn’t strictly GREP, but works alongside the GREP features). And one of the most useful POSIX codes is called “character equivalents.” The code is expressed by placing the letter inside two square brackets and two equal symbols. Therefore [[=a=]] will find the “character equivalents” of the letter a. (Yes, I know that those other glyphs aren’t really “equivalents,” but that’s just the official name.) Unfortunately, this POSIX code is not case-sensitive! That means the expression

ấảạ ầ ẩ

ằẳẵ

Searching for characters when a rose is a róse is a røse…

ậắ

Character Equivalents

äãặ

[==]

åâ

aáà ǻ ặ

GREP of the Month

above will also find A, Á, Ă, and other variations of the capital A. So on the one hand, the code is very powerful, and on the other hand, its application is somewhat limited, and usually reserved for searching a document, rather than doing large-scale replacements. (For example, if you search for [[=c=]]a and replace it with ca, then all instances of ca, ča, Ca, and Ça will all change to the lowercase letters “ca”. Nevertheless, if you have an author who has been inconsistent in how and when they applied accents, this code is a terrific way to find all the various instances quickly. —David Blatner

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Best of the Blogs

Best of the Blogs

A collection of the most important and informative articles from InDesignSecrets, InCopySecrets, and EPUBSecrets. If you want to add comments or ask questions, just click the title of the article to view the original post in your web browser. Create a Valentine’s Day Pattern Using Conditional Text Kelly Vaughn | January 18, 2016

Valentine’s Day is coming up, and so for me it’s time to take a break from the serious work in order to make a design full of fun and whimsy. Checkerboard patterns are easy to make in InDesign because there are so many ways to create these tidy little blocks of color. You can use gradients and stroke styles, PatternMaker, and nested styles; and that’s just for starters! But in today’s exploration of obscure ways to make patterns in InDesign, I’d like to explore conditional text. If you’ve never used conditional text before (which is probably most of you), let me explain it. Conditional text is a way to show and hide certain bits of text all within a single document. It’s a great way to create multiple variations of the same document (such as a student/teacher guide or a catalog with different currencies). But there are also some unconventional uses for conditional text, including creating

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patterns that would be difficult or impossible to make any other way in InDesign. So let’s get started! 1. Create a new text frame. Bring up the Glyphs panel, and insert the heart-shaped glyph from Monotype Sorts. Color it red using the Swatches panel.

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2. Open the Conditional Text panel (Window > Type & Tables > Conditional Text), and make a new condition. Now, notice that the default indicator method for conditional text is “Underline,” but we’re going to change that to “Highlight.” The great thing about the Highlight method is that the height of the highlight automatically expands to the height of the character. So as the character gets larger, so does the highlight. Note: When using this technique, if the character isn’t vertically positioned within the highlight to your liking, use baseline shift to tweak it.

3. Next, select the heart, and apply the white condition to it.

4. Copy and paste the heart. (You may have to remove an extra space that InDesign automatically places in between them.) Select the second heart, and color it white. Apply the other condition.

Now, make a second condition in the same manner, but choose white for your color.

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5. Select both hearts, and then copy and paste them a bunch of times. Again, you’ll need to remove the extra spaces that InDesign puts in. But you can this with the Find/Change dialog box. Simply type a space in the Find What field, and leave the Change To field blank. Then click Change All.

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Because the colors in the grid are based on conditions, it’s very easy to change them. Simply double-click the condition, and choose a new color.

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6. Choose Show and Print. Because conditions are normally used for editorial purposes, by default they’re set to Show. But for this purpose, we’ll need the Indicators to Show And Print.

Just by changing the color of the conditions and the swatches, you can create whatever kind of Valentine’s Day sentiment you desire. I can easily see this design followed up with a dozen roses and a fancy dinner.

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But this current design is a little boring. There are already so many other ways to make a checkerboard pattern in InDesign. What if there was a way to make all these little hearts rotated a bit, so they look a little more hand-drawn and a little less computer-generated? Well, there is! Last night while I was sleeping, a memory of an old script was resurrected from my long-term memory. Jitterscript is a quirky little script written by the amazing Kris Coppieters of Rorohiko. I first heard about Jitterscript at an early PePcon (Print and ePublishing Conference) where Kris demonstrated this script at his Ignite session. Jitterscript adds a “hand-written” quality to text. It slightly rotates and vertically moves each character. When applied to a frame full of icon characters, it transforms them into an arrangement that looks like it has been elegantly scattered about, like sprinkled rose petals. The script folder contains five different variations to the script, all of which yield slightly different results.

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The script takes each individual character, puts it in its own text frame, and then rotates it slightly. The original, unaltered text frame remains at the base of the layer. When viewed with frame edges on, the result is rather frightening.

But when viewed in Preview mode, the result is stunning. It looks like I have created 200 individual valentines and spread them out gently across the page.

Add a sentiment for your sweetheart, and the design is complete.

Making an Animated Route Map Mike Rankin | January 25, 2016

Remember those cool flight maps from Raiders of the Lost Ark and the other Indiana Jones movies? There are tutorials all over the web for how to make effects like this in applications like After Effects, Final Cut Pro, and even Keynote (courtesy of the amazing Erica Gamet). Here’s how to make something similar with InDesign.

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Start with a background map image. It’s best to put it on its own layer, or at least lock it, so you’re not accidentally selecting it as you work with the animation effects.

Use the Pen tool to draw a straight line (curved lines won’t work) from one location to another. Format the line with a solid stroke.

With the Selection tool, copy the line, and paste it in place (Edit > Paste in Place), so you have two copies stacked on top of one another. Select both copies.

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In the Animation panel, click the button to convert to motion path.

Make sure that both Speed and Opacity are set to None.

The top copy of the line becomes the motion path. In the Properties section, choose Animate: To Current Location.

Give the animation a name.

Preview the animation. If it moves too quickly or slowly for your taste, adjust the Duration.

If you want to control the animation with a button, deselect the On Page Load event.

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Create a mask (a frame with no stroke and no fill) that just reveals the end position of the animation. Masking the animation is what will make the line appear to grow in length rather than just move over the map.

For the Action, choose On Release or Tap, Animation, Play.

Use the EPUB Interactivity Preview panel to preview the animation to confirm that the button works. Now repeat the process for as many legs of the trip as you want. You can either use different buttons for different legs of the trip, or wire up all the legs of the trip in the right order to the same button. With the Selection tool, select the animated line. Cut it and paste it into the mask (Edit > Paste Into). To control when the animation plays, make a button in the Buttons and Forms panel. Name it to match the animation.

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When you’re satisfied, export the document to Publish Online or Fixed-Layout EPUB. Click here to see what a finished animated route map looks like. Be aware that if you need to tweak any settings of a masked animation, you will need to cut it out of the mask. After you make your tweaks, paste the animation back into the mask (paste it in place so it doesn’t get moved out of position), and go back to the Buttons and Forms panel, and reestablish the button to trigger the animation (the trigger event is destroyed when you cut the animation out of the mask).

There are three tabs in the dialog box. In General options, both Inset Spacing and Vertical Justification can affect the first baseline placement.

Understanding the First Baseline Position of Text Mike Rankin | January 27, 2016

Ever mystified about why a particular piece of text begins so low (or so high) in its text frame? There are several settings that can affect the vertical placement of text. You can find them in the Text Frame Options dialog box, which you can open by selecting a text frame and pressing Command+B (Mac) or Ctrl+B (Windows).

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So can the option to Ignore Text Wrap, if you were expecting text to be pushed lower in the frame by text wrap from another object on the page.

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In the Baseline options tab, you’ll find the First Baseline settings, which include five Offset choices, plus a Minimum value.

Four of the Offset choices use the text formatting (font, point size) to determine the first baseline: Ascent. This one ensures that the top of a lowercase d fits inside the frame. Exactly how far below the top of the frame varies, depending on the font you’re using. Some will be dead on.

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Others, not so much.

Cap Height. This one sets the flat tops of uppercase letters at the top inset of the frame. Characters that are rounded or pointed at the top will often poke out of the frame.

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Leading. The leading value of the first line of text is the space between the top inset and the first baseline.

There’s also a Fixed option that allows you to set a specific offset that will not be affected by the formatting of the text. When you leave the Minimum set to zero, Fixed offset will give you text that sits exactly on top of the text frame.

If you set the leading to zero, the first baseline sits at the top inset of the frame. And last but not least, text baselines can align to baseline grids as part of the paragraph formatting, and they can align to either a document-wide baseline grid…

x-height. The top of a lowercase x fits inside the frame. Though once in a while you may encounter a font where the x pokes out a little bit.

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…or a custom grid specific to the text frame.

Outlining Fonts, the 2016 Edition Steve Werner | February 1, 2016

For as long as this website has been around, there has been an ongoing discussion on whether or how fonts should be outlined when preparing a PDF to send a client as proof, or to send to your printer. The discussion started with a post I wrote almost nine years ago, in 2007, which pointed out that there are good reasons not to outline fonts using the Create Outlines command: Outlining the text degrades the typographic quality of the text because the font hinting is removed. Even more important, certain attributes—like

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bullets in a bulleted list or paragraph rules—will disappear. Also, the PDF will no longer be editable in case you need to do a lastminute correction of a typo. There is almost no good reason to outline fonts. InDesign always embeds fonts in a PDF, which will print successfully. Dov Isaacs, Adobe Principal Scientist, says: We are aware of various “print service providers” who are under the distinct wrong impression that converting text to outlines is somehow more reliable than leaving text as text realized by fonts. Other than some dicey, prehistoric RIPs based on non-Adobe technology going back over fifteen years or more, we are not aware of any problem during the RIP process due to fonts. If the font is embedded in the PDF and views correctly in Adobe Acrobat, it should RIP! If you have a “bad font,” you won’t be able to view the PDF file in Acrobat, nor will converting text to outlines even work. However, most people agree that while outlining fonts isn’t a good idea, there are occasions when it may have to be done. This is usually when you are forced to use a commercial printer who insists that it’s necessary in their workflow. In 2008, David Blatner posted a method, based on a presentation by Branislav Milic at an InDesign Conference, to convert text to outlines “the right way.” The method basically requires three steps:

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Create a new transparency flattener preset based on the High Resolution preset with Convert All Text to Outlines checked. Create at least one object on each page which contains transparency, which forces the transparency flattener to kick in when the PDF is created. Export the PDF using Acrobat 4 compatibility, which forces transparency to be flattened. In 2011, another post was necessary, because the technique temporarily broke in InDesign CS5. While that problem was fixed, the basic method remained the same. You have to create this multistep fix in every file where it’s necessary. It takes longer to create the PDF file and creates a larger file, sometimes significantly larger. David provided a good demonstration of this technique in his recent Print PDF video.

I can recommend it as being quite stable. Here’s how to use this new method: 1. Create your PDF file as usual. You don’t have to choose a particular preset, or select Acrobat 4 compatibility. The method is even compatible with the PDF/X-4 PDF preset, which retains transparency and supports color management. 2. Open the PDF file in Acrobat Pro DC. Open the Print Production panel, and open Preflight. In the Search field at the top right, search for “outline.” This selects the Converts Fonts To Outlines fixup. 3. To run the fixup, at the bottom of the dialog box, click Analyze and Fix, and save the file under a new name.

Acrobat Pro DC to the rescue in 2016 A short time ago, I read a posting by Dov Isaacs on an Acrobat forum which described a much faster technique. Instead of going through multiple steps within each InDesign file, you can simply run a Preflight fixup on a PDF in Acrobat Pro DC to outline the fonts. This is a new fixup which will not be found in Acrobat Pro XI or earlier, so you’ll need to upgrade to the latest Acrobat version. I’ve been using this version for nine months now, and some of the features I didn’t like when it was released have now been fixed, and

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To check to see that the fonts are no longer fonts but outlined, in Acrobat choose File > Properties > Fonts. You’ll see that there are no more fonts in the PDF file.

New Contest! The Mystery of the Perplexing Preview Mike Rankin | February 8, 2016

Hey folks, it’s time for another InDesign mystery that you can solve for a chance to win an awesome prize! Here’s the scenario: You receive an InDesign file with a logo composed of a placed image, some type on a path, and a background circle with a red fill and black stroke.

This method is faster, and keeps your PDF file smaller. It works with all PDF presets. Furthermore, if you needed to do this multiple times, you can create a Preflight Droplet to batch process your PDF files. Give it a try!

You want to get a quick preview of the logo without all the frame edges showing. So you deselect everything and choose View > Screen Mode > Preview (or press the keyboard shortcut W). Much

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to your dismay, the placed image disappears while the text and background circle remain.

If you go back to Normal viewing mode, the placed image reappears.

There are two reasons this can happen. First, the placed image can be set to be Nonprinting in the Attributes panel.

Or it can be on a layer set to be nonprinting in the Layer Options dialog box (which you can open by double-clicking the layer in the Layers panel).

And I am truly excited to report that everyone who entered the contest got the right answer! This is the first time that’s ever happened. Well done, folks!

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And the winner of this contest (chosen at random from all the entries) is… Mehmet Mese. Mehmet wins a copy of MathTools from Movemen! Thanks to everyone who entered, and be on the lookout for another contest with a new great prize next month!

Working With Text in Adobe Comp CC

Creating a text frame in Comp CC Like InDesign, Comp needs a frame to put text into. Unlike InDesign, however, when you create a text frame in Comp, it automatically pre-fills that frame with placeholder text. And in true Adobe fashion, there are a few ways to accomplish the task of creating a frame.

Erica Gamet | February 10, 2016

Using Adobe’s Comp CC mobile app can be a valuable first step in your InDesign workflow. Comp lets you rough out your design on your iPad, and then further refine and complete your design in InDesign (or Illustrator or Photoshop) on the desktop. There seem to be a lot of requests for Comp to deliver more in regards to its text capabilities, but for a comping app it really packs a punch. If you’re a seasoned InDesign user, some of the text controls can seem awkward at first, but like many mobile apps, it just takes a slight shift in thinking to get things working for you. Comp lets you work with text, vector shapes, and imported graphics. Here, we’ll be focusing on Comp’s text controls.

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Comp CC’s toolbar

To create a text frame quickly, tap the Type (T) icon in the top toolbar. Choose the App Styles option, and you will see three text styles: Headline, Sub Headline, and Paragraph. Tapping on any of these creates a Lorem Ipsum-filled text frame with appropriately sized text. The other option in that panel gives you the ability to style the text with styles you have saved to a Creative Cloud library. Tap on My Libraries to see your library list, and then choose the desired library. You may have to tap the cloud icon if the font used

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in the style isn’t on the device (see more in the “Styling Text” section below). Tap a style to create the text frame.

desired size with a couple of horizontal lines inside. If you want a headline frame, draw a rectangle and put a dot outside the lower right-hand corner. To see all available gestures, tap the Settings (gear) icon in the toolbar, and choose Drawing Gesture Help.

Quickly create a type frame using Comp’s App Styles text frames.

The final option is more fun and involves learning a couple simple gestures. If you want a one-line text frame filled with paragraph (body) text, draw a horizontal line with a dot at the end. Draw two lines followed by a dot to create two lines of text, three for three. You get the idea. Making a frame with 20 lines of text is going to take way too long with that method, so you can use a secret drawing gesture, which involves drawing a rectangle to the

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Comp’s drawing gestures include a few for creating different frames for type.

Entering text in Comp CC If you want more than just a bunch of frames filled with Lorem Ipsum, you’ll need to enter some custom text. Keep in mind the

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reason for creating your Comp CC file. If you’re creating a mockup for a client to get an idea of a layout, the placeholder text may suffice. However, it may be more appropriate to have real-world text for your client to view. I generally put some actual text in my Comp files, but I don’t spend a lot of time perfecting the size and flow. That final crafting and massaging of text will happen in InDesign, where I have total control over my text behavior. Once you have a frame on your Comp artboard, double-tap on it to bring up the keyboard. From here, you can start typing, or you can paste type from your clipboard. If you delete all the text in a frame, the Lorem Ipsum text comes back to fill the frame, so the frame is never empty.

Comp uses the term “character styling,” but the styling applies across entire paragraphs and frames.

Styling text in Comp CC To style the text in your frame, tap once on the frame. A slider will appear to the right of the frame. Slide your finger up or down to increase or decrease the frame’s text size. All text styling in Comp is applied to everything in that frame. Even though you can select individual words, you can’t format them individually. Additionally,

Use the slider to the right of a text frame to increase or decrease type size.

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With a text frame still selected, tap the Type (T) icon at the bottom of the artboard to view more text styling options. Font: You can choose to use any of the fonts available from Typekit in your Comp CC layout. Tap the currently displayed font name to see the list of all fonts you have synced. Tap on the font you want, or click Add to be taken to the Typekit site. From there, you can select and sync more fonts. The interface lets you search by filters—like serif, script, monospace, etc.—enter sample text, and

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check out featured Typekit fonts. Tap on any you’d like to sync, and then tap the sync (cloud download) icon. Style: If a selected font has multiple styles available, select one (or download more) from here. Size: Use the plus and minus buttons to increase or decrease point size. Tap and hold to move quickly to a particular size. Unfortunately, there’s no way to manually enter a point size. Alignment icons: Choose left, centered, right, or justified alignment. Formatting icons: Choose all caps or underlined text. Spacing: Comp’s Line Spacing is relative to the type size, with 0.0 being the default. That’s equivalent to 120% of type size (InDesign’s default leading), and from that point it’s all a bit of mathematical voodoo, really. I tend to make it look good onscreen and then finesse it in InDesign. Letter spacing is equivalent to tracking. Again, the numbers don’t mean much to this InDesign

user, but I tend not to mess with tracking too much, especially here in Comp.

Comp’s text styling options.

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Viewing sample text in several Typekit fonts.

Currently synced Typekit fonts appear here. The cloud icon indicates a synced font that hasn’t been downloaded to your device yet.

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Copying styles You can copy styling from one frame to another for consistency. What you don’t want to do is select text, copy it, and paste it into a new frame. Doing so retains the formatting of the receiving frame— remember the styling is applied to a whole frame. Instead, tap once to select frame whose style you want to copy. Next, tap the Type (T) button at the bottom, and choose Copy from the upper right. This will copy only the attributes found in this panel. Alternatively, select that first frame, tap the More (…) icon, choose Copy All Styles, and

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then tap any frames you want to apply styling to. This will apply not only the text styling, but also color and opacity. Tap Done when finished to exit the style editing mode. Moving and adjusting frames Getting frames situated on the artboard is important, whether you’re simply making a mockup to show a client or intending to complete the layout in InDesign. If Smart Guides are not already enabled, turn them on in the Settings panel (gear icon) in the toolbar. This will provide visual feedback to line up frames and other items in your layout. From that same Settings panel, select Edit next to Grid & Guides to set text column guides, and then choose the multi-column icon on the left to set column options. Choose the number of desired columns, enter a gutter amount, and set page margins. You can also manually set these options using the plus and minus buttons and the margin handles that appear in this edit mode. Tap Done when you’ve set all your guides. Even with a multi-column layout, you are limited to using single text columns. You can always use a script to convert those frames to multi-column text frames once the file goes to InDesign. You can also set free-range horizontal and vertical guides in the Grid & Guides editing panel. Choose the icon to the right of the

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multi-column icon, select Add a Guide, and then tap and drag the guide into place. Tap Done to exit the editing mode.

Setting up a page grid and margins in Comp.

To move a frame on the artboard, tap it once before moving it. If you jump the gun and don’t tap it first, you’ll end up drawing wayward squiggles on your artboard. After tapping once to select the frame, simply drag it where you want it. You can resize a frame with placeholder text by dragging one of the eight handles. Once a frame has custom text in it, the frame sizes its height to

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accommodate the text. You can change the width of the frame by dragging the handle on the right or left of the frame. Grouping frames You may find it helpful to group frames together. This applies to frames and items of any sort, and also is useful to keep the individual frames of a multi-column story together. To group items, select one frame, and then the More (…) button, and choose Select Multiple. In the editing mode, tap additional frames, and then tap Done to exit editing mode. Tap the Group (chainlink) icon at the bottom of the artboard to group the selected items together. Select a group of items at any time, and tap the Ungroup (broken chainlink) icon to ungroup. After selecting multiple items, you might choose to align those items. Choose the Alignment (middle) button at the bottom of the artboard. Align the items horizontally or vertically, or evenly distribute the spacing between the items. This resembles the alignment options in InDesign, so it should seem familiar to you. The Match Size option will make the height or width (or both) of the selected frames identical. To duplicate a frame, choose Duplicate from the More (…) button. Since you can’t copy text and paste it with styling intact, this is the way to get identical copy

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quickly. The last item in the More panel is the option to lock an item or items on the artboard.

Grouped text can be ungrouped by tapping the link/unlink icon.

Retracing your steps with Undo As you’re learning Comp’s touch interface, you’ll undoubtedly move things you hadn’t meant to, or draw shapes without even trying. That’s where the Undo button in the toolbar comes in handy. Also, Comp CC employs a three-finger gesture, where sliding left allows you to scroll back through the file’s history.

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Beyond the napkin sketch If you keep in mind that Comp CC is for creating a really well-laidout piece to serve as a jumping-off point for your finished work, you’ll probably be pleased with what it offers. It doesn’t have all the bells and whistles that a powerhouse program like InDesign does, but that’s not Comp’s job. Touted as a “digital cocktail napkin,” where you can sketch out ideas and move seamlessly into your desktop design software, I’d say Comp far exceeds that moniker.

InCopySecrets: Helping Spell Check to Deal With Other Languages Chad Chelius | February 10, 2016

I recently worked on a project that was a dual language document, meaning (in this case) that the document contained content in both English and Spanish text. One of the things that immediately struck me was how spellcheck would flag every word as a misspelled word. This was magnified when I turned on Dynamic Spelling, because almost every word in the Spanish text contained a red squiggly underline indicating that the text was misspelled (or so it thought). You don’t have to be working extensively with multilingual text to observe this; even limited use of words from other languages can be quite an inconvenience.

Although this doesn’t affect how a user interacts with the text, it can slow them down and become frustrating. Why it’s happening The reason why the text is being flagged by spellcheck is because by default, InCopy is using the English dictionary to check if words in the document are misspelled (assuming you live here in the US). So when InCopy encounters the word or words from another

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language, it can’t find those words in the English dictionary, and therefore flags them as misspelled. How to fix it The solution is relatively simple. Select the words that are being flagged with the Type tool, and open the Character panel in InCopy by choosing Window > Type & Tables > Character. You’ll notice that at the bottom of the panel there is a Language drop-down menu. Choose the correct language for the highlighted word, and if you have Dynamic Spelling enabled, you’ll immediately notice that the word is no longer underlined.

Ipsum) text within a document. This has also been known to choke the spelling system in InCopy and InDesign. Instead of assigning a different language to the text, which wouldn’t help anyway, choose “No Language” from the language drop-down menu in the Character panel. This forces the spelling system to completely avoid checking that text at all.

An Easier Way to Apply Gradients to Table Cells Kelly Vaughn | February 11, 2016

For years now, it has been extremely difficult to apply gradients to individual table cells. David Blatner wrote an article nearly seven years ago dealing with the subject, and since then it has never gotten any easier to apply gradients to table cells… until recently. In the June 2015 release of InDesign CC, one of the new features introduced was Paragraph Shading. Basic Paragraph Shading now has a checkbox in the lower portion of the Paragraph panel, right

You’ll also notice that when running Spell Check, those words will no longer be flagged, because they’ll be identified in their native language. Another useful way to take advantage of this technique is when your document contains placeholder (Lorem

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above Hyphenation. But additional options can be found in the flyout menu, under Paragraph Shading‌

But when applied to a multi-line paragraph, Paragraph Shading offers much more flexibility. Because the shading is tied directly to the height and width of the paragraph, the shading will resize along with the text.

When applied to a short paragraph spanning only one line, Paragraph Shading looks much like a Rule Below or Rule Above (with an offset applied to get it positioned behind the text).

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The beauty of Paragraph Shading is that it lets you apply any of your swatches as a paragraph shade… even gradients! By making a simple gradient, I can now choose it as the swatch for my paragraph shade.

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I discovered that at first the paragraph shading was overlapping the boundaries of my cells, despite having “Clip to Frame” selected.

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But then I discovered that in the Cell Style options, “Clip Contents to Cell” fixed the problem.

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By adjusting the offset values of your paragraph shading, you can get it to act as a cell fill. By making the offsets larger, you can accommodate a variety of cell sizes.

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Once your paragraph shading is set up to your liking, you can add it as a part of a paragraph style.

If you work with tables very often, you’re probably familiar with cell styles, and the fact that paragraph styles can also be referenced in cell styles (if that’s useful to your workflow).

It’s also important to note the stacking order, if you choose to use paragraph shading as a substitute for a cell fill. The default stacking order is, from the top down: 1. Text 2. Paragraph shading 3. Diagonal lines 4. Cell fill

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So if you use paragraph shading, by default it will cover your cell fill and diagonal lines. You can choose to have the diagonal lines in front, but they will sit on top of your text.

Because paragraph shading can utilize any swatch, you can create some interesting faux-cell-fill effects, just by adjusting the gradient that you use. Some time ago, I explored how to create a flat-bottomed stroke by stacking gradient stops directly on top of each other. Using this same technique, we can create a variety of

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interesting effects, such as How to Add a Rule Around a Paragraph and How to Create a Checkerboard Paragraph Rule. This same technique of stacking gradients stops can also be used to add vertical bars inside of table cells.

The beauty of using paragraph shading in place of a cell fill is that the width of the gradient will be contained completely within the cell. In this example, the top portion of the table has a gradient swatch applied as a cell fill, and the gradient extends across the entire width of the table. But notice the cells that have the gradient

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applied as a paragraph shading: the gradients do not extend across the entire table, but are contained within the cell!

Publish Online Project of the Month: The Cyberfolio of Michel Allio Mike Rankin | February 17, 2016

Once your gradient paragraph shading is set up, you can apply gradients to your table cells with a single click. Victory!

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This is the third post in the Publish Online Project of the Month series. Be sure to also check out the earlier posts: Irish Landscapes and Kia Sportage. So far in our look at Publish Online projects, we’ve seen a couple of high-end projects put together by agencies for major clients. But other folks are producing high-end stuff for themselves, ranging from personal projects to portfolios. Case in point: the Cyberfolio of Michel Allio. This 35-page document functions as a digital portfolio, showcasing Michel’s work producing all kinds of textbooks. It’s packed with interactivity and animation that enhance the portfolio viewing experience to go way beyond something like a static, print-replica PDF. Michel’s Cyberfolio is entirely in French, but even if you don’t know pommes frites from the Centre Pompidou, you can still understand everything about this document and be inspired by it to create your own portfolio in Publish Online.

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The opening page is a study in minimalism, with a simple invitation to enter.

The next page begins with a splash of color, courtesy of a rainbow of pages,

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which fades to more detailed information about Michel’s skills and the kinds of projects he produces, enhanced with several kinds of animation effects.

Clicking on the Extraits de livre (book excerpts) button reveals a sliding color-coded table of contents organized by subject matter and grade level you can use to jump to any project.

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The same button is placed on all the portfolio pages, giving you a great navigation tool, usable from any point in the document.

There are also navigation buttons under each example spread, as well as a home page button and a Contact button to send Michel an email at the top left.

Within each category, there are clickable thumbnails on the left side of the page that you can use to see additional examples.

My favorite interactive feature is the Help button, which is found at the bottom of each page. When you click it, a partially transparent overlay appears, explaining all the interactive features.

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Clicking anywhere on the overlay dismisses it. Easy and effective. Other thoughtful design touches are evident throughout. Michel even simplified the navigation thumbnails that are part of the Publish Online interface so they are easy to read and match the color scheme used in the sliding table of contents.

Submit your projects! We’re on the hunt for interesting Publish Online projects we can spotlight in this new monthly feature. If you’ve created one for yourself, your company, or your client, we’d love to see it! Please email mike@indesignsecrets.com with the URL and a few details about the publication, and include “Publish Online Project” in the Subject line. We can’t promise anything, but we will personally respond to every email submittal.

It’s brilliant stuff, and it ought to inspire other folks to assemble a showcase of their own work with InDesign and Publish Online. If you want to know more, click here to check out the article by Diane Burns, Using Adobe Publish Online from issue 81.

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The InDex: InDex Your Key to Our Content Can’t find that article you saw in an earlier issue? Wondering whether we covered that obscure plug-in? Never fear, the InDex is here. The first issue of InDesign Magazine was published in July 2004. Since then, we’ve cranked out thousands of pages on hundreds of related topics. While it’s possible to use Acrobat to simultaneously search all past issues of the magazine for one word or phrase, many readers have clamored for a formal index at the back of each issue. However, with 83 issues to account for, that’s not feasible. Instead, the InDex will live as a PDF you can download for free. If you come across a topic you want to know more about, but it’s in an issue you don’t have, you’re not out of luck. We sell back issues at indesignsecrets.com.

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If the topic you’re looking for isn’t in the InDex, you have one more way to search: that PDF trick we mentioned. To make it work, all of your magazine issue PDFs must be in one folder. Open any issue in Acrobat, and then press Shift+Command+F (Shift+Ctrl+F on Windows). In the Search window that appears, be sure that you click the radio button that says “All PDF Documents in,” and in the dropdown menu below that, choose the folder in which you placed your magazine issues. You’re on your way to finding anything in any PDF!

Click here to download the InDex.

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While this PDF is just for you, you can tell your friends about this great discount: $10 off a 1-year membership use coupon code: friend at indesignsecrets.com/issues INDESIGN MAGAZINE  83

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Idm issue 83