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M A G A Z I N E 80 December 2015

›  HOLIDAY GIF T GUIDE ›  MAKING CALENDARS ›  CROPPING IMAGES


InSide: Table of Contents  4

Top 5 Template Tips Anne-Marie Concepción shares her favorite tips for making awesome InDesign templates.

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2015 Holiday Gift Guide Jeff Gamet scored the internet to compile this list of great gifts for the creative types on your shopping list.

Best of the Blogs  A collection of the most important and informative articles from InDesignSecrets and InCopySecrets

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What’s New With InDesign CC 2015 Steve Werner shares the details of the latest update to InDesign. InStep: Optimizing Photos for the Web in InDesign Chad Chelius details a surprising use for InDesign: cropping and sizing photos for a website. The InDesign Conference 2015 Wrap-Up The show in Denver was a big hit and Erica Gamet has the scoop. Calendar Magic! Jeff Witchel shows how to use the amazing Calendar Wizard script.

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GREP of the Month: Word Boundaries Bart Van de Wiele shows how to target GREP searches to specific words, or parts of words.

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Why Does My High Res Image Look Low Res?

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Troubleshooting Data Merge Errors

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The Ultimate Fix for Overset Text Contest

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A Clever Trick for Making Custom Arrowheads

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InCopySecrets: Making Use of the Info in Galley and Story Views

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Spellchecking Tracked Changes

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Why InDesign Documents Open as [Converted]

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Understanding InDesign’s Hyperlink Formatting

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InDex to All Past Issues

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MAGAZINE

From the Managing Editor PUBLISHERS David Blatner, Anne-Marie Concepción EDITORIAL Editor in Chief Mike Rankin, mike@indesignmag.com Managing Editor Wendy Katz, wendy@indesignmag.com Contributing Writers Jeff Gamet, Steve Werner, Chad Chelius, Erica Gamet, Jeff Witchel, Bart Van de Wiele, Eugene Tyson, Colin Flashman, Linda Bergeron Szefer DESIGN Rufus Deuchler rufus.deuchler.net BUSINESS Contact Information http://indesignsecrets.com/contact Subscription Information indesignsecrets.com/issues Published by InDesignSecrets.com, a division of The Creative Publishing Network, Inc. Copyright 2015 InDesignSecrets.com. All rights reserved. Reproduction and redistribution prohibited without approval. For more information, contact permissions@indesignmag.com. InDesign Magazine is not endorsed or sponsored by Adobe Systems Incorporated, publisher of InDesign. InDesign is a registered trademark of Adobe Systems Incorporated. All other products and services are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners and are hereby acknowledged. Photos on pages 15, 20, 27, 36, 37, 40, 55, and 58 courtesy of Fotolia.com ISSN 2379-1403

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What are your December plans? No doubt you’ve got many. Setting up appointments for next year… getting organized (again)… gift-buying… party planning… updating your software…where does the time go? As the clock ticks toward the end of a year, most of us could do with some help. This issue of InDesign Magazine can provide it—well, some of it, anyway. Let’s start with time-saving. You know we love to share tools for making work repeatable, consistent, and quick. To that end, read Anne-Marie Concepción’s Top 5 Template Tips; they’re easy, painless, and really, really smart. I’m telling you, that woman gets you. These tips will save you some production angst and therefore minimize holiday stress. Maybe as the end of the year approaches, you think about… next year. Calendar time! Jeff Witchel shows us a few powerful ways to set up next year’s model, whether

it’s a just-the-basics organization tool or an extensive, multi-”stakeholder” Command Center. All that will leave you more time for holiday shopping, with the invaluable help of Jeff Gamet’s gift guide; he’s done the legwork for you, no trips to the mall required. And when you’re ready to ponder the InDesign CC 2015.2 update, savvy Steve Werner will fill you in on what’s new. When it’s time to publish your holiday e-newsletter (or personnel manual or anything with a lot of carefully-sized images), you’ll appreciate the creative way that Chad Chelius demonstrates how to size and crop photos with InDesign. We’ve got all that for you, plus another useful GREP of the Month by Bart Van de Wiele, a wrap-up of the InDesign Conference from Erica Gamet, and the Best of the Blogs. Enjoy!

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by Anne-Marie

Concepción

Creating a template for the publications you produce most often is like flossing or going to the gym. You know you should, but who has the time?

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’ve been producing layout files for my company and my clients for a couple decades now, and I can attest that starting with a workable template (as opposed to a blank page, or a copy of the previous issue or version) makes production go incredibly fast. However, I’ve found that, oh, about 98% of my clients don’t have templates to give me, and even if I create one for them, it’s a struggle to get them to use it. Believe me, I understand. People feel comfortable doing what they’ve always done. If you’re not a template user, I think you’ll find these five tips (there’s probably about 80 jammed in there) will help convince you it’s worth a try; and if you do use templates, I’m positive you’ll learn something new that will make them even easier and more useful for production.

If you like what you read here, (or want to see me demo these on video), please take a look at my recently published title on Lynda.com, Designing Templates with InDesign CC.

1. Make a Starter File Instead of a Template I know the name alone—TEMPLATE—is an obstacle for many busy designers. Who has time to create a template for a complicated

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publication from scratch? New editorial is filling up your inbox, the photographer has a folder of images for the feature story, the client wants to see a first proof yesterday, you need to start producing right now. So

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you just open a previous issue, Save As, and wade through old content as you bring in the new, like always. Let’s split the difference: make a “Starter File.” See how friendly that sounds? A Starter File is a copy of your existing publication file, cleaned up to receive new content and optimized to make production fast and accurate. Creating a Starter File for a repeated publication is just a little more work than what you’re doing now, but it will pay off tremendously in the future. Start like this: Grab one of the recent issues you’ve already published, and choose File > Save As. In the Save As dialog box, rename it to something like “WhitePaper_Starter-File” or “Acme Textbook Series – Starter,” choose InDesign Template from the Format menu, and save it in a location outside of that issue’s production folder.

TIP The template format gives the file an INDT extension instead of INDD. You can still edit it while it’s open, but when you close and reopen it, InDesign creates a duplicate of the file called Untitled.indd. This is to prevent you from accidentally overwriting the original template—which is the point of a template, after all. If you want to edit a template or starter file after you’ve closed it, you can either choose the Open Original option from the bottom of the File > Open dialog box, or just Save As your Untitled document with the same name, choosing the InDesign Template format again in the Save As dialog box to give it the INDT extension.

Make Your Starter File Pristine Practice safe setup and ensure that the document you’re using as a source for your

Starter File is free of internal problems (often resulting from multiple Save As’s, version updates, and recovery from crashes in its

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past) before basing actual publications on it. Doing an IDML Roundtrip step early in the game will clear out any file corruption. Just save any changes you’ve made so far, export the file (File > Export), and choose InDesign Markup (IDML) from the Format menu. Now close the document, and open the IDML file you just exported from the File > Open menu. It opens as Untitled.indd. Save this file as an INDT, and continue prepping it for duty as a Starter File. Now, start pruning away the deadwood (see Figure 1, next page). Open the following panels, and from their panel menus, choose Select All Unused, and then delete whatever gets selected: »» Paragraph Styles »» Character Styles »» Object Styles »» Swatches Do that first, before you start deleting pages (with content); otherwise InDesign won’t find the styles you need being used anywhere, and so will include them in the “All Unused” selection. If you’re worried that

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you’ll be deleting something that you may want to use in the future, remember you can always retrieve it from that older file. Now go through the document and look for elements that take a while to format but that you use fairly regularly. These are things that don’t belong on a master page, since they don’t show up on every document page, but which every issue uses at least a few times. Sidebars, image and caption groups, styled tables, and standalone pullquotes are good examples. Check to make sure the styles they use are “clean” (see the second tip, below), and then save out each element as a snippet (File > Export > InDesign Snippet) or drag it to a Library (File > New > Library or CC Library) to reuse in future issues (Figure 2). Do a final mucking out: Delete all the old pages except for a few placeholder starter ones (the first page of a section, for example), and on the pages that are left, delete any objects or content in those objects that you’d delete anyway when

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Figure 1: Clear out unused styles that will just get in your way. From the Paragraph Styles menu, choose Select All Unused, and then click the trash can button at the bottom of the panel. Do the same for your Character Styles, Object Styles, and Swatches.

Figure 2: Dragging single or multiple objects into the CC Libraries panel lets you quickly create a “swipe file” of items to reuse and customize in future publications. To reuse them, just drag and drop any of these items onto the page of your new file. One of the unique features of using a CC Library for this (only available in InDesign CC, of course) is that you can create named libraries, like this one for Top Tips ebooks, and you can share libraries with other InDesign CC users in your production department.

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bringing in new content for the next issue of the publication. Don’t forget to check the pasteboards for dust bunnies, and get rid of those too. This starter file probably contains links to image files that exist who knows where on your hard drive. To keep things organized, select all of them in the Links panel, and either embed them (Links panel menu > Embed Link), which saves the original Guides Be Gone Ruler guides tend to clutter up existing documents, so it’s nice to clear those out from your Starter Files too. A quick way is to press Command+Shift+G or Ctrl+Shift+G, which selects all the ruler guides on the active spread, and then press the Delete key to get rid of them. You have to do this spread by spread, but if you’ve already deleted most of the document pages, it only takes a moment or two.

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images inside the file itself, or copy them all to the new location of the template (Links panel menu > Utilities > Copy Links To). That’s it! Save your changes and close the document. The next time you need to create a new issue or version of the publication, open your Starter-File.indt. You’ll have a fresh, untitled document with just the right styles and pages you need, and a library of already-formatted elements to bring in and customize for that issue.

2. Clean Up Those Styles “Format creep” happens to all of us. We start with the best of intentions, creating paragraph and character styles for all our text, applying them consistently. But in the throes of production, someone adds manual formatting, perhaps bumping up the text size of a caption, or changing the color of a drop cap. And from then on, you find yourself fiddling with the text size of every caption so it matches. Ack!

Take some time to go through your starter file or template to see if it’s a Format Creep victim. With the Type tool, click inside a paragraph, and look at the Paragraph Styles panel. If you see a plus symbol following any of the style names (indicating manual formatting has been applied), and the same is true in most instances where that style has been applied, you’ve got a problem. This style is almost useless, since the purpose and benefit of the style—one-click formatting—is no longer doing its job. We’ll assume you like the look of the manual formatting. While your text cursor is still in the paragraph, choose Redefine Style from the Paragraph Styles panel menu. This adds the local formatting in the active paragraph to the style definition. Voilà! No more plusses, no more need to tediously apply manual formatting to text that already has a paragraph style applied. Do that for each of your paragraph styles. Banish the plusses!

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The Show Local Formatting script in action.

A Script to Show Local Formatting What’s faster than clicking inside text and looking for plusses in the style names? Using a script. I like IndiScript.com’s free cross-platform script, Show Local Formatting, which still works in CC 2015. It puts a red line over characters that have local formatting (meaning they need a character style) and a vertical line to the left of paragraphs with local formatting. As soon as you apply that character style or redefine that paragraph style, the markup disappears. The markup is non-printing, and you can toggle it on and off altogether by double-clicking the script.

Note: If you encounter a plus because your cursor is inside a particular word that’s been formatted differently than the paragraph—say it’s bold or italic—then open the Character Styles panel and create a new character style from it. Once you apply the character style to the text, the paragraph style’s plus symbol will disappear. There is so much more you can do with your styles to streamline your templates— create based-on styles, set up Next styles, organize them in style groups, and create

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nested styles, for example. But simply deleting unused styles (as we did above) and updating your style definitions to use your actual formatting will save you a huge amount of time the next time you produce the publication.

3. Make Master Pages Do More Work Useful templates have at least one master page holding essential page elements common to all (or most) pages, including

margin and column guides, headers and footers, and automatic page numbers using the Current Page Number placeholder (Type > Insert Special Character > Marker). To make your template’s master pages even more useful, consider adding (or in some cases, removing) these elements: »» Add Primary Text Frames (Figure 3) (or change your master page text frames to primary ones) The beauty of primary text frames (introduced in CS6) is that they don’t have

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to be overridden on the document pages when you want to type in them, and if you need to apply a different master page to a document page that already has text in it, the text will seamlessly flow into the new master’s primary text frames. Also, if you have Smart Text Reflow enabled for primary text frames (this is the default setting in Preferences > Type), there’s no need to hold down modifier keys to autoflow your text—InDesign will flow it all in, adding pages as necessary. »» Remove Elements If your master page is full of placeholders that you always have to override on the document pages, like text frames with sample content or FPO images, you’re doing it wrong. The best practice is to only create objects on the master page that will seldom, if ever, need to be overridden and modified on the document page. Instead, whenever possible, use library items or snippets, discussed above, as your placeholders,

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Figure 3: When you’re on a master page, you can tell if a text frame is a primary text frame or not by looking at the page icon under the In Port box, upper left on the frame. If the page icon has an arrow coming out of it (below left), that’s a primary text frame. Otherwise, a master text frame just looks like a page icon (below right). When you create a new document, you can choose to have InDesign add primary text frames by turning on the checkbox (image right). To convert a regular text frame on a master page into a primary text frame (or vice versa), click its page icon with the Selection tool.

bringing them onto the document pages as needed for those types of elements. They can remember their position on the page, too, if you use the Place command in the Library panel. Being strict with which objects you allow on master pages means you will be able to easily apply a

different master to a page with content, or move a left-facing page to a right-facing page, without ending up with extraneous, overlapping elements. »» Put Master Page Items on Layers You can save a fair amount of fiddling if you just add one layer at the top of your

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Layers stack called Folios, and move your folio text frames there. This avoids the common problem of page numbers disappearing behind document page elements.

4. Create Three Object Styles This tip is for those of you who never crack open the Object Styles panel. Why am I saying you should create three of them? Because using a feature (that’s new to you) at least three times will help you get used to it. Also, forcing yourself to add three object styles to your template or starter file will get you looking at your elements to imagine where object styles will become handy. As with paragraph and character styles, the reason to use object

styles is threefold: fast one-click application of a combination of formatting commands, consistent and accurate formatting for particular types of objects, and easy format updating by editing the style, instead of all the objects themselves. Here are some great candidates for object styles: »» Image frames (stroke, shadow, text wrap, auto-fit [Object > Fitting > Frame Fitting Options > Auto Fit]) »» Caption text frames (Figure 4) (paragraph style, text wrap, auto-resize) Figure 4: Include an object style for caption text frames in your template if your publication uses more than a few captions. You can save a lot of production time if you include the correct paragraph style for the text in the frame (top left), set it to ignore any text wrap applied to the image it’s next to (bottom left), and set the frame to automatically expand to contain the caption text (near left).

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»» Photographer credit text frames (ditto) »» Callout lines (stroke color, stroke width, arrows) »» Pull-quote text frames (stroke, rule above/ below, paragraph style, fill color) »» Jump line text frames (paragraph style, auto-resize) »» Repeated anchored objects (type of anchor, offsets) Object styles are also easy to create. Just as with text styles, start by manually formatting an object and selecting it with the Selection tool, or just select an object that’s been formatted manually. Then open the Object Styles panel and create a new style by clicking the New Object Style button on the bottom or choosing the New Object Style command from the Object Styles panel menu. Don’t forget to apply the object style to the source object in your template, and to apply object styles to elements before you add them to your Library or export them as snippets.

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5. Feed and Water Daily— or Monthly

latest version of your publication. One way to update the text styles is to open the template and import the styles (Paragraph Styles panel menu > Load All Text Styles) from the publication into the template. The default behavior is for the incoming style definition (the publication’s) to replace the destination, which is exactly what you want (Figure 5). For example, if you edited the

Do you know why designers abandon the beautiful templates and starter files they created once upon a time? Because they let them die on the vine. You may have created the first issue or three from your template, but soon, that old INDT was out of date. Here’s the reality: when you’re laying out an actual publication, you tend to tweak and iterate and revise. Soon enough, the starter file you created earlier in the year doesn’t have all the goodies the most recent issues carry, like that new sidebar treatment you came up with, the updated style you’re using for pull quotes, the hyphenation tweaks you did for some paragraph styles. Figure 5: When you load a publication’s text styles into your template, you will of course have many “conflicts,” which is InDesign’s way of To keep your starter file saying “matches.” When the incoming style matches the name of an healthy, periodically open it and existing style, InDesign defaults to updating the existing style’s settings to also match. That’s exactly what you want, if you’re trying to keep your update its styles, swatches, and template up to date with the edits you’ve made to the styles. master pages to sync with the

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type size, space above, and hyphenation settings for your Subhead style in the publication, the template’s Subhead style would get updated to match. That’s the method to use if you want to cherry-pick updated and new styles, swatches, master pages, and other settings to copy from your publication to your template. A faster way to update the template, though, is to use the Book panel’s Synchronize feature. This will let you update the template with all of a given INDD file’s styles, swatches, master pages, crossreference formats, variables, and more, with one click. (Well, you do need a little bit of set-up. Then it’s one-click.) Start by creating a new (temporary) “book:” Choose File > New > Book, and name the book file and save it. The new Book panel opens. If your template file has the official INDT template extension, open it and save it as regular INDD file, as INDT files can’t be added to the Book panel. Now,

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add your template’s INDD file and your most recent publication’s INDD file to the Book panel. Make sure the publication (not the template) is the Style Source by clicking in

Figure 6: Use InDesign’s Book feature to quickly update a template with all the edits you’ve made to the styles and master pages in a publication that was based on that template. In the image above, I created an InDesign Book file, “Update Template,” and added two files: an actual book publication called “Alice 2,” and the template I based it on, “Book template.” Since I made changes to the Alice2.indd file’s styles that I like better than the template’s, I set it as the Style Source (the icon to the left of Alice2, above). Now when I Synchronize, the Book template file will get updated to match. When I’m done, I can delete the “Update Template” InDesign book file.

the empty square to the left of its name in the panel (Figure 6). From the Book panel menu, choose Synchronize Options, and review exactly what you want synchronized when you click the Synchronize button (Figure 7, next page). By default, everything but master pages will be synced from the style source to the other document(s) in the Book panel, so turn on the checkbox for Master Pages. (This means that any edits you made to the publication’s masters, or new masters you added, will be copied over to the template’s.) Note that only additions or edits get synced, not deletions. That is, if you had deleted a swatch or master page from the style source document that currently exists in other book documents, and then choose Synchronize, the other documents will still retain those styles and master pages. You could view that as a feature or a bug; it’s up to you.

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A Blueprint for Success Still with me? Good—that means you’ve chosen to read this whole article instead of going to the gym or flossing. So I know you’re motivated. And the good news is that it probably took more time to read this than it would to implement one or more of these tips… so get out there and start making life easier on yourself!

n Anne-Marie Concepción is the co-publisher of InDesign Magazine. She has been designing and developing templates for her client’s InDesign publications for more than a decade, and loves to help InDesign users learn how to create their own.

Figure 7: Be sure to turn on the Master Pages attribute in the Synchronize Options dialog box (from the Book panel menu) if you want to update the template’s master pages with any edits or additions you made to the publication’s master pages.

Feature article design by Pam Sparks

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By Jeff Gamet

2015 Holiday Gift Guide

It’s that time of the year again. Decorations are going up, there’s a chill in the air, and we’re finding excuses to buy ourselves presents under the guise of “it’s work related.” Joking aside, it’s hard to find great gifts for the creative types on your shopping list, so I braved the malls and online stores to go on the hunt for you. What I came back with is a whole sled-load of gift ideas that are sure to put a smile on your face. And they’re all really cool, which will make you this season’s most awesome gift giver. You’re welcome.

with his beautiful Exploded Alphabet print. Matt created exploded designs for several of his favorite typefaces, and each letter is a work of art in and of itself.

Gifts for Your Eyes

Exploded Alphabet Print Matt Stevens, $25 hellomattstevens.com Type is an art, and it’s also an obsession. Matt Stevens makes that abundantly clear

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2015 Holiday Gift Guide

The two-color prints are 18 × 24 inches on 100 lb Cougar bright white stock—just right for Ikea’s Ribba picture frame (model 903.016.21). Matt is signing and stamping each print for a nice personal touch, too. His eye for design makes Exploded Alphabet a perfect accent for your office or home, and while each letter looks fantastic, Matt doesn’t guarantee you can actually build them from his designs.

Modern Arc Desktop Mobile Ekko Workshop, $60 fab.com

Our desks may not be big enough for large pieces of art, so it’s great that the designers at Ekko Workshop in Portland, OR have come up with some awesome designs that look good without taking up too much space. One of my favorites is the Modern Arc Desktop Mobile. It’s made from laser-cut aluminum in colors that’ll look slick most anywhere. The Arc is 8 inches high, 7 inches wide, and 6 inches deep, with teal and gray disks hanging from an arched orange base. It’s balanced just right, so the disks spin without getting too bouncy, plus it’s easy to clean if it gets dirty: just wipe it off with a cloth.

cool prints, which is why I’m so glad I came across Neil Stevens’s work. All of his prints are great, but I’m especially fond of his retro flight tags. They’re beautiful re-creations of the flight tags airlines attached to luggage in the 1960s and 1970s.

Neil Stevens Flight Tag Prints Neil Stevens, £30.00 crayonfireshop.bigcartel.com It doesn’t matter whether it’s at home or the office; seeing blank walls is torture for us creative types. I’m always on the hunt for

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2015 Holiday Gift Guide

Neil re-created flight tags for several major airports, such as New York, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Copenhagen, Dublin, London, and my personal favorite, Reykjavik. The posters are Giclee-printed A3 size, or for £46.00 you can get a 500 × 700mm print. They’re all beautiful, and a wonderful reminder of a time when flight tags could be functional and good looking—unlike today’s functional but oh-so-bland black and white thermal printed tags.

Where’s Wall-E Print Richard Sargent, £12.99 etsy.com The sci-fi universe is filled with memorable robots, as is Richard Sargent’s Where’s Wall-E print. He drew and colored hundreds of robots from TV shows and movies, including the one robot you need to find: Wall-E. You’ll have to spend some serious time looking for Wall-E because he’s mixed in with a massive jumble of robots like R2-D2 and C-3PO, Marvin, K-9, Gort, Bender, Cylons, and more.

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they’re infographics from David McCandless. He’s the author behind The Visual Miscellaneum and Information is Beautiful, and his new book, Knowledge is Beautiful, builds on his already fantastic graphics.

Richard’s print is A1-size, and he signs each one for a nice personal touch. The print quality is great, and it even offers a little bit for the hard-core sci-fi fans to debate…like are Daleks and the Tin Man really robots? My take: Daleks, no; Tin Man, yes. Gifts for Your Mind and Bookshelf

Knowledge Is Beautiful David McCandless, $30 amazon.com Checking out amazing designs can be a great source of inspiration, especially when

The hardback book is packed with amazing graphics detailing information about our world and history, how events are interrelated, politics, science, and more. Knowledge is Beautiful is more than eye candy; it’s an exercise in design, plus it’s loaded with facts, data, and relationships presented in the most beautiful way. The cover price is $30, but you can currently pick it up on Amazon for $21.69.

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2015 Holiday Gift Guide

Steve Jobs: Insanely Great Jessie Hartland, $22.95 amazon.com

Love him or hate him, the life of Steve Jobs is a big topic this year thanks to Aaron Sorkin’s film about Apple’s iconic leader. Turns out a lot of people wanted a dramatic documentary about his life, and not a three-part story inspired by events in his life. If you’re in the former group, how about a really fun graphic novel as a Steve Jobs biography? That’s exactly what Jessie Hartland created in her book Steve Jobs: Insanely Great. The book walks the line

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between showing Steve Jobs as a hero and a tyrant, and even though it’s a hardback comic book, you’ll find lots of details about the man who wanted to leave a dent in the universe. From a graphic design standpoint, the book is just plain fun to look at. Bonus: You’ll get to learn some interesting facts about the man who had a direct impact on the graphic design world. Steve Jobs: Insanely Great lists for $22.95, but Amazon sells it for $14.75.

legal career to create sculptures with bricks people considered to be nothing more than toys, and working in a medium he was told wasn’t really art. He also talks about the inspiration behind his most popular works and the emotional effort that goes into his creative process.

The Art of the Brick: A Life in LEGO Nathan Sawaya, $29.95 amazon.com You may not recognize his name, but there’s a good chance you’ll recognize Nathan Sawaya’s work. He’s considered one of the world’s top artists working with LEGO bricks, and he’s giving us a glimpse into his creative process with his book The Art of the Brick: A Life in LEGO. He talks about the self-doubt he faced after giving up his

Each work of art comes with no more than a couple pages, with Nathan sharing insights into the piece and anecdotes about the build and what was happening in his life. It takes just a few minutes to read about any piece in the book and is great

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2015 Holiday Gift Guide

for jump-starting your own creativity. And if you aren’t in a reading mood, just flip through the pages and marvel at the beautiful photos. List price is $29.92, but Amazon sells the book for $20.12. Designer’s Grab Bag

CC Embossed Rolling Pin Rainbow Rolling Pins, $29.99 etsy.com

ganache)? This handmade wood rolling Show your colors! This cool, 14-mm-square pin has got the mnemonics for InDesign, handmade glass-tile necklace will have your Illustrator, Photoshop, Bridge, After Effects, designer friends smiling knowingly and and more CC applications engraved into it, non-designers (and maybe your parents) not to mention the Acrobat Swoosh. scratching their heads and wondering who It creates repeatable product that’s not “I.D.” is…or “P.R.” or “D.W.” or … only tasty but looks fabulous. Hey, this is Wear it at conferences instead of a name starting to sound like an advertisement for tag, or just to remind yourself, and others, using templates and styles to streamline every day of the important players on your and ensure the quality of your work. But it’s creative team. They don’t all have to be not for your “just desserts;” you can use it on human, you know. If people can date their non-edible media as well, like pottery. Hmm, iOS (like in the movie “Her,”), then InDesign that gives me an idea… can be a necklace. Oh yeah, there are cuff­ links too.

InDesign Glass Necklace Eclectic Penguin, $10.00 etsy.com

Who doesn’t wish for flaky pie crust and cookies that proclaim their creative tendencies with panache (and maybe also

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CC Pillow Set RuVaTo, $77.34 etsy.com When you or the graphic designer in your life need a work break—or maybe this is part of your creative process—you can relax with these comfy sofa pillows. No, you can’t have just one; they are a family (it’s a suite, remember?). They might even serve a role

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2015 Holiday Gift Guide

in your editorial meetings, where actual weapons are not permitted.

The set of five coasters includes %, ?, &, !, and @ laser-engraved on bamboo, plus a bamboo storage case. The coasters look fantastic, and will fit in perfectly at your office or home with your favorite mug on top.

Chalkboard Mug Punctuation Coasters

Firebox, $9.09 firebox.com

Ugmonk, $32 ugmonk.com Everyone needs a place to set their coffee, or beer, or whatever, without leaving stains on their desk. Ugmonk has you covered with their punctuation coasters.

Make the Logo Smaller T-shirt

A little coffee or tea in the morning to get yourself going is pretty normal. Better living through chemistry, they say. Since your coffee mug is probably going to end up on

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your desk, it might as well show off your creative side. That’s just what you can do with the Chalkboard Mug. The Chalkboard Mug is exactly what it sounds like: a mug that’s also a chalkboard. More accurately, it’s a mug with a blackboard coating on the outside, and a normal ceramic glossy coating on the inside so your drinks won’t taste like chalk. It comes with two sticks of chalk to get you going, so you can draw or write whatever you want. When to mood strikes you, wipe it off and draw something new. Just don’t drag your fingernails down your mug.

Typography Shop, $12.99 typographyshop.com Clients may be necessary, but they aren’t always easy to work with. Not your clients, of course. Yours are the best. For all of those other clients, however, you can express your frustration with the “Make the Logo Smaller”

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2015 Holiday Gift Guide

T-shirt from Typography Shop. You can pick one up in black with white type or white with black type. Here’s a fun detail: The shirt type is Neuzeit S, which was designed in 1966 and is based on the Neuzeit Grotesk typeface from 1928.

all sizes aren’t always available. “Make the Logo Smaller” is also available in a hoodie, although it’s often out of stock. Once this run sells out, the T-shirts are jumping up $10, so try to get one before the price increase kicks in.

Smart Notebook for Creative Cloud Moleskine, $32.95 moleskine.com

Computers are great tools for creative minds, but that doesn’t mean you can’t start with paper and pencil to sketch out ideas. Moleskine’s notebooks have been a great choice for sketches and notes for years, and now the company is making it easy to turn your drawings into vector art. The Creative Cloud Connected Notebook looks like a traditional hardcover Moleskine, but each page is really a gateway to Illustrator, Photoshop, and InDesign. The pages have special guide marks that the companion iPhone app sees when it snaps a photo. After capturing a page, the iPhone app converts your drawing into a vector graphic, and then syncs it with your Creative Cloud account. The notebook cover looks sharp with its debossed Creative Cloud logo, plus it has a pocket inside and a red elastic closure band, too.

Men’s sizes are $12.99 and women’s are $9.99, and this design is popular, so

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2015 Holiday Gift Guide

Fun and Games

View-Master VR Mattel, $29.99 view-master.com

View-Master was cool when we were kids because it gave us a 3D-ish snapshot into places we couldn’t visit, let us be part of shows and cartoons we loved, and opened our imaginations. Now we’re grown up, and Mattel has a new version called ViewMaster VR that feels like it’s just for us because it does the virtual reality thing. It works with your iPhone or Android smartphone and View-Master Experience Packs,

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downloadable View-Master apps, and Google Cardboard apps, too. Mattel has Space, Destinations, and Wildlife packs available now, and more are on the way. Even though you can download the Experience Packs, buying the physical versions is better, because they include their own augmented reality features. Just set the Experience Pack disk on a flat surface to see animated menu options and other features through your fancy new goggles. ViewMaster VR isn’t on par with Oculus Rift, but that’s OK, because you don’t have to strap it to your head—and it looks a lot cooler, too.

spades, or clubs, but instead uses printing colors: cyan, magenta, yellow, and black. Card values are opacity percentages where 3, for example, is 30 percent, 7 is 70 percent, and 10 is 100 percent.

CMYK Playing Cards Fancy, $14 fancy.com Playing cards are playing cards—unless you’re buying them for a designer. Then they’d better be creative and cool looking, just like the CMYK playing cards from Fancy. Unlike regular playing cards, the CMYK deck doesn’t note suits with hearts, diamonds,

It’s easy to tell each card apart even when the deck is shuffled, plus the colors and opacities in a mixed hand look pretty awesome. This deck won’t make you better at blackjack or poker, but you will look cooler while playing.

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2015 Holiday Gift Guide

1000 COLOURS Puzzle 3rd Edition Clemens Habicht, $70 AUD puzzle.lamingtondrive.com

The cool thing about Clemens’ puzzle is that we’re putting the pieces together based on our understanding of the color spectrum. Every part locks in place to lead you to the next shade, and it’s a great exercise in recognizing subtle color gradients. His puzzle is relaxing, but it’s also a cool visual training tool.

LEGO Mac Classic

Jigsaw puzzle fans are in for an interesting twist with Clemens Habicht’s 1000 COLOURS design. He created a puzzle that shows the CMYK color spectrum where each piece is a unique color. Instead of re-creating a photograph or other image that relies on finding matching bits cut across multiple pieces, you’re building a graphic that we all know and recognize without the help of reference images.

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Chris McVey, $78.50 shop.chrismcveigh.com The Mac, along with PageMaker and PostScript, jump-started the digital design revolution and changed the creative world forever. LEGO bricks have had a huge impact on our imaginations and creativity, too, so it makes sense that eventually they’d cross paths. LEGO designer Chris McVey is well known for his creative brick creations, one of which is his computer-for-the-restof-us in LEGO form.

Chris’s 332-brick 128K Mac is a faithful reproduction—albeit smaller than the real thing—in a kit you can build yourself. My First Computer: Byte Edition v3.0 includes a classic Mac with keyboard and mouse, a display that says “hello,” and a case you can open to see the circuit board and CRT inside, no special tools required. It’s an easy build, and looks cool on your desk or bookshelf.

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2015 Holiday Gift Guide

Whisky Advent Calendar Master of Malt, $188.13 masterofmalt.com I’m sometimes slow on the uptake, so it wasn’t until last year I learned about counting down the Christmas holiday with advent calendars. It’s a good thing, because otherwise I might have missed out on discovering this year’s Whisky Advent Calendar from Master of Malt. To be clear: An advent calendar. With a different Whisky. Every day. For a month.

The calendar includes 24 whisky samples, so that’s a shot a day. It’s an amazing collection of quality whiskies (no Wild Turkey here) from some of the best distilleries. You

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get to try out a 50-year old Scotch that’s very rare, winners from the 2014 World Whisky Awards, an award-winning Japanese whisky, and more. I could tell you more, but that would take the surprise out of opening a new sample each day. Get Your Tech On

Sphero BB-8 Sphero, $149.99 sphero.com Sometimes creativity means taking a break from your computer and finding a fun diversion in the office, and one of the coolest diversions I’ve found is the Sphero BB-8 remote control robot. BB-8, for the two of you who haven’t been buried in the onslaught of “Star Wars: The Force Awakens” advertising, is the cute ball-shaped droid that accompanies Rey, Finn, and Poe on their adventures as they try to stop the First Order from taking over the galaxy.

Just like BB-8 in the movie, Sphero’s softball-size version zips around while chirping and beeping—and its little dome head stays on top of its body while it rolls around. You’ll need the companion BB-8 app for the iPhone or Android smartphones to control your little droid. You can drive your droid around or set it loose to explore on its own. When BB-8’s battery runs low, just set it back in the included USB charging base. Fair warning: cats may be intrigued by BB-8, but they are not amused.

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2015 Holiday Gift Guide

Pantone 8GB Flash Drive Pantone, $21.99 pantone.com

(Blue). They’re small enough to fit in your pocket without showing, and they have a small chain loop to help keep them from getting lost. They look like little Pantone chips, too, which is pretty slick.

Guide Griffin, $39.99 griffintechnology.com

USB flash drives still come in handy when we need to move files but don’t have a good Internet connection. You can use the same old boring yet functional drives everyone else has, or you can rock your designer style with Pantone’s colored thumb drives. They’re available in 4GB and 8GB sizes, and Pantone says 16GB versions will be available at some point, too. Pantone’s USB sticks are available in five colors: 18-1438 (Marsala), 18-3224 (Radiant Orchid), 213 C (Pink), Violet C, and 285 C

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system. The Guides are a set of heavy no-slip metal slabs with magnetic U-shaped loops that keep your cables in place and safe from slipping away when they aren’t attached to your computer. The kit includes three metal bases and three magnetic anchors you can use to route cables and keep them on your desk instead of under it. Sure, other companies make cable guides, but Griffin’s look great on your desk no matter what computer you’re using.

Pulse 2 Bluetooth Speaker

Losing a video or sync cable behind your desk is the worst. Fishing them out from their dark hiding places is a total pain, and crawling out from underneath a desk always makes people talk, so it’s great that Griffin invented its Guide cable-management

JBL, $199.95 jbl.com Silence is important for concentrating on some design projects, but others need some tunes to keep you motivated. JBL’s Pulse 2 helps by letting you listen to your music while giving you a lightshow, too. It’s a Bluetooth speaker that’s a little taller than a soda can with a wall of color-changing LED lights. You can customize its light show, and

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2015 Holiday Gift Guide

it also includes a sensor so you can sample colors and then see them dance to life on your speaker.

The Pulse 2 is splash-proof, sports a 10-hour rechargeable battery, includes a built-in noise cancelling microphone so you can answer calls without picking up your phone, and you can chain multiple speakers together for bigger sound. It also has an audio in port so you can connect devices that don’t support Bluetooth, like iPods.

n Jeff Gamet is The Mac Observer’s Managing Editor and the author of The Designer’s Guide to Mac OS X. You can find him on several podcasts including Apple Context Machine and The iOS Show, and speaking at events such as Macworld/iWorld.

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By Steve Werner

What’s New in InDesign CC 2015.2

The November 2015 release brings updates to Glyphs, Publish Online, CC Libraries, and more Adobe demonstrated the third version of Adobe InDesign CC 2015 (dubbed 2015.2) at Adobe MAX in October, and the updated features span from “welcome” to “revolutionary”! Along with the requisite handful of bug fixes and a few small features, the update appears to focus on four areas: finding and selecting special typographic glyphs, Publish Online, CC Libraries, and a new Windows touch-based workspace.

Finding & Selecting Glyphs InDesign users have been complaining that Adobe hasn’t updated its OpenType features for many years. Well, let the changes begin! In this new release, it’s now easier to find and select glyphs, especially from OpenType

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fonts, which may contain thousands of them. The InDesign team has added three new features. Better searching If you know the font that a particular glyph is in, you can use a new feature in the Glyphs panel (Window > Type & Tables > Glyphs): the new Glyph Search field, which appears below the Recently Used display. You can search glyphs by their name, glyph ID/character ID, or Unicode value. For example, to find the Greek letter psi, you can just type “psi” into the field. You can even use a search based on any combination of glyph number and name. (Read this article to see where to find the glyphs you need.)

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Feature: What’s New in InDesign CC 2015.2

Contextual menu for Alternate for Selection OpenType fonts may have many glyphs for the same character—including swashes, small caps, and so on. Previously, you could look for and view them in the Glyphs panel using the Show menu. Now it’s far easier to see them in context as you’re entering text. As soon as you select a character that has alternates available for it, a contextual menu appears showing up to five of the available alternates (Figure 1). If more than five are available, click the arrow at the right end of the menu to view all of the alternate glyphs. If you select a word, the contextual menu is

displayed for the first character in the word for which alternate glyphs are available. There is also a new preference to control this setting in the Advanced Type preferences.

Figure 1: A contextual alternate menu is available for fonts that contain alternate versions of a glyph.

Figure 2: It’s now much easier to create fractions (from fonts that support them) with a contextual menu.

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Contextual menu for fractions In the past, if you have an OpenType font that supports built fractions, you’ve been able to apply the fraction feature to a pair of numbers separated by a slash by choosing OpenType > Fractions from the Character or Control panel menu. Now, when you select the same numbers, you will see a contextual menu for applying the OpenType fraction (Figure 2). To return the fraction to the original numbers, use the contextual menu to

select that option. There is a new preference to control this setting in Advanced Type preferences. (Note that this menu will apply only to fonts that have built-in fraction support.)

Publish Online Enhancements The Publish Online feature is a technology preview that provides a way of publishing your InDesign documents online (as HTML web pages) by storing them on Adobe servers. They can be viewed with a modern web browser on computers, tablets, or smartphones, include built-in navigation, and support many of the interactive features you can create in InDesign, including buttons, animation, slideshows, video, and audio. Unlike some other export formats from InDesign, this technology doesn’t require special file preparation: All you have to do is click the Publish Online button that’s prominently placed on the Application Bar.

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Feature: What’s New in InDesign CC 2015.2

InDesign’s August update (2015.1) made the feature available for all versions of InDesign (the first release was for English versions only). It added support for multiple page spreads and multiple page sizes. Problems with hyperlinks in text were fixed, and there were improvements in support for mobile devices. For example, the tablet view now includes an easy-to-use scrollable thumbnail view. Now, in this newest release (2015.2), Publish Online offers these new features: Update existing documents If you have previously published a document, you now have the option to upload an updated version. You’ll see this choice in the Publish Online Options dialog box (Figure 3). When you click Update Existing Document, you’ll see a list of previously published documents so you can select one. You can also edit the title, description, or advanced options. When you click OK,

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bottom of the screen. You can toggle on page thumbnails, or zoom in and zoom out like you can in a PDF document. You can toggle into and out of Full Screen. A Share button gives you the same options shown in Figure 4. Volume can be turned off to shut off the sound, and there is a chance to report abuse. There are also Embed and PDF Download buttons, described below.

Figure 3: The new option to update an existing document in the Publish Online Options dialog box.

InDesign uploads the document to replace the previous version. Viewing/Sharing options When you preview in a web browser or a mobile device, you are given controls to move from page to page. You are also given viewing and sharing options at the

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

Figure 4: New options for creating an embed code and downloading a PDF when you view a publication. The controls at the bottom of the screen give you these choices: (A) Toggle Thumbnails; (B) Zoom In; (C) Zoom Out; (D) Full Screen; (E) Share; (F) Embed; (G) Download PDF; and (H) Click to choose Volume – Turn Off or Report Abuse.

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Feature: What’s New in InDesign CC 2015.2

Embed options Clicking the Embed button at the bottom of the preview opens the Embed on Your Site window. This provides an embeddable iframe code that can be included in a website (Figure 5). Just copy and paste into your web-page code. There are options for the size of the embed link and the start page. Click the embedded link to view the document full screen, beginning at the selected page, and then click from page to page.

Figure 5: You can create embeddable iframe code to be included in a website.

PDF download Previously, you had to view the publication online, which meant you had to have an internet connection. You also couldn’t

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search for text or copy it. In the new release, when you upload the document, in the Publish Online Options dialog box you can enable the “Allow viewers to download the document as a PDF (Print)” option (Figure 6). If you have done so, your viewers will see a Download PDF button. This will generate a PDF (Print) document in your web browser. The PDF is static, but having it will allow you to view the document pages, to copy or search text, or to print the document, all without an active internet connection. Analytics Analytics about all published documents (and soon, about individual documents) are now available in a separate tab in the Web Dashboard (File > Web Dashboard). Transparency effects Previous versions had some limitations on how transparent effects could be included. The newest version allows more transparency interactions, but caution is still advised.

Figure 6: The new option to allow users to download a document as a PDF in the Publish Online Options dialog box.

You may see unexpected results when using overlapping transparency effects with text frames, groups, buttons, animation objects, or multistate objects.

CC Library Improvements CC Libraries were introduced in the February 2015 release of InDesign CC 2014.2. They provide a way to share a variety of assets,

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Feature: What’s New in InDesign CC 2015.2

including graphics, paragraph and character styles, and swatches between InDesign CC, Illustrator CC, and Photoshop CC, and with Adobe mobile apps like Adobe Capture CC or Adobe Comp CC. They also provide you access to any assets you’d like to use between computers using the same Adobe ID. Furthermore, you can collaborate with other Creative Cloud members and share a library so they can use it. We discussed the introduction of CC Libraries in “What’s New in InDesign CC 2014.2 (February 2015 Release), InDesign Magazine #71, March 2015. CC 2015 in June brought paragraph and character style support and new ways to add colors to CC Libraries. It also added the ability to place a linked graphic from a CC library. This lets you create links to the library files you create. Keith Gilbert described these features in “The InDesign CC 2015 release,” InDesign Magazine #75, July 2015. But there were still many things

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missing, and this release fulfills many feature requests. Adding group members to a CC Library One of the biggest complaints in previous versions of CC Libraries was that adding anything to a library was a tedious process. You could only add one item at a time. Beginning with this release, you can select any group, and add its members to a library (Figure 7). This includes a color group in the Swatches panel or a style group in the Paragraph Styles or Character Styles panel. Once a group is selected, the Add Selected Swatch or Add Selected Style to My Current CC Library button will be enabled. Clicking it adds the swatches or styles to the library. (Note there are no groups yet in a library; they appear as individual items. This is probably because not all the applications which will use the items understand grouping.) In the Swatches panel, the following swatches are supported: Process (CMYK,

Figure 7: You can now add color groups and style groups to CC Libraries with one click.

RGB, Lab), Spot (CMYK, RGB, Lab), and color systems like PANTONE, ANPA, and so on. Adding a color theme or individual colors to swatches Previously, if you had a color theme you created (see the Adding Color Themes section), you had to apply color to a page object, and the color would be automatically added to the Swatches panel. Now you can add either

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Feature: What’s New in InDesign CC 2015.2

a color theme or an individual color from a CC Library to the Swatches panel without the extra step. In the CC Libraries panel, select one of your libraries, and right-click on a color theme. In the contextual menu, you can choose Add Theme to Swatches. The color theme will appear as a color group containing the same swatches. Or, click on the color theme to enlarge the swatch display in the library. Then, right-click on the swatch you want to add, and choose Add to Swatches. Only that swatch will be added to your Swatches panel. Adding multiple assets from a CC Library Until the current update, only individual colors, styles, or graphics could be added to your InDesign panels or to your page from a CC Library. Now you can multiple-select colors, character styles, paragraph styles, and graphics in a CC Library. Right-click the selection to

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see the options available: Selecting multiple colors adds those colors to the Swatches panel (Figure 8). Selecting multiple paragraph or character styles adds those styles to the appropriate panel. When you select multiple graphics in a CC Library, what happens depends on whether the graphic is created in InDesign or in another application, like Illustrator or Photoshop. For Illustrator or Photoshop graphics, Place Linked and Place Copy options are available. For InDesign graphics, only Place Copy is available in the contextual menu. Any graphics will be added to the InDesign place gun. Searching CC Libraries Another frequent complaint in previous versions of InDesign was that there was no easy way to find your assets. As you start developing multiple libraries for different projects, being able to search them becomes essential.

Figure 8: You can multiple-select colors, styles, and graphics, and move them to an InDesign document.

Now there is a search field at the top of the CC Libraries panel. You can choose between Current Library (the default), All Libraries, and Adobe Stock (Figure 9, next page). Select one of the search locations, and enter the asset name you’re looking for. All assets from that search location will be

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Feature: What’s New in InDesign CC 2015.2

listed, and a tooltip will provide more information about the found assets.

Adding Color Themes Adobe introduced the concept of a color theme when it created a website called Kuler a few years ago. Themes are groups of exactly five colors which originally could only be created on the Kuler.com website. They can be designed, saved, and shared by lovers of color, and other users can “favorite,” edit, and use them in their own artwork. Or, you can just create your own set of color themes. In the fall of 2014, the website was rebranded as Adobe Color, and it can be found at color.adobe.com. One of the first mobile apps Adobe introduced was called the Kuler app. It runs on an iPhone or iPad, and can use the camera on your device to create a color theme by grabbing colors from the environment or from your camera roll. This app was also rebranded, and is now called Adobe Capture CC. Rufus Deuchler described both the

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Figure 9 : When you start getting a lot of libraries, you can now use the new search field to find an asset.

website and the app as they worked at the time in his article, “Color Me Beautiful” in issue #60, April 2014. InDesign contributed to the color theme bandwagon in its October 2014 release. A new Color Theme tool was added that lets you select five colors from an image or a selected area of an InDesign page. A floating panel then appears and displays the colors, and a menu shows variations called color moods. These sampled colors (or a single color) can be added to the Swatches panel or to a CC library (in the current update) with buttons on the floating panel (Figure 10).

In the same release, InDesign transformed a somewhat limited Kuler panel into a new Adobe Color Theme panel (Window > Color > Adobe Color Themes). It gives you three tabs to work with color themes. You can use the Create tab to create and edit color themes using a similar interface to the Adobe Color website. You can save color themes to the Swatches panel and to the website. You can use the Explore tab to view themes created by yourself and others on the website. You can use the My Themes tab to view themes you’ve saved. When the Kuler/Adobe Color website was developed, CC libraries didn’t exist. Now CC libraries are integrated in both Adobe’s desktop and mobile apps. So the November

Figure 10: After creating a color theme with InDesign’s Color Theme tool, you can add it to your swatches or to a CC library.

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Feature: What’s New in InDesign CC 2015.2

2015 release also brings changes both to the Adobe Color Theme panel and to the website. On the Adobe Color Theme panel, the Create tab now works the same as before when creating and editing colors, but you

can now name and add the theme you mix directly to a CC library. The Explore tab gives you options to view themes you’ve favorited or published, but also explore themes from others. The My Theme tab shows you saved themes organized by library. (If you’ve saved themes before, you’ll be prompted to assign them to CC libraries.) You can sort them in a number of ways, and you can add them to Swatches, edit them, or view them online at the website (Figure 11). The Adobe CC website (Figure 12) follows a similar organization as the Adobe Color Theme panel, and any new themes you create online are named and added to your CC libraries.

Figure 11: The Adobe Color Theme panel is now designed to work with CC libraries.

Figure 12: The Adobe Color website has adapted again to support organizing color themes by CC library.

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Windows Touch Workspace Added If you’ve seen the “touch workspace” for Adobe Illustrator on a touch-enabled laptop or tablet (such as the Surface Pro), you’ve probably wondered when InDesign will go down that same path. The answer is now. The Windows version of InDesign CC 2015.2 comes with a new Touch Workspace that is supported on all Microsoft Windows touch-enabled devices, including tablets and touch-enabled desktop or laptop computers. Note that the touch workspace isn’t designed to replace the fully-functioning normal workspaces. Rather, it is targeted for creating basic layout comps in much the same way that Adobe Comp CC does on an Apple iPad. (See “InStep: Adobe Comp CC” by Conrad Chavez, InDesign Magazine #77, September 2015). The new workspace can be invoked by: »» Launching InDesign on a touchenabled device.

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Feature: What’s New in InDesign CC 2015.2

»» Clicking the Touch icon to the right of the Publish Online button on the Application Bar. »» Unplugging your keyboard on a touch-enabled device. Plugging in the keyboard switches out of the workspace (this behavior can be switched off in Preferences). The Touch workspace includes a few InDesign tools and panels to help you build comps, but they are laid out in a manner that is more suitable for using with a finger or stylus. Plus, there is a new gesture-based drawing tool, so you can quickly sketch out shapes that are converted to regular objects.

Accessibility Enhancement It is a requirement for an exported PDF file that it have a Title defined in the PDF metadata for accessibility support. The Title needs to be displayed instead of the filename. The document title is added to an

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InDesign document in File > File Info on the Basic tab. Beginning in this release, in the Export Adobe PDF dialog box, the Viewing section of the General panel includes a Display Title option to choose between File Name and Document Title. A tooltip previews the current document title or prompts you where to change it. A similar setting is found in the Export to Interactive PDF dialog box.

Start Screen The Welcome Screen introduced in InDesign CC 2014.2 has now been replaced by a Start Screen. It’s completely rebuilt to load faster. It also changes the behavior of Open File (Command/Ctrl+O). For those of us who don’t need such a screen, the good news is that it can be turned off in Preferences > General. Deselect “Show ‘Start’ Workspace When No Documents Are Open” and “Show ‘Recent Files’ Workspace When Opening a File.”

Small Stuff There are a some small enhancements also added to this release: »» The default for the recent number of documents in File Handling preferences has been increased to 20. »» There are new page sizes when creating a document in the New Document dialog box. For Web intent, there is a new 1366 × 768 pixel dimension. For Digital Publishing intent, the devices listed are iPhone 4, iPhone 5, iPhone 6, iPhone 6 Plus, iPad, iPad Retina, Android (1280 × 800), Surface Pro (1 and 2), Surface Pro 3, and Kindle Fire/Nook. »» People who use InDesign’s Eyedropper tool will be happy to know that it can be chosen to take priority in the Tools panel (shortcut: “I”). The Color Theme tool still has default priority, and has its own shortcut, Shift+I.

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Feature: What’s New in InDesign CC 2015.2

More Manageable Those of us who have worked with InDesign before the Creative Cloud would have to wait, sometimes as long as two years, to see new features in the application. When they came, there would be a huge number to learn, and even more so if you used other Adobe Creative Suite applications, because all the releases came at the same time. It would be like being at a Thanksgiving dinner when there are too many dishes to eat! With the Creative Cloud, application updates now come several times in a year. With this update, we see just a few terrific new features. This is probably easier for most people to handle. Enjoy learning and digesting them, and add them to your workflow if they’re appropriate for you.

n Steve Werner is a longtime writer for InDesign Magazine and InDesignSecrets, and presents training and consulting in the San Francisco Bay Area.

where creatives go to know INDESIGN MAGAZINE  80

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By Chad Chelius

InStep: Optimizing Photos for the Web in InDesign

InDesign may seem like an unlikely tool to optimize images for the web, but in some cases, it’s ideal. Adobe has provided us with numerous tools for optimizing images for the web. Both Photoshop and Illustrator have a Save For Web command, and the Asset Generator in Photoshop gives designers amazing power for generating web assets from existing artwork. How many more ways do we need to generate web assets, right? I was recently consulting with a client who produces a PDF newsletter every month with InDesign. As part of her role at her company, she needs to produce HTML from the newsletter that she then supplies to the web team to update the website with the content of that newsletter. We had

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already configured InDesign to generate the HTML in a way that could easily be used to update the website, including the proper tags and even classes that made the process very fluid for all parties involved. The newsletter that she creates each month contains a lot of headshots of various people in each issue. The design of the website requires that all of these headshots be supplied at a size of 100 × 125 px. This, by the way, is not the dimensions—or the aspect ratio, for that matter—of the headshots as they appear in the newsletter. Although she was happy with the overall process, she explained to me that the time

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InStep: Optimizing Photos in InDesign

required to produce the headshot images for the web team each month was considerable, and she wished that there was a better way. Her current workflow involved opening each image in Photoshop, cropping the images to the desired size, and saving them as JPEG files. In looking for a better solution, I started thinking about how I could produce an action in Photoshop, or possibly make use of the image processor to make the task easier. The problem is that cropping can be subjective, and in order to crop each headshot in the same way, you would need the ability to detect the bounds of a person’s face and then crop outward from there—a feature that doesn’t exist in Photoshop at this time.

When it comes to cropping, one size does not fit all.

Manually cropping in Photoshop gives you a lot of control, but can be challenging when you’re trying to crop each photo in the same way. After thinking a little while longer, I realized that InDesign actually has all the tools to get the job done in a much faster and more intuitive way. Below I’ve outlined the steps that I came up with to create web-ready images to supply to the web team.

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InStep: Optimizing Photos in InDesign

1. Create an InDesign template

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One of the challenges we were facing was that the images as they appeared in the newsletter were not the size or aspect ratio that were needed by the web team. So I created an InDesign template which consisted of a document with several empty graphic frames at the desired dimension of 100 Ă— 125 pixels (your template could contain graphic frames of any size that you wish). I also defined frame-fitting options for the frames on the template that centered the image in the frame automatically. You could also define how you want the photos to fit, but in this situation we chose not to, because the photos varied considerably from one to the other and always needed to be custom cropped. I then saved the file as an InDesign Template file (.indt) so that each month the user can create a new untitled document based on that template and place the required photos into each graphic frame. One of the benefits of this solution is that you can see all of the headshots next to one another at the same time, allowing you to crop each one in a similar fashion.

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2. Place images and crop as needed

3. Name your images

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With the template created, open it to create an untitled copy of the template to use for the current issue. Place each headshot into a graphic frame, and crop as desired. Again, the benefit here is that the graphic frame defines the size of the final image, and you can crop each image in a similar fashion because you can see each photo next to one another.

When we generate the final images, InDesign will use the name of the graphic file as the name for the exported images. If name is of no concern in your workflow, skip to step 4. If naming is important, however, you’ll want to make sure to name your files appropriately so that the final files have the desired name applied. If you’re realizing this after you’ve already placed the images, you can use a tool such as tomaxxiLINKrename to rename the files from within InDesign. As of this writing, the tomaxxi website was unavailable, but hopefully it will be back up and running shortly! Ideally, you’ll want to build this into your workflow so you can avoid this step.

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4. Export the images

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With the template populated, you’re now ready to export the images. Choose File > Export, choose HTML from the Format drop-down menu, and click OK. This will display the HTML Export Options dialog box. InDesign is going to generate an HTML page of all of our images. Now of course that’s not really our goal, but the side benefit of generating the HTML file is that all of the images will also be rendered based on the settings that we choose. It would be quite possible to create an HTML page of all of our headshots, should we need to do so at a later date. The area of this dialog box that we’re concerned with is the Images section, located along the left side. This is where we define the properties of the images that we want to generate. In the Copy Images drop-down menu, choose Optimized. This will create the optimized version of your images. Choose the resolution of the images that will be generated in the Resolution drop-down menu. We chose 72 ppi. Choose Fixed from the Image Size drop-down menu, and then choose the destination format for your images in the Image Conversion drop-down menu. Your choices are GIF, JPEG, and PNG. Finally, if you choose JPEG from the Image Conversion drop-down menu, the JPEG Options area at the bottom of the dialog box will be available, where you can choose the image quality as well as the format method for the JPEG images. We also enabled the Ignore Object Export Settings

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option as a precaution, but if you’ve created your template from scratch, there should be no concern for any Object Export Options applied to any of the images. Click OK, and InDesign will generate an HTML file and possibly a CSS file, as well as an Image folder that will be located in the web-resources folder that was generated during export.

5. Evaluate the images

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When you open the Image folder, you should see every image that was placed in the InDesign layout, and the dimensions of each image should be exactly the same as the graphic frame size from the InDesign document. All of the other files that were generated from the HTML export process, including the HTML file and the CSS folder, can be deleted. The images are fully processed and ready to be passed on to the web team.

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6. Enjoy the side benefit

This technique utilizes the HTML export feature, which is an often overlooked feature in InDesign. You can take this process a step further to actually generate HTML out of InDesign in various ways, but processing a page full of images is one side benefit to the HTML export feature that has made one client’s workflow a lot faster and so much easier. Hopefully you can adapt this technique to your workflow as well!

n Chad Chelius is an Adobe Certified Instructor, author, and consultant in the Philly area and is the Managing Editor of incopysecrets.com. He has authored several titles for lynda.com including his most recent titles, Creating Accessible PDFs with Acrobat DC and Advanced Accessible PDFs. You can follow him on twitter @chadchelius and you can reach him at chad@cheliusgraphicservices.com.

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By Erica Gamet

The InDesign Conference Wraps a Second Successful Summit

InDesign experts and users meet and greet in Denver

Another successful InDesign Conference— held in Denver, Colorado and co-located with the Photoshop Conference for Designers this year—has come to a close. The 250+ attendees left the event with brains full of InDesign tips, production techniques, and design wizardry; hearts brimming with the warmth of community; and satisfied stomachs. The Colorado weather threatened to put a damper on the event with a so-called blizzard, but this tribe of artistic folks was determined to engage in all things InDesign despite a bit of meteorological menace. On November 16th and 17th, the Marriott City Center conference rooms

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filled with many familiar faces and even more newcomers to the Creative Publishing Network family of events. Everyone was there to learn, share, and be inspired while basking in the community surrounding our favorite page design and layout software. And, to make sure no one missed a thing, breakfast and lunch were provided…and what a spread for each of those meals! Day One started out with a breakfast session sponsored by movemen’s MathTools. Ferdinand Schwörer demoed the equation editor for InDesign and gave everyone a sneak peak of the upcoming version, MathTools V3. With already full bellies, the attendees were then treated to a dessert

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The InDesign Conference 2015

Adobe sage Russell Viers, and tables guru Diane Burns. More food, and more in-depth sessions covering interactive PDFs, GREP, MS Word, and animation from Mike Rankin, Erica Gamet, Anne-Marie Concepción, and Keith Gilbert rounded out the conference portion of Day One. But, as is typical of CPN events,

After six PePcons and two InDesign Conferences, hosts David Blatner and Anne-Marie Concepción really know how to run a show for geeks.

spread of InDesign treats from Adobe’s Senior Director of Product Management for the design products Michael Ninness, typophile extraordinaire Nigel French,

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Diane Burns offered her best table tips and techniques.

Attendees got to know each other quickly during the bingo ice-breaker game.

five o’clock meant things were just getting started, as the attendees filled the main reception area to partake in a networking reception. Not to be confused with humdrum mixers with everyone blithely exchanging business cards, this event kicks off with a bingo ice-breaker game. As people tried to fill up their bingo card spaces labeled, “Someone who crossed an ocean to get here,” “Someone who has used GitHub,” or “Someone who is a vegetarian,” conversations were started and connections were made. I overheard someone say that

was her favorite part because it forced her to talk to people and that led to having new friends to hang out with the rest of the conference. The cherry on top of the Day One sundae was the InDesign/Photoshop Ignite session. This fast-paced series of talks gave attendees a chance to do the talking for a change. Based on Ignite events held all over the world, topics at the conference ranged from photography to table styles. Prizes are given to the brave few who take the Ignite challenge and it’s a regular favorite

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The InDesign Conference 2015

of other CPN events, such as PePcon. It was a most welcome addition to the InDesign Conference this year and a great way to wind down from the first day of conference programming. Day Two kicked off with another sponsored breakfast, this time led by PixelSquid, a collection of design-ready “spinnable” objects for use in Photoshop. The speakers from Day One were joined by InDesign masters David Blatner, Chad Chelius, and Chris Converse as multiple concurrent sessions delivering even more A sampling of slides from the Ignite presentations

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InDesign goodness were available for attendees to choose from. Long documents, troubleshooting, add-ons, fonts, PDFs, typography, and digital publishing secrets were laid out in a veritable InDesign buffet. And speaking of (metaphorical) food, not only did attendees dine on another wonderful lunch spread, but had a generous helping of the Adobe Dev Team during the lunchtime panel. Attendees were able to interact with and ask questions of the people that are responsible for the products that we use every day. The dev team was there to not only explain their vision for the

future of InDesign (and Photoshop), but also to hear what features attendees have on their wishlist for future versions. The Adobe Dev Team fielded questions and feature requests from the lunchtime audience.

Day Two wrapped up the “official” end of the main conference with “Three Minutes Max.” This fun session pitted eight of the speakers against each other as each showed a tip meant to wow the attendees. With a time limit of only three minutes, each speaker was playing for an individual attendee. Tips were then voted on by the attendees by way of applause, with the victorious speaker’s attendee winning an

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The InDesign Conference 2015

in-depth sessions delved deeper into their subject matter than the shorter sessions could possibly go. Next year, the InDesign Conference and Photoshop Conference will be held separately, which can only mean more of each topic to tuck into. The InDesign Conference will be held November 7–9 Nigel French schooled the crowd on the finer points of working with type.

Lunchtime is not downtime at The InDesign Conference; it’s an opportunity to connect with like-minded folks who do the kind of work you do.

As always, the Meet the Speaker table was a popular destination for folks seeking advice and answers to their InDesign questions.

annual subscription to the Creative Cloud. One speaker went far beyond the allotted time limit (cough, cough, Michael Ninness), and ended up winning. Being the great guy Mr. Ninness is, he made sure the runner-up also received a subscription. Day Three featured optional add-on fullday tutorials covering EPUB, Kindle, and tablet publishing apps led by Anne-Marie Concepción, Keith Gilbert, Kevin Callahan, and Chad Chelius. For those who hadn’t had their fill at the main conference, these

in Washington DC and the Photoshop Conference for Designers will be July 11–13 in Minneapolis. If you didn’t attend this year, ask yourself if you aren’t starving for more InDesign sustenance, then make a plan to curb that hunger in 2016. Like eating Chinese food, you’ll come away feel satiated in the moment, and then ready for more immediately afterwards. And Creative Publishing Network will be pleased to be your server for all the courses you can possibly take in. Bon Appétit!

n

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Erica Gamet is a speaker, writer, and trainer, focusing on Adobe InDesign and Illustrator, Apple Keynote and iBooks Author, and other production-related topics. With over 25 years experience in the graphics industry, she is a regular contributor to CreativePro.com. After living as a nomad, she recently put down roots in El Paso, Texas, where she hikes and bikes every chance she gets.

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By Jeff Witchel

Calendar Magic!

Create a Year’s Worth of Calendar in Minutes

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As we approach the end of the year, some of you will be faced with the huge task of designing a calendar for 2016. At the end of last summer, I designed a calendar for a large school district just outside of New York City. And believe me, it was not easy. Between setting up a 12-month calendar as tables and then manually adding national holidays, a variety of religious holidays, plus school events into each individual date cell, the layout became a massive project with lots of workarounds to make it happen. I wish I had known about Calendar Wizard, a free script by Scott Selberg (sourceforge.net). While this script is free

to download and use, I highly recommend making a donation, because Scott’s script does an amazing amount of work in no time, and the results are nothing short of magical.

Install the Magic Installing Calendar Wizard is easy, even if you’ve never installed a script before. 1. In InDesign, open the Scripts panel (Window > Utilities > Scripts). 2. Click on the User folder, and from the panel menu, choose Reveal in Finder (or Reveal in Explorer on Windows) (Figure 1, next page). 3. Drag your downloaded Calendar Wizard script to the folder.

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Feature: Making Calendars

Figure 1: To install your downloaded script, look under the Options menu of the Scripts panel, and choose Reveal in Finder (Explorer). Then drag the Calendar Wizard folder to the revealed Scripts Panel folder.

What Makes this Wizard so Powerful? To generate your calendar, the Calendar Wizard creates tables, with the various options you choose, stacked perfectly on top of each other in separate layers. This allows you to lock the various parts of the calendar in the Layers panel to make it easier to work. The script also applies separate paragraph and cell styles to the different

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Figure 2: With wide variety of options available in Calendar Wizard, you can generate the exact calendar you want.

parts of the calendar. So if you want your “days of the week” to be Myriad Pro Bold at 18 points, and the cells filled with PMS 301 blue, you can simply redefine the styles after the calendar is created.

Put Your Wands Away To get started, simply double-click the Calendar Wizard script to open its options dialog box (Figure 2). (If you don’t have a document opened, the script will

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Feature: Making Calendars

automatically create a new document.) Immediately you’ll begin to see why this is such a powerful script. There are lots and lots of options to customize your calendar to include exactly what you want, simply by choosing options from pop-up menus and via checkboxes. Many of the options in the Calendar Wizard options dialog box are selfexplanatory. Some are not. I’ll just go though the various sections one at a time. Whatever options you choose, I highly recommend creating your calendar in a separate document and then pasting it into your final layout. It’s safer and faster.

A Look Inside Calendar Options Wizardry

Figure 3: Select the beginning and end months and years for your calendar.

First pick a range of months for your calendar by choosing a First Month and Year and a Last Month and Year from the pop-up menus (Figure 3). In the Calendar Options section (Figure 4, next page), choose your calendar

language, which day of the week should come first, how many date rows the calendar should have, and a heading style for the days of the week (spelled-out day names or medium or short abbreviations, which are especially useful in smaller calendars).

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Next, choose options to be included in your calendar. Beyond the default Month Names and Day Names, you can start by adding Mini-Calendars for the months before and after the current month. You can choose Work Week to include a mini-column

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Feature: Making Calendars

that numbers the weeks of the year. You can include Non-Month Dates to fill in the cells that would normally be empty in the calendar month with ghosted dates from the month before and after. You can also highlight Sundays and/or holidays.

Control the Magic with the Power of Layers and Styles In the Layer Options section (Figure 5), you can choose to add numerous options to your calendar, each in its own layer.

Figure 4: The Calendar Options section of the dialog box is where you select the general options that determine the basic framework of your calendar.

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The Holiday Options section allows you to add various religious and national holidays that are built into the script, as well as any holidays or events that you list in a separate file or selected InDesign frame. You need to

Figure 5: The ability to set up everything you want to add to your calendar in layers, and with one of four default styles applied, makes Calendar Wizard an amazingly powerful and adjustable script.

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Feature: Making Calendars

set up these customized listings in a special way, so the script understands where to add the event. For example, “12-31: New Year’s Eve Party” will add your New Year’s Eve party listed on December 31 in your calendar. There’s also a profusion of religious and national holidays that can be added to your calendar, located in a folder named Extra Holidays in the Calendar Wizard folder.

InDesign Sorcery Can Help You with the Math Even if you’re a math major, you may find the Custom Sizes section of the dialog box (Figure 6) to be beyond comprehension. After several miscalculations and JavaScript errors, I finally discovered what I was doing wrong. The Custom Calendar Size/ Placement section positions and sizes your calendar from the upper left corner of a custom-size page. All measurements entered in the fields are the distance from the 0/0 point on your rulers.

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Figure 6: These are the settings for a custom vertical Tabloid page with the calendar positioned in the lower half of each page. All Size/Placement settings are measured from the upper left corner of the custom page.

Rather than using my calculator, I uncovered a simple way to have InDesign help figure out the math. Set up a temporary document in InDesign using custom page size and margins. Draw a text frame in this new document at the exact size and position you want your calendars. Select this text frame with your Selection tool. Then, in the Control panel, use the reference point to the far left of the panel to figure out all of the distances needed by Calendar Wizard. Click the upper left reference point to determine the Top and Left distances from the upper left corner of the page. Use the bottom right reference point to determine the distance of

the right and bottom sides of the calendar frame from the top left corner of your page. Write down all of these sizes and distances, and when you return to the Calendar Wizard options dialog box, transfer the appropriate numbers to the Custom Page Size/Margin and the Custom Calendar Size/Placement fields, and you’re ready to have Calendar Wizard work its magic simply by clicking OK (Figure 7, next page).

Casting a Spell for a Single Month Calendar Sometimes you don’t need a calendar for an entire year. With Calendar Wizard, you can easily generate one-month calendars too. 1. Create a text frame the size of your finished calendar. 2. With the text frame still selected, double-click the Calendar Wizard script. 3. Select the option to generate a single month, along with any other options you may want.

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4. In the lower left corner of the window, choose Current Text Frame in the Page pop-up menu. 5. Click OK to create a single-month calendar.

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Can you fit a 12-month calendar onto a single page? No problem for this Wizard. To set up a 12-month calendar on a single tabloid size page, simply do the following: 1. With no documents opened, or an existing tabloid-size layout opened, double-click the Calendar Wizard script. 2. In the dialog box that opens, choose a range of dates at the top and whatever other options you may want. (Keep it simple to make it readable.) 3. At the bottom of the window, choose 12 from the Calendars per Page pop-up menu (Figure 8). 4. Choose an orientation (Landscape or Portrait) and a page size, such as Tabloid.

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Figure 7: This calendar page was generated from the custom settings shown in Figure 6.

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Fit an Entire Year onto a Single Page

Figure 8: It’s easy to set up single page containing multiple calendar months.

5. Click OK to shrink an entire year onto a single page (Figure 9). Sun Mon

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Figure 9: The settings to the left produced 12 default calendar months on a Tabloid page.

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What If You Screw Up the Magic? Your beautiful calendar is finished, and in making some minor alterations, you inadvertently click on and move one of the table layers of the calendar. Don’t worry! The Wizard’s got your back. There’s another script that comes with Calendar Wizard to undo such unimaginable disasters. Simply double-click the realignCalendarTables script (Figure 10), and the calendar universe is back in alignment in an instant.

What if you wish to make your finished calendar a different size? No problem! Make the top text frame in your calendar smaller or larger. Double-click the fitCalendarToFrame script (Figure 11), and all calendar layers will be resized to the size of that top table frame. How cool is that?

Figure 11: Change the size of the top layer of your calendar. Then double-click the fitCalendarToFrame script to make all layers in the calendar the size of the top layer table.

Using Some InDesign Wizardry to Set Up Your Final Wall Calendar Figure 10: If you inadvertently offset some of the layers in one of your calendars, the Realign Calendar Tables script can fix the issue.

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Now that you have your totally customized calendars, you need to set up your final

layout for printing. While you can set up a single month calendar or even a multiple month calendar on a single page, in this section, we’ll concentrate on a 12-month hanging wall calendar with beautiful photographs on the top of your spread and each month’s calendar below the fold. Wait a minute!, I hear you cry. You can’t set up documents in InDesign with a horizontal fold. But, as you may already know, there’s a simple workaround. Set up your finished layout with facing pages, so you’ll be working sideways with a vertical instead of a horizontal fold. All images on the left page of your wall calendar will need to be rotated 90° counterclockwise in the Control panel. And when you copy and paste your calendar pages from their original document into the finished layout, they will have to be rotated 90° counterclockwise as well. A big thank-you to Scott Selberg for an amazing script (don’t forget to donate on calendarwizard.sourceforge.net).

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Avoid headaches Just thinking about working sideways, my neck started to hurt. But there’s an easy over-thecounter remedy. InDesign has some magic of its own to turn the calendar world on its side. Start by selecting all of the pages in the Pages panel (click the first page thumbnail and then Shift-click the last). Next, choose Page Attributes from the Pages panel menu, and then choose Rotate Spread View > 90° CW to rotate the view, so the photo is at the top and the calendar is beneath the horizontal fold. Now your calendar won’t be a pain (in the neck) to work on.

Are There Alternatives to the Wizard? In my research for this article, I did find some other options for InDesign calendars. Unfortunately, most of these have not been updated for the year 2016. I did try out two free InDesign calendar templates, either of which is great if you

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are saved in .idml format, so they will open in all recent versions of InDesign. The first template, from Graph Masters, you can download at graphmaster.com. The other template, from Pagination, can be downloaded at pagination.com.

n Jeff Witchel is an Adobe Certified Instructor for both InDesign CC and Illustrator CC with training clients all over the USA. He’s best known for his tips and tricks video tutorials, which you can view on his training website at JeffWitchel.net. Jeff is also Adobe’s Co-Representative to the InDesign User Group of New Jersey and an Adjunct Professor at Kean University, Robert Busch School of Design.

want an easy-to-use 2016 calendar that includes just the standard United States holidays. Of course you can add any other holidays or events manually. Both templates are easy to customize because the formatted type has styles applied. Simply change the style settings to change the look of the type throughout the calendar. Both templates

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GREP of the Month

\< \> Beginning and End of Word

Lock down keywords in a GREP search to avoid finding them in the wrong places. GREP Level: Easy When GREP becomes greedy Sometimes a simple text search can find (or change!) more than you bargained for. I remember occasions where I had to find and change the name of a product to a bold style, only to later find out I had accidentally also converted regular words in the same text. For example, looking for the word “light” accidentally also changes the word “highlight” or “lightning.” GREP is a great way to look for specific text, but when that text appears inside other words, you can find yourself in trouble.

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To counter this behavior and stop GREP from finding your search criteria within other words, you can use the Beginning of Word (\<) and End of Word (\>) expressions. You might think why can’t I just use the ‘whole word’ button in the Find/Change window? Well, for a simple reason: because that button doesn’t exist when you perform a GREP search. So… Imagine you have these words in the same text: cat, catalog, wildcat. Looking for the word cat will find all instances in any location, including within the other words. But adding the \< and/or \> characters tells InDesign to find only the word cat

at the beginning or end of your text. For example, \<cat will find cat and catalog (so just the first three letters in the word catalog), but not wildcat. And cat\> will find cat and wildcat (so just the last three letters of wildcat), but not catalog. And the combination is even more powerful, and will act as the “whole word” option that you can use when doing a regular text Find/Change. So using \<cat\> will find only the word cat and nothing else, nowhere else. Be careful, though. InDesign considers something to be a “word” when this word is preceded or followed by spaces, beginning or end of story or paragraphs, but also punctuation. So the cat in www.cat.com is also considered to be a separate word and will also be found. —Bart Van de Wiele

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Best of the Blogs

Best of the Blogs

A collection of the most important and informative articles from InDesignSecrets, InCopySecrets, and EPUBSecrets. If you want to add comments or ask questions, just click the title of the article to view the original post in your web browser. Why Does My High Res Image Look Low Res? Eugene Tyson | October 15, 2015

Here’s a very common question that I see on InDesign user forums: why does an image that you know is high res look awful when it’s placed in InDesign? This can be especially confusing if you’re coming from a purely Illustrator or Photoshop background, where images are always displayed at full quality. Here’s a side-by-side, Illustrator vs. InDesign scenario. As you can see, InDesign’s preview of the logo looks very jagged and low res.

Why does this happen? By default, InDesign uses a low-resolution thumbnail, also know as a proxy, to display the image in the layout. However, you’re not stuck with this low-resolution preview. InDesign has three options for how images/graphics are displayed, which you can access via View > Display Performance. Fast: Displays a gray box and you won’t see the image at all Typical: Shows a low-resolution proxy High Quality: Shows a high-resolution proxy How do I control what I see? By default, InDesign is set to display images using the Typical view, with proxy images for raster and vector images. This means that you will see low-resolution images by default. But you can change this behavior.

Illustrator

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Go to InDesign > Preferences (Mac) or File > Preferences (Windows) and click on Display Performance.

In the Options area (Section 1 in the screenshot above), there are two controls: A: Default View determines which Display Performance setting is to be used (Fast, Typical, or High Quality). B: Preserve Object-Level Display Settings, which saves custom display settings applied to individual objects. In the Adjust View Settings area (Section 2 in the screenshot), there are the following controls: C: A pop-up menu where you can edit the settings for Fast, Typical, or High Quality views. After you select one of these views, you can customize its settings in D, E, and F.

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D: The Raster Images slider that you can adjust to control the on-screen appearance of pixel-based images (like those from Photoshop) in your layout. E: The Vector Images slider that you can adjust to control the on-screen appearance of vector-based images (like those from Illustrator) in your layout. F: The Transparency slider that you can adjust to control the on-screen appearance of transparency effects. Once you’ve set your preferences as you want them, click OK. Then you can go to View > Display Performance, and use those settings. Note that you can lose these settings if your Preferences are reset, which can happen with a crash, an update, or when installing plug-ins. Outside the Preferences Understand that when you select View > Display Performance > High Quality, this does not mean you have high-quality Photoshop or Illustrator images; it just means that you’re telling InDesign to use the settings you defined for the High Quality on-screen view. So how do you check the resolution of a placed image to tell if it really is high-res or low-res?

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Open the Info Panel by going to Window > Info. Then select the image. The Info panel will show you the Actual ppi and the Effective ppi.

Actual refers to the image at 100% scaling. In this case, that’s 72 ppi, which would output as low res if I made no modification in InDesign. However, with this image, I have scaled the image down to 29%. Therefore, effectively it’s 248 ppi (72/29 × 100), and will output as high res. See how the effective resolution is what really matters? How an image looks on-screen in InDesign is not always reflective of what you’ll get in final output. What you really care about is how it looks when printed or exported to PDF for digital documents. Just because it looks good on screen does not mean it will print that way—always get an accurate proof!

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When the Info Panel will not show any PPI information If your image is a vector image, it has no set resolution, and is therefore scalable to any size! Placed PDFs will also not show any PPI information, as these are containers for raster, vector, text, and other objects. The only file types that do show this information are raster images like JPG, PNG, GIF, PSD, TIF, BMP, etc. Do I have to check every image I place? No, you can use InDesign’s Preflight Panel to automatically check for low resolution images. Go to Window > Output, and choose Preflight. At the top right of the panel is an option to Define Profiles.

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Start by clicking the + symbol to create your own custom preflight profile.

Navigate to Images and Objects, and select what resolution you want to check for. Now, when you have preflighting turned on and your custom preflight profile selected, images that fall below your minimum desired resolution will be detected and flagged as errors. Then it’s up to you to get a higher resolution image, scale the image down until its effective resolution is above your minimum, or decide if it’s OK to ignore the warning. If you don’t know, then your print vendor can help you out (or at least they should)…

vendor for the best option. However, you will notice that mine is set to 265 ppi, which is high enough for most printers. Requirements vary for newspaper, magazine, and high-end jobs, etc., but typically most people request 300 ppi. It also depends on the content of the image. A 150-ppi foggy scene will print fine. But a 150-ppi close-up of a person’s face may not fare as well. The output method is important too. Digital printing is a bit more forgiving than lithographic printing, so I could risk going below 265 for a digital print. Again, for large-format printing, signs, billboards etc., it’s completely different; speak to your print vendor. Side effects of Display Performance mode set to High Quality When you have your display performance set to High Quality for all images, you can experience lag in InDesign, sometimes a serious lag. For a complex vector-heavy image (like a CAD drawing) set to High Quality all the time, you will almost certainly experience InDesign lagging, which can be frustrating! If this is the case, consider using High Quality only for rough layout purposes; then set it back to Typical when you are happy with the image positioning.

What should the image resolution be? As for the all-important question of what is the right resolution for your images, the answer is that it depends—talk to your print

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What Does Object Level Display do? You can also control the on-screen appearance of images on an individual basis. You can select an image and go to Object > Display Performance and choose Fast, Typical, or High Quality. For example, you may need a certain logo to always display at High Quality, but you might not care about the other images in the layout. So you could go to Preferences, edit the Fast setting, and drag the Vector slider all the way to the right. Then, in the layout, select the image, go to Object > Display Performance, and choose Fast. Now just that logo will display in High Quality. Summary So let’s review. 1. InDesign will show images as a low-res proxy by default. This is set in the Preferences, using the following options (which you can edit to suit your needs): »» Typical display performance mode »» Display Raster as Proxy images (low res thumbnails) »» Display Vector as Proxy images (low res thumbnails) »» Display Transparency at medium quality 2. Displaying images in High Quality does not mean they are high res! Check the image’s effective resolution to see for sure. And check with your printers/print vendor/etc. for recommended guidelines.

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3. If the Info Panel does not show you the PPI, then check the image using preflight, or manually check images by opening them in Photoshop or Illustrator. 4. Be aware of lag when using High Quality mode. 5. You can set up and use Object Level Display Performance to control the on-screen appearance of individual graphics, separate from the rest of your other images.

Troubleshooting Data Merge Errors Colin Flashman | October 22, 2015

Working with the Data Merge feature of Adobe InDesign is something I do often. For those who do not use Data Merge as frequently, the Help page on the Adobe website offers enough information to get started with Data Merge, and there are plenty of video tutorials online to create a basic data merge. What I have noticed is the lack of resources when things do not go according to plan, namely troubleshooting the error dialog boxes that can pop up and leave users bewildered. So today’s post covers the common error dialog boxes one might expect to find during a data merge and how to fix the faults. It’s not an exhaustive list and doesn’t go into issues that can arise when dealing across languages and alphabets, but should be enough for most users to identify the fault and prepare a solution.

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The following errors can occur when selecting (or updating) a data source: The selected data source has one or more empty field names.

This relates to a field name in the header row being missing. When creating a database for a data merge, all of the fields in the header row must be named. Take the following file, for example:

The Surname field (D1) is missing its field name. Similarly, column B is completely blank, but so far as InDesign is concerned, it is a field that has no field name, and just has blank records. In this instance, column B should be removed. Lastly, columns F and G look like they are not in use, but at one stage they did contain data but the information was removed manually. Unfortunately, when exported from Microsoft Excel as a tab-delimited text file, Excel still treated the columns as if they did contain information. This is shown by opening the text file in an application such as TextWrangler (the tabs show up as triangles):

In that situation, those extra tabs at the end of the lines must be removed.

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The data source cannot be opened.

This error tends to happen if the file has been exported from Excel as a CSV or TXT file, but has not been closed from Excel. It tends to fool users, as it refers to “rights” and can often have users scrambling for their IT expert or administrator, asking all sorts of “permissions” questions, when the likelihood is that this isn’t the cause. Make sure that the file isn’t open in Excel, and if it is still open, then close the file and try again. There is a least one data placeholder that cannot be found in the data source.

This typically appears when updating a data source, rather than starting a new data merge project from scratch. The Data Merge field names that are already placed in the InDesign file can’t be

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found in the database that has just been linked to. This may be because: »» The field headers have been renamed »» A wrong database has been selected as a data source »» A field name has become corrupt. (An example is placing a Unicode file as an ASCII file using the “show import options” feature.) The data source file you selected either has no records or is not a supported file format.

This can occur in a few circumstances: »» When attempting to import an Excel file as a data source rather than the CSV or TXT file that needs to be exported first. It often happens because the suffix of the file may be TXT or CSV, but during the saving process it was still saved as an Excel file with the file extension being changed manually instead of using the Format drop-down in the Save dialog box. »» When attempting to import a text file that is either completely blank or has text on the first line only.

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Interestingly, the Select Data Source dialog box does let users select any format using the drop-down field located at the bottom center of the dialog box. This can lead to unusual alerts appearing if you’re importing files that weren’t intended to be used as Data Merge databases, such as the following two examples: Content contains characters which cannot be encoded.

Other data merge oddities Colons used in field names can have some strange behaviors. If a colon appears at the start or end (or both) of a field name, the data will import without any issues, but if a colon is within the field, the “Generic extended parser error” occurs. If there are two or more colons in the field name (neither at the start or end of a field name), a different error occurs: Not well-formed

This can occur when trying to select a PDF or an AI file as a data source. Generic extended parser error

That said, to avoid these errors, do not use colons in field names when creating a database for a Data Merge file.

This can occur when attempting to select an HTML file as a data source.

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No error message, but no import either There are also instances where despite no error message appearing when selecting a data source, the data does not import. This can occur because the first line of the database is a line return only.

Similarly, once data is imported via Select Data Source, not all of the data is available from the Data Merge panel. This can happen because there are not enough fields in the header row. To demonstrate this, take the following database. It has three fields (separated by tabs), but the header row only shows two fields.

To fix this issue, simply add a header row with appropriate field names and try again.

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But if that text is selected as a data source and placed into InDesign, this is how it looks:

projects that require images, I try to keep all images referenced by the database in the same folder as the database, as the file reference in the database is now only the name of the image, not the full file path—something that can be daunting to maintain over a network. As I said at the start of the article, this is not the complete list of every error dialog box associated with Data Merge, but hopefully it should be enough to get most users out of trouble.

The third column of data is completely lost. To fix this issue, the correct number of field names has to be created. You can also get the following error when toggling through the preview records: The data source references one or more missing images.

This occurs when a database used as a data source contains an image field that is referencing links that it can’t find. These links need to be fixed in the database and then the “update data source” selected from the Data Merge panel. In instances of Data Merge

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The Ultimate Fix for Overset Text Contest Mike Rankin | October 21, 2015

Hey folks, it’s time for another InDesign mystery that you can solve for a chance to win an awesome prize! Here’s the scenario (and because it’s Halloween season, we picked one that’s totally terrifying): You have a long document with over 100 separate text frames, and all of them are slightly overset!

As many of you wrote in, the answer is to edit the object style the text frames are based on. By default, all text frames use the [Basic Text Frame] object style, which makes this solution work. Double-click the [Basic Text Frame] entry in the Object Styles panel, select the Text Frame Auto Size Options entry, and turn on Auto-Sizing by selecting an option other than the default “Off.” We chose “Height Only” in the screen shot below. With Auto-Size enabled, all the frames will immediately expand to fit the text in them. Boom! Overset-be-gone!

Your deadline is right now, so you have just one minute to fix all the overset text in the document. You are not allowed to edit the text in any way and you cannot change any text formatting. How can you solve this problem?! And the genius winners of this contest are…

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Oleg Eltsov and Kimmi Patterson Both win a copy of Sandee Cohen’s awesome book, Creating Animations in Adobe InDesign CC One Step at a Time. Thanks to everyone who entered, and be on the lookout for another contest with a new great prize next month!

I converted the K to outlines (Type > Create Outlines). Then, to add an “arrow” pointing to the right, I held Option/Alt and clicked the Flip Horizontal button in the Control panel.

A Clever Trick for Making Custom Arrowheads Linda Bergeron Szefer | November 4, 2015

InDesign has a very limited choice of arrowheads, and when my editor asked for double arrows with a vertical bar at each end to indicate measurements in a math book, I had to come up with my own. The technique that I settled on can be adapted for lots of different looks and uses. Here’s what I did. I searched for a capital K that was geometric, i.e., that looked like a left arrowhead centered on a vertical line. I ended up using Frutiger 55 Roman.

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I created a new text frame, and to make it exactly fit the height of my arrowheads, I went to Object > Text Frame Options, and in the Auto-Size tab of the dialog box, I chose Height Only. I pasted both Ks into the text frame, and put a right-indent tab between them (Type > Insert Special Character > Other > Right Indent Tab).

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Then I added a paragraph rule to make the line connecting the arrowheads, adjusting the Weight, Offset, and Indents until I was happy with the effect.

shapes or objects. Tip: converting characters to outlines makes it easier to have the text frame fit snugly around the arrow.

VoilĂ !

Now the text frame can be rotated to any angle, and resized as needed, with no complicated adjustments to make! To create different looks, you can replace the arrowheads with other characters from the same font (or any other font), or other

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InCopySecrets: Making Use of the Info in Galley and Story Views

displayed in a gray bar at the top of every story in both Galley and Story views. Right there in front of me!

Chad Chelius | November 2, 2015

Sometimes the things that are most obvious go completely unnoticed because we’re focusing too hard on the task at hand. This became apparent to me when I found myself constantly looking at the Assignment panel for the stories that I needed to check out. It seemed inefficient to be bouncing over there all the time when most of what I was looking for was right there in Galley and Story views. Identifying a story For example, I had named all of the stories that I was working with using an easily identifiable name. I kept going over to the Assignments panel and double-clicking on the name of the story to locate it in Galley view. That’s when it hit me: that information is

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That gray bar not only tells you the name of the story, but did you notice that it also lets you know if the story is available to check out or not? That is convenient information to see at a quick glance. You want to check out the story to work on it? Simply right-click anywhere in the story and choose Check Out.

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Once you check out a story, it also lets you know that you are editing the story, and if someone else has the story checked out, it lets you know who has it checked out as well.

Checking in content is equally easy; simply right-click anywhere within a story and choose Check In. Galley and Story views also show you if a story is out of date, and provides an easy way

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to update that content if needed. Just right-click and choose Update Content.

Taking Control of the View Those gray bars can be a bit overwhelming. By default, when you open an InDesign document or Assignment, every story is expanded, forcing you to scroll down the page to see the various stories that are available. If you Option-click (Mac OS) or Alt-click (Windows) on a triangle located on the left side of the gray bar in an expanded story, it will collapse all stories except the one in which you click. Expand another story by clicking on the triangle,

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and then Option- or Alt-click the triangle again to collapse all but the current story.

Spellchecking Tracked Changes Mike Rankin | November 9, 2015

Here’s an obscure InDesign fun fact related to spell checking: sometimes you can see words flagged as errors that aren’t visible on the page in your layout.

Realizing that there were some great features right in front of me has caused me to work a little bit differently in InCopy and a little more efficiently. I hope these techniques help you to work a little faster and more efficiently as well. And no, it’s not because they’re in overset text—it’s because they were deleted. This might sound like a bug, but it is a feature—spell checking of deleted text—and a potentially handy one in some editorial workflows. While it is turned on by default, you might never notice it, because it takes effect only when the following conditions are met:

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»» Changes have been tracked in the document (or in a Word document before it was placed into InDesign). »» The Story Editor is open and visible, and Show Changes is enabled in the Track Changes panel (so you can see tracked changes).

»» The preference to Include Deleted Text When Spellchecking is enabled. You might think this would be found in Spelling preferences, or Story Editor preferences, but actually it is in Track Changes.

Then, as you do a spell check, errors in deleted text are flagged.

Unfortunately, it can be a bit tricky to make use of the feature, because if you use the Check Spelling controls to fix the error, the fix is treated like added text, and immediately entered into the story.

I suppose it has to work this way, but it means you have to correct spelling only on changes you want to reject (i.e., deleted text that you now want to restore). And you may also have to take

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an extra step of rejecting other changes, before moving on with your spell check. In this case, I’d need to reject the change of the added word “undeniably.” So in practice, it might be simpler to go through the process of accepting/rejecting changes, and then do the spell check on your final text. Otherwise you may find yourself constantly jumping back and forth between the Check Spelling and Track Changes panels. Still, it is an interesting option to have.

Why InDesign Documents Open as [Converted] David Blatner | November 11, 2015

Douglas wrote and said: Whenever I open a document I haven’t used for about 6 months, I make a little modification and save it, InDesign chooses to “save as” instead of a simple save. Why?! This is “a feature not a bug,” but I agree that it can be incredibly frustrating. The reason InDesign opens your document as [Converted]—and therefore requires that you use Save As instead of Save—is that you must have upgraded your version of InDesign between the time you created the document and the time you’re editing it. Whenever you upgrade InDesign, documents also have to go through a conversion process.

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Now this seems crazy at first, but here’s the reason it happens: Most people don’t realize that the InDesign file format is actually a database. The InDesign app is actually reading a database file! And, just like FileMaker or other database programs have to “update your database” whenever they’re updated, InDesign does, too. So the fact that your document opens as Converted and then forces a Save As is actually a safety measure. For example, if InDesign saved over the original file automatically, you might have trouble opening the file in an earlier version of the program. That said, many users find it very frustrating that InDesign sometimes doesn’t remember the location of the original file was (which folder it’s in). I have to say that I don’t usually have this problem. InDesign seems to always remember what folder the document was in and takes me there when I need to use Save As. This might be because I use Default Folder on my Mac. Windows users can copy and paste the File Path to the Save dialog box.

Understanding InDesign’s Hyperlink Formatting Mike Rankin | November 12, 2015

Hyperlinks are probably the most fundamental interactive feature you can build into your InDesign documents. In fact, they’re just about the only interactive feature that works across every kind of interactive document you can export from InDesign, including

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EPUBs (fixed-layout and reflowable), PDF, DPS (old and new), HTML, and SWF. So with all these hyperlinks to deal with, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s worth understanding how InDesign handles the formatting of hyperlinks to save yourself some aggravation.

A new blue swatch used by the character style (and also called Hyperlink) is created as well.

The Hyperlink Character Style and Swatch Since InDesign CC, a new character style called Hyperlink is created the moment you add the first hyperlink in a document. Strangely, this is true even if you choose not to use the style, and even if the hyperlink is applied to an object and not to text. By default, the Hyperlink character style applies just a blue color and an underline.

There is no way to turn off the automatic creation of the character style and swatch, but you are free to edit them or delete them and replace them with another style and swatch. Setting Default Hyperlink Formatting In the New Hyperlink dialog box, there is a menu where you can choose to apply the Hyperlink style, another style, or no style to

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your new hyperlink. You can also create a new character style to use.

use the Edit Hyperlink dialog box, which looks identical to the New Hyperlink dialog box.

And if you manually remove the character style applied to an existing hyperlink using the Control panel, the style will still be applied to the next hyperlink you make. Sticky indeed.

The choice you make here is “sticky,” meaning that it will apply to all new hyperlinks you create in the document, until you change it in this dialog box (or delete the style and replace it with another or [None]). It will even apply across documents, if you choose any style that exists in both documents, [None], or [Same style]. Changing the formatting of an existing hyperlink won’t affect the formatting that gets applied to new hyperlinks—even if you

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One Style Fits All…Except When It Doesn’t The chosen character style applies itself to all types of new hyperlinks. This is unfortunate because it would be cool if, say, InDesign could remember that you always wanted hyperlinks to text anchors to be formatted with a different style than URLs. Alas, this is not the case. On the other hand, hyperlinks that you wish would have consistent formatting may not. For example, there’s nothing to prevent shared destinations from having different styles applied to them.

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Deleting a Hyperlink Doesn’t Delete Its Formatting Also, if you decide to remove a hyperlink, the formatting stays, which can lead you to think there’s a hyperlink where there isn’t.

GREP Style Formatting is Overridden You might think you could compensate for a lot of these quirks by creating a GREP style to override the formatting from the hyperlink dialog boxes. And you can—but only if you choose [None] or [Same style] in the hyperlink dialog box.

Otherwise, the GREP style formatting will be overridden by the formatting from the chosen hyperlink style. For example, in the

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screenshot below, a GREP style made both URLs green until the second one was converted to a hyperlink.

Formatting Via Convert URLs to Hyperlinks One other point worth mentioning is that the Convert URLs to Hyperlinks feature, while somewhat primitive (it thinks any text without spaces around a period is a URL), does give you the ability to create new hyperlinks at the document or story level, and apply different character styles as you go, like a Find/Change.

So while there’s definitely room for improvement in the way InDesign handles hyperlink formatting, at least now you know where that Hyperlink style and swatch came from, and how to avoid them if you want to.

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The InDex: InDex Your Key to Our Content Can’t find that article you saw in an earlier issue? Wondering whether we covered that obscure plug-in? Never fear, the InDex is here.

Index for issues 1 through 80 July 2004 — December 2015

MAGAZINE

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The first issue of InDesign Magazine was published in July 2004. Since then, we’ve cranked out thousands of pages on hundreds of related topics. While it’s possible to use Acrobat to simultaneously search all past issues of the magazine for one word or phrase, many readers have clamored for a formal index at the back of each issue. However, with 80 issues to account for, that’s not feasible. Instead, the InDex will live as a PDF you can download for free. If you come across a topic you want to know more about, but it’s in an issue you don’t have, you’re not out of luck. We sell back issues at indesignsecrets.com.

If the topic you’re looking for isn’t in the InDex, you have one more way to search: that PDF trick we mentioned. To make it work, all of your magazine issue PDFs must be in one folder. Open any issue in Acrobat, and then press Shift+Command+F (Shift+Ctrl+F on Windows). In the Search window that appears, be sure that you click the radio button that says “All PDF Documents in,” and in the dropdown menu below that, choose the folder in which you placed your magazine issues. You’re on your way to finding anything in any PDF!

Click here to download the InDex.

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While this PDF is just for you, you can tell your friends about this great discount: $10 off a 1-year membership use coupon code: friend Send them to: indesignsecrets.com/issues

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Coming Soon!

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Idm issue 80