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M A G A Z I N E 82 February 2016

Plus… › Scripting for Beginners › Using Adobe Stock › Creative Type Spacing


InSide: Table of Contents  5

The New Rules for Printing Claudia McCue brings you up to date on how to get the best results in your print projects.

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Learn to Automate InDesign by Scripting Keith Gilbert gives a gentle introduction to the art and science of automating InDesign.

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Designing with Adobe Stock Conrad Chavez shows how CC Libraries give Adobe Stock key advantages over other sources of imagery.

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InType: Type That Touches Need an impactful type design? Nigel French can help! InReview: Style Utilities Cinnamon Cooper reviews an add-on that supercharges your ability to wield text styles. GREP of the Month: Unicode Peter Kahrel shows how to target character ranges.

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Best of the Blogs  A collection of the most important and informative articles from InDesignSecrets, InCopySecrets, and EPUBSecrets 47

Holiday FX: Do You Want to Build An InDesign Snowman?

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Publish Online Project of the Month: Irish Landscapes

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How Do You Type an [Insert Special Character Here]?

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What is the Nothing Font Style?

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Top 10 InDesign Secrets of 2015

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Line Styles in InDesign

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EPUBSecrets: EPUB2 or EPUB3 and InDesign’s Table of Contents

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Using the InDesign Touch Workspace

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Tips for Selecting Objects Using the Layers Panel

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Controlling Rounded Corners With Precision

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EPUBSecrets: InDesign EPUB Export Oddities

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Publish Online Project of the Month: Kia Sportage

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InDex to All Past Issues

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MAGAZINE

From the Editor in Chief PUBLISHERS David Blatner, Anne-Marie Concepción EDITORIAL Editor in Chief Mike Rankin, mike@indesignmag.com Managing Editor Wendy Katz, wendy@indesignmag.com Contributing Writers Claudia McCue, Keith Gilbert, Conrad Chavez, Nigel French, Cinnamon Cooper, and Kevin Callahan DESIGN Rufus Deuchler rufus.deuchler.net BUSINESS Contact Information http://indesignsecrets.com/contact Subscription Information indesignsecrets.com/issues Published by InDesignSecrets.com, a division of The Creative Publishing Network, Inc. Copyright 2016 InDesignSecrets.com. All rights reserved. Reproduction and redistribution prohibited without approval. For more information, contact permissions@indesignmag.com. InDesign Magazine is not endorsed or sponsored by Adobe Systems Incorporated, publisher of InDesign. InDesign is a registered trademark of Adobe Systems Incorporated. All other products and services are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners and are hereby acknowledged. Photos on pages 1, 5–7, 15–17, 19, 20, 22, and 46 courtesy of Fotolia.com ISSN 2379-1403

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Even though we’re a full month into the new year, I still have a hard time believing it’s really 2016. It’s crazy. Now the entire Back to the Future trilogy takes place in the past. I love those movies, but one thing that always bothered me was that they could envision a world with hoverboards, flying cars, and weather control, but folks still got their news on printed newspapers that looked unchanged from the ’80s. Well, print is indeed still around, but it has evolved a lot since the days of big hair and acid-washed jeans. So if you haven’t updated your procedures for preparing print files in a while, chances are you should—and Claudia McCue is here to help, with The New Rules of Printing. So rehydrate a pizza, pop open a Pepsi Free, and read on, McFly. Of course, any sci-fi vision of the future includes some robots who either serve or enslave us. Here’s hoping that robotic reality is more like The Jetsons than The Terminator.

In the meantime, you can check out Keith Gilbert’s gentle introduction to scripting InDesign, and put a little artificial intelligence to work for you. When you’ve had enough science, Conrad Chavez brings you back to the world of art— stock art, specifically, in his article Designing with Adobe Stock. Nigel French chips in with another brilliant InType. This time Nigel surveys designs that include type that touches and other examples that don’t play by the normal rules of spacing. It’s wonderful stuff for times when you’re willing to sacrifice some readability to achieve maximum impact. To round out the issue, Cinnamon Cooper reviews Style Utilities from In-Tools, Peter Kahrel is back with a new GREP of the Month on targeting ranges in Unicode, and there’s the Best of the Blogs to edify and amuse you. Enjoy!

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February 2016

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The New Rules for Printing by Claudia McCue

You don’t get your messages from a beeper, or carry your files on floppies, so stop preparing your print files like you did in the 1990s! INDESIGN MAGAZINE  82

February 2016

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The New Rules of Printing

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t the advent of desktop publishing, way back in the last century, powerful tools were placed in the hands of people who had no experience whatsoever with the actual process of printing. To say that chaos reigned would be an understatement. Suddenly, printers were being given files built by designers who had no concept of spot colors, bleed, resolution, or even cyan. Printers scrambled to educate neophyte production artists, dictating stringent rules for file submission: No RGB! No JPEGs! No TrueType fonts! Thou shalt submit only TIFFs and EPSs! Thou darest not use Microsoft Word! But now… Welcome to the 21st century! Times are different, and while many people are still following 20-year-old guidelines, the truth is that many of the old rules have changed (well, not that Word thing). Let’s take a look at some modern approaches that might convince you to change some old habits.

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Trim and Registration Marks When we used to output a separate piece of film for each printing ink color, we needed to be able to align those pieces of film on punched clear carrier sheets in order to register the colors for platemaking. To facilitate that process, when we set up jobs for output, we made sure to include registration marks, which are little target-like crosshairs imaged on each piece of film. In addition, we had to include trim marks, indicating the corners of the file’s trim area so that the films could be positioned correctly for platemaking and subsequent bindery work. Boy, have things changed. I can’t tell you the last time I saw film; the industry quickly moved to direct-to-plate imaging over 20 years ago. When files are submitted for platemaking, they’re imported into an imposition program, which controls the position of each file along with other files for most efficient printing. Imposition software doesn’t rely on trim marks to determine the

edges and dimensions of a file; that information comes from internal references in a PDF file or PostScript file. Thus, as long as you build your work to the correct trim size, the PDF itself will inform the imposition software. Including trim marks doesn’t usually present a problem, so long as the additional area generated around the document edges is uniform, allowing the PDF to be correctly centered in its slot on the imposition. But trim marks are rarely required anymore. Unless you’re generating art for silkscreening, there’s no reason to include registration marks; ask your silkscreen printer if they’re necessary. When work is imposed for offset platemaking, the final conglomerate image includes auto-generated color bars and registration marks that provide feedback for computerized print monitoring on press; they’re not used by humans to position film output.

Do your “best practices” belong in a printing museum, next to this old fellow?

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The New Rules of Printing RGB vs. CMYK The Great Color Acronym Wars of the 1990s have passed. In the olden days, the RIPs (Raster Image Processors) which ran imaging devices did a truly lousy job of converting RGB to CMYK. Consequently, submitting RGB content could merit your output provider giving you a strong talking-to (and billing for the conversion). In the 21st century, modern RIPs perform perfectly good conversions to CMYK, so it’s no longer an issue. However, your printer may still insist that you send CMYK images; if so, you’ll have to perform the conversion yourself. Tip: If you’re asked to provide PDFs, just keep using your RGB images, and then choose a CMYK destination target in the PDF Export options dialog box (Figure 1). RGB for digital output: Speaking of RGB vs. CMYK, if your job is printing on a digital press such as the HP Indigo, Kodak Nexpress, or Xerox iGen, or a large format output device such as a Vutek or Mutoh inkjet printer, you should ask the print provider

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if they’ll accept RGB content. Here’s why: the colorants used in digital devices may be called cyan, magenta, yellow, and black, but those colorants use different pigment formulations, which have a wider color gamut than offset inks. Wide-format inkjet devices

Figure 1: To convert RGB content to CMYK during export to PDF, set Color Conversion to “Convert to Destination (Preserve Numbers)” and set the Destination to the appropriate printing environment. If the printer provides a custom profile, import that and use it as the target.

often add light cyan, light pink, orange, green, and purple inks, too (Figure 2). Consequently, digital devices are capable of printing more of the wider gamut contained in RGB images; when you convert your images to CMYK prematurely, you sacrifice the colors that fall outside the smaller CMYK gamut (Figure 3, next page). Don’t kill those innocent hues! There are other advantages to keeping your images as RGB—they’re 75% of the file size of an equivalent CMYK image, and all of Photoshop’s filters work on RGB images.

Figure 2: More inks mean you can get a wider gamut of colors out of a modern printer.

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The New Rules of Printing As with everything, though, ask your printer before you blithely submit RGB content. Some still reject RGB (and in some cases, it’s only out of old habit, not device limitations). NOTE: For more on using RGB images in InDesign before converting to CMYK for output, check out this InDesignSecrets article.

Trapping If a printer asks you to submit a trapped file, check a calendar. Does it say “March, 1984”? Do you hear the Carpenters’ “Close To You” playing in the background? You may be caught in a tachyon bubble in the spacetime continuum. Or you’ve encountered a printer who’s using antique coal-powered equipment and has Always Done It That Way. What should you do? Push the printer to explain why they haven’t been out of the cave in the last two decades. Tell them that disco is dead, too. Run. Find another printer. Software for trapping has been around for over 20 years, so there’s no reason you should have to do anything special in

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Figure 3: The vibrancy of an RGB image (left) is substantially subdued when the image is converted to CMYK (right). Don’t

throw that gorgeous color away prematurely—talk to your printer about keeping your images in RGB. Their digital press may be able to print the fuller range of tones available in RGB.

InDesign or Illustrator to compensate for registration issues. In-RIP trapping is the norm now, and has been for many years. It’s a process that rarely needs any human

intervention to tweak some settings, and then only in exceptional cases involving metallic inks or complex gradients interacting with multiple underlying colored

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The New Rules of Printing objects. In fact, printers with digital presses don’t even worry about trapping anymore. We live in wonderful times!

Offset versus Digital Early digital presses were little more than glorified laser printers, and the quality was no competition for traditional offset printing. In the 20-plus years since the appearance of digital solutions, that gap has disappeared. While the speed and versatility of offset is still a driving force in printing, the quality of output on digital presses such as the HP Indigo rivals that of offset, and the flexibility of short runs can make digital printing a preferred choice. The rise of large-format inkjet output further extends the reach of digital printing. Most printing companies are no longer solely devoted to offset work; to better serve a wider range of customers, many have incorporated digital solutions in their offerings. What does this mean to you?

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Paper Choices: Because digital presses such as the Xerox iGen and HP Indigo have smaller footprints than giant offset presses, they also have smaller paper size capabilities. The Indigo 5600 and 7800 digital presses can take 13" × 19" paper, but the Indigo 10000 has a 29" × 20" maximum sheet size. The Xerox iGen 150 can take 14.33" × 26" paper. Wide ranges of stock are available for digital presses but, because of texture and humidity requirements, you may find that the 200-lb glitter stock you have your heart set on is not appropriate for digital presses. Spot colors on digital output devices: Most digital presses and large-format inkjet devices don’t have spot inks. The HP Indigo and Xerox iGen have some limited

spot toner offerings, including opaque white, commonly used PANTONE colors, and some metallics, but you’ll find that not all print providers have chosen to invest in those add-ons. However, there’s good news: because of the extended gamut of the pigments used on digital devices, there’s a good chance that spot colors will be more faithfully rendered. Lookup tables (LUTs) in the RIPs for PANTONE colors generate optimized values for imaging spot colors. They may not be bang-on, but rendering is likely to be far closer than is possible with the gamut of offset printing inks. If you’re incorporating spot colors in your work, leave them defined as PANTONE colors rather than converting them to CMYK (or even to RGB), and let the device handle the

The quality of output on digital presses rivals that of offset, and the flexibility of short runs can make digital printing a preferred choice.

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The New Rules of Printing rendering. (There’s one exception to this: see the later section on transparency and digital presses.)

File formats In the early days of desktop publishing, the limitations printers placed on image formats were based on the sensitive digestive tracts of the RIPs (Raster Image Processor; the computer that converts incoming print information to a language that an imaging device understands). Even something as innocuous as an LZW-compressed TIFF could bring a RIP to a halt, and an overly complex vector piece could prompt the dreaded LimitCheck error (translation: You expect me to process 31,567 points? No way!). We live in enlightened times, and current RIPs have much more capable craws. Native formats: If you’re an InDesign user, you’ve probably long since elected to use PSDs and AI files as artwork. But if you’re still scarred by printer lectures from long ago (“always use TIFF and EPS,” they

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liked to say), just know that it’s really okay to use the native formats. You can even place a native InDesign file as a graphic in another InDesign file! InDesign knows how to absorb them and squirt out healthy print files. Besides—if you’re submitting PDFs for print, it’s all melted together anyway, with no memory of origin; it’s just all pixels, text, and vectors at that point.

live, unflattened working version in addition to the flattened version. The same goes for Illustrator files; they won’t become any more petite, file size-wise, if you flatten them to a single layer. You’ll still have the same number of objects, and the same number of anchor points. Leave ‘em floating, for cryin’ out loud.

There’s no need to flatten native files! Don’t deprive yourself of the flexibility afforded by layered files. Speaking of native files, there’s no need to flatten! (Well, if you have a gigahuge Photoshop file, maybe squish it a little bit.) Both InDesign and Illustrator are fine with live layered Photoshop files. Don’t deprive yourself of the flexibility afforded by layered files. If you’re fearful that a client or printer might mess up your files (or discover your secret recipe for retouching), at least keep a

JPEGs are not (necessarily) evil: Put down the pitchfork! A JPEG which has been saved only once, using a high-quality (low compression) setting, is just fine (in addition to being petite). If you were to open a healthy JPEG, view it without any editing, and then resave it with a maximum quality setting, it would still be fine. And remember, once it’s baked into a PDF for submission to

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The New Rules of Printing the printer, it won’t matter how it began life. However, fear of JPEGs is not entirely unfounded: a JPEG that is repeatedly edited and aggressively squished will soon show signs of wear (Figure 4). My advice? If you receive a JPEG and it’s okay to use as is, then just use it. If you need to edit it in Photoshop, then plan on resaving it as a TIFF or PSD. Then its wonderfulness will be frozen, and it will be happy for the rest of its life. DCS 2.0 (Desktop Color Separations): I recently received a request for a DCS file for an image that included spot color channels. Whoa—what a flashback! Where are my platform shoes? This was for a job that’s running on a digital press that actually has some spot units. I strongly suggest not using DCS if you can avoid it; instead, just place a .PSD containing spot channels into InDesign, and then export to PDF—the correct spot color information is carried through, regardless of the nature of the original image.

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A

B

C

D

Figure 4  A: Original PSD.  B: First-generation JPEG, using Low Quality. Note rectangular artifacts, especially in eye, as well as some color shift.  C: JPEG “B,” resaved with same Low Quality setting.  D: JPEG “C,” resaved with same Low Quality setting. Note extreme rectangular artifacts.

Font formats: Fear of TrueType fonts dates back to the Dark Ages when RIPs would puke them out; modern imaging devices are font-agnostic. Don’t be afraid to mix PostScript, TrueType, and OpenType fonts; they coexist quite happily. That said, it’s still possible to encounter evil fonts— don’t be tempted to buy the Skid-o’-Fonts from FlyByNightFonts.com. You often get what you pay for. And beware of fonts that

don’t allow embedding in PDFs; they’re rare, but they’re out there.

Image Resolution and Transparency The Holy Grail of Resolution has long been 300 ppi at final size. In other words, don’t take a 3" × 2" image that’s 300 ppi and blow it up to 400% in InDesign; its effective resolution is then reduced to 75 ppi (because

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The New Rules of Printing you made the pixels four times as wide and tall). But there is more leeway than we’ve traditionally insisted, especially when it comes to digital printing. If your hero shot is just 250 ppi at final size, you’re probably OK. In fact, if the image in question is just an accent shot (such as a ghosted-back picture of clouds), you can get by with going as low as 150 ppi or so. This brings up another fun party topic (at least at the parties I attend): Should you scale in InDesign, or Photoshop? Given that you’re bound to encounter small images that must be “embiggened,” you’re going to be forced to grit your teeth and scale them up. My rule of thumb: If you’re scaling up to 125%, you can do it in InDesign. If you have to exceed that value, then do it in Photoshop so you can take advantage of the Smart Scaling features. What about scaling downward? I’d suggest that it’s OK to downsize in InDesign if you’re not going below 75% of the original image size. If you’re going below 75%, do

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the scaling in Photoshop so you can use the Bicubic Sharper option to introduce a bit of edge sharpening to compensate for the loss of pixels. Clipping paths: Because InDesign (and even PowerPoint!) will accept native PSDs with transparency, there’s rarely any reason to carve out old-fashioned clipping paths. However, I have a few clients whose catalog work involves digital asset management systems, and those DAM systems require that images are stored as EPSs. (EPS files cannot support transparency.) Because many of their products are silhouetted, they’ve found it more cost-effective to outsource that process, and the files come back

Figure 5  Left: Original curved path as drawn in Illustrator. Right: Exaggerated illustration of flatness.

to them as EPSs with clipping paths. (I envision workers chained to the keyboard, their hands permanently attached to the mouse, clicking their days away. Shudder.) By the way, when it comes to clipping paths, some people wonder: what is flatness? Well, RIPs actually approximate curves with a series of short straight segments, too small to be seen by even the most discerning eye. In Figure 5, you can see flatness exaggerated to illustrate the concept— don't worry, you'd never actually never see the tiny segments. But because some in the past have overreacted to the notion of flattening, it’s given birth to a persistent old wives’ tale. People seem compelled to put absurd values in the Flatness field—they have rules like use 0.02 device pixels! That will make my path even prettier! No, it won’t. It will just force the RIP to work harder than necessary to render curved shapes. So, what is the correct value? Nada. If you’re using clipping paths, then just leave

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The New Rules of Printing the Flatness field blank, and allow the RIP to use its own optimized flatness value (Figure 6). Expanding live Illustrator effects: Another old wives’ tale leads people to believe they should “expand” live effects in Illustrator files. Apparently, they think that simplifies files, or makes them easier for RIPs to digest. Nope. If you expand your effects, you’re only hurting yourself by eliminating the flexibility and changeability afforded by live effects. Expanding will not make a file smaller or better-behaved; in fact, it will often result in a larger file size. The truth is, when you hit File > Print, or create a PDF, the live content is expanded on the way out the door, so the net effect is the same. So stay live.

Figure 6: If you must use a clipping path, leave the Flatness field blank. This allows the RIP to optimize the flatness as it generates raster information.

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Flattening transparency: When transparent effects were first introduced in Illustrator 9.0 in 2000, printers promptly brought out the pitchforks and torches and proclaimed it to be forbidden dark magic. It turned out that most of the RIPs of the time actually supported transparency, so long as printers changed a few settings, so the mass freakouts were unnecessary. Most current offset print workflows support live transparency, so don’t be afraid to have fun with shadows, glows, and other effects. Some printers or publications may still be using older workflows (or older mindsets), and could insist on flattened PDFs for job submission. In those instances, choose PDF/ X-1a; it smashes everything flat, and converts non-spot content to CMYK. However, if your printer lets you send them PDF/X-4, then use that; it lets them flatten the transparency with their systems, which will always result in better output. However, there is sometimes an issue when transparency effects are processed

by the RIPs attached to digital output devices (Figure 7). On InDesignSecrets.com, we named it YDB—Yucky Discolored Box syndrome. What causes Yucky Discolored Box syndrome? Digital RIPs color-manage raster content (bitmapped images) differently from vector content (no, I don’t know why). You’ll see this anomaly when transparent effects (e.g., drop shadows, or Photoshop files silhouetted with a layer mask) interact with spot color content. The easiest answer? Convert spot color content to CMYK. You may sacrifice some color vibrancy (especially YDB

Shadow on spot color

Shadow on process color

Figure 7: Yucky Discolored Box Syndrome. The RIPs for many digital devices treat transparent areas (such as that surrounding a drop shadow) differently, resulting in an inconsistent appearance. Bummer.

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The New Rules of Printing in bright orange, neon green, and festive purple areas), but that’s far preferable to YDB Syndrome.

One time-honored rule still holds true: Talk to your printer!

Proofing

whether image subjects such as clothing might exhibit moiré when printed. There are digital alternatives: Kodak’s INSITE solution, for example, is considered a reliable representation of press outcome when used on such displays as the Apple Cinema 30-inch monitor or Eizo ColorEdge—reliable color isn’t cheap. But neither is reprinting a job because of disappointing results. If you fear that onscreen proofing isn't reliable for a particular highprofile job, ask if your printer can provide a physical contract proof.

different solutions, and thus may have slightly different requirements for submitted files. Some just want PDFs (and they should tell you what kind of PDF); some want original application files, too. Some support RGB, some don’t. Some welcome live transparency; some don’t. There’s no such thing as too much communication! Open the conversation with your printer early in the life of a print project, and keep up the dialog until the job is out of the bindery. Then you’ll both be happy with the results!

Advice that hasn’t changed

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For many years, printers created contract proofs—color representations of the final printed piece, accomplished by using output film to expose photosensitive color overlays on a carrier sheet (3M ColorKey), or pigments bound to a photosensitive base (Dupont Cromalin and Kodak Approval systems). Now, contract proofs are commonly generated on high-end Epson or HP inkjet printers, displaying color that matches the final print job, including halftones. Many printers these days just provide PDFs to clients for signoff. While this facilitates quick (and cheap) delivery, it’s at the expense of color fidelity—there’s no way to guarantee that a client’s monitor is profiled and calibrated to correctly display color. And PDFs provide no reliable representation of halftones on press, so it’s impossible to predict

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While equipment and workflows may have become more sophisticated, there is one time-honored rule that still holds true: Talk to your printer! Every printer uses slightly

Claudia McCue is the author of Real World Print Production with Adobe Creative Suite Applications, and the presenter for a number of print-related Lynda.com courses. When not chained to the computer, she can be found riding her motorcycle on country roads; she swears it’s the cure for writer’s block.

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By Keith Gilbert

Learn to Automate InDesign by Scripting

Scripts can keep the magic alive in your ongoing relationship with your work.

When you first learn InDesign, almost everything you do is new and exciting. The simple act of freely positioning text and images on a page, without constraint, is thrilling. But when the novelty wears off and you’ve attained a certain level of proficiency with InDesign, you may become frustrated by the many repetitive, mundane tasks involved in page layout and production. Learning “secrets,” keyboard shortcuts, and advanced techniques can help make some of these tasks easier. But true efficiency and automation comes through learning to script InDesign. A script might mean the difference between spending minutes vs. hours on a project.

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Every InDesign user should at minimum know how to find, install, and use scripts. So, at the very least, read that portion of this article. Then, once you’ve found how useful scripts can be, my hope is that you’ll want to continue on and learn to edit and create scripts specific for your work.

What is a Script? Scripts are computer programs that tell InDesign what to do. Almost all of the functionality of InDesign can be controlled by scripts. Scripts can: »» Increase your accuracy by allowing you to repeat the same process over and over without error

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Learn to Automate InDesign by Scripting

»» Increase your speed by helping you do something faster than you could manually »» Relieve boredom by automating repetitive tasks »» Extend functionality by increasing the scope of what can be done in InDesign For examples of scripts that extend what InDesign can do, see the following articles: Undocumented Feature: Export to “FixedLayout HTML,” Free Script Identifies Word Stacks, and IndyFont Quick Demo: Add Diacritics to an Existing Font.

Scripting Languages InDesign can be scripted with three different programming languages: AppleScript on a Mac, VBScript on Windows, or JavaScript on Mac or Windows. I’ll focus on JavaScript in this article. I prefer JavaScript because it is cross-platform, and because there is a huge community that knows JavaScript, so help is often just a simple web search away.

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Download These Scripting Samples You can download a zip file of several scripts referenced in this article here. The zip file contains the following scripts and resources: »» Paste and format URL.jsx  Copy a URL to the clipboard, choose an insertion point in your text, and run this script. The script will paste the URL into the text, remove the http:// or https://, convert the URL to a hyperlink, and format it with the Hyperlink character style. »» Find text size range.jsx  A completed version of the script that you will learn to write in this article »» Example_while.jsx  An example of a While loop »» Example_for.jsx  An example of a For loop »» Example_if-else.jsx  An example of an If-Else statement »» Example_switch.jsx  An example of a Switch statement »» Example_try-catch.jsx  An example of a Try-Catch statement

Also, don’t confuse JavaScript with Java. JavaScript and Java are two completely different programming languages, so the names are not interchangeable. Technically, InDesign uses ExtendScript, which is Adobe’s implementation of JavaScript. But

for clarity, I’ll use the more familiar term “Java­Script” throughout this article.

Where to Find Scripts Despite what you might think, your design and production workflow probably isn’t

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Learn to Automate InDesign by Scripting

completely unique. So when you begin thinking about automating portions of your workflow, you’re likely not the first one to attempt this. Chances are, someone has already written scripts to at least partially solve some of your challenges. So before you go to all the work of creating a script, it’s worth checking out a few sources to see if your problem already has a scripted solution. To begin with, did you know that InDesign comes with a bunch of scripts? To see these, open the Scripts panel (Window > Utilities > Scripts), and twirl open the Samples folder, and then the JavaScript folder. You’ll see 20 or so scripts listed. Some of these are quite useful. See What Do the Default Sample Scripts Do in InDesign? for a description of what each of these scripts can do for you. There are countless free and low-cost scripts to be found on the web. Scripter extraordinaire Peter Kahrel features many useful scripts at his website. Indiscripts is a source for several amazing scripts.

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Scripting Synergy: Automating Other Adobe Apps The focus of this article is scripting InDesign. But other Creative Cloud products, specifically InCopy, Illustrator, Photoshop, and Bridge, can be scripted too. The concepts for scripting these products are largely the same, so once you learn how to script InDesign, you will be well on your way to learning to script other Creative Cloud products as well!

In-tools.com contains an assortment of really useful scripts, as does my website at gilbertconsulting.com. An index of many more InDesign scripting resources is located at github.

The easiest way to determine this location is to first display the Scripts panel (Window > Utilities > Scripts) in InDesign. Then right-click the User folder, and choose Reveal in Finder (Mac) or Reveal in Explorer

How to Install a Script A script usually consists of a single file, and depending on how the script was written, the file will have a .js, .jsx, .jsxbin, .applescript, .scpt, or .vbs extension. This file just needs to be copied to a specific location, and then it will automatically appear in the InDesign Scripts panel.

Figure 1: Right-click on the User folder to reveal the folder that you should copy script files into. You can organize your scripts into any subfolders that you wish within this folder.

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Learn to Automate InDesign by Scripting

(Windows). The folder that is highlighted (“Scripts Panel,” not “Scripts”) is the folder that you want to copy your scripts into (Figure 1, previous page).

How to Run a Script To run a script, double-click its name in the Scripts panel. You can also assign keyboard shortcuts to scripts (Figure 2). However, with most scripts, you will need to know what the script is supposed to do, and what is required of you before you can run it successfully. The name of the script may or may not be self-explanatory. Try the following: Create a new InDesign file, and don’t put anything on the page. Then, double-click the AddGuides script in the Samples folder. The script “sees” that nothing is selected, and displays a nice message that you need to select something on the page before the script will do anything. Draw a rectangle on the page, select the rectangle, and try running the script again. This time, you’ll see a dialog box that gives

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Figure 2: You can use the Edit > Keyboard Shortcuts command to assign a unique keyboard shortcut to any script in your Scripts panel.

you a bunch of options for adding guides around the object. Now, again with nothing selected on the page, double-click the MakeGrid script. This script also requires that something be selected on the page, but it doesn’t display

any kind of helpful message so that you know what to do. So some scripts will give you useful instruction about what to do first, while others will just refuse to do anything, or worse yet, display a cryptic error message, unless you do all the right things first.

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Learn to Automate InDesign by Scripting

How to Edit a Script The easiest way to edit scripts written with the JavaScript language is to use the ExtendScript Toolkit (aka the ESTK), which is a script editor included with Creative Cloud. (While this was installed automatically in some earlier versions of InDesign, if you use CC you will need to download and install this program from the CC app. For more information, see this page at Adobe.com.) To use the ESTK, just right-click on a script in the Scripts panel, and choose Edit Script. This will launch the ExtendScript toolkit and open the script for editing.

A Few JavaScript Basics When you give instructions to a fellow human, you can get by with some misspellings and punctuation errors, and the recipient should still be able to understand your directions. But computers aren’t nearly as smart as us humans. (Yet!) You must dot all your is and cross all your ts if the computer is to understand your exact intent.

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ESTK: A Necessary Evil? As of this writing, the ExtendScript Toolkit has some severe performance issues for many users on the Macintosh platform. Thankfully, JavaScript files are just text files, so you can use any text editor to edit them. A dedicated code editor like Sublime Text or Brackets makes the job easier. Unfortunately, no third-party tools offer the integrated debugging functionality of the ESTK, so you may need to switch back and forth between editors to accomplish your work. This is known as proper “syntax.” Open the file Paste and format URL.jsx in the ESTK. There are five things you should know about JavaScript syntax: 1. You may notice that certain words sprinkled throughout the script appear in blue. These are “reserved words;” reserved words have a specific use in JavaScript, so they can’t be used for other things in a script. If you misspell one of these words, or capitalize any of them incorrectly, they will no longer appear blue, which is a helpful warning hint.

2. JavaScript is a case-sensitive language, meaning that False is not the same as FALSE or false. You need a sharp eye for detail. This has tripped me up more than once! 3. Notice how lines are indented, and that there are spaces on either side of each equal sign. “White space” is ignored in JavaScript, so you can add spaces, tabs, and extra returns anywhere that you’d like in order to add clarity to your scripts. 4. Note that most lines of the script end with a semicolon. The exceptions are

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Learn to Automate InDesign by Scripting

lines that end with an opening parenthesis or lines that consist of only a closing parenthesis. While these semicolons can often be omitted and your script will still function, it is a good practice to close single-line statements with a semicolon. 5. Lines that display in green are comments. Comments don’t do anything—they are just notes. Anything after a // at the beginning of the line is a comment, or anything between /* and */. Add lots of comments to your scripts as you write them. This will make it much easier when you return to a script months later and try to understand why you did what you did.

Variables Every script you write will likely contain one or more variables, so it is important to understand what they are and how to use them. A variable is a way to store and manipulate objects and data in a script. You create a variable with the var command. See

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Almost every script contains some sort of decision-making or looping mechanism. line 26 in the Paste and format URL.jsx file. In this line, I create a new layer in the document and assign it to the variable named myTempLayer. This way, later on in line 32, I can remove the layer easily by referring to it by its variable name.

Decision Making and Looping Almost every script will contain some sort of a decision-making or looping mechanism. You will encounter five primary types: »» If/else »» For »» Try/catch »» Switch »» While

Open each of the example files to see their proper use. It is beyond the scope of this article to examine each of these in detail, but you can use these examples as templates to get the syntax right. The logic of each is fairly straightforward.

The InDesign “Document Object Model” I suspect this might surprise you: you will likely be a better InDesign scripter than a programmer who has been using JavaScript for years without ever using InDesign. Why?

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Learn to Automate InDesign by Scripting

Because in order to automate InDesign with a script, you must have a good understanding of how InDesign documents and pages are constructed. This is right in your wheelhouse. Now you just have to learn how to parlay that knowledge into an understanding of the InDesign “Document Object Model,” or DOM. You know, for example, that text in InDesign always resides in text frames, and text frames can reside on the pasteboard, on a page, or anchored within another text frame. The InDesign DOM specifies the specific language you must use to “get at” a particular item. For example, a specific text frame on a specific page of a document might be addressed as app.activeDocument.pages[2].textFrames[5]. (Notice that this is read “backward,” like “a text frame on a page in the active document of the app (InDesign).”) How do you know what the precise syntax for the DOM is? Thankfully, there are two good references you can use to look this up.

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The reference that I prefer to use is located at indesignjs.de. You can see an alternative by choosing Help > Object Model Viewer in the ESTK, but I find this clumsy to use and navigate. The same information is presented in both of these resources, so it is simply a matter of which presentation you prefer.

The DOM is supposed to make sense… and sometimes it does (Figure 3). But other times, commands will be found in odd places. So you will often need to use ingenuity, resourcefulness, the search feature of the Object Model Viewer, or internet forums at Adobe.com and InDesignSecrets to help you locate a specific command.

application

documents

document

spreads

page

document

pages

application preferences

document

page

page

books

document defaults

...

libraries

...

...

document preferences

stories

application defaults

...

page items

rectangles

text frames

polygons

...

Figure 3: A visual representation of the InDesign Document Object Model. In this visual example, we see that the application (InDesign) contains a collection of documents, an individual document contains a collection of pages, an individual page contains page items, and page items are rectangles, text frames, polygons, etc.

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Learn to Automate InDesign by Scripting

An Example To put this all together, let’s write a script that finds all the text in the current story that is between 12 and 16 points in size and colors the text with a red fill. This script shows why you need a good working knowledge of InDesign in order to be able to write a useful script. You might start out thinking that we could use find/ change. And, looking at the specifications for a story in the InDesign DOM, you’ll see there is a findText method that we can use to easily script InDesign’s Edit > Find/ Change command. But when you start to think this through, you realize that InDesign doesn’t let you search for a range of sizes using the Find/Change command. With very few exceptions, scripting doesn’t add functionality that doesn’t already exist in the InDesign interface. So how do we solve this problem with a script? Imagine how you would do this by hand. With extreme patience, you could select the first character of the story, check the size of

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the character, and if it is between 12 and 16 point, fill it with red. Then, select the second character, and do the same thing. Repeat the process for every character in the story. While this would quickly drive anyone nuts, scripts are very good at automating extreme tedium and repetition very quickly. So this is the approach we will take with our script. In the ESTK, choose File > New JavaScript, and then choose File > Save As to save the file to your Scripts Panel folder. On the first line, type var mySelection = app.selection[0]; to tell InDesign “whatever is selected on the page, take the first item in the selection and give it the name mySelection.” Note that the first item

is item zero. (For scripting purposes, everything is numbered starting from zero.) So the first item in the selection is item 0, the second item is item 1, the third is item 2, etc. Also note that in this article, most of the bits of code break across two lines, but in your script they won't. For simplicity, this script isn’t going to do any error checking. It’s going to assume that you have some text selected, or an insertion point set with the Type tool. If you have something else selected, such as a frame, the script will not work. When you write a script for your own use, you might choose

Scripts are very good at automating extreme tedium and repetition very quickly.

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Learn to Automate InDesign by Scripting

to not include any error handling. If you’re creating a script for others, you should probably build in some more graceful ways for handling user error. On the second line, type var myStory = mySelection.parentStory;. Again, you can read the part with the dot in it backward, like “the parent story of my current selection.” So, this first creates a variable named myStory and then assigns the story that the selected text (or insertion point) is a part of to this variable. Every object in InDesign has a parent. The parent of an insertion point is a story. The parent of a story is a document. The parent of a document is the application. You will use parent, parentStory, parentTextFrame, and parentPage frequently when writing scripts to help you “get at” objects in your document. On line three, type var myNumCharacters = myStory.characters.length;. MyStory.characters refers to the “collection” of all the characters in myStory. Next, Length

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Every object in InDesign has a parent. The parent of an insertion point is a story. The parent of a story is a document. The parent of a document is the application. refers to the number of characters in the collection. So myNumCharacters is now the value of the total number of characters in the story that contains the selection or insertion point. On line four, type for (var i=0; i<myNumCharacters; i=i+1) {}. This is the start of a “for loop.” It says to create a variable named i and set its value to zero. Then, check to see if the value of i is less than the value of myNumCharacters. If it is, then do the commands that appear between the {} brackets. After executing the commands between the brackets, come back and add one to the value of i. Check to see if i is still less than the value of myNumCharacters. If it is, then do the commands between the brackets again. Repeat this

process over and over until i is no longer less than myNumCharacters. Place your cursor between the brackets after the for loop, and press Enter or Return twice. That gives you a little extra space to work with. On line five (the first blank line), type var myCharacter = myStory.characters[i];. The first time through the for loop the variable i is zero, and characters[0] is the first character of the story. That first character then gets assigned to the variable myCharacter. The second time through (when i equals 1) it is assigned the second character, and so on. On line six, type if ((myCharacter.pointSize > 12) && (myCharacter.pointSize < 16)) {}.

This means if the size of the character is

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Learn to Automate InDesign by Scripting

greater than 12 and less than 16, then do Your completed script should look like the commands between the curled braces this: (we’ll add those commands in a moment). var mySelection = app.selection[0]; The double ampersand (&&) means and. A var myStory = mySelection. double pipe character (||) means or. parentStory; You might ask how I knew about the var myNumCharacters = myStory. point­Size command—where did it come characters.length; from? It can be located in the DOM by lookfor (var i=0; i<myNumCharacters; ing at all the properties of the character i=i+1) { object. If you keep looking in that section, var myCharacter = myStory. you will also discover that the character characters[i]; object has a fillColor property, which we’re if ((myCharacter.pointSize > 12) && (myCharacter.pointSize < going to use. 16)) { Place your cursor between the two myCharacter.fillColor = brackets on line six, and insert two return "Red"; characters. } On line seven (the first line after the if } statement), type myCharacter.fillColor = "Red";. The script assumes that you have a swatch named Red. If not, the script Congratulations! will fail. Also, note that in general, you want You just wrote your first script… way to go! to make sure all the quote marks in your Now you can save it (remember to save it script are straight quotes (not curly, typogra- in the correct location—the Script Panel pher quotes)! folder—and use a .jsx filename extension)

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and run it from the Scripts panel inside InDesign. I hope this brief tutorial and the background information in this article helps to demystify the scripting process so you can start finding scripts, installing and using scripts, and then modifying, editing, and writing your own scripts. For further learning, I’d encourage you to complete my Lynda.com course, InDesign Scripting Made Easy. This 1 hour, 55 minute course, targeted at designers and production artists, expands on the information in this article, and then walks you through the process of creating three practical and useful scripts. And when that happens, you’ll rediscover the thrill and excitement you had when you first started learning InDesign.

n Keith Gilbert is a digital publishing consultant and educator, Adobe Certified Instructor, Adobe Community Professional, conference speaker, and an author and contributing writer for various publications. Follow him on Twitter @gilbertconsult and at gilbertconsulting.com.

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By Conrad Chavez

Designing with Adobe Stock

A new dividend from Creative Cloud

Figure 1: This newsletter story needs a graphic to go in the placeholder frame at the bottom of the page.

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Adobe recently created the new Adobe Stock service by combining their recent acquisition of the Fotolia stock agency with Adobe Creative Cloud. Adobe took the time to rethink how a stock image service could work within a cloud-driven production workflow involving Adobe applications, and this gives Adobe Stock certain unique advantages. Using any service’s stock photos in Adobe InDesign is not much of a challenge; just download the images and place them. How could it be any better? For Adobe, the answer was in using its Creative Cloud Libraries (or CC Libraries) to simplify how you try, buy, store, and import stock images. You can buy Adobe Stock images

individually or as part of a subscription plan; as I write this, Creative Cloud subscribers get a discount on the 10-images-a-month plan. To see this integration in action, we’ll use a sample InDesign document that’s a fictitious electronic newsletter (Figure 1), like the kind that a health care provider would send to its members. The layout is coming together, but it needs an image for the first page of an article on good nutrition. Let’s see what Adobe Stock can do.

Find the Right Image The usual way to find stock images is to visit a stock agency’s website in your web browser, search the site for the images you need, and download them. If you’re using

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Feature: Designing with Adobe Stock

Adobe InDesign CC, you can find Adobe Stock images without leaving InDesign, because Adobe Stock is built into the CC Libraries panel (Figure 2).

Figure 2: You can add Adobe Stock graphics or your own content to the CC Libraries panel, which is accessible from other InDesign documents and CC applications.

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To find an image, type a keyword like “Nutrition” into the Search Adobe Stock field at the top of the CC Libraries panel; you don’t have to press Enter or Return. (If the search field doesn’t say Search Adobe Stock, click the triangle to the right of the search field, and choose Adobe Stock.) The CC Libraries panel fills with Adobe Stock search

Figure 3: Enlarging the panel shows more search results at once.

results (Figure 3). You can see more at the same time if you enlarge the panel. These search results haven’t been added to your CC Libraries yet. As you move the pointer over each image, you see two icons. The shopping cart icon means “Buy and Save to (the active library)”; the cloud icon means “Save Preview to (the active library)” (Figure 4).

Figure 4: To download a preview to your CC Libraries panel, click the second icon. Click the first icon only when you’re ready to buy an image license.

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Feature: Designing with Adobe Stock

Because Adobe Stock saves to the active library, before you save any images be sure to check the top of the CC Libraries panel to see which library is active, and change it if needed. (Though you can always copy or move the image to another library later, if you need to, by right-clicking the library item and choosing Move to or Copy to.) Alternately, if you want to create a library for the current project, click the pop-up menu at the top of the CC Libraries panel, and choose Create New Library. After you name the new library and click Create, it becomes the active library. In the search results, when you see an image you want to try, click the cloud icon to save a preview to the current library. In our example, the image is saved to my Newsletter library (which I created and selected in advance). The preview is a watermarked, low resolution, for-position-only (FPO) image. Previews are free, so download as many as you like, especially if you need to present alternatives for approval by your art

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director or client. I chose several candidates for my layout (Figure 5). Searching Adobe Stock in the CC Libraries panel isn’t a perfect process. A limited number of search results are shown; when you get to the end, a “See more results on the web” button appears, and clicking it switches you out of InDesign and into your web browser. Sometimes I download a duplicate of a preview I already have because the CC Libraries panel can’t show

Figure 5: My candidates for the story image.

search results and existing library items at the same time. And after you download an image, it doesn’t remember recent searches if you want to find more images using the same terms. One thing you can do to find more images is to right-click an image in the CC Libraries panel and choose Find Similar on Web (Figure 6). This jumps from InDesign to your default web browser, displaying

Figure 6: Close but not quite? Right-click an image, and choose Find Similar on Web.

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Feature: Designing with Adobe Stock

the new search results on the Adobe Stock website. Fortunately, when you jump from the CC Libraries panel to the web, you’re usually automatically signed in to the Adobe Stock website with your Adobe ID—so from your web browser you can save images directly to one of your libraries or to your desktop (Figure 7). When you switch back to InDesign, images you saved from the Adobe Stock website to a library now appear in the CC Libraries panel. Tool tips in the CC Libraries panel provide useful information about Adobe Stock images, such as their licensing status (Figure 8).

Try It You can drag any image out of the CC Libraries panel to load it in your Place cursor (which lets you place it in your InDesign layout). I had already created a placeholder graphics frame for the image, so for me it was faster to select the frame, right-click the

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Figure 8: A tool tip provides information about the image under the pointer.

Figure 7: It’s just as easy to add images to libraries from the Adobe Stock website.

image in the CC Libraries panel, and choose Place Linked (Figure 9, next page). That places the image directly into the selected frame. After the image is in the layout, you can work with it the same way you would with any placed graphic; for example, you can resize it or crop it.

If you use Adobe Stock images in an InDesign document and package the document, the Adobe Stock images will be included. But if you haven’t licensed the images, the package will include only the watermarked low-resolution previews.

Inspect It You might notice a few subtle differences between a placed Adobe Stock graphic and

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Feature: Designing with Adobe Stock

Figure 9: Right-click an Adobe Stock image (left) to place it directly into a selected frame. The frame then displays a cloud icon (right). Figure 10: A cloud icon on a graphics frame tells you that the graphic is linked to a CC library, and the Links panel displays the metadata for a selected Adobe Stock image.

a graphic you place from local storage. For example, instead of seeing a link icon at the edge of the graphics frame, you see a cloud icon to remind you that the graphic is linked to a Creative Cloud library (Figure 10). You’ll see more differences if you open the Links panel and select the image to see its link information and metadata. For example, the Path entry leads to CC Libraries instead of local storage, and the PPI (resolution) and Dimensions are low when you select an Adobe Stock preview instead of a licensed image. You also can’t use the Edit Original command with an Adobe Stock image unless you copy it locally (see “The Local Option” below). Careful with color I should warn you that there is currently a problem with Adobe Stock images that could, in some circumstances, make them appear incorrectly on screen. It’s a color management problem, so it is kind of technical, but the quick version is that the

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Feature: Designing with Adobe Stock

unlicensed (preview) images don’t seem to have embedded ICC profiles—or if they do, InDesign can’t see them. Therefore, the Links panel reports that the ICC Profile of an unlicensed (preview) Adobe Stock image is Document RGB, which means InDesign displays that image’s colors using the same profile assigned to the InDesign document. And even though licensed (paid) Adobe Stock images do contain embedded sRGB profiles, for some reason the Links panel still reports them as Document RGB (this is probably a bug and may be fixed by the time you read this). Fortunately, you probably don’t have to be concerned about any of that if the RGB profile assigned to your InDesign document is sRGB, as it is by default for many InDesign installations (Figure 11). But be aware that if you change the InDesign RGB document profile to something other than sRGB (such as Adobe RGB), colors of Adobe Stock images may not appear as expected. In that case, if you want the colors of Adobe Stock

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images to appear more accurately, you can assign sRGB to them. Select an Adobe Stock image on the layout, choose Object > Image Color Settings, choose sRGB from the Profile menu, and click Choose. Unfortunately there is no quick way to do this to all of them at once, so you must manually select each Adobe Stock image in the document.

Figure 11: The RGB document profile assigned to this InDesign document (in Edit > Assign Profiles) is sRGB, so Adobe Stock image colors should appear as expected.

Buy It After you settle on a final image, you can buy a license for it. If your library contains many more Adobe Stock images than you used in your InDesign document, you can use the Links panel to make sure that you pay for only the images you actually used. In the Links panel, select an Adobe Stock image, and choose Reveal in CC Libraries from the Links panel menu (Figure 12), which selects the image in the CC Libraries panel. Because you selected that image from the document, you know it’s safe to

Figure 12: The Reveal in CC Libraries command shows you where a cloud-linked document item exists in your libraries.

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Feature: Designing with Adobe Stock

right-click that image in the CC Libraries panel and choose Buy Image (Figure 13). If you have an Adobe Stock subscription, the entire transaction happens in the CC Libraries panel. If you don’t have a subscription, you’ll jump to the Adobe Stock website to complete payment. After you buy an image, all linked instances of the image that you added using the low-resolution preview

Figure 13: To license an Adobe Stock image, right-click it in the CC Libraries panel, and then choose Buy Image.

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version are automatically updated to the high-resolution version, and the watermark goes away (Figure 14).

Figure 14: After purchasing the image license, the high-resolution version looks great and the watermark is gone.

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Feature: Designing with Adobe Stock

The Local Option Earlier I mentioned that you can save Adobe Stock images locally; here’s how. Select any or all of the Adobe Stock images in the Links panel (remember, they all have cloud icons), right-click any of the selected images, choose Copy Link(s) To (Figure 15), select a local folder or drive, and click OK. InDesign copies the images to the location you chose and updates the link path to match. The cloud icons disappear, because the images are no longer linked to your Creative Cloud

library. You’re now working as if you placed those images from local storage. In fact, it’s possible to work with Adobe Stock images without going through Creative Cloud libraries at all. Use your web browser to go straight to the Adobe Stock website, sign in, download previews and licensed images straight to your local drive, and place them in your InDesign layouts as you do with other images. This is also how you’d use Adobe Stock images if you’re using a version of InDesign earlier than InDesign CC, because those versions can’t use Creative Cloud Libraries.

and billing makes it the most seamless stock service to use with InDesign and other Adobe Creative Cloud applications.

n Conrad Chavez has provided education and training for digital media and publishing for over 20 years. His work includes the last three editions of the book Real World Adobe Photoshop for Photographers and the video Color Management for Photographers and Designers. He also contributes articles to publications including CreativePro.com and Peachpit.com, and is a photographer. To learn more about Conrad, please visit conradchavez.com.

Stock Up on Graphics

Figure 15: To save library-linked Adobe Stock images locally, right-click one or more of them in the Links panel, and choose Copy Links To.

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Adobe Stock isn’t just about photographs; you can also use Adobe Stock to find illustrations and vector graphics. (Adobe Stock also has video, although as I write this, importing video to InDesign from the desktop works better than adding video from the CC Libraries.) If Adobe Stock has the media you need, its integrated searching, storage,

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By Nigel French

InType: Type That Touches

What happens when letters connect…or don’t

Like much in life, good typography is as much about what to leave out as what to include. That special ingredient of space between the letters plays a key role in the way we respond to a message. Often “invisible,” good letterspacing, or tracking, is a key component of readability. It requires contrast between the letters and their background. It’s the background that gives form to the type. While consistency is usually the goal, does that mean consistently tight, consistently loose—or consistently “just right?” And how do we know the difference?

Why Does it Matter? With loose letterspacing, we see more of the background. Too much, and the background

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gobbles up the type—letters lose their association with each other, and words lose their shape. With tightly-spaced type, we see less background—the words can look dense, possibly more impactful. But if there’s not enough background, the letters run into each other (Figure 1, next page). Here there’s the risk of an undifferentiated mass of type or creating unintentional meanings. We’ve all seen those funny (and not safe for work!) examples that do the rounds on the web, where carelessly-spaced letter pairs create a whole new level of unintended meaning. Certain letter combinations are known to be troublesome; hopefully the font’s kerning metrics address the problem up front,

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InType: Type That Touches

but this won’t always be the case, nor will you always agree with the prescribed metrics values (Figure 2). At the micro level, you can employ manual kerning to adjust the spacing of particular letter pairs. Kerning is part of the fine-tuning of the spacing of a typeface, and you shouldn’t undertake it until the type style, size, and letterspacing (tracking) values have been decided. When it comes time to kern, be careful: you don’t want to end up keming instead of kerning (Figure 3).

Aesthetics Change Exactly what constitutes good letterspacing is neither fixed nor universally agreed upon. It varies according to the method of typesetting, the size of the type, and typographic fashion. In Ye Olde Times, when type was made of metal, the space between the letters was fixed—the spacing literally being a part of the type (Figure 4). While it was possible to add space between letters by inserting extra

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No one would have believed in the last years of the nineteenth century that this world was being watched keenly and closely by intelligences greater than man’s and yet as mortal as his own; that as men busied themselves about their various concerns they were scrutinised and studied, perhaps almost as narrowly as a man with a microscope might scrutinise the transient creatures that swarm and multiply in a drop of water. With infinite complacency men went to and fro over this globe about their little affairs, serene in their assurance Noonewouldhavebelievedinthelastyearsofthenineteenthcentury thatthisworldwasbeingwatchedkeenlyandcloselybyintelligences greater than man’s and yet as mortal as his own; that as men busied themselves about their various concerns they were scrutinised and studied, perhaps almost as narrowly as a man with a microscope mightscrutinisethetransientcreaturesthatswarmandmultiplyin a drop of water. With infinite complacency men went to and fro over this globe about their little affairs, serene in their assurance of their empireovermatter.

AV Te AW

AV Te AW

Figure 2: Common letter pairs in need of kerning. Metrics kerning applied (left), and no kerning (right).

Kerning Kerning

Figure 3: A kern too far.

N o o n e wou l d h ave b e l i eve d i n t h e l a s t ye a r s o f t h e n i n e te e n t h c e n t u r y t h a t t h i s wo r l d wa s b e i n g watched keenly and closely by intelligences greater t h a n m a n’s a n d ye t a s m o r t a l a s h i s ow n ; t h a t a s m e n b u s i e d t h e m s e lv e s a b o u t t h e i r va r i o u s c o n c e r n s t h ey we re s c r u t i n i s e d a n d s t u d i e d , p e r h a p s a l m o s t a s n a r r o w ly a s a m a n w i t h a m i c r o s c o p e might scrutinise the transient creatures that swarm a n d m u l t i p l y i n a d r o p o f w a t e r . Wi t h i n f i n i t e

Figure 1: The same text with letterspacing “just right” (top), too tight, and too loose.

Figure 4: With metal type, the spacing is incorporated into each piece of metal.

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InType: Type That Touches

strips of metal, the only way to reduce space between letters was to cut away part of the metal in each piece of type. It wasn’t until phototypesetting in the 1960s and ’70s that it was practical to move letters closer together. With no metal to worry about—only photographic images that had no physical body—typesetters could set type as close as they wanted. The graphic designer most skilled at tightly spacing and overlapping letters was Herb Lubalin (1918–1981). He wrote: “ We’ve been conditioned to read the way Gutenberg set his type, and for five hundred years people have been reading widely-spaced words on horizontal lines Gutenberg spaced far apart… We read words, not characters, and pushing letters closer or tightening spacing between lines doesn’t destroy legibility; it merely changes reading habits.” [Quoted in Heller, Steven and Karen Pomeroy, Design Literacy: Understanding Graphic Design, Allworth Press 1997, p. 65]

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The “rules” of readability are the same whether it’s metal type, photo type, or digital: letters far enough apart to be distinct, but not so far they separate into individual signs; the space between the words equivalent to the width of the letter “i;” the leading greater than the space between the words. But these rules of thumb do not necessarily apply to display type. For display type—where the text is shorter and the type larger—gaining attention, not readability, is the most important thing (Figure 5, next page). Art directors and designers saw the intricate, closely fitted layouts of Lubalin and other pioneers and tried to imitate that look. The phrase they used when they spec’d the type for their ads and brochures was “tight

but not touching.” In other words, set the letters as close together as you possibly can without their actually touching each other or overlapping. On the other hand, for special display projects such as posters and logos, they would sometimes allow their type to “kiss.”

Ligatures There is, of course, a subset of characters— ligatures—where the letters touching is the whole point. If fact, everyone’s favorite glyph—the ampersand—started out as a ligature, combining E and t, forming the Latin word “et,” meaning “and.” Ligatures join two or three separate glyphs into a single unit to create the visual effect of the type intentionally touching—either for the

We read words, not characters —Herb Lubalin 35


InType: Type That Touches

Figure 5: The distinctive style of Herb Lubalin, using his signature typeface Avant Garde for the magazine of the same name. Lubalin took liberties with the traditional rules of letterspacing and leading to create tight-knit “typographic pictures,” to make the type more expressive. Of the digital reproductions of Avant Garde, only the OpenType Pro version contains the stylistic alternates necessary for producing type treatments like this.

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InType: Type That Touches

aesthetic reason of avoiding a collision of characters, for ornamental purposes (discretionary ligatures), or to simulate the joined letterforms of handwriting (Figure 6). Beyond the obvious letter combinations of fi and fl, as English continues to create and absorb words, new ligature combinations are necessary. Words like fjord, hors d’oeuvre, and offjár place demands on the typeface that its original designer could not have foreseen. If you’re doing multilingual publishing, the range of available ligatures might be a factor in your choice of typeface (Figure 7). While ligatures are often necessary for serif faces, they are unlikely to be needed for sans serif faces. Thankfully, InDesign is smart enough to substitute individual glyphs for the ligature when the letterspacing is increased. And what about the other end of the scale: spacing the letters far apart? While it is commonplace to open up the letterspace of caps or small caps, for lowercase letters the conventional wisdom is that if the

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Figure 7: Ligatures in logos and hand-drawn display type: The University of Sussex logo by Blast, and Try and Fail by Wells from the Tumblr blog “I Love Ligatures.”

Figure 6: An example typeface with extensive language support, Minion Pro has a full range of ligatures.

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InType: Type That Touches

spacing is too loose, the words don’t hold together. On this topic, the opprobrium of Frederic Goudy speaking in 1936 is often paraphrased: “Anyone who would letterspace blackletter would shag sheep.” Goudy’s pronouncement inspired the title of Stop Stealing Sheep, Eric Spiekermann and E.M. Ginger’s introduction to typography. While it is true that wide and inconsistent letterspacing hampers readability for book typography, when it comes to headlines and display type, designers have far more latitude. Widely spaced headings are a hallmark of postmodern typography, where even the spacing between different syllables within

a word may be varied to make the type more expressive (Figure 8). When it comes to signage, increasing the letterspacing can increase rather than diminish the legibility (Figure 9).

Take a Deep Breath Tight or loose, the air you incorporate into your type is as important as the choice of type itself. A typeface’s personality will change depending on its letterspacing— the spaces around the letters functioning like intervals between notes of music. While consistency is usually desirable, when it comes to display type, even this tenet can be broken if done with bravado and confidence.

n Figure 9: UK road signage: the loose spacing of the type is designed to increase legibility from a distance.

Nigel French is a graphic designer, photographer, author, and teacher living in Lewes, UK. He is the author of InDesign Type and Photoshop Unmasked, both from Adobe Press, as well as several titles in the lynda.com online training library, including InDesign Typography.

Figure 8: Normal rules do not apply.

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By Cinnamon Cooper

InReview: Style Utilities

Increase your productivity when working with text Style Utilities In-Tools www.in-tools.com US$39 Mac and Windows, CS4 and later Rating:

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Here’s the situation: You’re at the end of a long production project when a designer or a client calls with a “simple” request. They just want to tweak “one little last thing.” And to them it is simple, right? Yeah, for them. You, on the other hand, now have to create new styles and then manually go through every page and apply those styles throughout the document, one paragraph at a time. If you’ve worked in production, you’ve likely encountered this scenario. I know I have. Thankfully, Gabe Harbs (affectionately known by almost everyone as “Harbs”) has created Style Utilities as a relatively inexpensive offering by In-Tools.com. This is not a snazzy or fancy plug-in. But it doesn’t need to be. It is a quiet, competent backstage player that subtly propels

the success of the entire show. It doesn’t do anything until you’re ready, but once you click each OK button, it quickly restyles paragraphs of text in a variety of ways that will automate your production and save you time and frustration. This $39 plug-in package gives you eight functions, any one of which would itself pay for the whole shebang in time-savings after just a few uses. If you routinely do production where styles change throughout the project, or if you use an InCopy workflow and need to apply and reapply styles throughout a project, you’ll likely find this very useful. Even if you’ve just got a “small” redesign or update planned for a legacy publication, some of these features will help you be more efficient, and more accurate.

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InReview: Style Utilities

The goal of this plug-in is to make it easier for you to change things faster and more accurately than you can manually. Almost everything Style Utilities does can be accomplished manually, or using other tools in InDesign. So if you are a GREP or a Scripting master, you may scoff at some of these things and say to yourself “Bah! I could write a command that will do that in ten minutes.” But not all of us are capable of that. And, of course, if you’re paid by the hour and enjoy manually applying paragraph and character styles over and over, you won’t be interested in Style Utilities. But if your goal is to save time, then the price of this package will be worth it. That said, if you only need to change a few styles on occasion, or if you are pinching pennies, this plug-in set may not be the best for you. But do a little simple division to see if this is worth it. Take $39 and divide it by your hourly rate. I suspect that you’d only have to save yourself 1 or 2 hours of work to pay for this plug-in. After that, it’s all gravy.

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But enough glowing about this plug-in; let me show you how it works!

Installation and Guidance Installation is as easy as with any other plug-in. Purchase the plug-in online, and download the .zip file. Quit all open versions of InDesign, open the .dmg file, click through the screens to accept the license agreement, choose the version of InDesign you want to use, select the drive to load the plug-in on, and you’re done. Once you reopen InDesign, you’ll notice that you have a new drop-down menu with options (Figure 1).

The Key to Working Smarter

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All for less than $5 a month! Figure 1: Choosing Style Utilites options from the newly-added InTools menu.

indesignsecrets.com/membership

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InReview: Style Utilities

If you go to the top option, InTools Dashboard, you’ll be able to see this plug-in as well as all of the others available from In-Tools. This dashboard shows the current version and whether it’s installed. If you’re using a trial version, you’ll see how long until your license expires. The next option in the menu shows you a further drop-down that displays all of the functions included in Style Utilities. There are more details about installation in the included documentation. The documentation is clearly written. But as a person who prefers visuals to written explanations, I found it a bit dense. There are screenshots of each function to show the drop-down menus and options that you have to choose from. But one page of examples per function wouldn’t make the PDF guide much larger. Alternately, the PDF could be generated to print on US Letter-sized paper, which would reduce the number of pages, and make it easier for folks who prefer to read from a paper copy. (Although if you can read smallish print, you

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can slightly reduce the guide to print as a spread on an 8.5” × 11” sheet of paper.) The guide provides fuller explanations of each of these functions than I have room to describe here, but I think these examples will augment the guide and let you determine if Style Utilities is for you. Conditional Paragraph Style Changer This function allows you to restyle a paragraph based on the content at the beginning of that paragraph. In my example, it was decided that every paragraph that begins with “Challenge” would be changed to black text (Figure 2). Without the plug-in, I would have to manually select each paragraph that needed to change and apply a different style. Or I’d have to create a GREP find/replace that would change this formatting (Figure 3). Style Utilities makes things a lot simpler. It lets me find every paragraph with the original “blue” style applied, and containing a specific character found in the first word,

and then apply the “black” paragraph style (Figure 4).

Figure 2: Before running the Paragraph Style Changer

Figure 3: The Paragraph Style Changer dialog box

Figure 4: After running the Paragraph Style Changer

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InReview: Style Utilities

In terms of performance, once you press OK, things go quite quickly, but the speed will depend on the size of your file. If you also wanted to change the character style of the number of words you have listed in your last entry in the function, you can call it out in the bottom portion of the pane as well. This would be useful if you were using a nested paragraph style and didn’t want to alter it or create a separate paragraph style (Figure 5).

repeating characters within any given paragraph. In my example, I needed to make all of the stage directions italic when they appeared within a line of dialogue (Figure 6). This would be very time consuming if done manually, or it can be done with GREP, but it’s easier with this function (Figure 7).

Figure 6: Formatting between delimiters

Figure 5: Applying a conditional character style to the first word of a paragraph

Style Between Delimiters This function is perfect if you need to change the appearance of text within parentheses, brackets, quotes, or any other

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Figure 7: The Apply Character Style Between Delimiters dialog box

The options for this function are fairly self-explanatory. You choose the paragraph

and character styles you want to apply. You choose your beginning and ending characters, whether there is a minimum or maximum number of characters you want restyled, and whether you want the restyling to happen in your document, your story, or your selection (which appears only if you have text selected). Once you click OK, your changes are made. I would love an option to not style the starting and ending characters differently. In my example, I would prefer the text within my brackets to be italic, but not the brackets themselves. Create Multi Line Styles This function applies styles based on the number of lines in a paragraph. If you want to make every single-line paragraph a heading (as in Figure 8, next page), or every three-line paragraph requires a specific style, this is the function to use. In my example, I have a set of paragraphs that are all styled as Body text, but the single-line paragraphs are headings. Again, this could be done

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InReview: Style Utilities

manually, not without a lot of time and effort. And a complicated GREP style could be used. But this is so much faster and easier. You just choose the original paragraph style, the new style you want for one-line paragraphs (or another line count, if desired), and the style you want for two-line paragraphs (or other line count, if desired). Consecutive Styles If you ever wished for a function that would permit you to apply paragraph styles to consecutive paragraphs, then this is the function for you. Not only can it restyle paragraphs in a consistent order, but it can also apply styles to paragraphs that come before or after a specific style. For example, I’ll frequently have to deal with a situation where I have a bulleted list, and I want more space after the last bulleted item than between consecutive items. This is great for any time when you need the first or last instance of a style to be slightly different (maybe your first paragraph after

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Figure 8: In this example, all single-line paragraphs are headings, and as such require special formatting.

a heading has a run-in character style). This function is easy to fill in and makes the changes quickly (Figure 9). Apply Next Styles It was great back in the days of CS2, when Adobe added the Apply Next Style option to the Paragraph Styles panel. This allows you to apply a sequence of predictable styles to a range of paragraphs. Style Utilities takes things a step further by applying style sequences throughout a document, sparing you from having to locate specific instances.

Figure 9: In this example, paragraphs following a heading must be styled as a bulleted list, and there should be extra space between a final list item before a heading—no problem for Style Utilities.

It’s very powerful and can be a huge timesaver in certain situations. You just choose the first paragraph style you want to begin the restyling with (Figure 10, next page).

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InReview: Style Utilities

Create Hyperlinks from URLs This one should be self-explanatory. This function will find text in your file that fits a web address pattern, apply a character style to it, and turn it into a hyperlink. The great thing is that this function chooses everything that begins with http:// or www., converts it, restyles it, and even

ignores manually entered line breaks on longer URLs. You simply select the character style to apply; whether you want to apply it to a document, story, or a selection; and then click OK. As you can see in the example, my style makes the text red and italic. The links appear in your Hyperlinks panel just as if you created them manually.

Figure 10: In this example, there are multiple paragraphs after a B-Head that can be styled all at the same time with Apply Next Styles.

Change Case By Style InDesign has offered the ability to convert lowercase text to uppercase text (and several related functions) for a long time. But there are some complexities to applying Title Case. You’ll notice that Style Utilities calls this Smart Title Case, and indeed it is smarter than the Adobe default. At the bottom of the screen are two “exceptions” lists you can edit, with a few instances entered into each (Figure 11). By editing these fields, you can keep articles like a, and, and the as lowercase. You can add anything to this list by simply typing into this field with one space between words. You can also add

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other instances where you want to call out capitalization. This is great for frequently used acronyms, state abbreviations, and things with tricky uses of camel caps like InDesign or ePub, for example. Add your commonly used words to this list and you’ll be spared having to search for and alter specific words. I would love it if a user could export lists to share with others. You can copy and paste, of course, but a Save/Load option would be great for larger teams who may need to frequently update these lists.

Figure 11: The Change Case By Style dialog box and its Edit Lowercase List option

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InReview: Style Utilities

More importantly, once you set this up, you can apply it quickly to all your headings or subheadings or whatever, based on a specific paragraph or character style. All Caps to Small Caps Converting multiple instances of capital letters to small caps can be very frustrating. In some cases, you can use GREP, but you need to know the proper GREP expression and you need an OpenType font that supports “all small caps.” So, for the rest of us, this function changes the text quickly in one pass (Figure 12). You can specify whether you want to choose only text with a specific paragraph or character style applied, and you can

Figure 12: The Convert All Caps to Small Caps dialog box

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select whether you want the document, the story, or the selection. Then you select the character style that has the small caps option included, and your text is converted. Proper nouns and capital letters that begin sentences are unaffected, since the plug-in selects only multiple instances of capital letters to convert. If your character style doesn’t apply small caps, you will get a confusing error message. Ideally, this message would be edited to be clearer to a nonGREP-using person.

I’m sure that as I work, I’ll find various other ways to use these functions so I can spend less time at the keyboard and more time doing other things.

n Cinnamon Cooper creates streamlined templates and concise instructions at Houghton Mifflin Harcourt by day. And by night she herds cats and designs and produces bags for Poise.cc.

Time is Money Despite a few feature requests I have, the value of Style Utilities is very clear to me, as it should be to anyone who routinely has to apply styles to any InDesign file after the text has been added. The amount of time this plug-in saves can be extensive if you run into these issues on a daily basis (or even just frequently). For the sake of space, I provided one example of each function. But there are many more uses for each function.

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GREP of the Month

\x

Unicode

Target any range of characters: Hebrew or Hirigana, Cherokee or currency, Devanagari or dingbats. GREP Level: Medium GREP is an excellent tool for finding characters in certain Unicode ranges and applying a character style to them. I’ve used this method to apply a phonetic font to phonetic characters and an Arabic font to Arabic script. To accomplish this, you need to know InDesign’s notation for Unicode characters and the limits of, in this case, the phonetic and Arabic Unicode ranges. The limits of Unicode ranges can be found on the website of the Unicode consortium. There you’ll find that the basic Arabic characters range from Unicode values 0600 to 06FF. InDesign’s format

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for Unicode characters is \x{0000}, so in InDesign’s notation the basic Arabic characters range from \x{0600} to \x{06FF}. Assuming that your document contains a character style (e.g., “arabic”) that sets an Arabic font, you can apply that character style to all Arabic characters in the basic range like this: in the Find What field, enter [\x{0600}-\x{06FF}]+, and set the character style in the Change Format panel. The bracket notation is used in GREP expressions to define a range of characters (it’s called a character class); and we use the plus operator to apply the character to series of Arabic characters.

Looking at the chart more closely, however, you notice that things are slightly more complicated: Arabic is contained not in one range, but in four. Apart from the basic range 0600–06FF, we have Arabic Extended-A (08A0–08FF), Arabic Presentation Forms-A (FB50–FDFF), and Arabic Presentation Forms-B (FE70–FEFF). In our document we’re interested only in one additional class, Extended-A. To find all characters in two ranges—here, Unicode ranges 0600–06FF and 08A0–08FF—we simply add the latter to the class we defined earlier: [\x{0600}-\x{06FF}\x{08A0}\x{08FF}]+.  —Peter Kahrel

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Best of the Blogs

Best of the Blogs

A collection of the most important and informative articles from InDesignSecrets, InCopySecrets, and EPUBSecrets. If you want to add comments or ask questions, just click the title of the article to view the original post in your web browser. Holiday FX: Do You Want to Build An InDesign Snowman? Mike Rankin | December 16, 2015

Start by making a snowball and rolling it downhill. Just kidding. Draw two ovals for a head and body, and fill them with about 7% black.

Do you want to build a snowman? Come on let’s go and play! I know that this is InDesign But that’s just fine Who needs Illustrator anyway? With sincere apologies to fans of Disney’s Frozen, let’s see how easy it is to make an InDesign snowman with transparency effects (just don’t call him Olaf, or you’ll invite the wrath of the Mouse’s copyright lawyers).

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Best of the Blogs

Give them some dimension by applying Bevel And Emboss and Inner Shadow with the Effects panel.

The next part is a little tricky. We need to add a shadow under the head that appears only on the head (and not on whatever background we decide to add later). To accomplish this, duplicate the head in place, apply a drop shadow, and then cut the duplicate head and paste it into the body shape. It may help to hide the original head temporarily while you do this.

Use the Pen tool to add some arms. Apply a similar 3D effect to the arms with Bevel And Emboss and a drop shadow. Then make them blend into the body shape with a Gradient Feather at the shoulders.

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Best of the Blogs

Next, add some facial features. An orange triangle with a little bevel and emboss quickly becomes a carrot. Distort some black Olafs ovals with the Direct Selection tool for eyes.

A couple of curved lines with dotted black strokes can create a mouth and a set of buttons.

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Fashion a hat by starting with a rectangle and an oval for the brim, and then tweaking the shapes with the Direct Selection tool. Make the sides of the rectangle concave and the top convex.

Make the hat fancy and shiny by adding a red band and a highlight.

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Best of the Blogs

This is another case where you can draw a couple relatively simple shapes (ovals and rectangles work fine), group them, and paste them into the hat shape.

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As before with the head shadow, letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s add a hat shadow with some help from the magic of Paste Into. Duplicate the brim in place, add a drop shadow, and paste the object into the head shape. That way the shadow appears only where it should (on the head).

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Best of the Blogs

Add a background with curved gray shape for the ground and a cyan-white gradient filled rectangle for the sky.

a drop shadow, and make sure that you set it so the object doesn’t knock out that shadow.

Last but not least, we need to add a shadow under the snowman so he doesn’t seem like he’s floating in the air. Since the shape of the shadow needs to be flatter than the round body, we need to use a transparency trick. Fill an oval with white, and set the object to Multiply in the Effects panel. This makes the white fill disappear, but will leave a shadow of the oval visible. Add

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Best of the Blogs

Now we’ve got ourselves an InDesign snowman! Tweak any of the shapes or effects to taste to suit your wishes. You could even try animating parts of him.

the snowman. It’s neatly organized so you can identify each part of the snowman and manipulate it if you want to.

Enjoy! Click here to download the snowman snippet.

Publish Online Project of the Month: Irish Landscapes Mike Rankin | December 21, 2015

Too busy shopping and making cookies to do all this? If you’re currently logged in to InDesignSecrets.com as a Premium member, a link appears below that you can use to download a snippet file of

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One of the most interesting developments regarding InDesign in 2015 has been the emergence of an entirely new option for publishing your documents, called simply Publish Online. This “technology preview” allows you to put a document online

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Best of the Blogs

(on Adobe’s servers), with your entire layout and interactivity preserved, with literally the push of a button. If you’re using InDesign CC 2015, you’ll see the button in the Application Bar.

In the latest CC 2015.2 update, Adobe added the button to the Print dialog box and most of the Export (PDF, EPUB, etc.) dialog boxes as well. If you don’t see the Publish Online button, check the Technology Preview pane in your Preferences to make sure it’s enabled. When you publish a document this way, you get a URL you can distribute, as well as code to embed your document in web pages (as I’ve done below!), and the option to let your viewers download it as a PDF. We’ve written a few posts on Publish Online here at InDesignSecrets, and an in-depth article by Diane Burns is coming soon in the January 2016 issue of InDesign Magazine. But I think the best way to grasp what you can do with Publish Online is seeing (and interacting with) the cool stuff that others have done so far. So to that end, we’re starting a new feature: the Publish Online Project of the Month.

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To kick things off, let’s take a look at an art catalog showcasing the Irish landscape paintings of John Kelly.

Produced by Spark+ in New York City, this 18-page catalog features a cover with a slow horizontal animation that serves two purposes: it reveals more of the beautiful Irish landscape that inspires the artist, and it draws your eye to a button you can click to view the catalog. The button itself features a rollover state where the text becomes bold when you move your cursor over it.

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Best of the Blogs

The presentation of the paintings on the interior pages of the catalog is clever too. The paintings were photographed in tastefully decorated settings where they blend in perfectly.

On top of each photograph are interactive buttons you can use to open separate, larger views of the paintings with accompanying details. The buttons are also animated, quickly growing and

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shrinking in size to draw your attention to them when you first view the page.

Each close-up view also features a close box you can click to go back to viewing the full photograph. Overall, the interactivity strikes a nice balance. It’s useful and inviting, but it doesn’t overwhelm or distract from the photography—or the paintings themselves. It comes across as refined and subtle, a great fit for a fine art publication, and a nice example of the virtues of Publish Online.

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Best of the Blogs

Submit Your Projects! We’re on the hunt for interesting Publish Online projects we can spotlight in this new monthly feature. If you’ve created one for yourself, your company, or your client, we’d love to see it! Please email mike@indesignsecrets.com with the URL and a few details about the publication, and include “Publish Online Project” in the subject line. We can’t promise anything, but we will personally respond to every email submittal.

4. Scroll down the list of Type Menu items until you find the command you’re looking for. For example, you might choose Insert Special Character > Other > End Nested Styles Here.

How Do You Type an [Insert Special Character Here]? David Blatner | December 24, 2015

Chris wrote: »» Anyone know if there’s a keyboard shortcut for ‘end nested style’ character? While there is no default built-in keyboard shortcut (KBSC) for that character, you can make your own really easily! In fact, if you often find yourself needing any character in the Type > Insert Special Characters submenu (or any other menu in InDesign), I encourage you to make your own shortcut for it. Here’s how: 1. Choose Edit > Keyboard Shortcuts. 2. If you haven’t made your own shortcut set before, then click the New Set button and give it a name. 3. Choose Type Menu from the Product Area pop-up menu.

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5. Click once in the New Shortcut field, and then type the shortcut you want to apply to the command. If that shortcut is already being used, InDesign will tell you. You can click the Assign button to use it anyway, or type a different shortcut and then click Assign. 6. Click OK to close the dialog box. Your shortcut will work right away. It’s easy and fast to make shortcuts for special characters, so try it today!

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Best of the Blogs

Using Quick Apply If you’re going to use a special character only occasionally, but you still want to keep your hands on the keyboard, then remember your friend Quick Apply. (See the movie about it here.) Here’s how you’d do it: You’ll be typing along when you realize you need a special character (such as a Hair Space), and you won’t remember how to type it—or even if there is a keyboard shortcut for that character. So just press Command+Return (or Ctrl+Enter on Windows) to bring up Quick Apply. Then type “hair,” and that command appears in the list:

It’s not quite as fast as having a custom shortcut for the character, but it’s faster than having to use the mouse and menus!

What is the Nothing Font Style? David Blatner | December 28, 2015

What the heck?! I opened an InDesign document and got this Missing Fonts dialog box that tells me “Myriad Pro Nothing” is missing!

As soon as it is selected in the list (you can use the up and down arrow keys to move through the list), you can press Return/Enter, and InDesign will “type” that character for you.

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Best of the Blogs

Nothing? Not regular, italic, bold, semibold… just Nothing! There is no such thing as the Nothing style in the Myriad Pro family, of course. There is actually a lovely font called Nothing, but certainly not a “nothing” style. Of course, I clicked Find Font, and then clicked the More Info button, which is sometimes helpful when troubleshooting:

Curiously, Find Font says this is not used in any styles, but that’s wrong… I clicked Find First, which highlighted some text in the document. Then I noticed it had a character style applied to it: the Hyperlink style that is often created and automatically applied when you make a hyperlink!

That is very weird. I wish I had a clever answer for how this happened, but I don’t. Anyone have any ideas? In the meantime, I just chalk it up to cosmic rays, and perhaps even minor document corruption. It was easy to find and easy to fix, which is sometimes the best you can ask for.

Top 10 InDesign Secrets of 2015 Mike Rankin and David Blatner | December 31, 2015

What an incredible year for InDesign it has been! No matter what flavor of InDesign CC or CS you use, we have published over

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Best of the Blogs

200 new articles for you this year, containing hundreds of tips, tricks, videos, and more. You can find our full archive here, but I’m guessing that you’d probably rather focus in on the most important, coolest, most awesome articles… am I right? OK, let’s get to it. We’ll start with 10 stupendous and useful InDesign “secrets”—and then, as you’ll see, we won’t be able to stop there… (The following are in no particular order! Just click the title to jump to the article.) Apply Character Style [None] with a Keyboard Shortcut If you use character styles (and, if you don’t, you should!), you know that one of the biggest annoyances is when you have to go back and set a character style to None. Fortunately, Anne-Marie explains in this article how to assign a shortcut to None! Three Ways to Improve Your Hyperlinks You’re probably already making your InDesign documents suitable for print and digital (so that you can, for example, put a PDF up on a website), so you’re making hyperlinks, right? Keith Gilbert provides three super-easy tips to make those hyperlinks work better than ever.

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Creating Live Captions With Auto-Fit Transparency Effects The coolest InDesign techniques come when someone finds a way to combine several features together in a way that no one has done before. That’s what Mike did in this article about putting captions above images. It’s surprisingly simple and elegant! Work Faster with Long Documents Are you working with a big ol’ document, or perhaps even multiple documents held together in a book? Alan Gilbertson has had plenty of experience with this, and he shares a few lesser-known tips you really need to know about. What Do the Default Sample Scripts Do in InDesign? InDesign ships with a bunch of ready-made scripts that you should be using today! But where are they and what do they do? We explain it all for you in this article that lists all the important scripts, including MakeGrid, SortParagraphs, and more. Dynamic Pull Quotes Pull quotes are easy to make, but they’re often hard to standardize or “templatize”—that is, make a quote that can be put in a template or library. Masood Ahmad figured out a clever solution using tables that you should consider using in your workflow.

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The Swatch Panel’s Stealth Feature Last year Adobe snuck a couple of new features into InDesign CC that most people don’t know about: an eyedropper and hex field into the Color Swatch dialog box. They’re confusing at first, but they’ll be easy once you read Alan’s explanation. Troubleshooting Data Merge Errors I’ve been doing Data Merge for over a decade and I was still amazed at the incredible resource that Colin Flashman created in this article: a list of baffling errors that you may run into (and, more importantly, some great suggestions to fix them). This is a must read for any data-merger. A Clever Trick for Making Custom Arrowheads Everyone who has ever added an arrow to the end of a path in InDesign has wished they could create custom arrows (or other shapes). Well, with this clever and surprisingly straightforward trick from Linda Bergeron Szefer, you can! Try it today. How to Add a Rule Around a Paragraph This was a surprise hit at The InDesign Conference in Denver this year… the ability to draw a border around a paragraph, and even have it break across columns! Keith Gilbert presented it for the first

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time there, and then followed up with this article detailing how to do it. Best Articles About Scripts and Utility Apps It’s impossible to stop at just 10 great articles… there are just too many more that you should see. If you missed these six posts about scripts and utilities, you just have to read them! »» How to Find the Font That Has the Glyph You Need »» Making Page Numbers as Words Instead of Numbers »» How to Magnify Your Screen Display »» Creating Dropwords with InDesign »» How to Save InDesign Files as Layered Photoshop Files »» A Script to Show Options for Placed Files Important Articles About InDesign Upgrades Finally, here are three more that we can’t help but include: one about what is new in InDesign CC, one a warning that every CC user needs to read, and finally one just for fun: »» InDesign CC 2015 Now Available: Shading, Graphic Cells, and More »» Read This Before Installing InDesign CC 2015 »» News Release: Adobe InDesign Goes All-in with iOS, Drops Support for Mac and Windows (notice the publish date on this one before you take it too seriously)

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Well, that’s it! We hope you’ve enjoyed this roundup of some of the best InDesign tips and tricks this year. Of course, stay tuned… next year there will be even more InDesign Secrets!

and Nested Styles pane of the New Paragraph Style (or Paragraph Style Options) dialog box:

Line Styles in InDesign David Blatner | January 4, 2016

Most users don’t realize that InDesign lets you apply formatting to the first line of any paragraph. I’m not talking first character (for which you’d use a drop cap) or the first word or sentence (for which you’d use nested styles)—I mean literally the first line. For example, you might want to apply small caps to the first line of a chapter. Or make the first four lines of a magazine article bold. The trick is to use line styles. The Line Styles feature is hiding inside the Drop Caps and Nested Styles dialog box (which you can find in the Control panel menu or in the Paragraph panel menu). But because you’d normally use this for a paragraph style, you can look at the bottom of the Drop Caps

To make a line style, click the New Line Style button, and then choose a character style from the pop-up menu in the left column. Yes, that means you need to create a character style—but if you don’t have one, you can choose New Character Style in the pop-up menu and make one on the fly.

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If you want the style to apply to more than one line, click the “1” in the third column, and change it to some other number. Of course, you can always add more formatting, too. For example, you can add a drop cap to the line, which can use a different character style:

The best part about line styles is that they update automatically when the text or the text frame changes. For example, before:

and after:

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By the way, you don’t have to stop with a single line style! You can assign more than one line style, one after the other, and you can even choose Repeat from the pop-up menu on the left:

two rules (red, then blue) over and over again until the end of the paragraph:

When you choose Repeat, the number in the third column means something different—it refers to the last number of line style rules. For example, in the example above, the first line will be red, the second line will be blue, and then it will repeat the last

I love the way InDesign lets me automate formatting so I don’t have to manually apply it to each line, and then update it manually every time something changes!

EPUBSecrets: EPUB2 or EPUB3 and InDesign’s Table of Contents Kevin Callahan | January 5, 2016

I’ve been seeing conversations on Twitter recently about some folks exporting EPUB2 files from InDesign. When asked why, those EPUB2-ers cite the Nook, which doesn’t support EPUB3. There’s no reason to export EPUB2 just because the Nook asks for it.

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The main element the Nook is looking for in an EPUB2 document is the toc.ncx, because that’s what it uses to build its navigation. EPUB3 has done away with the toc.ncx (except as a backwardlooking convenience). Instead, for navigation, it uses an xhtml document (toc.xhtml), with an epub:type of toc. InDesign can do it InDesign is very helpful when exporting EPUB3 documents, though. Not only do you get a toc.xhtml, but it also generates the toc.ncx. That is, InDesign generates both lists as long as you use its Table of Contents builder (Layout > Table of Contents Styles).

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It’s easy to use. Simply add paragraph styles to the Include Paragraph Styles column. Style No need to assign an Entry Style, since you won’t be generating a TOC within the document. Page Number: choose No Page Number. Options Make sure to check Make Text Anchor In Source Paragraph. This will create the live link in your EPUB’s toc.xhtml file. When you Export to EPUB (Reflowable), you’ll see this screen:

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General Choose EPUB 3.0.

I have to remember to add it to the spine in the content.opf (line 48 below):

Navigation TOC Choose Multi Level (TOC Style) from the drop-down menu. Under TOC Style, find the table of contents you’ve already created (here called epub). When you export your EPUB, InDesign will automatically create the toc.ncx for EPUB2-reading devices and the toc.xhtml (with <nav id="toc" epub:type="toc"> already stated) for EPUB3. Inside-the-book contents It’s good practice to include an inside-the-book contents listing (say, between the Introduction and Chapter 1). It’s just an extra help for readers navigating the book, and Amazon requires it. I used to use InDesign’s Table of Contents builder for both the export-generated and the inside-the-book listings. I would generate the listing in the InDesign doc and place it where I wanted it. It would export along with the rest of the document. Now, though, I crack open the EPUB and use the toc.xhtml that InDesign has generated. This way it does double duty: as the device’s navigation tool and the actual content with the book.

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And, I format the content as I would any content in the rest of the book. For more on handling the TOC within an EPUB, read Joshua Tallent’s two posts at Digital Book World: Best Practices for Ebook Front Matter: Table of Contents, Part 1 and Part 2.

Using the InDesign Touch Workspace Mike Rankin | January 6, 2016

They say seeing is believing, but when it comes to modern technology, I think you can take it a step further and say touching is believing. Right now you can control anything from a car to a refrigerator with a touchscreen, so it’s no surprise that even InDesign is gaining more touch features, in addition to ones we’ve noted in the past.

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In InDesign CC 2015 there is a workspace called Touch.

Getting to Know the Touch Workspace To switch to the Touch workspace, tap the icon at the top of the InDesign window, or choose Touch from the Workspace menu.

For the time being, you can only use it on Windows-based devices with touch capabilities, such as the VAIO Z Canvas, which I reviewed for CreativePro. Let’s take a look at how to use InDesign’s Touch workspace.

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There’s also a preference you can set to switch to the Touch workspace automatically when you detach your keyboard from your device.

The first thing you’ll notice about the Touch workspace is that it seems pretty sparse. Yes kids, minimalism is in.

The Tools panel has only a few items: a Selection tool, a Drawing tool (which only appears in the Touch workspace), a Type tool, and tools for drawing various shapes, plus a pair of undo/redo buttons. For panels, you get a combination Color Picker and Swatches, Strokes, Align and Distribute, Opacity, Text (which combines features of the Character and Paragraph panels), CC Libraries, and a context menu whose content changes depending on what you have selected.

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There’s also just one menu, File, with commands like New Document, Open, Place, Close, Save, and Share on Behance.

When you’re ready to create a new document, tap File > New Document, and then tap the size you want in the dialog box that appears.

The simplicity of the Touch workspace is fitting, since it is mainly geared for quickly sketching out layouts, similar to what you can do with the Adobe Comp CC mobile app. When you want to switch back to one of your usual workspaces, just tap the button at the top of the screen again. For adjusting the document display, there are three handy buttons in the bottom right corner of the window that you can tap I love how this allows you to toggle back and forth between your most recently used workspace and Touch so quickly and easily. Little things like this make the Touch workspace feel like a pure bonus, and a natural extension of my normal way of working.

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to toggle the Preview mode, Fit the Spread in the Window, or zoom to Actual Size.

Tap the Help symbol in the top right corner to reveal the guide to drawing gestures.

Drawing Objects in the Touch Workspace In the Touch workspace, you can still use your mouse or trackpad to control your cursor and create new objects. But itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s way more fun to take advantage of the gestures that InDesign recognizes. There are 16 gestures in all for creating and deleting objects.

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Then tap a gesture to watch an animated version showing how it works.

If you’ve never used Adobe Comp CC or other touch-based apps, there might be a little learning curve as you get the hang of things. On one hand, you don’t have to worry about being perfect. For example, to create a square, you don’t have to draw anything close

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to a perfect square, or even a closed shape. You needn’t give up caffeine to draw beautifully in the Touch workspace.

On the other hand, if you’re trying to draw something like an oval, you might have a few unsuccessful attempts as InDesign thinks you want a rectangle or triangle. You also can’t dawdle, since you have only about two seconds to complete a gesture before InDesign passes judgment on what you drew. Practice makes perfect, especially with more complex gestures like the ones for polygons and rounded and chamfered rectangles. If sketching a layout with your fingers seems too clumsy, try using a stylus. If you totally mess up and draw something that InDesign doesn’t recognize, it simply gets ignored and disappears, and you have a clean slate to try again. If only everything in life worked that way!

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I find that once I’m in the drawing mode, I want to do just about everything with gestures, so one feature request I’d make would be for a new gesture to resize rounded or chamfered corners. Right now you have to switch from the Drawing tool to the Selection tool before you can tweak your corners. Editing Objects with Touch Once you’ve created an object, you can modify it with gestures too. For example, you can twist two fingers to rotate selected objects. Tip: when you rotate an object, it’s very easy for your fingers to get in the way so you can’t read the angle. To solve this problem, start your rotation gesture with your fingers spread apart so they’re outside the bounds of the object, or even use both forefingers so you can spread them really far apart.

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Tap on an object to select it, and then drag to move it, or tap the round button that appears above the object for a small context menu.

Maybe my favorite gesture of all is the one to erase objects. Just use your finger or stylus to scribble over the object a few times and it disappears.

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You don’t have to select anything first. Better yet: this works with multiple objects. You can just keep going with a single long, squiggly gesture, and one by one objects will disappear. And I absolutely love the slider to move objects up and down in the stacking order.

Working with Text in Touch Of course you can create and edit text frames in the Touch workspace. There are three gestures to make text frames filled with placeholder text.

You can also drag with the Type tool. A really nice touch (no pun intended!) is that as you resize the text frame, the amount of placeholder text automatically changes to fit the frame. So cool! I wish this was a feature in all workspaces.

It’s all so natural it makes me think that keyboard shortcuts are an endangered species. No one will devote brain cells to remembering Ctrl+[ or Ctrl+] when all they have to do is tap and drag a slider. How will we explain all those keyboard shortcut posters to our grandkids?

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In the Touch workspace, each text frame is adorned with a round menu button and a slider for adjusting the type size.

regular keyboard or an onscreen one. To adjust the formatting of text, use the Text menu.

Document Navigation with Touch Not only can you create and edit objects, you can (and should) navigate through your document using gestures for maximum speed. Pinch and spread your fingers to zoom in and out (keeping an eye on the zoom percentage at the top of the window if you like). Drag two fingers to scroll through the pages of a document. Tap once on a text frame with the Type tool to select all the text. To grab a range of text, double-tap on a word to select it, and then drag to extend the text selection. To edit text, use either your

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At the bottom left of the window are buttons you can tap to jump to a specific page, go forward or backward a page at a time, and create or delete pages.

Quibbles Like just about everything in the Universe, the Touch workspace could be improved. I have a few minor beefs, like the fact that you can’t draw a diagonal line. You have to draw a vertical or horizontal line and then rotate it to the angle you want. Also, when you’ve locked an object, there’s no good way to unlock it. You have to go to the context menu on the right side of the screen and choose Unlock All. And I’m still working through my feelings about a right triangle being called a “corner”—somewhere, a geometry teacher weeps. But I’ve yet to encounter anything truly annoying or dysfunctional. I think Adobe got all the key elements right, and I’m sure we’ll see enhancements in the future.

touch interface for production work (not including things where touch has an obvious advantage like drawing/painting, photo retouching, etc.). But once I had the basic gestures down and gained some confidence, I smoothly started working in a few modifier keys, like Alt-dragging a frame to duplicate it. Or adding Ctrl+Shift when dragging a corner of a frame to scale the content within it. If you know InDesign, your hands already know what to do, and the Touch workspace becomes just another tool for getting your work done. In fact, for me it got to be so natural that when I switched back to my normal workspaces, I started to tap objects, expecting to get context menus, and was disappointed when they didn’t pop up. How quickly our minds adapt to cool new things! Have you used the Touch workspace yet? Or Adobe Comp CC? Let us know what you thought in the comments! We’d love to hear your experience and if you have any cool uses or tips.

Keep InTouch Overall, I’ve been amazed at how quickly I’ve gravitated towards using the Touch workspace. I had been a bit skeptical of using a

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Tips for Selecting Objects Using the Layers Panel

panel appears. This tells you which entry in the Layers panel corresponds to the selected objects.

Keith Gilbert | January 7, 2016

When it comes to selecting objects on complex pages, the Layers panel is invaluable. In this post, I’ll show you the basics, as well as a few obscure tips and tricks that I’ve discovered as I use this method almost daily. “But I never use layers in my InDesign layouts,” you say! Did you know that since CS5, InDesign has automatically included every page object as an entry in the Layers panel? Open any InDesign file, go to the Layers panel (F7), and click the triangle to the left of Layer 1, and you’ll see every object on the current page listed. Now let’s see why this is useful. To begin, select an object on your page, and you’ll see that a small, colored square to the right of one of the rows in the Layers

Conversely, click on a hollow square to the right of an object in the Layers panel, and the corresponding object on the page is selected. The key to the Layers panel is to understand that you select items in the Layers panel by clicking on the item name, but you select objects on the page by clicking the square to the right of the name. So, if you want to grab an item in the panel and drag it

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up or down to rearrange the stacking order, or move it to a different layer, you click on the item name and drag it up or down. But to select an object on the page so that you can change its fill and stroke, or move, rotate, or manipulate the object in other ways, you click on the square to the right of the name. This is where all the power lies. On complex, richly-layered pages, or when working with interactive multi-state objects, groups, or objects pasted inside other objects, this is often the easiest way to select the object you need.

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You can click twice on an object name in the Layers panel to change the name of the object. Naming objects intelligently makes them easy to locate in the Layers panel later on.

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To select multiple objects on the page, you can click the square corresponding to the first object you want selected, and then Shiftclick additional squares.

right-click and choose Select Item(s) to select multiple objects on the page.

Or, you can Shift-click or Command/Ctrl-click on the object names in the Layers panel to select multiple entries, and then

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If you are having trouble finding an object on a page, right-click on a single entry in the Layers panel, and choose Select and Fit Item. This will not only select the object on the page, but also zoom and center the object on your screen for better visibility.

Option/Alt-clicking on a square next to a placed image will select the contents of the image, instead of the image frame.

Spend some time getting used to how the Layers panel works with page objects, and I’m sure you’ll find it a valuable way to select certain types of objects in many different layout situations.

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Controlling Rounded Corners With Precision

For example, Here’s a simple 10-pica square with a fill and no stroke.

Mike Rankin | January 11, 2016

It’s great that you can create rounded corners in InDesign so easily, just by selecting an object and using the Control panel to choose the rounded corner style and a corner radius.

But did you know that corner radius value does not take into account any stroke that you add to the object? So depending on where you align the stroke, the actual corner radius of the object as a whole could be quite different from what you set.

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If I add rounded corners with a 1-pica corner radius, I get exactly what I’d expect. And I can confirm this by aligning a circle with a 1-pica radius with the corner (which it matches perfectly).

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So far so good. But what if later Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m told to add a stroke to this object? Then I have two corner radii, on the inner and outer boundary of the stroke. By default, the stroke is center-aligned on the path. So the outer radius will always be bigger than the value I specified.

If I use the Stroke panel to align the stroke to the outside of the path, then the inner radius will always be the value I set in the Control panel, and the outer radius will grow with the stroke width.

If I align the stroke to the inside of the object, then the outer radius will be the value I set. The inner radius will always be smaller than the value I specified, until I make the stroke so big that the inside gets squared off.

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So aligning the stroke to the inside can help if you want to try different stroke widths and maintain a specific corner radius for the object as a whole. However, you can run into problems setting the stroke to the inside if you have a relatively thick stroke applied to rounded corners. At a certain point the stroke breaks up, or gets deformed. Eventually, if you keep increasing the stroke width, the rounding disappears altogether.

To fix this, go to the Stroke panel, and set the Join style to Rounded.

Ahh, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s better.

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Note that with a really thick stroke, even aligning to the inside of the path won’t maintain the precise radius you set in the Control panel.

EPUBSecrets: InDesign EPUB Export Oddities Kevin Callahan | January 12, 2016

Why do I dig into the HTML and CSS after an InDesign export? Well, because of oddities like the following. CSS not called out in cover.xhtml, toc.xhtml I noticed that the InDesign-generated toc.xhtml (below, top) and cover.xhtml (below, bottom) do not have the CSS called out in the <head>.

So now you know when to trust those corner radius values you see in the Control panel, why they might not always reflect the radius you see on the page, and why rounded corners sometimes get mangled (and how to fix them). Yes folks, when it comes to InDesign minutiae, we’ve got the market…cornered.

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I usually use my own CSS, so I thought InDesign didn’t spec a CSS in the <head> because of that. Then I exported a book using InDesign-generated CSS, and came up with the same problem. One other thing: InDesign decides to use inline styling in the cover.xhtml. So what do I do? I add the CSS to the <head> (see below). And in the cover.xhtml, I remove the inline styling and use CSS styling as for any other image in the book. An advantage of linking the CSS to the TOC is that you can then style it for use as the internal contents listing as well as for the navigational TOC; this body-of-the-book TOC is required by Amazon.

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List collapse Do you use InDesign’s bulleted and numbered list features? You should, instead of manually entering bullets or numbers in lists. InDesign has very fine list controls, so get to know them. One issue on export, though, is that InDesign sometimes collapses lists, or at least doesn’t close them where they should end. So unintended text is captured in the list (creating further and further indents).

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Here, the <ul> list begins on line 14, and should end where the next <p class="text"> begins (line 18, 4th line down). Instead, the list closes way down at the end of this string of <p> and <h1> tags on line 19. In this case, I created the bulleted list using InDesign’s bulleted list feature, and assigned a paragraph style to the text. I’m not sure why this happens. In fact, it doesn’t always happen. And in case you were wondering, I chose Map to Unordered Lists in the EPUB export process.

Publish Online Project of the Month: Kia Sportage Mike Rankin | January 13, 2016

This is the second post in the Publish Online Project of the Month series. Be sure to also check out the first post: Irish Landscapes, as well as the January 2016 issue of InDesign Magazine. This time, let’s take a look at some automobile marketing from Kia, promoting their Sportage model. This 29-page document functions as a digital brochure, with a heavy emphasis on photos and a very sparse amount of text. The opening page features just a single full-page image of the Sportage, with a rapidly pulsing button inviting you to click onward.

If you’re seeing some list oddity, take a look at where the <ul> or <ol> close.

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The next page features five buttons that slide and fade in from all sides. When clicked, each button opens a pop-up frame containing a close-up photo (with animated caption) of some detail of the car.

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The third page gives you links to three YouTube videos that play in a new browser tab in fullscreen mode. The buttons also pulse to get your eye, like the arrow on the first page.

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Pages 4–29 form the bulk of the brochure, with a gallery of images showing the Sportage in various colors, angles, and locations.

What struck me about this was not that the gallery composed almost the whole document, but that all the pages in it were textfree. No ad copy in sight. Viewers are left to form their impression of the car purely by its looks. I’m guessing this is common in car brochures, both printed and digital.

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After the gallery, the closing page leaves you with contact information, and a link to the Kia website.

When you view the Sportage brochure at Adobe.com, the available thumbnail navigation at the bottom of the page is especially fitting. It gives you quick (and key for this project) imagebased navigation throughout the document. Viewers can jump right to the videos, or the index page of the gallery (which you could also think of as a purely visual section-level Table of Contents). If you don’t

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see the page thumbnails, click the grid button at the bottom of the viewing area.

Submit Your Projects! We’re on the hunt for interesting Publish Online projects we can spotlight in this new monthly feature. If you’ve created one for yourself, your company, or your client, we’d love to see it! Please email mike@indesignsecrets.com with the URL and a few details about the publication, and include “Publish Online Project” in the Subject line. We can’t promise anything, but we will personally respond to every email submittal.

Overall, the Sportage brochure is a good example of a digital document enhanced by a little bit of animation and interactivity, which are not all that complicated to create in InDesign. If you want to know more, click here to check out Adobe’s tutorial on getting started with Publish Online.

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The InDex: InDex Your Key to Our Content Can’t find that article you saw in an earlier issue? Wondering whether we covered that obscure plug-in? Never fear, the InDex is here. The first issue of InDesign Magazine was published in July 2004. Since then, we’ve cranked out thousands of pages on hundreds of related topics. While it’s possible to use Acrobat to simultaneously search all past issues of the magazine for one word or phrase, many readers have clamored for a formal index at the back of each issue. However, with 82 issues to account for, that’s not feasible. Instead, the InDex will live as a PDF you can download for free. If you come across a topic you want to know more about, but it’s in an issue you don’t have, you’re not out of luck. We sell back issues at indesignsecrets.com.

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If the topic you’re looking for isn’t in the InDex, you have one more way to search: that PDF trick we mentioned. To make it work, all of your magazine issue PDFs must be in one folder. Open any issue in Acrobat, and then press Shift+Command+F (Shift+Ctrl+F on Windows). In the Search window that appears, be sure that you click the radio button that says “All PDF Documents in,” and in the dropdown menu below that, choose the folder in which you placed your magazine issues. You’re on your way to finding anything in any PDF!

Click here to download the InDex.

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While this PDF is just for you, you can tell your friends about this great discount: $10 off a 1-year membership use coupon code: friend at indesignsecrets.com/issues

Coming Soon!

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