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M A G A Z I N E 81 January 2016

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Publish Online


InSide: Table of Contents 5

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Publish Online Adobe’s new publishing platform offers the simplest way to publish interactive documents from InDesign, and Diane Burns has all the details.

Best of the Blogs  A collection of the most important and informative articles from InDesignSecrets and InCopySecrets 47

InCopySecrets: Saving Content

InDesign in Africa Starshine Roshell rounds up some of the most interesting work from InDesign users in Africa.

49

Contest: The Text That Wouldn’t Move

54

InCopySecrets: Retaining Important Formatting When Importing Word Documents

57

What’s New With InDesign CC 2015.2

60

How to Create a Checkerboard Paragraph Rule

67

Creating Keylines

71

Holiday FX: Snow

74

Using Adobe Stock with InDesign

80

InCopySecrets: Check Spelling Dynamically

81

Why the “Document fonts” Folder and Data Merge Don’t Mix

85

InDex to All Past Issues

Vector Path Basics Olav Martin Kvern demystifies paths, and shows some surprising things you can do with them in InDesign. InReview: QuickResize Bob Levine reviews an add-on that can save you a lot of time and aggravation when you have to resize a document. GREP of the Month Erica Gamet shows how to use the vertical pipe to add either/or flexibility to GREP expressions.

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From the Co-Publisher PUBLISHERS David Blatner, Anne-Marie Concepción EDITORIAL Editor in Chief Mike Rankin, mike@indesignmag.com Managing Editor Wendy Katz, wendy@indesignmag.com Contributing Writers Diane Burns, Starshine Roshell, Olav Martin Kvern, Bob Levine, Erica Gamet, Chad Chelius, Keith Gilbert, Kelly Vaughn, Eugene Tyson, and Colin Flashman DESIGN Rufus Deuchler rufus.deuchler.net BUSINESS Contact Information http://indesignsecrets.com/contact Subscription Information indesignsecrets.com/issues Published by InDesignSecrets.com, a division of The Creative Publishing Network, Inc. Copyright 2016 InDesignSecrets.com. All rights reserved. Reproduction and redistribution prohibited without approval. For more information, contact permissions@indesignmag.com. InDesign Magazine is not endorsed or sponsored by Adobe Systems Incorporated, publisher of InDesign. InDesign is a registered trademark of Adobe Systems Incorporated. All other products and services are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners and are hereby acknowledged. Photos on pages 30 and 45 courtesy of Fotolia.com ISSN 2379-1403

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As we stand (or sit, comfortably) at the precipice of a new year, it’s traditional to consider resolutions and set intentions. This coming year is a big one for us, both personally and professionally, and perhaps for the publishing and design industry, too. For me, I turn 50 this year—one of the strangest sentences I’ve ever typed. Wasn’t it just yesterday that I was trying to convince people that InDesign was better than QuarkXPress? And a week before that when I argued that there were options beyond PageMaker? Tempus fugit when you’re having fun, as they say. And it has been great fun. But instead of dwelling on the past, I find myself constantly wondering “what’s next?” InDesign continues to adapt to the changing times, increasingly embracing HTML5—as we can see in Adobe’s newest “technology” experiment, called Publish Online. However, it’s still frustratingly difficult to import HTML into InDesign

or repurpose InDesign content for a CMS such as WordPress. Adobe must begin to recognize that InDesign is not just a landing pad for content, but part of a much larger system through which content flows and is repurposed. That will, of course, be a theme at this year’s PePcon: The Print + ePublishing Conference in San Diego, California, in June. We are also launching a new standalone event called CreativePro: The Photoshop and Illustrator Conference for Designers (more on that to come). And of course, I encourage you to start making plans for The InDesign Conference, this year in Washington DC. We strongly believe in the power of bringing people together live, face-to-face! In the meantime, we’ll be making InDesignSecrets and InDesign Magazine better, stronger, and cooler in the coming months. It’s going to be a great year! We’re so glad you’re part of our community.

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By Diane Burns

Publish Online

Interactive publishing to web, made easy

Once upon a time, a creative pro/publisher is published to Adobe servers. The Adobe had a dream. She dreamt she could take website provides an interface for users to her beautifully-designed InDesign print navigate your document, zoom in or out, document, perhaps add some interactivity— share the document, download a PDF of the buttons, slide shows, or animations—then document, or even embed the document publish that document out to the world, so on another website (Figure 1). that anyone with a browser, on any device, While it is a dream come true in many anywhere, could view and experience ways, there are currently several important the document. limitations that mean Publish Online will With Publish Online, this dream becomes not fulfill the wishes of every user. Perhaps reality. This “technology preview” feature, the biggest single drawback is that the first available in InDesign CC 2015, allows document is published on Adobe’s servers. you to publish your InDesign document to This means that you cannot publish your the web, including interactivity, while keepdocument on your own servers, behind ing your layout intact. a firewall. And while the URL is unique Using Publish Online, your InDesign and not easily discoverable, you cannot document generates a unique URL when it password protect the document. Finally,

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you cannot monetize the document; there’s no way to charge for it or list it in an app or eBook store. But for many users and many types of documents, Publish Online offers a quick, easy, and low-cost/no-cost way to share your documents online. That most of InDesign’s interactive features, including animations, can be used is a big bonus. Contrast this with DPS, a solution that is expensive, requires significant resources, and doesn’t even support InDesign’s rich animation feature set!

Figure 1: Publish Online documents can be viewed from any browser on any device. You can include interactive elements such as buttons and animations, as well as audio and video.

iPad

Preparing Your Document The good news about Publish Online is that no special preparation is required. Fonts in any format can be used, although it’s always a best practice these days to opt for OpenType or Typekit fonts when available. A Publish Online document is essentially like a fixed-layout EPUB that is published on Adobe servers. That means that your designed layout will remain intact. With CSS

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computer

To view this document online, click or tap here

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and HTML5 under the hood, you can use nearly all of InDesign’s interactive features in your document, too, and they will translate beautifully in the published document. You can include hyperlinks, buttons, object states (multi-state objects or MSOs), and animations, as well as audio and video files. The only exceptions are interactive features found in the Overlays panel—which are used primarily for DPS projects—as well as forms and bookmarks.

Setting the Options Once you’re ready to publish your document, it’s as simple (literally!) as pushing a button. Click the Publish Online button

Figure 2: Click the Publish Online button in the upper right corner to start the publishing process.

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will be published. There are only two groups of options: General and Advanced.

Figure 3: General options let you update an existing document, set the title and description, a page range, and allow a PDF of the document to be downloaded.

in the upper right of your screen in the Application Bar (Figure 2). You’ll also find a checkbox in the EPUB and PDF export dialog boxes that allow you to initiate the Publish Online process after your document is exported. Next, the Publish Online Options dialog box displays, and provides settings for determining exactly how your document

General options It’s important that you look through the General options (Figure 3) carefully. First, you need to choose between Publish New Document or Update Existing Document. If you choose Update Existing Document, a drop-down menu appears, listing all the previous documents you have published, starting with the most recent (Figure 4). There’s an option to view them, in order to ensure you’re choosing the right document to update.

Figure 4: When you choose Update Existing Document, you’ll see a list of your previously published documents.

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The ability to update existing documents was added in the CC 2015.2 update, and it is a welcome addition. Once you publish a URL for your document, you want to be able to maintain that URL even as you make corrections or other updates to the document. When publishing a document for the first time, fill in the Title information, which is the text that will appear at the top of the browser window when the document is viewed. You can also fill in Description information. This is what will be displayed when you share the document via Facebook, and is also displayed in the Web Dashboard, as discussed later in this article. You can choose a range of pages to export, using standard page syntax, such as 1,3-6,10. You can also use Export To to publish your document in pages or spreads. And while a Publish Online document cannot be downloaded directly, you can click “Allow viewers to download the document as PDF (Print)” which will enable your viewers to download a PDF of your

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document. Next, switching to the Advanced options, you can choose any of your Print PDF presets, including custom presets, and the PDF will be created with settings from the chosen preset. There are a few things to keep in mind when selecting this option. First, some of the interactive features may not be included in the PDF. You can create a custom Print PDF preset that includes hyperlinks, but no other interactive elements will be functional in the PDF, including buttons, objects states, or animations. Their appearance on the page may be correct, but they will not work. The other thing to keep in mind is that the PDF that is created can only be of your current document. This usually works fine, but sometimes including interactive effects, such as animations, will result in a document page that doesn’t work in a PDF. For example, let’s say you have a large object on the page that you want to fade in, and then fade out. On your document page, and in the PDF, you will only see the object as

it appears in full size on the Fade In, which may obscure other objects on the page, and is not what you want your viewers to see. But for many documents, the ability to download a PDF makes it possible to view the document and its content offline. This can be an important criterion for many situations.

Figure 5: Advanced options let you choose a cover thumbnail, image export settings, and a PDF preset (if you are allowing readers to download a PDF of the document).

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Advanced options Under Advanced Options (Figure 5), you can choose a cover thumbnail for your document. This can be the first page of the document, an inside page from the document, or it can be a separate image. This cover thumbnail will be displayed in the Publish Preview dialog box when you’re uploading the file and will also display when you share your document on Facebook or in the Web Dashboard. If you select an external image file, which can be JPEG, PNG, or GIF, it’s best to use the same proportions as your document file, but the image will always be quite small, so a 72-dpi resolution is fine.

Figure 6: If you check the General option to allow PDF downloads, you can use the Advanced option to choose one of your Print PDF presets.

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Image Settings control the size and format of the images on your document pages. I recommend you leave the Format set to Automatic, which lets InDesign determine the best format for all your images. The default Resolution setting is 96 ppi, which will work well for most documents. However, if you want the highest image quality possible, choose 144 ppi. Note the warning that appears, however: HiDPI images will significantly increase page downloading times. If you choose to convert all images to JPEG, you can set the image quality to Low, Medium, High, or Maximum. If you convert all images to GIF, you can choose an Adaptive, Web, or System palette. The last option, Download PDF Settings, is available only if you have chosen “Allow viewers to download the document as PDF (Print)” under the General Options. With that option selected, this setting allows you to choose from any of your Print PDF presets, including any custom presets you’ve created (Figure 6).

Figure 7: Once your document has been uploaded, you can view or share your document, or copy the URL to the clipboard.

Publishing the Document Once you’ve set the General and Advanced options, you’re ready to click OK and publish your document. After you click OK, InDesign will take a moment to prepare the document; then the Publish Online dialog box will display (Figure 7) and show the progress of your document upload. My experience, and that of others, has been that the documents upload in a very reasonable amount of time. Once the upload is complete, the dialog box shows the cover thumbnail, along with the title and description that you set in the

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General options. You can view the document, or click icons that allow you to share it on Facebook, Twitter, or via email. You can also copy the URL to your clipboard. You’ll always want to click View first to preview your document, and make sure it looks the way you want it to, especially if you’ve included interactive elements. The View option will open your browser and take

Figure 8: Facebook posts include the document cover image, along with the title and description.

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#idpubon

Use the Twitter Hashtag: #IDPubOn When sharing your published document on Twitter, be sure to add the Twitter hashtag #IDPubOn to your post. This hashtag will allow others to easily search Twitter to find your work, and you can use it to see other creative examples of Publish Online. you to the unique URL for the document, where you can click through each page to check it. When you return to your InDesign document, the dialog box is still displayed until you click the Close button. Sharing the document If you want to share your document on Facebook, Twitter, or in an email, click the appropriate icon in the dialog box. Sharing on Facebook will open your browser and allow you to add a comment. The cover page thumbnail, set in the Advanced options, along with the document title and description you set in the General options, will be posted on Facebook (Figure 8). When you share the document on Twitter, your browser window will open with a post

that includes the document title and the URL. You can edit the entry and then post to Twitter. When sharing your document, be sure to use the hashtag #IDPubOn, so others can easily find your work. Sharing via email will open your default email application and create a new email with the document title as the subject, and the document description and URL in the body of the email. Click the Copy button to copy the URL to your clipboard. You can then post the URL in other social media or paste it into any other document.

Using the Web Dashboard Once you’ve published one or more documents to Publish Online, it’s important to be

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able to manage these documents. InDesign provides the Web Dashboard management tool for this purpose. Choose File > Web Dashboard to launch the Dashboard in your default browser (Figure 9). The Dashboard opens to the Publications page, listing all the documents you’ve published, from the newest to the oldest, along with each document’s cover thumbnail, title, and description. The publication date for each is also listed. From this list, you can click on any document to go to the document URL. If you mouse over an entry, a Delete option appears that allows you to delete the document. Take care with deletions, though, since you can’t undo them, and make sure you don’t delete a document for which you have distributed the URL. The Analytics page gives you basic information about the behavior of the people reading your published documents. Overview shows cumulative stats for all your documents. Click Document Trends to

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Figure 9: The Web Dashboard Publications page (left) lists all your published documents, which you can view or delete. The Analytics page (right) shows combined statistics for all your published documents.

see the number of Views and Readers for specific documents. »» Views shows the number of times any of your documents was viewed (visiting multiple pages within the same document counts as one view). If the same user refreshes the page in the same session, it is still counted as one view. The session ends after 30 minutes of inactivity, and from then on it is counted as a new view, which updates the view counter by +1.

»» Readers shows the unique readers for your documents. When a document is viewed by the same browser on the same device, even if over several days, it counts as one unique reader. However, if the same reader opens the same document, but from a different browser on a different device, that will count as a new reader. »» Avg. Read Time (secs) shows the average amount of time spent viewing each document. In our example above, ­almost

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six seconds were spent viewing per document—typical, perhaps, of today’s attention spans. »» Total Read Time (hrs) is the total time spent viewing all documents. You’ll usually view the Web Dashboard on your computer, having launched it from InDesign. However, you can also access the Dashboard from your phone or other mobile device (Figure 10), by logging in to https://indd.adobe.com/dashboard, and signing in with your Adobe ID. The pages are not responsive, but still, you can manage your documents when not at your computer.

Viewing a Document Once your document is published, the real fun begins: viewing the document. Publish Online documents will open a window in your default browser, and icons will display at the bottom of the window. After a few seconds, the icons will be hidden, but they

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can be displayed again by mousing over the bottom of the window (Figure 11, next page). When viewing on a computer, you can navigate from page to page using the left or right arrows adjacent to the sides of the document. Use the Toggle Thumbnails icon to view thumbnails, and click on a thumbnail to turn to that page. To zoom in, click the icon and click on the page; use the Zoom Out icon to zoom back out and view the entire document page. Clicking the Full Screen icon puts the document into full screen mode; press the ESC key to return to viewing the document in your browser window. The Share icon allows you to share the document on Facebook, Twitter, or via email. The options are the same as those available in the Publish Online dialog box when you publish the document (see “Sharing the document” on page 10). The Embed icon generates code that can be used to embed the Publish Online

document in a website page. See the next section, “Embedding a Publish Online Document in a Website,” on page 13. If, when publishing your document, you set it to “Allow viewers to download the document as PDF (Print),” the Download PDF icon will be available. When the icon is clicked, a PDF of the document will display in the reader’s browser window and can be viewed, saved, or printed from there. If you did not set the document to allow a PDF download, the icon will not be displayed.

Figure 10: The Web Dashboard can be viewed from your phone or other mobile device.

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Viewing on mobile devices On mobile devices, such as an iPad, there are some additional ways to interact with a Publish Online document by using various gestures. In order to see the Publish Online interface, tap on the screen. As on a computer, navigation arrows are available on either side of the document page, or at the bottom of the screen, depending on the device. You can toggle thumbnails and navigate by tapping on them. However, as you would expect on a mobile device, you can also swipe from page to page. Zoom in and out by pinching the page. Some functions, such as Full Screen mode, are not available on all mobile devices. This is often a limitation of the device. You cannot copy the embed code or download a PDF from mobile devices. Also, keep in mind that Publish Online pages are not responsive. That means, for example, that while most documents will look fabulous on an iPad, they may be too

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small to read easily on an iPhone without zooming in and out.

Embedding a Publish Online Document in a Website While the ability to share Publish Online is useful, it’s not necessarily sufficient for

engaging the target audience, especially if the document is related to a business or corporate enterprise. A document may need to be available directly from a website, and that’s where embedding a Publish Online document comes in. With embedding, you can display the document directly on a website page. To embed a document, it must first be published. Every published document has an embed icon, as shown in Figure 11. When you click the icon, the Embed On Your Site Figure 11: Several functions are available via icons at the bottom of the Publish Online document screen.

Toggle Thumbnails Full Screen Share (FaceBook, Zoom In Zoom Out Twitter, Email)

Embed Download PDF

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Figure 12: Embed options allow you to set the size and start page for the document as it will appear on your web page, along with the necessary embed code.

Figure 13: Add the embed code to your website to make the document available directly from your web page.

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dialog box displays, showing a preview of your document as it will appear when it is embedded (Figure 12). Embed options allow you to choose the size the document will be initially on your web page. You can choose a preset small, medium, or large size, or enter a custom value. The thumbnail displayed will change size to reflect the setting you’ve chosen. You can also set the document start page, using any page in the document, and that page will be the page displayed initially. Usually, though, you’ll want to leave it set to page 1. The Embed Code field contains the code you’ll need to incorporate into your website. Click on the code to select it, and then copy and paste it into the appropriate HTML file on your site. The document will display in the size and with the start page specified (Figure 13). You’ll notice in the document preview, and when the document is published on your website, there is a Read Now button in

How to Remove the Read Now Button when Embedding Documents When you embed a Publish Online document in a web page, a Read Now button displays over the first page of the document. You can remove this button by making a change to the URL of the document within the code before you add it to your website’s HTML. Here is an example of a standard embed code: <iframe style="border: 1px solid #777;" src="https://indd.adobe.com/embed/1dd285f0-92d2494e-820a-d0eeb96c3312?startpage=1" width="650px" height="460px" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""> </iframe>

The URL of the document within this code (marked in red above) is: https://indd.adobe.com/embed/1dd285f0-92d2-494e820a-d0eeb96c3312?startpage=1

Change the word “embed” to “view” and delete the start page information at the end of the URL. It will look like this within the embed code: https://indd.adobe.com/view/1dd285f0-92d2-494e-820ad0eeb96c3312

This means your start page will always be page 1. But the document will other­ wise function normally, and the Read Now button will not appear.

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the center of the page. This provides a visual prompt to the reader that the page can be clicked. Visual prompts are important, but if you have other visual prompts on your web page, you may not want this button to appear. Fortunately, you can modify the code to remove it. (See the sidebar “How to Remove the Read Now Button when Embedding Documents” on page 14.) When the embedded document is clicked on your website, it can be viewed within the frame in which it initially appears, using the navigation arrows. However, if the reader clicks anywhere on the page other than the navigation arrows, the document will change to full screen mode.

Publish Online Examples (click to view) Corporate Brochure

Product Catalog

Annual Report, Non-profit

Product Catalog

Morisawa USA This Japanese font vendor and Typekit partner converted their corporate print brochure to an interactive online version.

Trabajo y Persona This Venezuelan non-profit created an interactive online version of their annual managment report.

Soul Electronics This slick, interactive product catalog for headphones includes a music video by Korean Gangnam Style star Psy.

The Lighting Company This UK-based company created a magazineinspired catalog that includes product links back to their website.

What’s It Good For? So, who can use Publish Online, and for what kinds of documents? The answer yields a long list. Any type of document that doesn’t require password protection, or which

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isn’t directly for sale, is a candidate for Publish Online. If you think about it, one of the big problems today for digital distribution has to do with file format. If you have a document or publication—whether a book, catalog, or brochure—the challenge is how to make it available to the widest audience possible. Conversion to HTML for a website is not always a viable option, and PDF documents are limited, especially when it comes to engaging your audience with interactivity. Corporations want to extend the reach of their print collateral, and they can do so easily with Publish Online, while maintaining the look of their print products. Educational institutions have countless catalogs, brochures, and other information that they want to make available online. And almost every business that sells a product needs to find a cost-effective way to distribute sales and product information, often via both print and online.

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Publish Online Examples (click to view) Photography Book

University/College Publication

Magazine

Symposium Program

Atlas Magazine This Turkish publisher of a magazine that emphasizes photography embedded a photo essay book about Mt. Karaca on their website.

BlagMAG This glossy magazine, Skin, is embedded on the publisher’s website, so the entire site is the magazine, which is viewed full-screen.

Brown University College football season is brought to life in this highly interactive guide that includes all the stats, sights, and sounds of the game.

Thailand Creative & Design Center The interactive program catalog for this organization’s annual symposium, “Creativities Unfold,” is linked to the event home page.

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For these users and many others, Publish Online is an ideal solution. It offers the ability to create an online presence that’s finally “one-click,” and provides an opportunity to add rich media and interactivity, all while utilizing existing resources. It’s of no small significance that InDesign’s interactive features are accessible and relatively easy to learn for anyone who is familiar with InDesign, and no other application or coding skills are required. The possibilities are endless. You can see several examples of currently published documents on the previous pages: from magazine publishers, to universities, to manufacturers, Publish Online provides a great solution for making documents easily available anywhere.

Looking to the Future Publish Online is a new technology, and very much in its infancy. And so there’s plenty of room to grow and improve. There are

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many features that need to be included in the future. Features we’d like to see down the road include: »» Searchable text »» Integration with InDesign’s Book panel »» The ability to choose a separate PDF to be downloaded (for example, one that doesn’t have interactive elements that might otherwise obscure content) Perhaps more importantly, we believe that in order for Publish Online to remain an evolving, robust technology, Adobe is going to have to figure out a way to allow users to password protect or otherwise limit access and sharing of Publish Online documents. For many companies—no matter what Adobe does with Publish Online on Adobe servers, even if they can, for example, add some kind of password protection—the technology is not an option unless Publish Online can be run on their own corporate

servers. Much of the content of corporate America cannot and will not be placed on Adobe servers. It would be interesting to see if Publish Online could be made available as some kind of SDK (software developer kit), where a company could license technology from Adobe, but run it on their own servers. There is certainly precedent for this, WordPress being just one example. Time will tell. In the meantime, Publish Online remains a very exciting option for publishing all kinds of documents. With just the click of a button, InDesign content, including interactivity, can be made available online for users of all kinds of devices, anywhere, to view, engage in, and enjoy.

n Diane Burns (@dianeburns_sf) is a San Francisco-based consultant and Adobe Certified Instructor in InDesign. She is author of the Lynda.com course Creating Animations with Adobe InDesign CC. Her design firm, TransPacific Digital, provides services adding interactivity and animation to InDesign documents.

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OUT OF

AFRICA How Designers in Africa Are Using InDesign to Realize Their Creative Visions

By Starshine Roshell

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AFRICA

It’s the birthplace of civilization. So it should come as no surprise that inspiring InDesign projects are born daily out of Africa. From Kenya to Zambia and from books to product packaging, we went on a safari of sorts to explore the creative minds and inspired projects of a variety of graphic designers hailing from the Equator-straddling continent known to many as the Motherland. Come meet the personalities behind some of the vibrant designs we saw, and see firsthand how they use InDesign to solve their design problems—and realize their creative visions. Along the way, they share their favorite InDesign secrets …

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Artistic Influence Mohammed Jogie SOUTH AFRICA “Africa has a rhythm and energy not to be found anywhere else in the world,” says designer SOUTH AFRICA Mohammed Jogie— who goes by Mo for short. “It is the cradle of our human experience and thus throbbing with creative possibility and opportunity. I draw on what I see and hear all the time.” As the creative director at Morning Star Design near Johannesburg, South Africa, his primary focus is design, illustration, image manipulation, animation, and motion graphics. And his approach is simple: “It needs to be honest, succinct, and relevant to the design problem,” he says. “My work is inspired by the world—and lovingly crafted in Africa.”

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His passion for design began during childhood. “I was influenced by artists in my neighborhood at a young age,” Jogie recalls. “They were satirists, poets, and artists involved in the anti-apartheid movement. I grew up in one of the segregated areas during that time. We had people like Vela Padayachee, a cartoonist and artist; Don Matera, a poet; Ameen Akhalwaya, a writer and editor; Zwelakhe Sisulu, an editor; amongst others.” Jogie has been using InDesign since version one. “It gives me a tremendous amount of creative freedom whilst offering very tight quality control and templated workflows,” he says. Recently, he designed a book for the African Peer Review Mechanism of Ghana. The goal was to capture the essence of Ghana by drawing on the nation’s history, music, and visual aesthetic. InDesign allowed him to shuffle pages around and ensure a synchronous design for the pages, spine, and front and back covers.

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But it was on another project—the South African Survey 2014–2015—that InDesign really came to the rescue. “The client wanted some sub-headings with a 1-point rule running through the middle of the type, but it had to stop 1mm short of the text and not actually run through it,” Jogie says. “We set up a style sheet with paragraph rules above and below to accommodate for this.” They were also losing italics when they imported from Word, so they set up an import preset to solve the problem. “We find import style presets very handy,” he says. “We also used GREP and nested styles to draw out very specific formatting requirements of the job.”

REPUBLIC OF

GHANA January 2007

Front (above) and back (left) covers of the Peer Review Mechanism report, designed by Jogie using elements that evoke the national’s culture and ethos. The cover imagery is adapted and used throughout the book in marginalia, icons, and other repeated items.

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Jogie doesn’t shy away from using InDesign’s tools to create fresh looks while maintaining his commitment to relevance and simplicity.

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Jogie’s biggest InDesign timesavers? “Cell styles offer the possibility to include paragraph styles as well,” he says. “And Create Links When Placing Text and Spreadsheets makes updates from Excel and Word a breeze because they are treated

as any other linked file. It just needs to be turned on in your preferences.” His favorite feature of InDesign CC 2015 is the improved tables functionality—but he’s still experimenting. “Publish Online,” he says, “is the next exciting thing I’ll be exploring in more detail.”

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A Long Road Rahim Kara KENYA Some designs spring from the head, others KENYA from the soul. “My most recent project is one that’s close to my heart,” says Rahim Kara, the InDesign User Group chapter rep for Nairobi, Kenya. “For a few years, my late wife and I had been working toward building a publication that covered travel and the vastness of the landscapes and beauty of Kenya. After her passing last year, I began working very stringently on the project to keep the idea alive and to make sure that I kept true to its focus. It should be launching soon and will be a rotating publication every month.” The three years since Kara and his wife conceived of the project have been

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challenging—both emotionally and creatively. “The process itself has been long and arduous,” he says. “We’ve run through at least eight different designs, each one with its own A/B testing, and working toward the development of what we deem is the right and final design. It’s been a steep learning curve to find out what I can and cannot do, what engages the market, what doesn’t, how we’re able to conduct our design for the best emotional involvement, and most importantly, how to build the entire document so that the content takes the front seat. “What’s kept me going is my love for what I do—not settling for anything, and making sure that I keep what’s important and lose what isn’t.”

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HOME Often the phrase, “where the heart”, identifies home for me. I have a lot to say about a place like this, and more than most, I have seen my home. It is a place where love thrives. Where there is suffering and as much, there is peace. It is where I live.

Lake Naivasha at Sunrise. The mist rises from the Lake.

WHERE THE HEART IS The incandescent light wavers from the candle. I sit alone in the room and watch it blowing in the wind. There isn’t much I can do to stop it from going out, but there isn’t anything to worry about, i’m home. I can see the stars from my window, the clouds are bustling by without a worry and the moonlight shines down onto the star studded ground littered with droplets of water reflecting the blue light from the celestial body in the sky. It has been a month since I decided to start travelling, and my preparations were almost complete. I finally had all the tools I needed to document the trip in the way I had wanted. As dawn crept in, I realised it was time to start getting my things in order. The day I had been preparing for was here.

An odd sense of melancholy bellowed and I began to waver as I fought the urge to play it safe and stay home.The pro’s began outweighing the cons even as I thought about it. It wasn’t going to be a decision I was going to go back on. All it took was that first foot out the door. And I was on my way. The road beckoned, I could hear it’s enticing call. There was no longer any way to ignore it. A lot can be said about travel in Kenya. There are always concerns of safety with the drivers on the road, hijacking isn’t as prevalent, and the on-road robberies aren’t too heard of either. What isn’t too widespread is the information about the relatively inexpensive fare of the local “Matatu” transport system. Travel from Nairobi ( Our Capi2

Kara’s evolving vision of his travel project comes together in an ebook that combines great evocative photography, informative and personal messages, and interactive elements that promote a sense of grounding and of place.

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AFRICA The Naivasha - Nakuru Highway

He’s proud to have created the publication’s interactive content, and loves how it reflects the Africa he knows. “One of the key concepts was keeping the look and feel as local as possible,” he says. “And that meant ideally working with colours and designs that resonate with our mosaics and batiks. There are icons such as the next-page icon being designed with a spear.” Kara’s first foray into digital design came in the mid-‘90s, when he began fiddling with Adobe Photoshop 2.5 and an application called Gif Animator 32 on his cousin’s desktop PC, an Intel Pentium. “I’ve been using InDesign for eight years, since the launch of the Creative Suite 3 in 2007,” he says. “It’s allowed me to create content for distribution on multiple platforms including the mobile development platform on iOS.” And he’s never looked back. “I haven’t used a desktop publishing software that is as flexible and intuitive as

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tal city in Kenya ) to the city of Nakuru is 4600 Kenya Shillings. Depending on the type of Van selected and seat type. Though highly unreliable in the past, the matatu’s are now fairly comfortable and safe as long as you take the Shuttle services from one city to the next. They are committed to an excellence that is quite befitting the price as well as a luxury that isn’t common amongst the local public service vehicles. The Shuttles do not crowd their vans, one person per seat, and they do as they say, which is Shuttle without any unnecessary stops such as to pick more passengers along the road. They will even drive through the security checks at the start of the journey to ensure that the police have checked their vehicles of unnecessary contraband or possibly harmful objects. All passengers are also checked for the same before the shuttle departs for their destination. It is also noteworthy that the shuttles have now been fitted with a speed governer which attributes to their safety with a maximum speed of 80KPH.

Kara says this project, long in the making and painstakingly researched, considered, and tested, is “close to my heart.”

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InDesign,” Kara says. “I’m able to use file formats that aren’t normally attachable within publications such as panoramic images, create interactive animations, and add video and audio as media files.” In fact, it’s possible he’s over­ using the application … “I think I overindulge in the Quick Apply panel! I find myself hitting the Command and Return keys in succession even when I don’t need to,” he confesses. “I guess it’s become a force of habit now.”

THE GREAT RIFT VALLEY One of the most intrinsically shaped, beautiful and natural phenomenons traversing through Kenya. If one was to trek through the Rift valley, they would find themselves at the northernmost point starting in Jordan, stretching across through the heart of Africa, down to the southern most point in Mozambique. Discovered by John Walter Gregory in the late 19th Century, it was named “The Great Rift Valley” by him. It spans an approximate 6000 Kilometers ( 3,700 Miles ). While the Rift may seem to be one connected and distinct valley, it is indeed a part of three different rifts. The Jordan Rift Valley, Red Sea Rift,and the East African Rift Valley. The three are part of the Great Rift 6

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New Direction Kangwa Mubanga ZAMBIA Kangwa Mubanga had just about completed his degree in ZAMBIA civil engineering. Then he chucked it all and became a graphic designer instead. “When I was young, my elder brother fixed computers from our bedroom,” he says. “Every time a new computer came in, I turned it on and played solitaire when he wasn’t around. Spades got boring, and one day this computer came with Adobe Photoshop 7 installed. I looked up a tutorial by a retoucher called Michael O and everything changed. It was love at first sight.” But his mother and father had other plans for Mubanga.

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“Back then our parents wanted us to be what they deemed fit for us, so I was compelled to study civil engineering,” he recalls. “During my dissertation, an advertising agency offered me a design job based on posters I did for school gigs—and I went for it. I threw my degree down the drain and decided to be a designer.”

Mubanga considers InDesign “magical” in the ways it helps him accomplish all his design ideas.

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Now he’s creative director for Mfumu Creative agency in Zambia, doing 2D and 3D animation and design for print and the web. “I love colour. I’ve loved crayons since I was 3,” he says. “My style has a lot of vibrant color and typography. I fuse European trends with deep African graphic elements.” A visual representation of the continent and its cultures are crucial to commercial work produced there, Mubanga says: “Most people want an African feel to designs in order to buy them. If I did a hipster-like logo and sold it to a local company, they would turn it down, saying I got it online. But if it had an element of an African drum or safari sunset, it definitely would sell.” He got to know InDesign in 2009 when he was hired to design his university’s antiAIDS campaign magazine. “InDesign spoke to me. It was magical,” said Mubanga, who did some online InDesign training to boost his skills. “I’m able to combine my illustration and Photoshop

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In some projects, Mubanga is able to fuse his knowledge of design and engineering to promote clear and intelligible messages.

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grading skills in InDesign to come up with amazing editorial spreads. I prepare 95 percent of my presentations and pitches in InDesign through the power of its limit­ less layout options. It’s the core of my project-acquisition strategy.” His favorite tool: the Eyedropper. “I like to eyedrop colors from my graphical elements to use as text colors or highlights,” he says. “If my picture has a subject wearing purple and blue, I eyedrop purple for my title and perhaps shades of the same blue for my main text. “I also like to use the Pen tool. It gives me freedom to add extra shapes and backgrounds so I don’t have to travel from one software to another.” He recently used InDesign to create the brand manuals and manufacturer specification sheets for condoms that he was hired to design. “I am proud of the project because I applied all my engineering and design skills to develop the product,” he says.

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 ubanga’s love of M color is evident in this spread from a magazine that seeks to “educate, in form, and inspire…about both the traditional heritage and urban lifestyle of mother Zambia.”

The project had lofty goals. They weren’t just hoping to sell condoms; they wanted to address a rise in unwanted pregnancies and rapid population increase within the region. “Our problem statement showed that people are shy or uncomfortable when it comes to buying protection,” he says. “We wanted to make people comfortable.” To address the youth culture specifically, they used street slang on the packaging, and imagery of sunglasses and straight caps.

“After illustration and photography, we imported different elements into InDesign for the final production manuals,” he says. “I learned how stable the software is and how it can handle huge projects with different elements from various software. I also love how developing a product can help change the perspective of a nation—how it can foster good citizenship.”

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1 Childhood

By the Book Stephen Walker SOUTH AFRICA Of course, not all designers in Africa are producing “African” work. Stephen Walker SOUTH AFRICA of Port Elizabeth, South Africa does occasionally incorporate ethnic patterns in his design, and local slang or words from any of the 11 official languages spoken there. Generally, though, “I’d say I’m more Western in my approach to design and layout,” he says. “Remember we are a former British Colony and quite Western in our ways.” Walker designs publications from magazines to books to brochures, and considers himself a fairly conservative designer.

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“Everything is neat and tidy and everything lines up,” he says. “The function of the design is paramount.” He came to graphic design 30 years ago by way of the prepress industry (his former work as a drum scanner operator made him a perfectionist when it comes to color). “I used Quark for many years and didn’t really enjoy versions 4 or 5,” he recalls. “I tried PageMaker but it didn’t do it for me. And FreeHand, although popular, was definitely not my favourite. “When Adobe launched InDesign for Mac, I switched immediately, seeing the potential of InDesign, Photoshop, and Illustrator as a unit from one vendor. As soon as InDesign was working as I wanted it to, I said goodbye to Quark—something I’m very happy about, as I think the power and integration of all the CC programs is the key to the future of design.” His latest design challenge was a book for South African artist Fred Page. “Doing

10. Toddlers’ Terminus. 1975. Borman collection. 478 x 590 mm. Acrylic on paper.

farmed in the Dundee district of Natal, and on his mother’s side he appeared to have had Afrikaner and German heritage. Information about his childhood is sketchy. Both he and his sister Molly, who was six years younger, and his mother, Johanna, appear to have been abandoned by his biological father, a farmer and trader who finally left home for good after many years spent on the road working as a transport rider in the off-season when he was not farming. The family lived a simple and uncomplicated existence on the farm Spitzkop, near Utrecht, punctuated only by sporadic visits from the largely absentee father. Page recalls moving to farms at Wakkerstroom, and later to Dundee in northern Natal. When Fred was ten, Johanna Page died in the 1918 flu pandemic. Her death left both young children devastated. Fred was always reluctant to talk about her demise, saying ‘The past is the past – I was only a small boy when it happened.’ He appears to have had a bonded and loving relationship with her and remembers how, when she died, ‘her gentleness ended.’ He remembered the sombreness of the funeral and the sense of desolation, loss and utter finality, which ‘lived with me for a long time.’ His mother’s death appeared to have also profoundly affected his adult life (Holliday, 1992). Subsequently, both children were transferred from one relative to another. Page expressed a fondness for his maternal grandmother, who lived among the German community at Wartburg in Natal and who spoke little or no English. She did, however, read Dutch which Fred taught himself from her books. He said, regretfully, that she had not been able to care for them as she was dependent on her own children for support. The extended family appear to have had disputes over the children’s future

exchange on the subject of fellow artists’ work or in what was happening on

and physical care. Fred was farmed out to one of his father’s brothers, a man called Lewis. In letters in 1941 Lewis was to proffer his sympathies to Fred about his sister’s death from a miscarriage, his brother-in-law’s death from a gunshot wound, and his father’s death a few months before (NMMAM archives).

the world stage of art. Once he had assimilated the basic training acquired at art school, he appears to have made a conscious decision to develop his own vernacular style, which he was to pursue single-mindedly to the end of his life.

at Rietfontein near Parys in the then Orange Free State. Van Eeden was reputed to have been a conservative and stern guardian. Here Page was to make a lifelong

In terms of the artistic trends of his day, Page was something of an anachronism. Throughout his life he apparently took no interest in any kind of intellectual

xx | Fred Page

Frederick Hutchinson Page was born at Utrecht in the province of Natal, South Africa, on 11 September 1908. On his father’s side he had Irish grandparents who

The boy was later shunted to another brother called Fred van Eeden, who lived 11. Figures in an Interior. 1967. Private collection. 500 x 615 mm. Acrylic on board.

Childhood | 1

Page design for a book about the art of Fred Page, a renowned South African surrealist painter.

a book for an artist is always difficult,” he admits. “I didn’t want to detract from the work of the artist and I didn’t want to over-design it. Yet it was important that it was ‘artistic’ in its own way.” Clients choose him for his conservative approach, so he stuck with the neat style he’s known for, using lots of white space.

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“A neutral colour was chosen, as the works are quite serious and somber,” he says. “And of course, everything we do is in InDesign.” The software allowed him to completely control the design process from start to finish, Walker says. “Captions are formatted automatically using nested styles in paragraph styles. Page numbering is obviously automated, which allows me to concentrate on the layout without bothering about uniformity across the publication. InDesign also allows me to easily retouch all the images—something we do to each and every job that passes through here.” When he’s finished with the design process and the client signs off on the work, Walker packages the file, and then runs a script in InDesign to convert every image to an RGB PSD file. Then those are retouched and converted to CMYK.

Walker is attuned to the need to let the art be center-stage while providing an appropriate and aesthetic setting for it.

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connection with his cousin Leonie, who wrote to him regularly and kept an eye on the state of his health and his personal affairs. Archival letters suggest that the two kept up an almost monthly correspondence until 1975. Leonie, who appeared to keep Fred in touch with family gossip, worked at a car dealer in Springs in the Transvaal province and supported Page with odd amounts of money, clothing and motherly advice – a curiously familiar and comfortable relationship in the light of Page’s later reputation as a hermetic and prickly personality. She called him ‘My dear old sod’ and always ended her gossipy letters with an affectionate ‘love and good wishes.’ In 1964 she admonished him in a letter for ‘taking those keep awake pills.’ She also appears to have been aware of his drinking problems as, on one of her visits to Port Elizabeth, she declares herself trustworthy enough to allocate the available ‘boose’ to other visiting family members. Leonie seems to have been a constant and reliable confidante who knew about his daily prob12. The Bird Market. 1960. Borman collection. n.d. Gouache.

13. The Casket. 1965. Nelson Mandela Metropolitan Art Museum collection.* 590 x 445 mm. Acrylic on canvas on board.

*hereafter referred to as NMMAM collection.

back to Natal to attend an ‘industrial school.’ This, it appears, was a farming trade school. He talked of learning about wagon making, blacksmithing and working on the land in the humid summer heat in Natal. He also talked about how his interest in poultry keeping developed. Early signs of his quirky sense of humour and a feeling for anthropomorphic traits in animals surfaced in his comments on how he could distinguish personalities amongst individual birds. He recalls: ‘How like people they are. You could tell what they were like by the way that they moved their heads!’ (Holliday, 1992). He chose to specialise in poultry keeping and hoped one day to become a professional poultry farmer. It was probably during this period that his knowledge and observation of animal behaviour and physiology was formed, surfacing as subject matter throughout his work.

lems and was always full of encouragement and enthusiasm for his work and exhibitions, about which he appears to have kept her informed (NMMAM archives). Any early contact with culture seems to have been actively discouraged by those with whom Page lived, with the exception of a book-loving uncle who owned a farm near Utrecht. Here the boy had access to a vast number of books, which were kept not on shelves but in huge stacks and in boxes and crates in the loft. It was here that a lifelong love of books and reading for pleasure began. ‘There were huge piles of them,’ Page recalls, ‘… up to the ceiling, it seemed.’ These books probably also formed the foundation for much of Page’s convoluted imaginative life. Among them he found the works of Rider Haggard, who had a farm in the area at that time. He was able to read classics such as Dickens and Jane Austen and science fiction by people such as Arthur C. Clarke and Edgar Allan Poe. He recalled spending many captivated hours in the farm loft, reading until the light faded (Slabbert, 1975, P 15). For years the boy drifted between relatives and institutions such as the Dutch Reformed Church orphanage in Potchefstroom, where he spent two and half years. He recalled that he also ‘messed about with picture-making,’ using a child-sized box of watercolour paints. About his experience there he said: ‘I don’t know why they sent me. I suppose that I was a nuisance to them. It was dreadful – absolutely dreadful!’ (Holliday, 1992). Apparently the school also had a large library where Page got to grips with Charles Dickens, who became a favourite author whose works he was to re-read time and again. The inventory of his books after his death included a full set of Dickens’ works. An aunt appears to have made the decision to send Fred

14. The Chef in the Closet. 1967. F. Scott collection. 610 x 400 mm. Oil on board.

15. And Then There’s the Egg. 1974. Kerbel collection. 345 x 240 mm. Acrylic on board.

2 | Fred Page

Childhood | 3

3 Port Elizabeth Port Elizabeth has a history steeped in British colonialism. The city started as an industrial and manufacturing centre, developing a thriving export ostrich industry in the early twentieth century and remaining one of the country’s premier wool exporting outlets. It is also a major iron and manganese ore terminal. Urban historian Margaret Harradine’s comprehensive and instructive book on Port Elizabeth’s streetscapes – much of which disappeared as a result of modernisation and the subsequent forced removal strategies of the Apartheid government – provides an accurate visual record of the suburbs of Central and South End, which Page found so fascinating. In the preface to the book, she describes the city as follows: ‘Old Port Elizabeth was built in a row of hills with kloofs between, now turned into roads. There were really several villages with their own schools and churches and shops: South End, the Hill with the town below, Hospital Hill/St Paul’s Hill and North End. The scale of the buildings was mostly small and the houses and cottages basically all very similar in style with verandas and balconies for protection against the sun.

22. Untitled. 1968. Private collection. 760 x 500 mm. Acrylic.

23. Drawing for Untitled. n.d. Private collection. 430 x 195 mm. Pencil on paper.

frustrating of his career – long lonely battles trying to find a voice for his creativity – a process which, in retrospect, he regarded as hours of wasted effort. However, it may have been one of the most formative periods of his life in which the nucleus of his subject matter and the way in which he was to translate his inner visions into images were forged. He was awarded the King’s Commendation for his military service. During his army service his feet sustained some sort of injury that was to dog him for most of his life. He appeared to have been stoical about his health and seldom talked or complained about it except when using it as an excuse to avoid contact with other people. Crippling arthritis in his hands and spine finally prevented him from drawing anything at all. 8 | Fred Page

The view of the town from the sea must have been a very attractive one. The buildings [in these pictures] have all either gone or been greatly altered’ (Harradine, 2004). Before the Second World War, from 1937 , Page spent two years as a tyre moulder at the newly opened Firestone factory in Port Elizabeth. There is no record of why he came to the city, other than that his sister had lived there at one time. In her letters to him she asked if he had enough money for his tobacco, and sent him writing paper and envelopes so that he could keep in touch with her (NMMAM archives). He earned two shillings an hour for piecework that involved stretching canvas tyre linings over a vulcanising frame. In conversation with friends at the time he said: ‘It was worse than the farm. If you didn’t make more than your basic [wage] you’d had it – you were out – they fired you! You came in to work and there you bloody well waited – it could be an hour, two hours. You waited until they filled the fly-reels. They couldn’t care less. You had to make up that time spent waiting. That dreadful stench of rubber – your clothes stank of it, you stank of it. It was just tyre building, tyre building and more tyre building.’ He was later to attribute his debilitating spinal arthritis and fallen arches to this period of his life. After the war, at the age of 37, he returned to the city and did odd jobs just to survive. ‘Sometimes you were so bloody bone weary that you did not even think about surviving – you were simply there again the next morning doing the same thing’ (Holliday, 1992).

24. The White House. 1960. NMMAM collection. 484 x 254 mm. Mixed media and ink.

Port Elizabeth | 9

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“InDesign then makes updating really easy by allowing me to relink to a folder and a file type,” he says. “This was always a very time-conRHODES UNIVERSITY suming operation before; it’s now a breeze with InDesign doing all the Graduate hard work.” Exhibitions Walker has some advice for anyone using InDesign: 1. Use styles for everything. 2. Be aware of the life-saving capabilities of Find/Change, especially the GREP component. 3. Use Frame Fitting Options, usually built into an Object Style, to make it much easier and faster to place images than if you don’t set any parameters. 4. Use the Preflight panel to monitor your InDesign document for technical errors. “This can save huge off to print or digital,” he says. “If you amounts of hassles as it continuously don’t know how to set up a preflight monitors your document for potenprofile yourself, ask your printer to help tial problems when it’s finally handed you. A green light at the bottom of your

2015 3

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Cover and inner spread from the Fine Art catalog for Rhodes University in Grahamstown, South Africa.

Fine Art

Echo Narcissus and Echo Shall the water not remember Ember My hand’s slow gesture, tracing above of Its mirror my half- imaginary airy Portrait? My only belonging longing; Is my beauty, which I take ache Away and then return, as love of Teasing playfully the one being unbeing. Whose gratitude I treasure Is your Moves me. I live apart heart From myself, yet cannot not Live apart. In the water’s tone, stone? That brilliant silence, a flower Hour Whispers my name with such slight light: Moment, it seems filament of air, fare The world becomes cloudswell. well.

SKYE BURNS Side Gallery, School of Art

- Fred Chappell (1985). 7

document window is your assurance that your document is within the defined output parameters (provided it’s set up correctly, of course).”

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AFRICA Your Turn

Candice Johnstone presents

Queen of Dance Friday June 13 at 19h30 Saturday June 14 at 14h30 Saturday June 14 at 19h30

Walmer School of

Dance

presents

As you can see, creative projects and design styles in Africa are as varied as on any other continent—and InDesign serves them all. Take a cue from these artists, and try out some of the tips they shared. If they work well for you and you’re glad to have learned them … give thanks to the Motherland.

n Starshine Roshell is an award-winning journalist, content-marketing pro, and syndicated columnist. She has authored three books: Keep Your Skirt On, Wife on the Edge, and Broad Assumptions.

Opera House Port Elizabeth 1

Walker reminds us that while many, many clients demand Africa-inspired designs in their projects, still “we are a former British colony and quite Western in our ways.”

22nd November 2014, Port Elizabeth Opera House

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By Olav Martin Kvern

A Path is Something You Follow Getting to know the virtues of vectors

Good and Evil. Darkness and Light. Chocolate and Vanilla. To these classic rivalries, let’s add another: Pixels and Vectors. Pixels—what you get when you use Photoshop’s brushes (for example)—now feel, somehow, more “natural,” or “intuitive,” because they can simulate traditional fine art tools and media. Vectors—what you get when you use InDesign’s drawing tools (the Pen, Rectangle, or Line tool, for example)— on the other hand, are often viewed as geometry. That’s mathematics—a field that many visual artists view as Evil. My background is in illustration—I always wanted to grow up to be a children’s book or fantasy illustrator. I ended up working in various flavors of technical illustration (veterinary, medical, electronics, archaeological).

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My tools weren’t charcoal and brushes on canvas (remember that this is before the days of personal computers); they were Rapidograph pens on Mylar film. Being able to maintain a consistent stroke width while drawing with rules and French curves was a mark of superior skill. It’s shouldn’t be surprising, then, that I lean toward the vector-drawing side of the argument. It’s the path that I’ve been following.

Paths and Points The world of vector drawing is made up of paths. A path is something like a connectthe-dots puzzle. Connect all the dots together in the right order, and you’ve made a picture. But paths are far more than

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a series of straight lines connecting dots— they also include curves of any complexity. More than that, paths also include formatting, such as stroke weight, color, or stroke styles. Just as you can use paragraph styles to improve your typesetting productivity, you can use object styles to streamline the process of formatting paths. The paths you draw in InDesign are made up of points, and the points are joined to each other by line segments. Paths have a direction, so points along a path have an order (or “winding”). Each point has an “anchor,” which defines the location of the point on the page. In addition, each point can have an incoming control handle and an outgoing control handle. These user interface gadgets determine the curvature of the preceding and following line segments, respectively. Apart from geometric perfection, what’s so great about paths? If you’re drawing objects in a pixel-based program (such as Photoshop), changing a shape means

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erasing part of what you’ve drawn, and then drawing it again. In a vector-based program (like Illustrator or InDesign), you don’t have to start over every time you want to change a shape. Instead, you change the properties of the path, adjusting the position of the points on the path or their control handles. Or you can leave the path alone and simply change the formatting (such as stroke or fill) to alter its appearance. All of the shapes that you can draw in InDesign, including text frames and text wrap boundaries, are paths. The shapes that you draw with the Rectangle, Ellipse, Polygon, and Line tools are specific arrangements of path points and control handles— there’s nothing special about them. At any time, you can use the Pen tool, the Direct Selection tool, or the Scissors tool to change one of the basic shapes into an entirely arbitrary path.

It pains me when I see people reflexively switching over to Illustrator whenever they need to draw anything more complicated than a box. I think this is just crazy—and not only because I hate Illustrator with a whitehot passion. You have the tools, right here in InDesign, to draw anything that doesn’t require Illustrator’s “fancy” brush effects, gradient mesh, or patterned fills. I’ve often heard people say that Illustrator is “the right tool for the job” when it comes to drawing, but that’s like saying that the hammer in the toolbox across the room is better than the hammer in your hand. When it comes to basic path drawing, the two programs are functionally identical. In fact, my main point in writing this piece is to try to get InDesign users to notice the tools that are right in front of them. Next, I want to cover some simple things about paths that are often forgotten.

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Feature: Vector Paths

Here’s a more-or-less random collection of thoughts about path drawing in InDesign. Some of these will probably seem very basic, but believe me, they’re based on real questions I’ve heard or behaviors I’ve observed. Some of them rely on scripting, which seems very advanced to many InDesign users. I’m hoping that one or more of them is of some use to you. There’s a reason Illustrator’s Outline view exists For more precise drawing, skip the stroke/ fill until your path is perfect. When I’m drawing in InDesign, I always set my document default stroke to 0 and default fill to None, and set the document view to Normal (so that I can see the paths). I do this because InDesign often moves the path itself— actually changes the location of the path points—based on the stroke weight. When I’m doing any type of technical illustration, I want to work with the geometry of the

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paths. I don’t care about their appearance until their path points are in the right places. Drawing without the stroke makes it easier to see when path points and line segments join and abut each other. This approach helps me avoid small errors that I can’t easily see on screen (strokes that don’t quite overlap, points that aren’t perfectly coincident, etc.). These kinds of drawing mistakes are the ones that jump out and bite you when you print your layout. The Direct Selection tool is your friend Unless you’re working with very simple paths, and doing very simple things, the Direct Selection tool (Press A when the cursor is not in text) is the tool to use. With the Direct Selection tool, you can select individual points by clicking on them, or select multiple points by dragging a selection around them. To select all of the path points in a path, hold down Option/Alt as you click a line segment on the path. If the

path is inside a compound path, a group, or pasted inside another page item, hold down Option/Alt as you drag. Non-selected path points are hollow; selected path points are filled in (Figures 1 and 2).

Figure 1: All of the characters in this example are part of a compound path, and a graphic has been placed inside the compound path to make it a little bit more interesting. To move a subpath within a compound path (in this example, a single character), select the Direct Selection tool, hold down Option/Alt, click the subpath, release the key, and then drag the subpath to a new location.

Figure 2: Point at a line segment with the Direct Selection tool and drag. InDesign will move the line segment.

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Several times per day, as I’m working with paths, I’ll mistakenly select the path using the normal Selection tool. This selects the path as an object—rather than seeing selected path points, you’ll see the selection handles. When this happens, there’s no need to select the Direct Selection tool from the Tools panel, and no need to reselect the path. Instead, simply press A, and InDesign will switch to the Direct Selection tool and magically select the path points in the selection. One of my favorite aspects of working with a path that I’ve selected with the Direct Selection tool is that guides will snap to the points (assuming that I have View > Grids & Guides > Snap to Guides turned on). This makes it easy to align other points or page items to the point. Note that you can also use the AddGuides.jsx script to position a pair of guides at the position of the point (Figure 3). This script is installed by default in InDesign—you’ll find it in the Scripts panel (Window > Utilities > Scripts). Having

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guides placed on path points also makes it easier to position other page items on the points—something that might come in handy if you’re drawing a simple chart. Finally, note that you can transform (move, rotate, scale, and skew) path points. This means that you can select a subset of the points in the path, and, for example,

Figure 3: AddGuides dialog box. Select the circled options to draw a pair of guides through every path point in a path.

rotate them while leaving the non-selected path points in place. Note that when you transform path points, page item content is not transformed (as it would be if you were using the Selection tool). This is a very useful difference in the behavior of the two selection tools. Theory and practice: path direction Remember that I said that paths have a direction? It turns out that this fact can help you in both large and small ways. When you apply arrowheads (and/or “tailfeathers”) to a path, InDesign puts one arrowhead at the start of the path and, optionally, another at the end of the path. Given that these locations (“start” and “end”) are based on the path direction, you can easily end up with something other than what you expect. At this point, many people go to the Stroke panel and re-specify the arrowheads, but there’s a quicker way: select the path, and then choose Object > Paths > Reverse Path.

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Another effect of path direction relates to the way that InDesign fills self-intersecting or compound paths. If you’re familiar with Illustrator, you know that there are two options: the Non-Zero Winding fill rule and the Even-Odd fill rule. These rules control the way in which the application fills—or doesn’t fill—the intersecting parts of the path. InDesign supports the Even-Odd fill rule, but not the Non-Zero Winding fill rule.

Does this mean that you have to go to Illustrator to get the effect of the missing fill rule? Nope—you can do the same thing right here in InDesign. To do this, select the path, and then copy it. Choose Edit > Paste In Place to create a duplicate of the object exactly on top of the original. Select both objects, and then choose Object > Pathfinder > Add (or click the Add button in the Pathfinder panel) (Figure 4).

Non-obvious uses for path text The text on a path feature can be used (abused?) in conjunction with inline/ anchored graphics to create ornamental borders, dimension lines, and other nifty things (Figures 5 and 6). Indeed, I find this use for the feature a lot more compelling and useful than simply putting text on a path (which I very rarely need). Being able to use text alignment and spacing controls to position the graphics is a bonus.

Figure 5: Dimension lines with text on a path.

Figure 4: Even/Odd fill in InDesign: Here you see InDesign’s default “Zero Winding” fill rule on the left. Copy the path, and then Paste in Place. Select both paths (the original and the duplicate), and then apply the Add Pathfinder operation. The new compound path (right) simulates the appearance of the Even/Odd fill rule.

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Figure 6: Graphics pasted into a text path on the text frame containing the title create a decorative border.

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There’s a very nice tip on using text on a path to create custom arrowheads and dimension lines on InDesignSecrets.

Repairing Basic Shapes With Convert Shape When you’re working with the Direct Selection tool, it’s pretty easy to accidentally move path points. It’s also easy to fail to notice this change until it’s too late to undo. What this means, in practice, is that some basic shapes (rectangles, ovals, and polygons) get distorted—their path points are out of position ever so slightly. Instead of redrawing the shape, or laboriously moving the path points back into the correct position, select the path, and use the options on the Object > Convert Shape menu to turn the shape back into whatever it is supposed to be. Note: This comes in very handy when you’ve accidentally dragged one corner of a text frame. When InDesign sees that a text frame is non-rectangular, some text frame

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options disappear. And InDesign defines “rectangular” in a very precise way—having a corner point out of position by .0001 point is all it takes. If you’re not seeing the text frame insets you expect, for example, you should suspect a misplaced corner point (Figure 7).

Two Things About Stroke Styles InDesign’s stroke styles provide a way for you to incorporate dashed, dotted, or striped strokes in your layouts. That’s nice, but nothing too exciting. There’s at least one tip, however, that can really improve

This point is .001 points from where it should be.

Figure 7: “Squaring” an accidentally stretched text frame. At left, how it should look. As you can see, the text frame inset values in the Text Frame Options dialog box have differing values. But if you accidentally drag a corner of the frame using the Direct Selection tool, the frame is no longer a rectangle, and, as such, is limited to a single frame inset value (right). Use Object > Convert Shape > Rectangle to restore the text frame to its proper shape.

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your technical illustrations, maps, and so forth: when you’re using a callout rule (a line that points from a piece of text to part of an image), it’s easy for the rule to get lost in the detail of the image behind it. To make the rule stand out, create a striped stroke style with a white background—the background will enhance the visibility of the line by knocking out the image behind it (Figure 8). The secret trick, though, is to think beyond the capabilities of single stroke styles. Instead, keep in mind that you can layer stroke styles to create interesting design effects (Figure 9).

Figure 9: Examples of using stacked strokes to create beads (left) and ribbons (right).

Use my path utilities scripts Every now and then, I’ll find that I need a path-drawing feature that InDesign doesn’t have. When this happens, I’ll usually write a script to provide the feature. I’ve written scripts that allow me to save a selection (so that I can come back to it later), or outline a path, or connect the center points of a series of selected page items. Back in July 2014, I wrote a piece for InDesignSecrets on one set

of tools that I often use. It’s gotten a whopping two (2!) comments. This disappoints me greatly, because I think that everyone who draws anything in InDesign could use some of these features. And they’re free! So what are you waiting for? Give ‘em a try! (Figure 10, next page)

Thinking About Path Operations InDesign’s path operations (aka the “Pathfinder” feature) give you a way to merge two or more shapes into a single shape. The difference among the path

Figure 8: It’s easy—especially in printed pieces—for callout rules to get lost in background images (left). To solve this problem, create a Stripe stroke style that includes a white (or similarly high-contrast) background color (right).

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operations has to do with the way that they deal with the area of intersection between objects. Add, for example, merges overlapping objects into a single path, removing the area of intersection as it does so. Intersect, by contrast, creates a new shape from the area of intersection, and discards the remainder of the overlapping paths. One usually thinks of path operations in an additive way—building up complex shapes from basic shapes. A feature of path operations that’s often missed is the ability to use them in a “cookie cutter” fashion— using shapes to knock out the area of intersection in a background shape (Figure 11). Convert point operations The award for the most-ignored feature related to path drawing has to go to the Convert Point operations (Object > Convert Point). You can use these to convert the point type of a selected point (or series of points) to some other type of point.

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Figure 10: Select a path, and run the OffsetPath.jsx script. The script will present a dialog box where you can enter the offset value you want. Note that you can enter measurement values using standard InDesign measurement overrides. The basic unit for the InDesign dialog box object is points, but I can enter the value I want in millimeters. Click OK, and InDesign creates a new path, offset from the selected path by the distance you specified.

What’s the use of this? Like the Convert Shape features, it’s mostly for cleaning up mistakes you’ve made while you’re madly selecting and moving points. It’s pretty easy to accidentally apply a curve to a line segment that should be straight. Rather than drag the offending control handle into the point (a process that can be hard to do perfectly at some magnifications), just select the point and choose Object > Convert Point > Corner. This will retract the control

Figure 11: Cut a shape out of a page item to show an image beneath. Here’s a compound path (the circles) cut out of a shape using the Subtract path operation. Place the shape over a background image to let the image show through. I’ve added a transparent fill, just for fun.

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handles associated with the point, which gives you straight line segments on either side of the point. My favorite use of this feature, however, is to draw paths using corner points and then convert some or all of the points on the path to smooth points (Object > Convert Point > Smooth). Once you get the hang of what will happen when you do this, you might find it’s easier to create precise curves this way (it is, at least compared to drawing the path with the Pen tool). Also, it can be a lot of fun.

Thinking About Paths How we think about our tools sometimes causes us to miss better ways to work. It’s easy to fall into a rut, to put off learning new approaches to tasks we have at hand. I often find that the largest mental barrier to working more efficiently or creatively has to do with the unexamined assumptions I bring to the process. I need to remind myself to try new things.

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Using scripts for creative drawing effects We generally think of scripting as a tool for automating repetitive tasks, but scripting can be a creative tool as well (see InDesignSecrets to learn how), making it easy to experiment with design effects that would be difficult or impossible to realize in any other way. At several points in this article, I’ve talked about using scripts. If you’re new to InDesign scripting—and perhaps a little scared of the whole topic—I’ve got you covered. Take a look at this blog post that I wrote.

Fractalize, Mystic Rose, and NINA images, all realized through a script.

I’m hoping that something in this piece might have helped you look at some part of InDesign path drawing in a new light, and made your work a little easier or more enjoyable. We’re walking this path together, after all.

n Olav Martin Kvern is Senior Solutions Architect at Silicon Publishing Inc., and the co-author of Real World InDesign.

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By Bob Levine

InReview: QuickResize

A script to save you a lot of page-tweaking—and cussing.

QuickResize Id-Extras www.id-extras.com US$59 Mac and Windows, CS4 and later Rating:

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It’s happened to all of us. For one reason or another you have to resize a document that you’ve pretty much completed. You have a couple of choices built in to InDesign: liquid layout or layout adjustment. Both feature kind of work, but require you to make certain choices, and if they’re not correct you wind up with either objects on the pasteboard (if shrinking the page size) or (if enlarging it) enough white space to make Jony Ive jealous. Fiddling around with this stuff is about as much fun to me as drawing a clipping path. Enter Quick Resize, a script from developer Ariel Walden (www.id-extras.com). The website description of this script states: “QuickResize presents a simple window

where you can input the new size you’d like the current InDesign document to be.” Based on my test drive, simple is a very accurate description. Let’s take a look.

Installation Because this is a script, there’s no installation routine. Instead, you’ll just need to copy the QuickResize.jsxbin file to your scripts folder in the InDesign application folder. While you could go searching for it, there’s a little trick for installing scripts that I’ll share with you to make it a bit more, shall we say, simple. Open InDesign and, if the Scripts panel is not part of your current workspace, open it (Window > Utility > Scripts), and rightclick on either the User or the Application

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InReview: QuickResize

folder in the panel (Figure 1). Choose Reveal in Explorer (Windows) or Reveal in Finder (Mac). You should put the JSXBIN file inside the Scripts Panel folder (or a folder inside that folder). Once you’ve installed it, it should start working immediately, and you’ll find the script in the Scripts panel (Figure 2).

Figure 2: The QuickResize script in its natural habitat.

Activation

Figure 1: Right-click in the Scripts panel to reveal the location of your script files.

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The script needs to be licensed before it can be used, so once it’s installed, double­ click it to bring up the activation screen, which will prompt you for your serial number (Figure 3). Activating on my Mac and Windows machines, I was unable to paste the serial number in from the clipboard. If you have the same experience, enter it carefully and click OK. In the future, instead of having to use the Scripts panel every time, you can make this even simpler by adding a menu item for it. Launch the script, and click About.

Figure 3: You will need to enter your serial number manually before you can use the script.

Figure 4: You can add a menu item for QuickResize by selecting this option in the About dialog box.

Click the Create Menu Item box (Figure 4) to add an ID-Extras menu to your workspace, from which you can choose the script.

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How does it work? This script takes every item on the page and scales it up or down, leaving you with a completely editable layout. In some cases, that “simple” action may well be enough. What kind of choices do you have in resizing? Let’s take a look at the interface after launching (Figure 5). (Note that you must have a document open or you’ll get an error message telling you to open one.) As shown in Figure 6, the interface is quite simple. You can set a new size for the document using most measurement units or

by percentage. You can control aspect ratio as well, but as we’ll see, and in keeping with the simple nature of things, it’s best to use this script with identical aspect ratios. For those involved in digital publishing, you’ll note that pixels are not an option here, but InDesign recognizes a point as a pixel for that purpose. If you’ve got the freedom to resize based on only one dimension, leaving the Constrain Proportions check box ticked will result in the other dimension being automatically calculated for you.

Figure 5: The QuickResize dialog box shows the current size of the document (A), the size of document after resize (B), and whether proportions will be constrained (C).

Figure 6: You can resize a document using several standard measurement units.

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How well does it work? First let’s take a look at the best part of this script. We’ve already covered the drawbacks involved in using the native tools in InDesign. While they work, in many cases (at least the ones I’ve been in) they leave me with more than a desirable amount of cleanup to do. Many other solutions to changing page sizes involved exporting and placing PDFs and then scaling them, but you may wind up with something difficult, if not impossible, to edit. With only a small change to the size, those solutions may be enough, but when you’re making a large change, it’s entirely possible that you may want to tweak the layout a bit, especially when it comes to text where a dramatic change in size may require some tracking or leading corrections. This script leaves you with a fully editable document.

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Let’s look at what happens when we increase the document to 200% (Figure 7). Not too shabby a job. Let’s take a look at how the text is scaled (Figure 8).

Figure 7: Before (top) and after (bottom) increasing the document size to 200%. Hard to tell the difference!

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Notice how the text has been scaled up. I’m assuming there’s a small bug here, since the leading looks fine but the numbers aren’t showing it. Choosing the text frame and redefining the scaling to 100% from

Figure 8: Before scaling (top ) and after (bottom).

the Control panel menu fixes it, if you’re so inclined to do so, though the developer does advise against it: “Another side-effect is that the text in text frames will display with a size in parentheses—e.g., 14pt (21pt). To get rid of the parentheses, select the text frame, go to the flyout menu of the Control panel, and select Redefine Scaling As 100%. However, be warned: owing to various InDesign bugs (or limitations), selecting this option can cause text to reflow or acquire some weird formatting—which is why QuickResize does not do this by default.” (Figure 9) For what it’s worth, I didn’t run into any issues doing so, and given that the best part

Figure 9: Type size displays normally after you redefine scaling as 100%.

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InReview: QuickResize

of this script is that it gives you the ability to edit, I don’t look at reflowing text as a dealbreaker.

The not quite so good What about other aspects of the layout? Let’s look at some text that has a drop shadow applied (Figure 10).

If you think the settings look the same, it’s because they do. The script doesn’t seem to scale effects no matter what my scaling preferences are set at. What about scaling when the aspect ratio is not the same? I would not expect things to be quite as smooth, and in my testing, that turned out to be the case.

For example, let’s look at an extreme case where we change our landscape page to portrait (Figure 11). Figure 11: To change a document’s aspect ratio, deselect Constrain Proportions.

Figure 10: Before (left) and after (right) applying a drop shadow to text.

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InReview: QuickResize

Not exactly what you want to see, but it’s not all bad. For digital publishing projects where you need to create a phone layout from a tablet layout, just changing one dimension will give you a page that can scroll or can be easily adjusted (Figure 12). For instance, the iPhone 5 has a width of 640 px, but keeping the aspect ratio at 1:1 gives us a height of 852 px. We have two choices: tweak the layout and change the page setup, or just add a smooth scrolling action to it for DPS. Personally, I’ve always elected the latter.

and certainly lives up to being simple. Will it work for you in every situation? As we’ve seen, of course not, but nothing simple does. Is it enough for you to invest $59 in? Only you can answer that, but I do recommend that you give it a try. A demo version that works in a very unique way is available for download. With it, you can test the script, but the results will be changed by up to 15% randomly.

n Bob Levine is the author of the Lynda.com titles Adobe Digital Publishing Suite Essential Training and Developing Multistate Objects in InDesign. He is a consultant assisting clients of all sizes in developing new workflows for digital publications as well as InCopy workflows. Reach him via his website, www.theindesignguy.com, his blog, boblevine.us, and follow him on Twitter @idguy.

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Figure 12: Resizing a document to fit an iPhone 5 screen.

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The verdict QuickResize is easy to use and does what it’s supposed to do; it quickly resizes any layout

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January 2016

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GREP of the Month

| This | Or | That

The vertical bar helps when you need options Sometimes you need to find several different strings of text in your document. If you know the specific strings, you could always do individual searches, using the Text tab of the Find/Change dialog box. But you can save time by writing a single GREP expression that covers each string you’re looking for. Plus, using a “this or that” expression lets you build the search into a paragraph style. The magic “either/or” symbol in GREP is the vertical slash |, or pipe, typically found by pressing Shift+backslash. In a GREP string, the expression will look for everything on either side of the pipe. For instance, the expression

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candy apple|banana finds candy apple

ACME (Anvils|Dynamite|Rocket Skates),

or banana (but not candy banana). An example of this in a find/change search would be to find a list of product names Anvils|Dynamite|Rocket Skates and change it to $0~d, which means add the trademark symbol ~d to the found text $0. Since GREP wants to take everything to the sides of the pipe, you often need to isolate the list of strings you’re looking for. You do this by creating a subexpression, which involves encasing the list in parentheses. If I searched on ACME Anvils|Dynamite|Rocket Skates, I’d get “ACME Anvils” or “Dynamite” or “Rocket Skates”. However, if I search for

I’ll find ACME Anvils, ACME Dynamite, or ACME Rocket Skates. You can also use a subexpression to isolate parts of a word, for instance to find alternate spellings. Searching adapt(o|e)r will find adaptor or adapter. You could use adaptor|adapter, but the former is quicker and cleaner. One thing to remember is that GREP works in a logical fashion when applying GREP Styles. If you search for cat|category, InDesign won’t find “category” because it finds “cat” in the word first. So put the longest word first in the list, like category|cat.  —Erica Gamet

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Best of the Blog

Best of the Blogs

A collection of the most important and informative articles from InDesignSecrets, InCopySecrets, and EPUBSecrets. If you want to add comments or ask questions, just click the title of the article to view the original post in your web browser. InCopySecrets: Saving Content Chad Chelius | November 13, 2015

As computer users, most of us have gotten into the habit of saving our work on a regular basis. It only takes one instance where you lose power, or quickly close a document and accidentally choose no when it asks you to save, for you to realize that it’s not a good idea to go any length of time without saving your file. I’m a keyboard shortcut nut, so my method is to press Command+S (Mac) or Ctrl+S (Windows) on a regular basis to ensure that my changes have been saved. Saving in InCopy InCopy is no different when it comes to periodically saving while you’re working on a file. Although technically there is no “save” command; it’s actually “save content” instead, but it performs the same operation as the traditional save does. When you have a file checked out when working on an InDesign or

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Assignment file, choosing Save Content from the File menu or pressing Command+S (Mac) or Ctrl+S (Windows) will perform the save content operation in the current story. This is also what happens when you check a file back in, but the Save Content command saves any changes to the current story and allows you to keep working.

The limitation of the Save Content command is that it saves only the current story (i.e., the story that you’re currently clicked in). When you have several stories checked out, this could give users a false sense of security because you’d think that performing a save would save everything. Not so.

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Saving All Content InCopy addresses this limitation by providing another save option found in the File menu called Save All Content that does exactly what you would expect—it saves any changes in all checked out stories. The shortcut for Save All Content is Option+Shift+Command+S (Mac) or Alt+Shift+Ctrl+S (Windows). Whew, that’s a hand twister! Ann-Marie Concepción reminded me of this during a recent discussion, and we both agreed that the Save All Content command is much more useful than the Save Content command.

2. In the Keyboard Shortcuts dialog box, choose File Menu from the Product Area drop-down menu. 3. In the list of commands that appears, scroll down to the Save All Content listing, and click on it to select it. 4. In the Current Shortcuts section, click the current keyboard shortcut that is assigned, and click the Remove button to remove the shortcut. Click Yes to confirm that you want to remove it, and then enter a name for the customized set of shortcuts that you’re currently creating. You can’t modify the default shortcut set in InCopy, so you are prompted to create a new set. 5. Click in the New Shortcut field, and type Command+S (Mac) or Ctrl+S (Windows) on your keyboard; then click the Assign button. (You’ll notice a message below the shortcut field that indicates that the shortcut is assigned to another command, which is fine, as you want to override that currently assigned shortcut.) 6. Click OK to close the Keyboard Shortcuts dialog box.

Making Save All Content the Default Rather than using the hand-twisting shortcut that is assigned to the Save All Content command, you can customize the keyboard shortcut so that Command+S (Mac) or Ctrl+S (Windows) initiates the Save All Content command. Here’s how to do it: 1. Choose Edit > Keyboard Shortcuts.

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Now using the trusty Command+S (Mac) or Ctrl+S (Windows) shortcut will save any files currently checked out in the open InDesign or Assignment file. We’d love to know what your favorite InCopy shortcuts or customized InCopy shortcuts are. Please share them with us via the orignial post of this article.

Contest: The Text That Wouldn’t Move

The text frame is not threaded to any others and it is nearly full with text. You’re asked by the designer in charge to delete the image at the bottom of the page and resize the text frame so the text runs to the bottom margin. But when you do so, the text barely moves at all. It refuses to fill the new space in the text frame. What gives?

Mike Rankin | November 18, 2015

Here’s the question: You have a page with a three-column text frame at the top and an image at the bottom.

It turns out the answer to this mystery was the subject of a recent InDesign Tip of the Week. The Balance Columns feature has been enabled for the 3-column text frame. With Balance Columns

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turned on, InDesign makes the depths of each column roughly equal, ignoring the rest of the empty space at the bottom.

How to Add a Rule Around a Paragraph Keith Gilbert | November 23, 2015

At the InDesign Conference in Denver, I showed attendees how to add an automatic rule around a paragraph using an admittedly strange but effective technique. The details are pretty non-obvious, so I promised this detailed follow-up post. It is a multi-step procedure to set up this trick, but once you’ve created it and saved it in a paragraph style, it is effortless to use. For this example, I’m going to create a 2-point black rule around a paragraph. But this technique works with rules of any weight and color.

And the genius winners of this contest are Kate Hodge and Joe Cabrera! Both win a copy of Multi-Find/Change from Automatication! Thanks to everyone who entered, and be on the lookout for another contest with a new great prize next month!

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Using Paragraph Rules and Shading to Add a Box Around a Paragraph 1. Create a paragraph style named “Body text, boxed” that has paragraph rules above and below. Use Left Indent, Right Indent,

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Space Before, and Space After to “inset” the paragraph text away from where the rules are going to be.

2. Measure the width of your column. My column is 225 points wide. 3. Divide the weight of your rule by the width of your column, and multiply by 100. So in my case: 2 / 225 × 100 = .89 4. Choose New Gradient Swatch from the Swatches panel menu. 5. Create a new linear gradient swatch called Rules that has 6 “stops” on the gradient ramp. To create a new gradient stop, just click below the gradient ramp. These stops, from left to right, should be black, black, white, white, black, black (or substitute your stroke color for black, and whatever color you want for the

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box background for white). The location of the gradient stops is not important at this point, only the order from left to right.

6. Now, working from left to right, select the first gradient stop, and enter 0% for the location. 7. Select the second gradient stop, and enter your value from step 3 (.89 in my case).

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8. Select the third gradient stop, and enter the value from step 3 for this stop also.

9. Select the sixth gradient stop (the one furthest to the right, and enter 100% for the location. 10. Select the fifth gradient stop and enter (100â&#x20AC;&#x201D;your value from step 3) (99.11 in my case). 11. Repeat for the fourth gradient stop.

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12. Click the OK button. So now we have a gradient that goes from black to black, and then goes immediately to white with no transition, and then returns to black the same way. 13. Edit your “Body text, boxed” paragraph style to use the Rules gradient swatch for the Paragraph Shading color. You will probably need to adjust the Top and Bottom Offsets so that the vertical rules line up with the rule above and rule below.

Of course, the whole point of this is that now you have a paragraph style that can be applied to paragraphs of any length, and they will be boxed automatically. The box will grow and shrink as the paragraph is edited.

I’ve noticed that as I zoom in and out sometimes the right side rule appears slightly thinner than the left side rule. But this seems to just be a display issue. If I zoom all the way in on a corner of the box, the rule weights match perfectly. In terms of output, the effect will look great in print, PDF, or Fixed-Layout EPUB. But don’t use it for a reflowable EPUB unless you’re OK with rasterizing the entire text frame to preserve its

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appearance. Also note that if you resize the width of the column, you’ll need to go back and recalculate the position of the gradient stops, and edit the gradient swatch accordingly.

InCopySecrets: Retaining Important Formatting When Importing Word Documents Chad Chelius | November 23, 2015

As I’ve written in the past, Word is often an integral part of any InCopy workflow. In many situations, content is authored in Microsoft Word due to its widespread availability on most computers. Editorial staff often keep content in the Word format when working with authors because it’s easy to go back and forth with changes until the final content has been completed. Once the content has been finalized, the designer can flow that Word document into InDesign, or an editor can flow the content into an InCopy file in preparation for layout. Although the process of bringing a Word document into an InDesign or InCopy file may seem like a simple process, retaining the desired formatting of that Word document can present some unique challenges. Notice that I said “desired” formatting. I say this because authors are known for applying their own formatting to documents to “enhance” the visual appearance of the file while they’re writing, often making headlines bigger or changing

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their color to make it easier to view and read. This is much more easily accomplished by using styles in Word, but that’s an entirely different blog post. When you bring Word content into InDesign or InCopy, the goal is to remove the undesirable formatting but retain the formatting you wish to keep, such as bold and italic styling. Preserving Formatting Many users will select all of the text in a Word document, copy the text, and then paste it into InDesign or InCopy. In essence, this strips all of the formatting from the text, including any formatting you wish to keep. This can be detrimental, because work has been lost and will need to be performed by someone a second time. Instead of copy and paste, InDesign provides some options for retaining the formatting of text when you choose File > Place. In the Place dialog box, select the Word document that you want to place, and then enable the Show Import Options checkbox and

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click Open. This will display the Microsoft Word Import Options dialog box.

We’ll focus on the Formatting section located at the bottom of the dialog box. This section offers you two main choices for dealing with text imported from Microsoft Word. 1. Remove Styles and Formatting from Text and Tables: This will strip out all formatting from the Word document and use the current style in the InDesign or InCopy document. 2. Preserve Styles and Formatting from Text and Tables: This will retain any formatting applied in the Word document and also gives you the option to import any Word styles or map them to existing InDesign or InCopy styles.

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Option 1 is tempting, but remember, this will remove all formatting, including bold, italics, and anything else you actually want to retain. Therefore, more often than not, I take advantage of option 2 in order to retain all of the formatting in the document. Once placed in the InDesign or InCopy document, all formatting is retained. Cleaning Up the Formatting Now that you have the Word text in the InDesign or InCopy document, you need to keep the formatting you want and get rid of the formatting you don’t want. To do this, I create a character style for all of the formatting options that I want to retain. Usually this consists of bold, italic, and bold italic formatting, although depending on the type of content that you’re working with, you may want to create more. When creating the character styles, only define the properties necessary within the style. For example, when you create your italic character style, define only “Italic” as part of the style. No need to define the font, size, or other formatting, unless it is very unique formatting.

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In order to retain the formatting that you want to keep, open the Find/Change dialog box by choosing Edit > Find/Change. Leave the Find What and Change To fields empty, but click the More Options button to display the Find and Change format sections of the dialog box. Click on the Specify Attributes to Find button , and click on the Basic Character Formats section on the left side of the dialog box. Now choose Italic from the Font Style drop-down menu, and click OK. Now in the Change Formatting section, click on the Specify Attributes to Change button , and choose the Italic character style from the Character Style drop-down menu.

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Click the Change All button, and you’ll be notified how many changes have been made. Note that you have options to make this change in all open documents, the current document, the current story, and to the end of the story. Repeat this process for the other styling that you want to retain. Apply Paragraph Styles Remember, character styles have more power than paragraph styles. So with your character styles applied to the text formatting that you want to retain, you are free to apply the appropriate paragraph styles and clear any formatting that you wish to remove. Looking at the figures below, you can see the original Word document that was used as well as the final InCopy file that has been cleaned up using the described method in this article. We’ve highlighted the italicized text to make it easier to see.

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What’s New With InDesign CC 2015.2 Mike Rankin | December 1, 2015

Adobe has released updates to several important Creative Cloud applications, including InDesign CC 2015.

In their 2015.2 versions, all of the main apps have jettisoned their old Welcome screens in favor of a new Start screen. This new screen makes it easier locate recent files, create new files, manage CC libraries and presets, and access Adobe stock photos and tutorials. Here’s what the Start screen looks like in InDesign:

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New InDesign features include several enhancements to CC Libraries, including the following: »» Add all members of a group to a library with one click (including color groups and style groups) »» Add color themes and/or individual swatches to the Swatches panel without having to apply those colors to page objects »» Add multiple styles, swatches, or graphics to a library with one click »» CC libraries can now be searched, finally! We also have a revamped Color Theme panel:

It’s a little easier to make accessible PDFs, thanks to the new ability to designate a title for the PDF and to display that title in the PDF via a setting in the PDF Export dialog box.

Smaller changes include: »» An increase in the number of recent documents you can display (up to 20)

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»» New page sizes for Web and Digital Publishing

For a full, deep dive into the other new features of InDesign CC 2015.2, see issue 80 of InDesign Magazine. Also, be sure to check out the latest version of James Wamser’s Guide to InDesign New Features, which includes the features in this latest release. You can view the guide via Publish Online or download a PDF. Bug Fixes in InDesign CC 2015.2 The new release of InDesign also sports several welcome bug fixes, addressing problems with crashing, cross-references, data merge, relinking, EPUB, and more.

»» The ability to make the Eyedropper take priority over the Color Theme tool (yay!) A comprehensive review of the new features In addition to the features above, the new release includes the features announced at Adobe MAX, which Steve Werner covered here a few weeks ago. These include enhancements to the Publish Online service, new features for finding and selecting glyphs, and a special workspace where users of Microsoft Windows touchenabled devices can quickly sketch out new layouts with gestures, similar to the Adobe Comp CC app.

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Macintosh: El Capitan issues »» InDesign no longer crashes on launch when “Automatically hide and show the menu bar” option is enabled. »» Navigation window’s Title Bar is no longer missing in Open/Place dialog boxes. »» Relink functionality now works properly. Publish Online »» No more white bounding box when multiplying transparency effects on JPG graphics. »» Ease In/Ease Out animation setting now behaves correctly.

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»» State actions are now honored in Publish Online export when buttons are anchored in a multi-state object (MSO).

»» XML import now works when pointing to transformation file in CC versions.

Fonts, Text, Styles, Data Merge »» Previewing a font in a dialog box adds font to Recent Font list. »» Users can now use Verdana OTF font from Document Fonts folder »» Fit Frame to Content now works when the last character of the line is hyphen, em-dash, or en-dash. »» Paragraph shading appearance consistently updates when removing forced line breaks from paragraph. »» Now able to use character styles inside cross-reference formats.

Direct Download Links If you’re one of the folks who has had trouble installing updates with the CC application, check out the following posts at ProDesignTools.com, where they have a table of links to direct downloads of all the application updates (not just InDesign), and instructions for both Mac and Windows. Mac Adobe CC 2015 Updates Windows Adobe CC 2015 Updates

EPUB »» State actions are now honored in FXL EPUB export when buttons are anchored in a multi-state object (MSO). »» Exporting to EPUB 3 Fixed Layout now embeds and displays the fonts in the EPUB if they are present in the package, and font embedding now works when World-Ready composer is selected. XML »» InDesign CC no longer crashes when deleting XML elements that contain missing tables.

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How to Create a Checkerboard Paragraph Rule Kelly Vaughn | December 3, 2015

In a recent InDesign Secrets article, Keith Gilbert explored How to Add a Rule Around a Paragraph. It is a very cool trick using gradients composed of bands of color that transition sharply from one color to the next. One of our readers then commented: “I wonder if anyone has worked out a way to combine this with underline to create a hacked shaded box.” And today I will explain how to do just that. This technique uses both InDesign and Illustrator. I started using the same technique that Keith used, but I wanted to see how far I could push the limit of InDesign gradients.

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Methodically, I added and adjusted gradient stops until I had a gradient that consisted of 20 distinct color breaks. Now, initially, these stripes look quite similar to the American Flag stroke style I made a couple of years ago. But notice that this simple line is a solid stroke style, and the stripes are created just by the use of precisely positioned gradient stops.

to expand Illustrator’s Gradient panel to the entire width of my 27” monitor! (Compare that with the teeny tiny width of InDesign’s Gradient panel.)

Illustrator Gradient panel

So using your vector-editing program of choice, build a nice, complex gradient consisting of 20 different stripes. If you edited your gradient in Illustrator, now is the time to copy and paste your line back into InDesign. Just by doing so, InDesign will automatically add the gradient as a new swatch. If you decide to make more or fewer stripes in your gradient, be sure to use an even number of stripes.

The Advantage of Making Gradients in Illustrator Before we get too far into this, I want to remind you that you can copy vectors from Illustrator to InDesign (or vice versa). And when editing complex gradients, it’s a heck of a lot easier to do it in Illustrator than it is in InDesign, because some Illustrator panels (including the Gradient panel) are super-expandable! I was able

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Reverse the Gradient The reason for the even number of stripes is because we’re going to flip the gradient. In the Gradient panel, click the Reverse button. Now make a second swatch.

the gradients to a couple of lines in order to better see how the gradients are reversed.

Create a Paragraph Rule Now, let’s apply the first gradient to a paragraph rule to see what happens. With your text insertion point inside the word, go to the Paragraph panel menu, and choose Paragraph Rules. You’ll see that we have two distinct (though similar) swatches: one begins with white and ends with black; the second begins with black and ends with white.

Black and white gradient swatches

Since those swatches are very small, and the thumbnails are too small to accurately represent the gradients, try applying

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Then apply the following settings. Because the paragraph rule will extend the entire width of whatever you specify (Column or Text), the width of the individual stripes is flexible and dynamic.

Change the Stroke Style Used in Your Paragraph Rule By changing the stroke style of the paragraph rule (this example uses “Thick - Thick”), we can quickly see how this is moving toward the checkerboard effect we’re after. What we need next is a way to fill in the center area with our second gradient swatch.

Paragraph rule applied to column width

Using Gap Color By choosing our second gradient swatch (the reversed one) for the gap color, we instantly create a checkerboard pattern.

Paragraph rule applied to text width

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But what if you just want a stack of two checkerboards instead of three? No problem! You just need to make a custom stroke style that covers only 50% of the stripe width. Choose Stroke Styles from the Stroke panel flyout menu.

Now go back to your paragraph rules, and choose the new stroke style you just made.

Create a new stroke style with the following settings:

Making Perfect Squares in the Checkerboard Pattern You may notice that the rectangles in the checkerboard aren’t perfectly square. To make them square, you’ll need to adjust the measurements of your text frame and the point size of the paragraph rule, so that the point size of the paragraph rule is evenly

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divisible by the width of the text frame. In my case, I made the text frame 120 points wide and the paragraph rule 12 points thick.

6. Choose Library: Document Swatches.

Changing the Color of the Checkerboard So now comes the inevitable dilemma: you spent all this time creating the gradient (which was no small task), and now your boss/client wants to change the color. Here’s how. 1. Apply the gradient to a line. 2. Copy and paste it into a new Illustrator document. 3. Delete all the default swatches, and create a new color group with a single swatch. (Bonus tip: make the new color swatch a Global Color for easier editing down the road.) 4. Select your gradient line, and choose Recolor Artwork. 5. Choose the “1 color job” preset.

Create a new color group with a single swatch

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Recolor Artwork

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Voilà! A red and white striped gradient that didn’t take 15 minutes to create!

Copy and paste the object back into InDesign. When you do this, InDesign automatically adds a new red and white gradient swatch to your Swatches panel. Next you’ll need to reverse it in order to get the second version of the swatch that you need. Once you’ve reversed the gradient (using the Gradient panel), add the new gradient to your Swatches panel.

Recolor Preset: 1 Color Job

Color Library: Document Swatches

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Gradient swatches in InDesign

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Now go back to your paragraph rule, and apply the new red and white gradients to your rule and gap colors.

The final step to make the effect complete is to apply the appropriate font and color to the typeface.

Because the checkerboard is an actual paragraph rule, it can be included as part of a paragraph style; xthe checkerboard will always reflow along with the text. Click here to download a snippet file of the checkerboard rule.

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Creating Keylines Eugene Tyson | December 7, 2015

Keylines are important things to include in your InDesign file when you have items that are going to be cut out using a die form, or if you need to set up folding lines, perforation lines, and the like. Keylines show clearly where the paper should be cut, folded, or perforated, so you can avoid costly mistakes at the printer. Regardless of what you use them for, there are two very important points to remember regarding keylines. First, your keylines must be set in a spot color to separate them from the rest of the objects in the file. Second, they must also be set to overprint. Let’s take a look at an example of how to set up keylines in InDesign. Creating a Folder In this example I am going to create a folder (only the outside for this purpose). I want it to have a tab that folds in and can hold A4 sheets of paper, so I have set the document to be 220 mm (w) ×

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307 mm (h). This ensures I will end up with a folder large enough to hold A4 paper.

To set that up, I used the Page tool. I just click and drag the third page beneath the other two. See this post on creating gatefold spreads for more information. Create a Keyline Layer It’s important to isolate your keylines on their own layer, separate from all the other content in your document. So create a new layer, call it Keyline or the like, and put it above all other layers.

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Create a Spot Color Create a new spot color, and call it Keyline. This is really helpful for the prepress operator who has to print your file. They can simply choose not to print the spot color—which is exactly what you want, since your keylines should not be printed.

Draw the Keyline The next thing to do is draw the shape you want to be cut out. I’m going to outline the whole page and the flap that folds in since

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I need to show the printer what to cut and what to fold. Even though it might be fairly obvious, it’s best to take no chances.

Why is there a dotted line? A dotted line means a fold, or if you want to have the page perforated you can write the word perf on it in the keyline color (make sure to put the text on the key line later and set it to overprint—more on that in a moment). Why do I need to add lines to the spine? Because it is going to be folded. It doesn’t matter if it’s a single fold or if you have a spine width or not. The die form is made up with metal that will either cut or crease. A nonbroken line means a cut, a dotted line means to fold or perforate. And you want to crease your page in the middle to make it easier to fold.

As you can see I’ve overlaid the keyline on top of the design. At this point, you might be wondering about a few things. Why is there an angle? As the flap folds upwards, if it’s butting up against the page when folded, it won’t close properly. The angle allows the fold to work.

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Viewing Separations There’s one other thing we need to take care of here, and it’s only evident when viewing separations (Window > Output > Separations Preview or Shift+F6).

When I click the keyline spot color in the panel to hide it, I can see a white line! Why does it do that? Because the line is set to knock out, meaning that no colors print underneath it. Since it has effectively knocked out the color behind it, InDesign shows us the color of the page. This is a problem, since the prepress operator will need to turn off your spot color/keyline color before printing, and if left unfixed,

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it will leave a visible white gap in your designs. So what do we do now? Set your Keyline Layer to Overprint Thankfully, the fix is easy. Select your Keyline layer by pressing the little square to the right of the layer name in the Layers panel. This will select everything on that layer. Go to Window > Output > Attributes, and set the stroke to Overprint. If you’ve put text in there, set that to overprint too (select the text, and click Overprint Fill). You will notice that the line appears darker when it’s set to overprint (and you view it with Separations Preview or Overprint Preview enabled). In my example, the pink keyline color is added to the green background color and I end up with a brownish line. It will revert back to a pink line if I turn off Separations Preview/ Overprint Preview. Creating Custom Folders Your folder doesn’t have to have a flap shaped like a square—you can be creative. It can be reindeer shaped, or Christmas tree shaped, or shaped like a person, or a car, etc. Any shape is OK as long as you’ve included the keyline and your design fits within your keyline. Of course, have a conversation with your printer first to be sure they can execute whatever design you’re envisioning.

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Another thing to be aware of is how many pages can fit in your folder. Will a big document be going inside your folder? Will it have to fit a lot of documents? If you think you’re going to put a lot of documents, then you should consider adding a gusset to the flap and also including a spine. Great video here for laying out a book cover to add the spine to your folder, or a gusset. To add the gusset to your flap, draw another dotted line underneath it the same width as your spine. I’m going to add a 5mm spine and a 5mm gusset for the flap so that I can add lots of documents into my new folder. You may need to make the flap bigger or whatever suits you.

Now I have a funky flap: a 5mm spine and 5mm gusset. Final Thoughts Many printers have standing keylines they use for things like folders. If you need a folder and you’re not too concerned about the shape or position of the flap, then talk to your print provider and get a template from them. But remember, this wasn’t just about setting up a folder—you could be setting up a job to cut out circles, stars, human body shapes, or anything at all. And for those purposes, you’re going to have to set up your own custom keylines. Once you have a spot color and it’s set to overprint—and your Separations panel isn’t showing gaping white when you turn off the spot color—then you’re good to go.

Holiday FX: Snow Mike Rankin | December 9, 2015

It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas… or not, depending on where you live. Personally, I haven’t seen a single flake yet, but that doesn’t mean I can’t whip up a blizzard anytime I want in InDesign. Here’s a quick roundup of ways to add snow effects in your designs.

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Start with whatever elements you want to winterize.

Using the Pen tool, sketch out the outline of the snow you want to add. Follow the object’s outline closely for a light dusting, or lay it on thick for big storm.

Not all that confident in your Pen tool skills? Don’t worry, this is one time where sloppy curves are no problem. Or, if you want some great Pen tool help, check out Deke McClelland’s Lynda.com course on Pen Tool Fundamentals.

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Don’t forget the small details like the counters in letters like o.

Give the snow a very light gray fill so it looks a little more realistic, and so you can use it on a pure white background.

If you want a flat look, you’re done. Or use the Direct Selection tool to tweak the shape of the snow, if desired. You can also experiment with different ways of adding a little dimension and “pop” to the snow.

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You could go with a classic Bevel and Emboss effect to add some highlights and shadows (another reason to not make your snow pure white—it’s pretty hard to add a highlight to white).

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If a Smooth bevel doesn’t give you the look you want, try using Hard Chisel or Soft Chisel, and then dialing in the exact amount of softness.

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Or if you want something a little more hip than an old-school bevel, try layering a few copies of the snow object, with slightly different fill colors.

Or mix and match any of the techniques. Use a bevel and multiple copies of the snow object and a chilly blue fill, etc, etc.

Be creative, have fun, and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget your galoshes! By the way, what the heck are galoshes?

Using Adobe Stock with InDesign Anne-Marie Concepcion | December 10, 2015

Use a light blue instead of a neutral gray to cool things down even more. Brrr!

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Back in June, Adobe launched a new service for Creative Cloud users, Adobe Stock. It gives members access to over 45 million images and videos, mainly from Fotolia.

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And now, with InDesign CC 2015.2 and enhancements to CC Libraries, the Adobe Stock workflow in InDesign is really slick. From the CC Libraries panel you can search the stock photo library, find the asset you want, save it to any of your custom-named libraries in the panel, and from there drag and drop it into your layout. If you use a pre-CC version of InDesign, you can still subscribe to the Adobe Stock service and use it like a regular online stock photo agency, but its integration with the CC Libraries panels in the CC apps is available only if you’re a CC user. For example, in an article about a time-limited offer, I want to find a fun picture of a clock. So I open the CC Libraries panel in InDesign (Window > CC Libraries) and enter “clock” or “time” in the search field. The Search field here is a welcome new feature in CC 2015. You can also search for assets you’ve saved in the current library, or all of them—use the drop-down menu at the far right of the field to select a search scope other than the default Adobe Stock service.

When I hit Return/Enter, the number of results is so big that it helps to make the panel really large.

Scrolling through here, I select a fun clock image for my article. To use it in my layout, I click the Cloud icon that appears when I hover over the thumbnail, which saves it as a low-res preview

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to my CC Library. So far it’s the only image in my custom Clock Project library.

in the future. That’s one of the beauties of using this CC Libraries integrated workflow.

From there, I drag and drop the thumbnail into my layout, where it reconstitutes itself as a full-size, albeit low-res, image. Once I’ve placed it, I can manipulate it as much as I want (crop, add effects, add a stroke, and so on), print it, export it to PDF, upload it to Publish Online—you know, the usual. Any effects I apply in InDesign will be maintained should I decide to purchase the image

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The cloud icon on the frame edge and in the Links panel are reminders that I’m working with a linked CC Libraries asset. Cute icon!

Another interesting factoid: Unlike, say, a synced Typekit font, this linked stock photo preview image is a tangible thing that you can possess. As a test, you could choose File > Package, and the low-res (and watermarked) image would be added to the package’s Links folder. Of course you’d need to license it first in order to use it in your publications, legally speaking (and you’d want to get rid of the watermark too!). Still, I’m a fan of tangible things. They make me feel secure.

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Buying the Image The Adobe Stock watermark will stay on the image until you or your client decide it’s the one to buy. You can do that right from the CC Libraries panel too. Just right-click, and then choose Buy Image. (Yes, I know we’re not buying it, we’re licensing it—but that’s the language Adobe uses.) I’ve already subscribed to the 10 images per month plan—the one that CC subscribers get a 40% discount on— so no money or credit card numbers exchange hands, it’s all done nice and neat in the panel.

available in other CC apps), then those images too would lose their watermarks and refresh with high-res previews. t

To see the exact specs for the full-res image in InDesign, open the Links panel again. (Compare it against the earlier screen shot above.) It’s now a 300ppi image, the author’s name was iQoncept,

After I click OK, I wait a few seconds, and then all placed instances of the image in the layout refresh to show a high-res, watermark-clear preview. If I had earlier dragged the same image into a Photoshop or Illustrator file from their respective Libraries (remember, all your CC Libraries are synced with each other, so stock photo previews you download in one app are immediately

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and I can see he/she/it used Photoshop CS3 for Windows to create it.

By the way, you don’t have to do all your Adobe stock photo searching and downloading from the panel. Go ahead and jump over to the actual Stock.Adobe.com website in your browser. As long as you’re logged in with your CC account, you can search and select images to download to your CC Libraries as previews, or purchase them there. Using the website, I do like being able to

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quickly see the details of an image (file size, format, etc.) when I double-click it, before deciding to download it. (You can always right-click on a CC Library stock photo thumbnail and choose View Details on the Web to get to this same Details screen.)

What’s nice about the web interface is that if you did your searching here, instead of saving a preview or licensed image to the desktop, you can choose to save it right to your CC Libraries. Just open the drop-down menu next to the Desktop choices, and you’ll see the names of all your libraries. Hop on back to InDesign (or Photoshop, etc.), and the image will be there in the CC Library. I think it’s pretty fun! If you want to learn more about using Adobe Stock photos in InDesign, please comment. And in the meantime, you might find this well-done Adobe support page useful.

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InCopySecrets: Check Spelling Dynamically Chad Chelius | December 10, 2015

How it Works To get started, you must enable Dynamic Spelling in InCopy by choosing Edit > Spelling > Dynamic Spelling.

On a recent consulting engagement, I had the opportunity to work with a client who had implemented InCopy a few weeks before I arrived. During our introduction we started talking about how things had been going up to this point and what roadblocks they’d been encountering. One user raised her hand and said “I miss the ability to check the spelling of the words as I type like I could in Microsoft Word.” It occurred to me at that point that if she doesn’t know that InCopy has dynamic spelling, then there probably are other users that don’t know this either. Dynamic Spelling First of all, let’s get the terminology out of the way. Dynamic Spelling is the feature in InCopy that will underline a word that it considers misspelled dynamically as you type or immediately after you paste copy into a document. Microsoft Word refers to this as “Check Spelling as you Type” while other programs might call it something totally different. The point is that most programs have this capability and InCopy is no different. The problem is that Dynamic Spelling is not enabled by default.

Once it’s enabled, as you type and InCopy detects a misspelled word, the word will display a red squiggly underline underneath the word, as seen below.

When a word appears with the squiggly line below it, you can fix the problem by retyping the word, or you can let InCopy do the

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work for you. Simply right-click on the misspelled word, and InCopy provides a list of possible alternatives for the underlined word. Choose a replacement from the list, and InCopy will change the misspelled word to the one that you select.

This is a really efficient way to deal with spelling errors as you type or as you see them, and InCopy makes it really easy. Any additional words that you add to your user dictionary are also included when Dynamic Spelling is detecting words, so it won’t flag any words unnecessarily. More than Meets the Eye Dynamically checking spelling is a great benefit for sure, but when Dynamic Spelling is enabled, it will also check for repeated words, uncapitalized words, and uncapitalized sentences. To control the color that appears for each of the errors when InCopy detects them, go to InCopy > Preferences > Spelling (Mac) or Edit >

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Preferences > Spelling (Windows), and choose a unique color for each of the options listed.

Be sure to enable Dynamic Spelling in InCopy so you can address spelling and grammatical issues on the fly!

Why the “Document fonts” Folder and Data Merge Don’t Mix Colin Flashman | December 14, 2015

I recently had an instance where a Data Merge project had some strange behavior concerning overset text warnings that were inconsistent between the creation of a PDF and InDesign files. The cause could be traced to a Document fonts folder, but it is worth being familiar with this behavior of InDesign.

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The Scenario A Data Merge project was initially merged directly to PDF and proofed to the client.

Once the client made the corrections to the proof, it was clear that Data Merging directly to a PDF would not be possible to complete the project given the nature of the changes, so I decided to merge to a new InDesign file and make the changes manually. Upon creation of the InDesign file, the following dialog box about overset text appeared.

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That was unusual, as the PDF output had not created an overset text-error report. A closer look at the InDesign file revealed that the font used in the Data Merge project had been reported as missing and was now substituted with a font that was wider than the intended font.

This newly created file was not saved, so the file was saved in the same folder as the InDesign file used to create the merge, closed, and then reopened. This time the intended fonts appeared correctly and there was no overset text.

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The cause The answer was simple—the InDesign file that was the master had a “Document fonts” folder that contained the necessary fonts for the artwork.

The explanation David Blatner wrote a related article here that explains the basics of the Document fonts folder. The point of difference in this situation is the consequence it has with Data Merged results and the overset text warnings. When files are made using Data Merge, the files are merged to a temporary location that loses the link to the original Document fonts folder. This results in font substitution and the resulting overset text. In this instance, once the temporary merged file was saved into the same folder as the original, closed and reopened, the link to the Document fonts folder was restored.

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In the original instance where the artwork was merged via the Data Merge panel’s Export to PDF option, a temporary InDesign file was not created to accomplish this task, but instead the resultswere exported directly using the fonts available in the original artwork, thus exporting correctly and with no overset text report. Could the reverse be true? Wondering if the reverse was true, I made a version of the artwork that would intentionally overset in the preview by using a wide font that was also located in the Document fonts folder.

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I then merged to a new InDesign file. Sure enough, no overset text error report was generated, and the font was substituted with a font that was narrower than the intended font.

The file was then saved to the same directory as the original InDesign file, closed, and reopened. As predicted, the type became overset.

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The result In these instances, the use of a Document fonts folder to provide a reference to the font for a Data Merge master is quite dangerous, as it undermines the accuracy of an overset text report, either alarming users unnecessarily or failing to warn them of overset text that could be catastrophic for the job. The solution: use alternatives to Document fonts with Data Merge Rather than using a solution that only allows files saved into the same root directory to use the same fonts, load the fonts via the operating system, third-party font management software, or webbased service (e.g. Adobe Typekit) instead. To be fair, the Document fonts feature was a great idea when introduced to InDesign and still serves an important purpose when handing off files. In the instances of Data Merge projects, it can have unforeseen and dire consequences.

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The InDex: InDex Your Key to Our Content Can’t find that article you saw in an earlier issue? Wondering whether we covered that obscure plug-in? Never fear, the InDex is here.

Index for issues 1 through 81 July 2004 — January 2016

MAGAZINE

INDESIGN MAGAZINE  81

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The first issue of InDesign Magazine was published in July 2004. Since then, we’ve cranked out thousands of pages on hundreds of related topics. While it’s possible to use Acrobat to simultaneously search all past issues of the magazine for one word or phrase, many readers have clamored for a formal index at the back of each issue. However, with 81 issues to account for, that’s not feasible. Instead, the InDex will live as a PDF you can download for free. If you come across a topic you want to know more about, but it’s in an issue you don’t have, you’re not out of luck. We sell back issues at indesignsecrets.com.

If the topic you’re looking for isn’t in the InDex, you have one more way to search: that PDF trick we mentioned. To make it work, all of your magazine issue PDFs must be in one folder. Open any issue in Acrobat, and then press Shift+Command+F (Shift+Ctrl+F on Windows). In the Search window that appears, be sure that you click the radio button that says “All PDF Documents in,” and in the dropdown menu below that, choose the folder in which you placed your magazine issues. You’re on your way to finding anything in any PDF!

Click here to download the InDex.

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While this PDF is just for you, you can tell your friends about this great discount: $10 off a 1-year membership use coupon code: friend Send them to: indesignsecrets.com/issues

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Coming Soon!

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Idm issue 81