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M A G A Z I N E 79 November 2015

• Amazing Animations • Monospace Fonts • Cross-References

Tablet Apps InDepth


SPEAKERS INCLUDE: DAVID BLATNER ANNE-MARIE CONCEPCION RUSSELL VIERS MICHAEL NINNESS ERICA GAMET KEITH GILBERT CHAD CHELIUS MIKE RANKIN DIANE BURNS

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DENVER

NOVEMBER 16–18

SESSIONS INCLUDE: • INDESIGN POWER SHORTCUTS • MAKING GORGEOUS TABLES • GREP: YOU CAN DO IT! • INTERACTIVE PDFS THAT WORK EVERYWHERE • GET MS WORD AND INDESIGN ON THE SAME TEAM • ACCESSIBLE PDFS • SECRETS OF THE LONG DOCUMENT MASTERS • BRILLIANT TYPE: CRAFTING BEAUTIFUL TEXT

2015 2


InSide: Table of Contents 6

18

37

44

52

60

Feature: Tablet Apps Keith Gilbert shows you how tablet apps can cure your publishing headaches.

Best of the Blogs  A collection of the most important and informative articles from InDesignSecrets and InCopySecrets 61

InCopySecrets: Adding Hyperlinks in InCopy

64

The Transform Panel Mystery Contest

66

InCopySecrets: Repurposing Projects in an InCopy Workflow

68

The Swatch Panel’s Stealth Feature

InFocus: Let’s Give Thanks Erica Gamet shows us a lot of time- and worksaving items we can be really thankful for.

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Tips for Background Tasks

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Understanding InDesign’s Place PDF Options

InType: Monospace Type Nigel French reminds us that “mono” does not mean “boring.” Far from it!

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How to Make Nonprinting PDF Objects

78

New InDesign Features Revealed at Adobe MAX

82

Tips for Using the Make Grid Script

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InDex to All Past Issues

5 Amazing Animations Sandee Cohen and Diane Burns show how to add movement and interactivity to your layouts. Feature: The Joys of Cross-Referencing Jamie McKee takes the fear out of this useful feature and helps take you (and your reader) anywhere you want to go.

GREP of the Month: Sectioning Peter Kahrel shows you how to quickly add section heads to an index.

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MAGAZINE

From the Editor in Chief PUBLISHERS David Blatner, Anne-Marie Concepción EDITORIAL Editor in Chief Mike Rankin, mike@indesignmag.com Managing Editor Wendy Katz, wendy@indesignmag.com Contributing Writers Keith Gilbert, Diane Burns, Sandee Cohen, Jamie McKee, Nigel French, Erica Gamet, Peter Kahrel, Alan Gilbertson, Steve Werner, Chad Chelius, Eugene Tyson DESIGN Rufus Deuchler rufus.deuchler.net BUSINESS Contact Information http://indesignsecrets.com/contact Subscription Information indesignsecrets.com/issues Published by InDesignSecrets.com, a division of The Creative Publishing Network, Inc. Copyright 2015 InDesignSecrets.com. All rights reserved. Reproduction and redistribution prohibited without approval. For more information, contact permissions@indesignmag.com. InDesign Magazine is not endorsed or sponsored by Adobe Systems Incorporated, publisher of InDesign. InDesign is a registered trademark of Adobe Systems Incorporated. All other products and services are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners and are hereby acknowledged. Photos on pages 1, 6, 37, 44, 52, 60, and 86 courtesy of Fotolia.com ISSN 2379-1403

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Can we agree that we’ve reached the point at which we no longer have to call out our once-brave-new-world of portable, mobile technology? That’s not to say that everyone has a smartphone and 24-7 access (that’s another story… or several). But when parents give their “old” iPhones to their toddlers for entertainment, we’re undoubtedly past the novelty stage, and it seems like everything is on the move. That’s why we continue to publish articles to help familiarize you with emerging apps, methods, and systems for thriving in that on-the-go world, but which may seem daunting to jump into. (User manuals aren’t going to have our friendly touch or our unbiased ability to compare and share different approaches.) This month, we lead off with Keith Gilbert bringing you a wellinformed report on apps for publishing to mobile devices. You’ll feel a lot more

prepared to choose the best solution for you, after you’ve read this! And since everything is on the move, this month we address two other kinds of movement as well. Jamie McKee explains the different kinds of cross-references you can use in InDesign (did you know there was more than one kind?), and Sandee Cohen and Diane Burns offer up not one, not two, but five styles of animation you can use in InDesign and output in HTML5 format (that is, pretty much anywhere). To offset all that movement, Nigel French brings us back to some typographical roots— monospace fonts, and the comeback thereof. We’ve got all that, plus another useful GREP of the Month by Peter Kahrel, Erica Gamet’s Thanksgiving-themed InFocus, and the Best of the Blogs, which now includes great articles from InCopySecrets. Enjoy!

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S N O I S S E S INCLUDE:

ers: ues n g i s or Ded Techniq f p o sh ips an Photo and ial T r t B n e d s Es os an g o L ing Buildtity ner g i s e ry D Iden e v E ques i n h c Te orld W s K CMY Need a n i RGB g n i s U

s You t i b a ting H i d E Old to Break y in h p a r Have pog y T d n Text aoshop ues q i n h Phot Tec g n i h c Retouesigners for D

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S R E K A E SP INCLUDE:

d n a l l e l C c M h Deke t i m S n i l o C r e d i n S a s Le e s r e v n o C s y Chri e l e e S n i t Jus s p a e H k r a M h c n e r F l e Nig 5


By Keith Gilbert

Take two tablets...

...and publish in the morning. An in-depth look at the available tablet apps. When Steve Jobs unveiled the iPad in 2010, he demonstrated the new Wired magazine app, which was created with InDesign and an early version of Adobe Digital Publishing Suite (DPS). Publishers large and small rushed to create digital content for the iPad, eagerly anticipating huge consumer demand for the chance to read graphically rich, interactive content on these shiny new devices. DPS quickly established itself as a market leader, at least in part because it is an Adobe product. But competitors such as App Studio, Aquafadas, Mag+, and Twixl Publisher quickly came along to fill niches, workflows, and price points that DPS didn’t address. All of these solutions are the same in one respect: they allow non-programmers

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to create rich, interactive content with pixel-perfect precision using InDesign. These solutions also provide tools to help build an app to house your content, and a delivery system to publish content into the finished app. Now, five years later, where are we at? Instead of coalescing into a single, bestpractice solution, as many of us expected, the publishing landscape on mobile devices is still highly fragmented. There continues to be great debate over whether one should publish digital content as a mobile-friendly website, reflowable EPUB, fixed layout EPUB, PDF, or as a native app. Should there be open standards? Should different types of content be delivered using different

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Feature: Tablet Apps

types of output? What about accessibility? Unfortunately, the experts, and the market, don’t agree on answers to these and many other questions. For the purposes of this article, let’s assume that you’ve decided that the best solution for your needs is to publish your content into a native app (rather than another solution such as PDF, EPUB, FXL, or a website). Which solution should you use? Which solution incorporates the best technology? Which is the best value? Which supports the widest range of interactivity? Which is best for small publishers? My goal is to try to answer as many of these questions as I can. This is not intended to be a comprehensive “white paper” comparing all the details of each solution. Instead, I’ll give my opinions about the strengths and weaknesses of each solution, beginning with DPS, and then five more solutions in alphabetical order. All six of these solutions offer free trials, so my advice is to narrow your selection down to a couple

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Article-based publishing Adobe believes that today’s mobile device users don’t want to wait a month or more for an entire “issue” of content—and that users are better served by a continual stream of Adobe DPS individual articles or other small content In July of this year, Adobe once again shook “chunks,” served frequently, like a blog. They up the tablet-app landscape by introducing claim that this will lead to greater retention a shiny new version of DPS…along with a of readers and keep readers engaged with subtle name change. DPS now stands for your brand. The entire workflow of DPS is Adobe Digital Publishing Solution (not Suite), built around easily publishing individual aka DPS 2015. As of this writing, the new “articles” on a frequent basis (Figure 1). These DPS is completely different than its competarticles can be arranged in “collections” by itors, due to its emphasis on “article-based” theme, date, product, or any other criteria publishing and dynamic “browse pages.” you specify. of solutions, and then try them both out. Research is great, but there is no substitute for actually using a product to determine if it is a good fit for your needs.

Figure 1: Published articles listed in the DPS portal.

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Feature: Tablet Apps

Dynamic browse pages DPS displays an image representing each article as a “card” arranged on a grid-like “browse page.” These cards and the grid configuration of the browse pages can be highly customized (Figure 2); they can be changed at any time without needing to update the app itself. So now, instead of just a single, static “library” or “storefront” view of your content, you can display articles, collections of articles, and banner artwork in an attractive, easily customized grid within your app, which can be changed as your needs evolve (Figure 3, next page). As a bonus, this grid arrangement is responsive, fluidly adapting to multiple screen sizes and aspect ratios. “Rules” determine the type of card that is used to display each article image. For example, articles that you tag as “featured” could appear with large cards, and normal articles with small cards. Though somewhat complex to set up, once cards, rules, layouts, and collections

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Figure 2: The DPS Layout Properties screen is used to specify the appearance of a browse page grid.

are in place, it is quick and easy to publish a steady stream of articles into the app. In the new world of DPS 2015, “issues” or “folios” of content can still be mixed in

with this article content, if you prefer. In addition, Adobe still offers the older DPS 2014 for use by customers who prefer that platform.

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Feature: Tablet Apps

Content for DPS 2015 apps can be a mix of articles created with InDesign CS6 or later, HTML content from tools such as Dreamweaver or Muse, or HTML content created from a content management system (CMS) such as Adobe Experience Manager, WordPress, or Drupal. Another strength of Adobe DPS is support for “entitlement” with the leading subscription management companies. If you use CDS Global, Time Customer Service, Palm Coast Data, Dovetail, or Hallmark Data Systems to manage a subscriber list, these companies have pre-built connections to DPS to make it relatively easy to offer paid subscriptions in your DPS app. DPS is the only solution reviewed here that outputs apps for Windows 8.1–10 devices. However, it does not build apps for Amazon devices. DPS 2015 just became available at the end of July, and it remains a work in progress. It will be interesting to see if any of Adobe’s competitors follow suit

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Figure 3: A browse page created with DPS 2015.

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Feature: Tablet Apps

with similar approaches in their digital publishing products. Pricing The pricing of DPS 2015 is not published anywhere on Adobe.com. It is subscriptionbased, with an entry price starting in the range of $17,000 per year. It is clearly oriented towards mid-size to large accounts publishing periodicals or sales tools. You can view a gallery of apps that have been created with Adobe Digital Publishing Solution at adobe.ly/1Lu3GBi.

container of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. The first thing you will notice when learning how to create content for App Studio is the long list of “don’ts,” such as no hyphenation, no justified text, no kerning, tracking, baseline shift, text wrap, snap-to-baseline grid, vector graphics in interactive content (other than rectangles), rotation, or flipping of page items, CMYK swatches, or content on master pages (Figure 4).

App Studio

Pricing

App Studio is owned by Quark. Yes, Quark! But, surprisingly, content for App Studio can be authored in InDesign. App Studio is very different than its competitors. It converts InDesign content into App Studio content using HTML5 as the underlying screen technology. To do this, it needs to “squeeze” all the typographic and layout richness of InDesign into the simpler

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One big benefit of using HTML5 as the underlying format for the output is that it gives you fully selectable and searchable text within the app. Quark also claims that it results in smaller file sizes. App Studio's many constraints certainly make it more challenging to convert printbased materials to digital content for an app. This solution is probably best suited for highly repetitive, templated publications. They seem to have a lot of medical journals on their customer list, which are probably a good fit.

November 2015

Figure 4: The App Studio Exporter panel contains a validation feature that alerts the user to page elements that don’t meet the strict criteria required by App Studio.

Single Edition app

$199 per app per device for iOS $499 per app per device for Android $99 per year fee to allow for minor updates

Multi-Issue Pro

$1139 per year iOS apps only One app, unlimited issues 1500 downloads per month

Multi-Issue Premium

$5699 per year iOS, Android, and Kindle apps One app, unlimited issues 2500 downloads per month

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Feature: Tablet Apps

You can view a gallery of apps that have been created with App Studio at www.appstudio.net/en/Clients/.

Animation and Timing panels in InDesign are partially supported by Aquafadas. This support for a broad range of interactivity makes Aquafadas particularly appealing for app content that is targeted to children or the education market. Content created with Aquafadas contains a very nice parallax effect that is applied to page elements automatically. This effect provides an interesting transition as the user swipes from one screen of content to the next. None of the other solutions offer anything like this. If you don’t like the parallax effect, it can be turned off (Figure 6, next page). Aquafadas provides a full text search that highlights the exact word or phrase that the user is searching for. Of the solutions reviewed here, only App Studio, Aquafadas, and in5 provide a robust search.

Aquafadas AVE Mag Aquafadas is a French company, part of Rakuten, a Japanese e-commerce company based in Tokyo. Rakuten also owns Kobo, a Canadian e-book reader company. According to Wikipedia, Rakuten had 2014 revenues of about $5 billion USD (more than Adobe). Aquafadas produces a complete ecosystem of tools to create AVE (Adaptive Viewing Experience) files. These include AVE Mag, AVE PDF, AVE Reflow, and AVE Comics. AVE Mag is the solution for creating interactive mobile app content from InDesign. Aquafadas includes a large set of interactive enhancement widgets with AVE Mag, and several more are available for purchase for an extra fee. These include some unique interactive elements such as mazes, games, and puzzles (Figure 5). In addition, the

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Figure 5: The AVE Interactivity panel lists the different types of interactivity that can be created in InDesign for Aquafadas AVE Mag.

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Feature: Tablet Apps

Pricing One singleissue app on all supported platforms

$720 per year. This one-year license enables you to create a single-issue app and app updates for one year. When the license expires, the app will still be available on the stores, but you will need to purchase another one-year license when and if you need to update the app.

One “KioskBookshelf” app on all supported platforms, 4 issues per year

$4000 per year. This one-year license enables you to create one app and app updates for one year. When the license expires, the app will still be available on the stores, but you will need to purchase another one-year license when you need to update the app. Unlimited downloads included. Several different kiosk (store and library) configurations are included. Analytics and push notifications available for an extra charge. For an entitlement solution, add $1500 for the first year, $500/year after that.

See bit.ly/1EV1HQl for complete pricing info. You can view a gallery of apps that have been created with Aquafadas solutions at bit.ly/1UDZLUT.

“Roll your own app” with in5 Like the other solutions described in this article, Ajar Productions’ in5 lets you create

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Figure 6: Click to play a video showing the automatic parallax page transition.

rich interactive content from InDesign. Unlike the other solutions, it offers no app-building, subscription, or e-commerce tools. Instead, the sole purpose of in5 is to

output your interactive content as a folder of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, with appearance preserved and full interactivity. Then you can add this output to a website, or use tools and services such as PhoneGap Build (free with a Creative Cloud subscription), Baker Framework, or Liquid State to build an app to house the in5-generated content. in5 has many options to control exactly how the HTML is output. Pages can be rendered with text converted to images (for pixel-perfect precision), with text formatted with embedded fonts, or with text converted to SVG. The HTML can be output in standard web format, configured in the HPUB format for Baker Framework, structured properly for inclusion in Liquid State, or as various flavors of “web apps” (Figure 7, next page). in5 converts complex InDesign layouts to HTML pages with perfect fidelity if text is converted to images, and with really good fidelity, preserving many layout features, if text is included with embedded fonts.

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Feature: Tablet Apps

Almost all the native InDesign and DPS interactive elements are supported. This includes full support for the Animation and Timing panels and interactive form elements. In fact, because Adobe DPS doesn’t support the Animation and Timing panels, in5 has a feature specifically for DPS users that exports a selected animation in HTML format ready to use in DPS. For those on tight budgets, in5 may be the only way to get into the app game, as it is by far the least expensive of all these solutions to create interactive, graphically rich content for distribution on mobile devices and websites. Pricing Unlike all the other solutions in this article, in5 is software with a perpetual license per seat, not a monthly or yearly subscription. Student version

$279

2-seat license

$299

6-seat license

$699

See bit.ly/1Hsu6E4 for complete pricing info.

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Figure 7: in5 offers many options for exactly how the exported HTML should be configured.

For more information about in5, see the review in issue 54 of InDesign Magazine. Two good examples of web experiences created from InDesign using in5 can be viewed at bit.ly/1UBRnud and bit.ly/1RuMjSB.

Mag+ Mag+ is owned by Bonnier AB, the Swedish parent company of Bonnier Corp. Bonnier

Corp. publishes Popular Science, Popular Photography, Field & Stream, and many other magazines. Mag+ was originally developed as a custom solution for Popular Science magazine, and soon after, a separate company was formed to market the solution to other publishers. Curiously, in July 2014, Bonnier Corp. announced that they would begin using Adobe DPS instead of Mag+ for its U.S. magazine titles (see bit.ly/1LhtD6d). Mag+ seems to be repositioning itself as a solution for corporate communications, sales enablement, and other uses outside of consumer magazines. The early issues of Popular Science on the iPad featured a unique user experience that consisted of long scrolling screens. As the user swiped up and down through a long screen to read a lengthy column of text, the background image would change as certain breakpoints were encountered in the long vertical screen. The entire Mag+ product was engineered to make this type of user

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Feature: Tablet Apps

experience easy to create. Mag+ also adds some “pinning” capability that makes it fairly easy to create dual-orientation content (Figure 8). The question is, do readers actually want this type of long scrolling page experience? I find publications that use this type of navigation to be wearisome to read and difficult to navigate. I also find that most people no longer care about content being dual-orientation. If long, scrolling pages of the type offered by Mag+ are key to your publishing strategy, then this is the solution for you. Mag+ is also very capable of creating more conventional “snapping page” types of screens, but the process is more complex in Mag+ than in its competitors. Overall, I found Mag+ to be the most difficult to learn and use of all the products discussed in this article. On the other hand, there is a substantial payoff for your efforts. The app “chrome” or user interface that is created automatically for the user by Mag+ is, in my opinion, the

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the user swipes vertically between screens. A very nice “page scrubber” appears across the bottom when a user taps in the middle of the screen. These are the clearest automatic navigation and wayfinding guides of any of the solutions. You can view a gallery of apps that have been created with Mag+ at www.magplus.com/clients/. Pricing

Figure 8: Click to play a video that shows the unique user experience made possible with the Mag+ tools.

nicest of any of these solutions. Clear yet subtle icons indicating progress through the publication appear at the top of the screen when a user swipes horizontally, and small icons appear on the left of the screen when

One single-issue app on all supported platforms

$99 per month

One app, all supported platforms, multiple issues

$499 per month Unlimited downloads, analytics and push notifications included

One app, all supported platforms, multiple issues, with entitlement

$699 per month Unlimited downloads, analytics and push notifications included Access to entitlement API

See bit.ly/1HslYn7 for complete pricing info.

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Feature: Tablet Apps

Twixl Publisher Twixl Publisher is definitely the third party solution most similar to Adobe DPS 2014. Anyone who has used DPS 2014 will be able to learn how to create interactive content with Twixl Publisher very quickly. In many ways, Twixl Publisher is a twin of DPS 2014, but at a very different price point. Twixl Publisher has the easiest-to-learn and easiest-to-use interface of any of the solutions. A single panel in InDesign contains all the options necessary for interacting with Twixl Publisher. When it comes to sharing an article or an issue with others for proofing or approval, Twixl makes it extremely simple—so much easier than Adobe DPS or any of the other solutions in this important, frequent task (Figure 9). Twixl Publisher takes advantage of InDesign’s Alternate Layouts feature for creating dual-orientation apps, and the Book panel for organizing articles into issues. The “Twixl Distribution Platform” for publishing issues into an app is very flexible.

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It can distribute Issue and Article content exported from InDesign with Twixl Publisher, as well as PDF and HPUB content, which provides some interesting publishing flexibility not available with any of the other products. The chrome provided by the Twixl app builder is the most basic of any of the

solutions. It is the only solution that doesn’t offer a thumbnail or scrubber view in the user interface. Pricing Unlimited single-issue apps on all supported platforms

$850 per year

One app, all supported platforms, multiple issues

$1950 per year 5000 downloads included— additional downloads 4¢ each Includes analytics and push notifications Add $1400 per year for an entitlement solution

See bit.ly/1JXj5bo for complete pricing info.

For further reading

Figure 9: A single InDesign panel contains all the options needed to create Twixl Publisher content with InDesign.

The Ghent Workgroup has released a white paper that provides test results and best practices for quality control of tablet publishing solutions.

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Feature: Tablet Apps

Comparison of tablet publishing solutions Adobe DPS

App Studio

in5

Aquafadas

Mag+

Twixl Publisher

Creates apps for the Apple App Store

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes*

Yes

Yes

Creates apps for Google Play

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes*

Yes

Yes

Creates apps for the Amazon App Store

No

Yes

Yes

Yes*

Yes

Yes

Creates apps for Windows 8.1–10 laptops, desktops, and tablets

Yes

No

No

No

No

No

Creates apps viewable in a desktop web browser

Coming soon

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Creates apps for Enterprise (private) distribution

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes*

Yes

Yes

Supported authoring tools (Mac and Windows)

InDesign CS6 and later, PowerPoint, HTML editors, CMS

InDesign CS5 or later, QuarkXPress, HTML editors, CMS

InDesign CS5 or later. Photoshop CS5 or later also required

InDesign CS4 and later

InDesign CS4 and later. Photoshop CS4 or later also required

InDesign CS6 and later

Full text search

No

Yes

Yes

Yes, via browser

No

Yes (user is brought to correct screen, but location of the search term not highlighted)

Selectable text

No

Yes

No

Yes, via browser

No

No

* via integration with PhoneGap Build, Baker Framework, or Liquid State

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Feature: Tablet Apps

How to Choose the Right Solution Which of these six choices is right for your needs? Here are my recommendations: »» Familiarity If you are looking for a solution that is the most like Adobe DPS 2014 (the “old” version of DPS) in terms of functionality and capability, Twixl Publisher is the clear winner. »» Simplicity Of all the solutions described, Twixl Publisher is also the easiest to learn and easiest to use, based on its singlepanel interface and good support. »» Interactivity in5 is the solution that best translates all the native InDesign interactive features, such as the Animation and Timing panels, form fields, and DPS overlays into final app content. That said, Aquafadas offers the widest range of “canned” interactive experiences, such as puzzles, mazes, Sudoku, etc. »» Text Capabilities Aquafadas and App Studio offer the most robust text searches, not only bringing the user to the page

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containing the search word, but also highlighting the search word on the page. For comparison, Twixl Publisher only brings the user to the correct screen, and DPS and Mag+ have no search functionality at all. »» Cost If you just have a one-off app to create, such as an annual report or an interactive guide, look at in5, Aquafadas, or possibly App Studio, depending on your needs. These solutions have the best pricing for single-issue apps. »» Sales Applications If you need an app for distributing sales materials to a corporate sales force via enterprise (private) distribution on iPads, look at DPS 2014 and Twixl Publisher. »» Periodicals If you create periodicals, you should first look closely at DPS 2015 and decide if the radical new approach taken by this solution is right for you and your workflow. If not, look at any of the other solutions described here, as they all can be used for a periodical workflow.

n Keith Gilbert is a digital publishing consultant and educator, Adobe Certified Instructor, Adobe Community Professional, conference speaker, Lynda.com author, and contributing writer for various publications. Follow him on Twitter @gilbertconsult and at blog.gilbertconsulting.com.

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Amazing 5 Animations By Sandee Cohen & Diane Burns

Ask a random group of InDesign users if they know how to create animations in InDesign and the most common response will probably be, “Animations? InDesign creates animations?” It’s not surprising that few people know about InDesign’s animations features. When they were first added to CS5, animations could be exported as Flash SWF files. When Steve Jobs decided that SWF would not be supported on Apple’s mobile devices, InDesign’s animation features began collecting dust in the corner. Until the release in June 2014 of InDesign CC 2014, that is. With animations converted to HTML5 output and supported

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in fixed-layout ePub export, InDesign’s animation features got a new lease on life. With the release of Publish Online (Preview) in CC 2015, animations got another boost. Now animations, along with other interactive elements created in InDesign, can be easily shared with others on any platform. In this article, we take five “amazing animations” that push working with animations just a little further than the InDesign defaults. These lessons start easy and get more advanced. Even better, we’ve provided links to the animations exported with the new Publish Online (Preview) technology so you can see the final results.

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1

Five Amazing Animations

Super-fast Spin Rotations

Back in the 1940s, many movies used the spinning newspaper effect to propel the story or give historical background to events. It was used effectively in classics such as Citizen Kane. Today it can be used for many corporate announcements. The animation starts with a headline that scales up from 5% while simultaneously spinning five times. The cool trick is to rotate the objects more than 360°. This makes the object spin faster than it would if you just set the animation to play several times. We’re showing the effect with superfast spins, but it can be used with fewer rotations to introduce any object onto the page.

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View the animation by clicking here

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Five Amazing Animations

Super-fast Spin Rotations (continued) 1. Set the text, and convert it to

outlines. Position the outlined text on the page where you want it to spin. (You may want to save a copy of the actual text on the pasteboard in case you need to modify the text later.)

3. Select the text outlines, and

enter 1440 in the Rotate field to spin the text four times. You can also enter 360*4, press Enter or Return, and let InDesign do the math. This sets the rotation and opens up the rest of the animation controls. Positive numbers spin counterclockwise. Negative numbers spin clockwise.

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2. Open the Animation

panel (Window > Interactive > Animation). Click the Properties triangle to open the Properties area of the panel. (It’s a good idea to keep the Properties options open during all your animation work.)

4. We want the text to start

small and scale up as it spins. Change the Scale W and H fields to 5%. However, there is a problem with the settings as they appear right now. Instead of starting small and zooming up in size, the text will shrink as it spins. Fortunately, we can fix that in the next step.

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Five Amazing Animations

Super-fast Spin Rotations (continued) 5. Choose To Current

Appearance from the Animate menu. Notice that the label below now says Animate From. This indicates that the text will start at 5% of its current size and scale up.

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6. Open the EPUB Interactivity

Preview (EIP) panel, and click the Play button to preview the animation. The text spins and zooms into view.

Extra! Extra!

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Five Amazing Animations

Custom Blinks and Pauses

You might think that setting an object to continually blink on and off would be a question of simply setting it to appear and then repeat over and over using the Loop setting. While looping is part of the answer, the challenge is to get the object to pause longer between blinks. The ordinary interface controls don’t allow you to set a pause between each time the animation repeats. Fortunately, we stumbled onto the solution by use of a “null” object. This is an object that has no fill or stroke, but does have an animation applied to it. In this case, we’ll use the technique to make eyes that blink, but you can use it to add a pause to any animation that repeats.

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View the animation by clicking here

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Five Amazing Animations

Custom Blinks and Pauses (continued) 1. Create the object that will

be the “off” state of the blink. Here, the eyes will be visible and the black polygon will be the mask that appears and disappears to hide them.

3. Change the Duration to .5

seconds. The Opacity menu in the Properties area shows that a short fade from a preset causes the object to appear.

Although there’s a Loop setting in the Animation panel, this isn’t the loop we’ll use, because it would cause the eyes to blink too quickly.

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2. Select the masking object, and

apply the Appear preset from the Animation panel Preset menu.

4. Move the mask over the object

that will appear when the mask is hidden. A simple background for the area around the object makes it easy to fill the mask with a single color and position it correctly.

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Five Amazing Animations

Custom Blinks and Pauses (continued) 5. Draw a small rectangle with no

fill or stroke somewhere on the page. This is the null (empty) object that will create the pause between the blinks.

7. Hold the Shift key, and click to

select both the mask and the pause objects in the Timing panel. Click the Play Together icon. The bracket indicates they will start playing at the same time.

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6. Apply the Appear preset

to the null object. Set the Duration to 3 seconds. It actually doesn’t matter what animation is applied, as the object is invisible. It’s the time the animation takes up that we care about.

8. We now need the blinks and

pauses to repeat. Select both objects in the Timing panel, and select the Loop setting so the group repeats. However, the group doesn’t restart until the null object has finished. That creates a 2.5-second pause.

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Five Amazing Animations

Custom Blinks and Pauses (continued) 9. Preview the animation in the

EIP panel. The mask quickly turns on and off, with a longer pause for the eyes to be visible.

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Optional: Originally we

thought we could increase the pause between each blink by increasing the Duration. However, this made the mask fade in and then pop off—not realistic. If you don’t mind this look, you don’t have to use a null object. But we prefer the eyes to appear at just half a second—the blink of an eye.

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Five Amazing Animations

Animating a Bar Chart

Few things beg for animation more than business graphics. Adding movement to otherwise static data points can help engage the viewer and increase attention. There are many options for animating your business presentations. Here we’ll show you how to create horizontal bar charts that appear to draw themselves on the page. The key to this effect is to use nonproportional scaling. In this example, only the horizontal scaling is set to zero, with Animate set to To Current Appearance. This causes the bar to appear to grow. This technique can be used to create the effect of any bar or line drawing itself, whether presenting business graphics or animating part of an illustration.

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View the animation by clicking here

FROM THE LYNDA.COM TITLE CREATING ANIMATIONS WITH INDESIGN CC

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Five Amazing Animations

Animating a Bar Chart 1. In the Animation panel, click

the triangle next to Properties to open that section of the panel.

3. Change the Animate setting to

To Current Appearance. Notice that the settings below now say Animate From.

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2. Select the first bar that you

want to animate. Click the Link icon to the right of the Scale fields so that you can scale nonproportionally. Set the Horizontal scaling to zero.

4. In the origin point proxy, select

the point from which you want the bar to “grow;” in our example, the left center point.

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Five Amazing Animations

Animating a Bar Chart (continued) 5. Test the animation in the EIP

panel. If correct, you can save time in animating the other bars by saving the settings. From the Animation panel menu, choose Save, and name the preset.

7. Check the sequence of the

bars in the Timing panel. Or, if you want them to all play at the same time, select them and click the Link icon.

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6. Select the next bar in the

chart, and apply the preset. You will have to change the Animate setting to To Current Appearance, which is not saved with the preset. All the other settings will be applied.

8. If the bars vary greatly in

length, you may want to adjust the duration. For example, a long bar playing for 1 second will move faster than a short bar set for 1 second. Set the shorter bars to play for a shorter duration so the relative speed of all bars appears to be the same.

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Five Amazing Animations

Animating a Bar Chart (continued) 9. If your chart is part of a

presentation, you can control when the graph starts to animate. In the Animation panel, change the Event(s) setting from On Page Load to On Page Click. (You can select all the bars at once.) The animation will not begin until you click the page.

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10. Test the animation and

sequencing in the EIP panel.

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Five Amazing Animations

4

Pop-up Window and Close Button

Buttons can be used to trigger animations. Once you set a button action to “Animation,” you have options to not only Play the animation, but to also Stop, Pause, Resume or even Reverse the animation. There are all kinds of effects that can be created with these, but one of our favorites is to make a button that triggers a pop-up window and includes a button that closes the window. To create this effect, start with the pop-up window object, and group it with a close button object. You can apply any animation to the group, but it’s often best to use a simple effect such as Fade In. Set the trigger button to play the animation. The close button object is then set to the action “Animation” also, but instead of it being set

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to play, set it to Reverse. When clicked, it closes the pop-up window with a Fade Out animation. Use this effect when you need a pop-up window. It’s great for adding information to a

layout that doesn’t take up space, and it adds a useful touch of interactivity. It’s great for adding things like recipes in cookbooks, too, as shown in the second page of the example animation online.

View this animation and a bonus example by clicking here

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Five Amazing Animations

Pop-up Window and Close Button

1. Create the pop-up window

object. Create a close button, and position it next to the popup window. Group the objects, and position them where you want them to appear when the pop-up window is opened.

3. Create the button that will

be used to open the pop-up window, and position it in your layout.

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2. Select the group containing

the pop-up window, and apply an animation, such as Fade In or Appear. Deselect the Event(s) setting On Page Load (our button will trigger the event). The menu will now say Choose.

4. Select the object, and convert

it to a button by clicking the Convert To Button icon in the Buttons and Forms panel. From the Actions Pop-up menu, choose Animation, and then make sure that Play is chosen in the Options menu.

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Five Amazing Animations

Pop-up Window and Close Button (continued)

5. Next, go back into the pop-up

window group, and doubleclick to select the close button. Convert it to a button in the Buttons and Forms panel, and set the action to Animation and the Options field to Reverse.

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6. Test the animation in the EIP

panel. Reposition objects on the layout if needed.

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Five Amazing Animations

Moving Mosaic Tiles

This exciting effect gives the appearance of moving puzzle pieces. With this effect, you create tiles of an image that begin in an out-of-order arrangment, then fly into the center, and finally fly out of the center into the correct order. The use of built-in InDesign scripts help prepare the image. Custom motion paths give the tiles their movement, and linking the animations in the Timing panel causes them to move simultaneously. For added impact, the whole image fades in at the end. You can use this effect for any type of image, and you can change the sequence of movement. For example, all the tiles could start in the center, and then move out into position.

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View the animation by clicking here

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Five Amazing Animations

Moving Mosaic Tiles (continued)

1. Divide an image into a grid

using the MakeGrid Script (Window > Utilities > Scripts).

3. In the Layers panel, number

each tile in sequence.

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2. Position guides at the center

and edges of each tile using the AddGuides Script.

4. Move the tiles out of sequence,

to the position they will start in. For each tile, draw a path from its center to the center of the center tile, and then click the icon at the bottom of the Animation panel to convert to a motion path.

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Five Amazing Animations

Moving Mosaic Tiles (continued)

5. Link all animations in the

Timing panel.

Draw an empty rectangle on top, and then group it with the tile. This creates a new object you can animate. Name it, based on its number, using the Layers panel.

7. Draw a path from the center of

the tile to the center of where it will move to. Create a motion path. Then move it back to its original out-of-sequence position. Repeat for each tile.

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6. Move one tile to the center.

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8. In the Timing panel, link the

animations from step 7, so they all occur at the same time. Set a delay on the first item in the second group to pause the tiles when they are all in the center.

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Five Amazing Animations

Moving Mosaic Tiles (continued)

9. Optionally, add the final image

10. Test in the EIP panel.

and set it to Fade In, so that after the tiles move to the correct position, the entire image appears.

n Sandee Cohen (@vectorbabe) began teaching computer graphics 25 years ago. She has authored books, articles, or videos on every version of InDesign since it was first released. Animations have become her favorite feature to write about and teach.

n Diane Burns (@dianeburns_sf) is a San Francisco-based consultant and Adobe Certified Instructor in InDesign. She is author of the Lynda.com course Creating Animations with Adobe InDesign CC, and co-author, along with Sandee Cohen, of Adobe Press’ Digital Publishing with Adobe InDesign CC.

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By Jamie McKee

Getting the Most Out Of Cross-References One thing leads to another.

We all love hyperlinks—they take us where we need to go, and we never actually have to know how to get there. They do the driving! But sometimes it’s still important to know the specific destination, and that’s where cross-references (the granddaddy of hyperlinks) come in. This article explores the details of cross-reference creation in InDesign so you can help your readers easily navigate to anywhere they need to go. A cross-reference, often shortened to x-ref, is basically a pointer to another part of your document. You see these all the time, for example, with lines like “For more information, see XYZ on page 32.” What makes

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using cross-references in InDesign so useful is that page numbers will be kept current and up to date even as your content (and the pages that content appears on) changes. You set these up using the Cross-References panel, which since the January 2014 release of InDesign CC (9.2) is no longer part of the Hyperlinks panel. To create a cross-reference, place your cursor in your text where you want the x-ref to appear, and click the Create New CrossReference button in the Cross-References panel (this command is also found in the panel’s flyout menu). You could also choose Type > Hyperlinks and Cross-References >

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Feature: Cross-References

Insert Cross-Reference, or Interactive > Insert Cross-Reference from the contextual menu. Your first option in the New CrossReference dialog box allows you to specify whether the cross-reference destination is a paragraph style, such as a heading, or from a text anchor you’ve created and inserted into your text. Text Anchor destinations If you want your cross-reference(s) to point to a text anchor, you’ll save yourself some frustration by creating those anchors first, because you can’t access the Hyperlinks panel (to create a new anchor) while you’re inside the New Cross-Reference dialog box— heck, you can’t even scroll your document! To create a text anchor, in the Hyperlinks panel choose New Hyperlinks Destination > Text Anchor (Figure 1). See Creating Cross References with Text Anchors at InDesignSecrets.

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Figure 1: Creating a text anchor using the New Hyperlink Destination command.

Assuming you’ve already created your text anchors, simply choose the destination document and text-anchor names from the drop-down menus, and the x-ref will be created. Paragraph destinations The other Link To: destination option for an x-ref is Paragraph. With this option selected, you choose which document you want to link to, select the paragraph style applied

to the text of your destination on the left (another reason to format all your text with paragraph styles), and then select the destination paragraph in the list that appears on the right (Figure 2, next page). The sequential, modal process in the New Cross-Reference dialog box may feel a bit tedious and frustrating, but the good news is that your cross-reference is being created on the fly in the background as you choose your options.

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Feature: Cross-References

Cross-Reference Formats There are many ways to determine the look of your x-ref using the Cross-Reference Format options, such as Page Number Only or Full Paragraph & Page Number. You need only select from the list in the Format pop-up menu. However, if you want to customize the look of your cross-reference, you can open the Cross-Reference Formats dialog box by clicking the Create Or Edit Cross-Reference Formats button (   ) to the right of the Format drop-down menu (Figure 3, next page). Clicking the Building Block button (   ) allows you to edit the definition of the cross-reference with predetermined building blocks or code tags (indicated by the angle brackets). You can also apply a character style to your entire x-ref. Also in Figure 3, I've added the word see before the cross-reference, used a non-breaking space instead of a regular space, and applied my Cross Reference character style to highlight the cross-reference in blue.

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Figure 2: Setting up a cross-reference with the Link To: Paragraph option.

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Feature: Cross-References

When you’re editing a custom x-ref format, you can use the Building Block button to access basic code tags, such as Page Number and Paragraph Text. This also provides other tags that allow you to customize your cross-reference, such as Partial Paragraph and Character Style. For instance, if your cross-reference links to a long headline that uses a colon, such as InDesignSecrets: The world’s #1 resource for all things InDesign, you could use the Partial Paragraph tag: <fullPara delim="" includeDelim="false"/> to include only the part of the paragraph up to the colon by entering a colon between the quote marks and making sure the includeDelim value is false so as not to include the colon itself. Note that there seems to be a bug in InDesign CC 2015 that causes curly quotes to be inserted into the code, rendering it invalid! To work around this problem, use a plain text editor to write the code, and then copy and paste it into the dialog box. You could further customize the look

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Figure 3: Cross-Reference Formats options.

of the x-ref by using the Character Style tag: <cs name=""></cs> to enclose the Partial Paragraph tag and apply a character style named “Italic,” for example. Your final definition would then look like this: see <cs name="Italic"><fullPara delim=":" includeDelim="false"/> </cs> on page ^S<pageNum/> and the

result for your cross-reference would be: see InDesign Secrets on page 23 Just like the Find/Change dialog box, the Special Characters button (   ) allows you to choose from InDesign’s list of special

characters, such as the non-breaking space that I used (^S). Unfortunately, unlike many of InDesign’s dialog boxes, there is no Preview option to see the results of your definitions; however, the Save command works in a similar fashion, showing your changes without closing the dialog box. If you don’t like a change you’ve made, simply edit it within the Definition window, and click Save again to update the definition. Click OK when you are happy with the appearance of your cross-reference. Keep in mind that any adjustments made to a cross-reference format apply to

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Feature: Cross-References

all cross-references with that name—if you wanted some x-refs with a character style and others without, you would need to name and use two different cross-reference formats. Finally, don’t forget you can save yourself time by choosing Load CrossReference Formats from the panel’s flyout menu to load x-refs made in another document into the one you are working on. The final section of the New CrossReference dialog box allows you to specify appearance options for x-ref links within a PDF. These characteristics are a sort of limited version of a character style, and appear only when the Include > Hyperlinks setting is used when creating the PDF in InDesign (Figure 4).

pitfalls I’ve encountered (and the solutions I’ve found to most of these setbacks). »» It's not immediately obvious how to apply a character style to a cross-reference. The trick is to click the Edit Cross-Reference Formats button (   ), which opens a dialog box where you can choose a character style (Figure 5).

»» Deleting cross-references essentially converts the x-ref to text, often with the wrong page number! To remedy this problem, select the cross-reference first, and then choose Type > Text Variables > Convert Variable to Text, and then delete the cross-reference. See Converting Cross References to Text and Retaining the Information at InDesignSecrets.

What to watch out for when working with Cross References On the surface, creating cross-references is fairly straightforward, but there’s a lot that can trip up a new user. Here are some of the

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Figure 5: You have to edit the cross-reference format to apply a character style.

Figure 4: Cross-references can be inverted, inset, or outlined when a user mouses over them in an interactive PDF, according to options set in the PDF Appearance section of the New Cross-References dialog box.

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Feature: Cross-References

When you need more power than InDesign’s built-in Cross-References Let’s face it, InDesign’s built-in cross-references feature comes up short at times. Fortunately, other companies have stepped up to offer solutions for when InDesign alone just can’t get the job done. Cross References Pro DTP Tools (dtptools.com) $12.90/month; $119/year for DTP Tools Cloud Cross References Pro is billed as a modular system which responds to every referencing need, inspired by a similar feature in Adobe FrameMaker and improved thanks to the greater flexibility of the InDesign environment. Each reference and its components can have a specific character style, and each reference part can be set to appear only in selected languages. The plug-in is scriptable, is compatible with InDesign and InCopy CS3 and later, and supports saving in both .IDML and older .INX formats. In InDesign CC and later, the Cross References Pro plug-in is part of the DTP Tools Cloud bundle. Sonar Bookends InXref Virginia Systems (virginiasystems.com) $195 Sonar Bookends InXref uses a “labeling” system to mark both where referenced page numbers are to be inserted and where the material being referenced is found. These labels can be

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created at any time, in any order, meaning you can create a reference to “Chapter 2” even if Chapter 2 doesn’t yet exist. The cross-references can be resolved any time, in seconds, with a single command, and more than one file can be cross-referenced at one time. Quick Reference Script In-Tools (in-tools.com) Free To use Quick Reference, just select the source text, and you get a list of potential destinations. Quick Reference will do the rest of the work by searching your document for the text you selected. It looks for a match, and then gives you a list of all the places in the document where that match was found. (If the document is part of a book, and the book panel is currently open, the script will look through all book documents, too.) Select the instance you want to use, choose a format (all the formats found in the New Cross-Reference dialog box are there), and click Create. The script puts a text anchor in the “target” text, and then creates a cross-reference to that anchor.

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Feature: Cross-References

»» The Definition section of the CrossReference Formats dialog box is clunky and difficult to use. For starters, the text is incredibly tiny and hard to see. One solution is to copy and paste your cross-reference code between a plain text editor (or code editing application) and the dialog box (Figure 6). »» I find navigating cross-references frustrating too. If you select a cross-reference in the Cross-References panel, the “Go to source of the selected cross-reference” and “Go to destination of the selected cross-reference” icons become active at the bottom of the panel. However, you can only go to the source if you click on it first. If you click on the destination first, the icons become inactive…and you can’t then go to the source! (Granted, you can go to the source by clicking on the page number in the panel, or navigate to it manually.) It’s a small annoyance, but still, the icons should always work, regardless of which order you choose them.

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Figure 6: Working in a dedicated code editing application like TextWrangler (top) can be a lot easier on your eyes than the CrossReference Formats dialog box.

»» Finally, the cross-reference feature is often the cause of slowdowns in InDesign, especially with x-refs that span from one document to another. If feasible, opening all the documents containing your cross-references can help in this situation.

in CS4. Over the years, however, the feature has seen minor attention at best. But if your needs are basic and you understand its quirks and peculiarities, the cross-references feature will see you to your next page, your next document, and beyond.

The Bottom Line

n

Cross-references were a good and welcome addition to InDesign when they were added

Jamie McKee is a book designer and typesetter for university presses throughout the US. More information about him can be found at mackeycomposition.com.

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By Erica Gamet

InFocus: Let’s Give Thanks A feast of goodies for InDesign users. As days grow shorter, leaves start to fall from the trees, and the evenings grow chillier, my mind drifts to the approaching Thanksgiving holiday. When I stop daydreaming, I realize there aren’t many trees where I live, and “cooler evenings” means temperatures will dip to a bearable 75 degrees Fahrenheit. But I’ll never stop feeling thankful for all the time-saving add-ons, sources of inspiration, and productivity tools available to InDesign users like us. So find yourself a spot at the table and dig in!

Change Consecutive Paragraphs When I am a crazy old lady I will probably be found sitting in a corner, still muttering to anyone who will listen, “Why didn’t you

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always use text styles in InDesign? I told you to always use text styles in InDesign.” I am constantly saying this already, like the proverbial broken record. Styling is a great way to ensure consistency and to be certain your text gets updated, without being left behind. But, best laid plans being what they are, you can’t account for everything. I’ve often had a nice series of styles such as title, subhead, sub-subhead, and body text set to flow from one to another in that order, when I suddenly trip over a stumbling block: I need a set of body text that has more space beforehand, in cases where it needs to immediately follow a subhead, for instance. The Change Consecutive Paragraphs script from ID-Extras allows me to do that, and more. Their $49 script lets you search

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InFocus

for this pattern of styles in all open documents, if needed, and can change the paragraph style before or after another style. In the case above, I can first create a new body text style—preferably based on my existing body text style—that is to be used only when it follows the subhead style. I launch the script and tell it that whenever Subhead is followed by Body Text, change Body Text to my new Body Text With Extra Space style (Figure 1).

People of Print Any book whose rallying cry is “Print is not dead!” deserves a space on my bookshelf. If you’re a print designer—and most of us still are—you might find yourself extolling the virtue of your craft and dispelling the myths of printing going away in our lifetime. Even in this so-called digital age, print is very much alive and well. People of Print, published by Thames & Hudson, demonstrates this vividly on each of its 336 wonderful ink-covered pages. People of Print is named for the online community of the same name, comprised of print enthusiasts, designers, and fans. The People of Print website and printed magazine are where this community gets print-related stories and generally feeds their print habit (Figure 2).

Figure 1: The Change Consecutive Paragraphs script lets you change the ordering of paragraph styles.

Conversely, I could create a new style called Subhead Before Body Text—with extra space after built into the style—and tell the script if Subhead is followed by Body Text, change Subhead to Subhead Before Body Text. Trust me, it takes longer to explain it than it does to choose the options and run the script. Even reversing the operation is quick, since InDesign’s Undo feature will put everything back as it was in one go, if necessary.

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Figure 2: People of Print showcases examples of print in today’s digital world.

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InFocus

Back to that book, though. The coffee-table volume will keep any print-lover supplied with inspiration for a very long stretch. Designed by Marcroy Smith and Andy Cooke, the designs showcased between the covers pop off the page. Sections throughout the book include print-themed essays; interviews with printers, journalists, and publishers; and a section on techniques and styles running the gamut from traditional to quirky. Not all of it is eye-candy, though. Processes and studio techniques are showcased, demonstrating the art and craft involved in creating a finished printed piece. Whether you read it for the stories or just want to keep your love for print alive, People of Print is a hefty love letter to print fans everywhere. Now, why is this not on my bookshelf yet?

8,000 font families at your fingertips for browsing and purchasing (Figure 3).

FontBook Mobile App

When browsing, you can use your vast type knowledge to search by designer or—and I have friends that this feature was made for— by release year. Me, I’m not a typophile, so I would probably opt for the visual approach and start with a class of font, such as sans serif. From there, you can continue to drill down to weed out the fonts that don’t fit your criteria. For instance, in the sans serif example, the sub-classes presented include the likes of Humanist, Geometric, and Gothic. Each choice then brings up a list of fonts in that subclass in various sizes and weights. After you pick one that suits your needs, you can swipe to access the typeface’s entire glyph set, fact

From 1989 to 2006, the de facto typography bible was the FontBook. If you were looking for a historical usage for a typeface, or wanted to know what typefaces were new and upcoming, you most likely flipped through your dog-eared copy. A few years ago, the compendium went digital, both online and with an app. The FontBook app from the creators at FontShop is available for iPhone and iPad, currently for $5. The app is a portable gateway to the offerings of over 130 international type foundries, featuring the works of more than 1,600 type designers. The FontBook app puts over

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Figure 3: The FontBook mobile app lets you browse, share, and purchase fonts from over 130 type foundries.

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InFocus

sheets, and other fonts in the family, as well as other creations from the same designer. You can organize your chosen typefaces by adding them to your list of favorites and compare them to other fonts. When you’ve found the perfect typeface, you can buy it directly through the app, share via social media, or email the samples to a teammate or client.

MergeTables Tables in InDesign are—in my humble opinion—one of the most underused features in our favorite page layout application. With the new table enhancements in recent versions of InDesign CC, they are even easier to create and maintain. But let’s not kid ourselves; there are still many ways InDesign’s tables continue to disappoint. Fear not! That’s where scripts come in handy. The MergeTables script from In-Tools lets you do something that seems so simple: merge multiple tables into one big happy one. The free script is simple to use: just select two tables and doubleclick the script in the Scripts panel. Choose to have the second table merge below or beside the first one, effectively adding rows or columns, respectively. Even if your tables contain differing numbers of rows or columns, the script will handle that by adding in empty cells where necessary. There are a few limitations to consider, like the fact that your new supertable will have the styling of the first table in the merge and that it can merge only two tables at a time.

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I’ve found that if you select multiple tables—living in separate text frames—and run the script, it will merge the first two. Simply re-run the script for it to pick up the next table, and so on. So, while it’s not perfect, this free little script certainly adds more functionality to one of my most beloved InDesign functions (Figure 4). Figure 4: The MergeTables script lets you merge a table below or to the right of another table.

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InFocus

Scanbot Mobile Scanner App Production people like me (read: of a certain age) remember, with little fondness, the large, clunky, and oftentimes painfully slow document scanners of yesteryear. Whether we needed to immortalize a napkin sketch of a client idea or make a copy of the lunch receipt for the accountant, scanning those items would leave us spending a literal minute or two(!) per page, while the scanner chugged and churned. Then we often had to use the awful software that came with the scanner to get it into a format our professional software could understand. Oh, the humanity! Enter the smartphone, where taking a picture of napkin artwork or tax deduction alike is done in a snap. But even taking a picture just leaves me with a now-digital pile of drawings, receipts, and other items of note. That’s where a handy app called Scanbot comes in. Available for iOS and Android, this little workhorse does so much more than take a snapshot. In its free version, you can use it like many other scanner apps to record your item, straighten the edges, and email it for safekeeping. Scanbot’s in-app upgrade to the pro version—for a paltry five bucks—gives you the smooth integration that keeps the app from getting in your way. To take a photo of your item, just start pointing the camera, and the onscreen prompts such as “too dark” or “get closer” will help guide you. Use the manipulation tools to change the edges or the hue, and crop as needed. Scanbot then steps it up and gives you

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several editing tools, such as a highlighter, freehand drawing tool, notes field, and a signature creator that lets you sign at full size, and then lets you adjust the signature to fit the document. You can then save the finished item as a PDF to many of the most popular file-storing services, like Dropbox, iCloud, Box, and Evernote, and set up a reminder to actually do something with those files once you’re back at your desk (Figure 5). Oh, and if a PDF isn’t what you’re after, Scanbot also has built-in OCR, which does a fairly decent job of converting your scan to searchable type. Figure 5: Scanbot makes it easy to capture, annotate, and organize scans of notes and important papers.

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Multipaste Sometimes, even though I am all about styles and automation in InDesign, I just need something done quickly, protocol be damned! For instance, if I want an item—or set of items—to appear on certain pages in my document, I would be wise to create a new master page that incorporates those items. But if I weigh the time it would take me to do that against just pasting the items on individual pages, the latter operation often wins. Even so, pasting something from the clipboard on a “mere” 47 of my document’s 352 pages can take some time. Say it with me, “There must be an add-on for that!” You know it. MultiPaste is a free extension from online user “Smorodsky” that takes the contents of your clipboard and lets you pick and choose which pages or spreads to paste them to. You can even paste items in another document. The placement isn’t always ideal, especially when copying from a document with facing pages and pasting into a single pages document. The extension is accessed from the Edit menu and gives you the option of selecting individual pages, all pages, or just left- or right-hand pages, if applicable (Figure 6).

Graphic Art Designs Just because we spend a lot of time in the digital world doesn’t mean all of our tools have to live there. By the same token, we may

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Figure 6: MultiPaste lets you paste items from your clipboard to specific pages in your InDesign document.

live in a grown-up world, but we don’t always have to act like it. Coloring books for adults (notice I didn’t say “adult coloring books”) are all the rage these days, and I’d be lying if I said I hadn’t looked at a few. One that caught my eye is the appropriately named Graphic Art Designs Coloring Book from the Creative Haven series by Dover Publications. Each of the 31 full-page designs features a background element and smaller foreground items, inspired by nature. Some of the texture and shading is provided within the pattern, allowing you to focus on bringing the designs to life through your color choices. I’m a colored-pencil kinda gal, but since the pages are perforated and printed only on one side, I’m guessing crayons or even watercolor markers would work just as well, with little mess or transfer to

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InFocus

neighboring pages. Other titles in the series feature seascapes, tessellation patterns, mandalas, and steampunk imagery (Figure 7). Figure 7: Let your inner child out to play, with these graphic art designs for you to color.

Novelty Scripts I know I often describe scripts as “one-trick ponies,” and I (usually) mean no disrespect. Sometimes all you need is that one trick. Well, I recently stumbled on a whole stable full of one-trick ponies! Bruno Herfst has written many scripts, and he has compiled—in the non-coding sense—many of his scripts and those of other developers into a valuable group of scripts he has dubbed “Novelty.” Not because the items are quirky, but because the set is aimed at book designers, get it? This megaset is available via GitHub, a

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collaboration and review site for developers of open source and private coding projects. As you would expect from scripts geared towards book designers, many of these deal with text issues. There are tools for removing all character and paragraph style overrides, creating styles on the fly, fixing orphans, and even changing American-style nested quotation marks—double quotes on the exterior, single on the interior—to European style and back again. Some of the scripts deal with objects and layout, such as quickly removing all guides and aligning page items to the document grid, and there are scripts for assigning master pages quickly to specific document pages. There is a folder called Random Tools that has gems like the Frame Divider script, which breaks an object into smaller units of the same shape; a random number inserter; and the Letter Presser script that randomly changes letter thickness and baseline shift to give type a letterpress look (Figure 8). Figure 8: The LetterPresser font gives type an old-fashioned feel with uneven baselines and slightly different type widths.

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To download all the scripts in their .jsx-flavored, ready-toconsume format, click the Download ZIP icon on the far right. Otherwise, you can pick and choose which scripts to use, but you’ll have to copy and paste the text and create the .jsx files yourself. (See the sidebar in issue 77’s Must-Have Add Ons article for instructions.)

Until Next Time I hope this month’s menu of morsels left you feeling satisfied, and like me, giving thanks for the folks who make awesome InDesign add-ons. Gobble them up and enjoy, I’ll be back again with more!

n Erica Gamet is a speaker, writer, and trainer, focusing on Adobe InDesign and Illustrator, Apple Keynote and iBooks Author, and other production-related topics. With over 25 years experience in the graphics industry, she is a regular contributor to CreativePro.com. After living as a nomad, she recently put down roots in El Paso, Texas, where she hikes and bikes every chance she gets.

where creatives go to know INDESIGN MAGAZINE  79

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By Nigel French

Monospaced Fonts

What’s old is new. Mono is back! And not just for screenplays, state documents, and source code. Back in the ’80s when desktop publishing put proportionally-spaced type in the hands of the masses, it must have seemed like monospaced fonts were destined for the trash can of design history. Why would you use typefaces that make it look like your publishing technology was from the Stone Age, when you could use “real” fonts and look as professional as a giant publishing house? To make matters worse, perhaps the bestknown monospaced font, Courier, acquired the stigma of being the stand-in used when the real fonts went missing or didn’t get downloaded to the RIP. Presumably it was chosen for this inglorious role because

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it looked so wrong that you’d realize immediately there was a problem. But recent years have seen an upswing in the fortunes of monospaced fonts. Monos are cool again, and rather than looking dated, they can look fresh and exciting— even when used for body text. But let’s start out with a look at their history. Monospaced typefaces owe their existence to typewriters. Typewriter carriages needed to move the same distance forward with each character typed, so each character had to take up the same amount of space on the line. From typewriters, monos branched out to early-generation computer terminals, where characters were made

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InType: Monospaced Fonts

from pixels in boxes that were all the same size, and from there to computer programming. Pick up any programming textbook, and the source code will be monospaced. And in fact InDesign Magazine continues the tradition each month, by formatting code in the GREP of the Month with Monaco. In a monospaced font, each character is distinct, minimizing the ambiguity between characters. In code, where a single typo can be devastating, this is an essential quality. There is a subcategory of monospaced typefaces designed specifically for coding. Examples include Inconsolata, Anonymous Pro, and Source Code, where the letters are distilled to their simplest form, with slab serifs added to the tops of i, j, and l to make these letters wider and appear less spaced. The figures are often smaller than the cap height to distinguish 0 from O and 1 from l. The punctuation marks are bigger than those of proportional-spaced font, as are characters like the greater- and less-than signs (Figure 1).

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These same qualities make monospaced fonts the best choice for optical character recognition. OCR-A and OCR-B are designed specifically for this purpose. Code and OCR notwithstanding, the strongest associations most people have with monospaced fonts is typewriters. Think monospaced and you probably can’t help thinking of typewriters. And even if you’ve never used a typewriter, you’ve seen the movies. All those scenes of writers possessed by great ideas, fueled by coffee and cigarettes, tap, tap, tapping away at the

keys through the night while the rest of the world sleeps. Anyone who’s ever dreamed of being a writer has, in a moment of romantic indulgence, imagined such a scene (Figure 2). It’s because of this association that— alongside their day job as code fonts— monos are often found impersonating typewriters. They’re used to evoke a personal, handmade feel, and to effect the sense that the designer’s only means of communication is a typewriter, preferably a broken one. We know that no one uses typewriters anymore and yet we have an emotional connection with them. We see them and we hear them. Unlike proportional-spaced fonts, which are

Figure 1: Source Code, designed by Paul D. Hunt as a companion to Source Sans.

Figure 2: Love Letter Typewriter, popular during the ’90s grunge period, lends a certain gravitas to the text.

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InType: Monospaced Fonts

gracefully silent, typewriter fonts have their own sound—the rhythmic clatter of the keys, the slamming of the carriage return. If the letters are a little out of whack, with wandering baselines, and struck-out text, they can create a tight, edgy feel. Visions of Jack Nicholson in The Shining come to mind (Figure 3). The “undesigned” look of monospaced typefaces makes them the go-to choice for conveying a message so important it doesn’t need the trappings of design (Figure 4).

Figure 4: Record cover by Hipgnosis for XTC’s Go 2 (1978).

Figure 3: The typewriter featured in Stanley Kubrick’s adaptation of Stephen King’s The Shining.

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InType: Monospaced Fonts

Monospace Medley Here are eight popular monospaced fonts to consider for your next project: Source Code Pro

Telegrama Raw

TheSansMono

Waltz, bad nymph, for quick jigs vex!

Five jumping wizards hex bolty quick

How quickly daft jumping zebras vex

Designed by Paul D. Hunt as a companion to Source Sans specifically for coding, Source Code Pro supports a wide range of languages.

Designed by Yamaoka Yasuhiro in 1992, Telegrama Raw evokes the look of low resolution computer monitors.

Letter Gothic

OCR-A

Nymphs blitz quick vex dwarf jog

Go, lazy fat vixen; be shrewd, jump quick

Designed by Lucas de Groot as an easy-to-read face for computer code, and available in eight different weights and three different widths, it has been used for years as the go-to monospace font by many writers, including Olav Martin Kvern and David Blatner in their book Real World InDesign.

The default font for InDesign’s Story Editor, Letter Gothic was created between 1956 and 1962 by Roger Roberson for IBM and was meant to be used in Selectric typewriters. A proportional version, New Letter Gothic, was designed by Gayaneh Bagdasaryan for ParaType in 1999.

Anonymous Pro

Sex-charged fop blew my junk TV quiz Designed by Mark Simonson in 2009 and available on Typekit, Anonymous Pro is intended for coding.

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Created in 1966, OCR-A was one of the first optical character recognition typefaces, and quickly found widespread use on credit cards and bank checks.

Ubuntu Mono

Bright vixens jump; dozy fowl quack Designed by Dalton Maag for the Debian-based Linux operating system of the same name, Ubuntu Mono is named after the Southern African philosophy of ubuntu—“human-ness” or the belief in a universal bond of sharing.

Courier

Junk MTV quiz graced by fox whelps Designed by Howard “Bud” Kettler in 1955, Courier was later redrawn by Adrian Frutiger for the IBM Selectric Composer series of electric typewriters. Until January 2004, Monotype’s version, Courier New, was the U.S. State Department’s standard typeface. It was replaced with 14-point Times New Roman.

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Or perhaps a project so shoestring that “real” fonts are not in the budget. Of course, we see through such artifice, but it doesn’t matter. Belief is suspended, and even though we know the anti-design look has been carefully crafted by the designer (probably too young to have ever used a typewriter), we’re happy to imagine that a beaten-up typewriter, worn-out ribbon, and five minutes were the only resources available. As a conduit of pure creativity, this person was obviously too busy with important ideas to worry about the design. On a subconscious level we buy the message: this is the raw stuff. It’s about the content: these are the facts, take them or leave them. There are no stealth messages concealed in a Trojan Horse of fancy serifs, louche ligatures, or coquettish cursives (Figure 5). No wonder, then, that the default font for InDesign’s Story Editor is Letter Gothic. On a purely practical level, in certain situations monospaced typefaces have advantages. If you’re making a grid or

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aligning type vertically, monospaced fonts let you line up the characters (Figure 6). For the same reason, monospaced fonts are a good choice for tabular information. In fact, the default figure style for most

Figure 6: Monospaced fonts line up vertically, creating a tidy look.

Figure 5: Without adornment, monospaced fonts don’t have easily recognizable characters in the same way serifs (classic, authoritative) or sans serifs (cool, modern) have. This hard-to-pin-down character gives them an enigmatic quality—a perfect choice for cult “post rock” ensembles, like Godspeed You! Black Emperor.

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InType: Monospaced Fonts

proportional typefaces is lining numbers, which are monospaced (Figure 7). This is why if these numbers are used in running text, there often appears to be too much space around the 1.

Figure 7: Lining numbers (monospaced) are often the default for OpenType fonts that offer a choice of numbering styles.

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So what about kerning and monospaced fonts? A good font may have thousands of kerning pairs; a free font may not have any—in which case optical is your best option. However, because a kerned monospaced font is an oxymoron, there are no metrics values in monospaced fonts. But if you choose InDesign’s alternative kerning method—Optical—then the program disregards the metrics values and adjusts the space between the glyphs based on the glyph shapes. There’s no right or wrong

answer: choose the kerning method that looks the best—which in large part depends on the quantity and quality of the metrics values. If you choose Optical kerning with monospaced fonts, you are essentially making the monospaced font proportionally spaced. This might be useful if you like all aspects of the font except its monospacedness, but not a good idea if you chose the font for that very quality (Figure 8). Try it yourself: Set the same paragraph in a monospaced font with Metrics (i.e., zero)

Figure 8: Applying Optical kerning to monospaced fonts disrupts their vertical rhythm.

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kerning and with Optical kerning. The paragraph with Optical kerning now has proportional spacing—you can insert your cursor between each letter pair to see how much kerning has been added—and the vertical rhythm derived from each character having the same width is disrupted. Similarly, features like justified alignment and Optical Margin Alignment are contradictory to the ethos of monospaced type. Graphic designers being a contrary lot, it’s not surprising that the wheel has come full circle with monospaced fonts. Designers are discovering that what is old can be made new again. Monospaced fonts, rather than looking dated, can look novel and energetic (Figures 9–13). If a design style or tool falls out of fashion, you can bet that somewhere a graphic designer is strategizing how they can rehabilitate it and incorporate it into their work. After all, anything that hasn’t been seen for a while has the potential to look daring and new.

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Figure 9: Designed for the USA Bureau of Standards in 1966 by Adrian Frutiger, OCR-A is intended for optical character recognition. It was used by banks, credit card companies, and similar businesses, but has recently been “rediscovered” for advertising and techno events. German graphic designer Alexander Branczyk used OCR-A for German trend magazine FrontPage.

n Nigel French is a graphic designer, photographer, author, and teacher living in Lewes, UK. He is the author of InDesign Type and Photoshop Unmasked, both from Adobe Press, as well as several titles in the lynda.com online training library, including InDesign Typography.

Figure 10: Poster set in Decima Mono, designed by Yotam Hadar for the Art of Public Health, a collaborative project between the Yale School of Public Health and the Yale School of Art.

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Figure 11: The website for Atelier Boiron Architectes uses monospaced type to create a sparse, crisp feel.

Figure 12: Menu for the Tangent Café, Vancouver, BC.

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Figure 13: Empire: The Unintended Consequences of Dutch Colonialism by Eline Jongsma & Kel O’Neill shows that monospace can function effectively as body text.

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GREP of the Month

Adding Section Heads With GREP, it’s never too late to organize content with headers. GREP Level: Medium

If you ever have to add section letters to an existing index, you can do that quickly using a GREP query. You use a single query: Find what: ^(\u).+\r(\1.+\r)+ and Change to: $1\r$0. Translation: match and capture a capital ((\u)) at the beginning of a paragraph (^), and then match all following characters in the paragraph (.+) up to and including the return character (\r). Then match a letter that’s the same (\1) as the one we captured earlier, followed by all characters up to the end of that paragraph (.+\r), group that, and find as many as

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Barbera 14 Barolo 2 Beaujolais 10 Brunello  8, 9, 13 Cabernet 4 Chardonnay 5 Côtes du Rhône  11

possible of the same (+). In the example above, ^(\u).+\r matches Barbera 14 (and the return character), and (\1.+\r)+ matches all following lines that start with B. And there’s your section. Now, to insert the section letter (which is the letter we matched by ^(\u)), we replace the section with the letter we captured ($1) followed by a return (\r) and the entire section ($0)—remember that $0 stands for “everything that was matched by the Find What expression.” If you want to apply a paragraph style to the section letters, e.g., to add some space

B

Barbera 14 Barolo 2 Beaujolais 10 Brunello  8, 9, 13

C

Cabernet 4 Chardonnay 5 Côtes du Rhône  11 before and a font style, that has to be done using a very simple, separate query. At Find What, enter ^\u$, and in the Change format panel, enter the paragraph style—in other words, apply a paragraph style to all oneletter paragraphs. Make sure the Change To field is empty, and then click Change All. The drawback of this method is that it makes a mess of any formatting, such as italics. You can convert formatted text to text tags, insert the section letters, and then convert the text tags back to the formatting (see InDesign Magazine, issue 76 for details). —Peter Kahrel

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Best of the Blogs

A collection of the most important and informative articles from InDesignSecrets and InCopySecrets. If you want to add comments or ask questions, just click the title of the article to view the original post in your web browser. InCopySecrets: Adding Hyperlinks in InCopy Chad Chelius | September 11, 2015

Although InCopy is used heavily for products destined for print, more and more of the content that we produce in InCopy ends up in one digital format or another. Very often a copy of a product is exported to a PDF file and posted on the web, but InCopy is being used for other digital formats as well, such as DPS, EPUB, and even HTML. These digital formats have some different requirements and possibilities that don’t apply to print output. One of these is hyperlinks. Although hyperlinks display in print, they aren’t interactive, but in digital they are. Because of this, we should make sure that we define hyperlinks in documents intended for digital output, and fortunately, we can do this in InCopy!

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The Hyperlinks Panel The Hyperlinks panel can be found in InCopy by choosing Window > Hyperlinks. It may not look like much, but it’s a powerful tool that makes it easy to add hyperlinks to web URLs, email addresses, files, pages, text anchors, and shared destinations— likely more hyperlink options than you’ll ever possibly need.

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Creating Hyperlinks To create a hyperlink in InCopy, select the text which you want to become a hyperlink with the Type tool and click the Create New Hyperlink button at the bottom of the Hyperlinks panel, or rightclick on the selected text and choose Hyperlinks > New Hyperlink. This displays the New Hyperlink dialog box, where you can define the properties of the new hyperlink.

In the Link To drop-down menu, you can choose the type of hyperlink you want to create. You have the following choices: »» URL: Links to a web URL. »» File:  Links to a file of your choosing on your computer or on a server. Only works when the final file is exported to PDF or SWF.

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»» Email:  Links to an email address. When a user clicks on this link, it will launch their default email application and compose a new message to the email defined in the hyperlink. You can also define a default subject for the message of the email. »» Page:  Links to a page in the file. This works only when exporting to PDF or SWF. »» Text Anchor:  Links to a specific text anchor previously defined in the document. »» Shared Destination: Links to a shared destination. A shared destination has to be created in advance and is useful if you have several links in a document that link to the same location (such as your company’s URL). Most commonly, you’ll be using URL, Email, or Shared Destination. I’ve chosen URL for this example. By default, InCopy (and InDesign) inserts the selected text after the http:// in the URL field. Remove the text that is inserted, and type the actual URL of the hyperlink you are creating. You can copy and paste from another location if you wish to save time. As a default, InCopy wants to make every new URL a shared destination. Unless you intend to use this URL more than once, I recommend that you uncheck this option. In the Character Style section, you’ll see Hyperlink listed in the drop-down menu. InCopy creates a hyperlink character style by default that colors the hyperlink text blue and underlines it. If

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you’re into the retro early-‘90s blue hyperlink look, you can leave it; otherwise you can create your own or simply choose None from the drop-down menu. Finally, in the PDF appearance section of the dialog box, you have limited control of how that hyperlink will appear when exported to a PDF file. I typically leave this set to Invisible Rectangle, but if you’d like the hyperlink to have a rectangle around it, you can choose that option and then define the properties of that rectangle in the other values found in this section.

Navigating the Hyperlinks panel After adding hyperlinks, you’ll see them listed in the Hyperlinks panel. One of the great features of this panel is the “traffic lights”

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that appear to the right of the hyperlink, indicating whether the hyperlink is valid or not. InCopy actually uses your internet connection to go out and verify that it can access the hyperlink. If it can, it displays a green light; if it can’t, it displays a red light. Brilliant! You can click the Refresh URL Status button at the bottom of the Hyperlinks panel at any time to force the updating of the URL status. Clicking the traffic light will open the URL in your default web browser.

Also to the right of each hyperlink is a number indicating the page of the document that the hyperlink appears on. Clicking that number highlights the text that the hyperlink is applied to, giving you quick visual confirmation of where the hyperlink is used. Implicit hyperlinks will automatically populate the URL field when you create a new hyperlink, but they appear implicitly in the Hyperlinks panel as well and that can make them difficult to identify. You can easily rename a hyperlink by selecting it in the

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Best of the Blogs

Hyperlinks panel and choosing Rename Hyperlink. In the Rename Hyperlink dialog box, give the hyperlink a more appropriate name, and click OK.

Adding hyperlinks in InCopy will make your interactive documents more user-friendly and provide an enhanced user experience for your readers.

The Transform Panel Mystery Contest Mike Rankin | September 23, 2015

Here’s the puzzle and the solution for this month’s contest. In the screenshot below, the image is selected. Why are there + signs next to the X and Y values in the Transform panel and what do they mean?

Your list of hyperlinks can grow lengthy depending on the document you are working on, so InCopy lets you sort the list of hyperlinks in a number of different ways. From the Hyperlinks panel menu, choose Sort and then select one of three options: Manually: The default option, which allows you to manually drag the hyperlinks up and down in the Hyperlinks panel in the order that you wish. By Name: Sorts the hyperlinks by name. By Type: Sorts the hyperlinks by type.

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The answer is that the placed image—not the frame—was selected with the Direct Selection tool. When you select image content in this way, by default the Transform panel reports the

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offset of the content from the top left corner of its frame. So, the panel was showing the distance from the top left of the frame to the center of the image (because the center reference point was selected in the Transform panel).

In the image above, the frame was set to fit the content, so you can’t see the frame edge when the content is selected. Below is an example where the frame and the image content aren’t kissfit. It will make understanding the concept of frame offsets easier to understand. The tomato image is selected, and the selection proxy point (the grid of nine squares on the left) in this case is the upper left corner. So the X+ and Y+ fields are measuring the distance of the upper

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left corner of the selection—the image’s bounding box—from the upper left corner of the frame that it’s pasted into.

By looking at the tomato image’s bounding box (cyan), you can see that the image is indented from its frame (red). It’s a little offset from the left side of the frame and the top edge of the frame. As the Control panel reports, its X offset is exactly .2127 inches and its Y offset is exactly .204 inches. Got it? And the genius winners of this contest are… Marc Biesmans and Rhiannon Miller. Both win a copy of Mastermatic, the awesome add-on that lets you connect master pages to paragraph styles and object styles!

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Thanks to everyone who entered, and be on the lookout for another contest with a new great prize next month!

InCopySecrets: Repurposing Projects in an InCopy Workflow

stories. The problem in this situation is that even though you’ve made a copy of the InDesign document, it’s still linked to the stories in the original file. The figure below illustrates this concept.

Chad Chelius | September 30, 2015

One of the questions that always seems to come up when I’m teaching or implementing an InCopy workflow is how can users repurpose projects. What they’re referring to is the ability to take an existing project and save it as a starting point for another project. I know this sounds easy enough; we do it all the time with InDesign files. But the InCopy workflow presents a unique set of challenges that need to be considered when repurposing files. The Problem To understand why this requires special attention, we need to take a look at why it isn’t as easy as doing a “save as” or making a duplicate of a file for another project. Let’s start with the simplest situation, which would be the layout-based workflow. In this situation, you have an InDesign document that contains linked InCopy stories that can be checked out, edited, and checked back in. If you were to create a copy of the InDesign document for another version of the project with a different name, you might think that all is fine—until you begin making edits to the linked

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What happens in this situation is that if a user edits the story in either of the InDesign files, the corresponding story will get edited, essentially making the change in both layouts. Not exactly what everyone is expecting in this situation! If you use an assignmentbased workflow, you encounter the same problem, as the assignments are also still linked to the new InDesign document. Solving the Problem To achieve the expected result, you need to take a slightly different approach than the traditional “save as” that everyone is used to.

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Solution 1 In this solution, you can perform the “save as” as usual, but then you need to break the links to all of the stories that are currently linked to the document. This is accomplished by right-clicking on each story in the Assignments panel and choosing Unlink Content from the resulting menu. This unlinks the stories, leaving the text as basic static text in InDesign. Now, you’ll want to re-export all of the text in the InDesign document as stories to a new location on your server so that you have a separate instance of each story specific to this document. In the case of an assignment-based workflow, you’ll also want to delete the assignments from the layout and recreate them, again in a new location on your server. Solution 2 In this solution, you duplicate the entire project folder to create an entire copy of the project. Open the duplicated InDesign file, and go to the Links panel. If you look at the Link info for all of the stories, you’ll notice that InDesign is still looking at the ones at the original location. Select all of the InCopy stories in the Links panel, and choose Relink to Folder from the panel menu. Navigate to the folder that contains the duplicated stories, and click OK. InDesign will relink all of the stories to the new location, making this project completely separate from the original one.

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Note: You may also want to do this to all of the graphics in the Links panel if you truly want this project to be completely separate from the original one. Also, if you are using an assignment-based workflow, you’ll want to relink the assignment to the new location by double-clicking on the assignment in the Assignments panel and changing the location to the new location. This step can be misleading, as you’re really not relinking the assignment, you’re just saving a new copy to the new location and overwriting the old one. Using one of the above techniques will allow you to repurpose projects without the need to start from scratch. A similar technique can be used when you have projects of a similar look and feel that need to be created at regular intervals. You can create an InDesign file with linked blank stories each saved in their own project folder. With this technique, InCopy users can actually begin a new project as needed before the designer even receives the file. It’s important to understand that in all of the instances mentioned above, only the InDesign user can perform the necessary steps to repurpose the project. Even so, this technique will save a considerable amount of time compared to starting over every time.

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The Swatch Panel’s Stealth Feature Alan Gilbertson | October 1, 2015

The Eyedropper tool has been with us for a long time. It’s a fantastically useful tool, but, as they say in the ads, “Some restrictions apply.” »» It can select colors only from the current document. »» There are some situations, like complex objects pasted from Illustrator, where it won’t read the color at all unless you click through multiple graphic frames to an underlying path. »» It can’t pick the color at a single point in a gradient, only the gradient swatch itself. »» If there’s a frame with a fill of None overlaying the part of the object you want to sample, the eyedropper will return None unless you hide that frame first. There was much (deserved) ado about the new Color Theme tool, which can read colors from complex pasted objects and from gradients, but it makes its own choices about which five colors to pick. While we were all distracted by the wonders of automated color themes, another wonder slipped in on little cat’s feet, entirely unnoticed. You won’t find it mentioned in InDesign Help, you won’t find it on InDesign Secrets (well, not until now), and you won’t even find it in James Wamser’s invaluable New Features Guide. (If you

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don’t have a copy, what were you thinking? Seriously. Go get it now, and we’ll wait.) See also: Using the Color Theme Tool The Hex Problem Until recently, if you wanted to grab the hexadecimal value of an RGB color to use on a web or e-book project, you had to use a script or other workarounds. And you couldn’t create a new swatch directly from a hexadecimal number without a script. All that has changed. Somewhere between CC and CC 2015 (David says 2014, which is probably right), the InDesign team silently added two items to the Swatches dialog box: a new field that allows direct entry

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of a hexadecimal color, and a new eyedropper that scoffs at the limitations of lesser tools.

The usual out-of-gamut warning will show up if your starting point is a color that can’t display correctly in RGB (say, a 100% Yellow CMYK swatch).

You will find this new feature in the New Color Swatch dialog box, as above, or Swatch Options, when you switch the color mode to RGB. Need to know the hex value of an existing swatch? Rightclick the swatch and choose Swatch Options. The hex value will display in the “#” field, and you can copy from there. Creating a new RGB color from a web spec? Type or paste the hex value into the field.

Double-click the warning icon to have InDesign automatically adjust the RGB values to bring them to safe values.

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See also: InDesign’s Evil Color Picker Photoshop’s Eyedropper Comes to InDesign The new eyedropper works exactly like the one in the Photoshop color picker. (It probably is the one from the Photoshop color

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picker.) Click and hold, and then move the mouse cursor over any color anywhere on the screen (even outside of InDesign). The color in the dialog box updates continuously as you move.

 ee also: Why You Should Import RGB Images Into InDesign and S Convert to CMYK On Export A couple of advantages to keep in mind: You can pick the result of a color blend, if you have overlapping objects. The normal eyedropper will give you the assigned color of whichever object is on top, regardless of what the blend looks like.

When you have the color you want, let go of the mouse button. Your new swatch is ready to add to the Swatches panel. Like its Photoshop twin, this eyedropper reads pixels from the display, not from InDesign objects, so if you have the empty part of a text frame overlapping the object you’re trying to sample, you won’t get a None swatch value, you’ll get the RGB value of that point. And yes, it will only return RGB values, never CMYK or Lab. (If you hear of anyone manufacturing a CMYK display, let me know.)

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You can also pull a solid color from any point in a gradient. These two very useful additions to the Swatches panel are worth making a fuss about, especially if you’re working on any kind of RGB document, such as a web banner, e-book, DPS app, or electronic

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billboard. With a bit of attention to color management, it can even be pressed into use for CMYK work in situations where the regular eyedropper can’t do what you need.

Tips for Background Tasks Eugene Tyson | October 5, 2015

When you export a file to PDF (Print) or IDML, InDesign begins the process in the background. On the front of the program it can look like nothing is happening. But there’s a small sign that something is going on, as InDesign displays a new icon in the Application Bar.

In the panel, you can keep an eye on current background tasks or click the ‘x’ to cancel them. Other than that, the panel doesn’t tell you much. It tells you the name of the file, the progress of the job by a percentage, and it will display an alert if something goes wrong. For example, using a font that does not allow embedding will cause the background task to give a warning about this.

What’s also great about this icon is that you can click it to open the Background Tasks panel. There is also an option to “Show alerts in Background Tasks panel only.” If this isn’t showing for you, go to InDesign > Preferences (Mac) or File > Preferences (Windows), and in General settings, click the button to Reset All Warning Dialogs. The Background Task Alert should now show whenever there is an issue with an export/save. Of course you can still click that option and alerts will only show in the Background Tasks panel, but it’s important to know how to get it back. See also: Why Is InDesign Soooo Slow?

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Fixing Background Task Problems Background tasks can go wonky at times. So if you’re having issues with a file that won’t export in the background, read the troubleshooting documentation at Adobe.com. If you don’t care about the ability to export in the background, you can try turning the feature off. In some cases this will solve the problem and allow you to export your file to PDF. And if you’re still having issues, pop over to the forums and we’d be happy to help out!

Understanding InDesign’s Place PDF Options Jamie McKee | October 7, 2015

A colleague contacted me recently with an issue that was stumping her. She was trying to place a PDF inside her InDesign document before sending the whole thing off to a printer, except only part of the PDF would place. She could open the PDF in Acrobat and see there was more to it than what was showing in InDesign, but she couldn’t figure out why only part of it was being placed. Did I have any idea what might be going on? As we dug into the problem, we discovered what I had expected: InDesign’s Place PDF options had been set to use a different cropping option than what she was expecting.

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Viewing Place PDF options To view the Place PDF options, either select the Show Import Options checkbox in the Place dialog box (which will always show the Place options for all placed files until this option is deselected) or hold the Shift key when you select the text or image you want to place, which shows the Place options for just that file, even if Show Import Options isn’t selected. The Place PDF options feature gives you a preview of your PDF, allowing you to scroll through the PDF’s pages. Whichever page is showing in the Preview (which, unfortunately can’t be made larger) will be the page that is imported unless you change the value in the Pages section to either a different page, a range of pages, or all pages. (You can place a multiple-page PDF if you don’t mind the manual process of clicking to place each page. Search InDesignSecrets for multiple options to automatically place all pages of a PDF.) See also: Placing All the Pages of a PDF Inside InDesign Crop To Options The Crop To option allows you to specify which portion of the PDF page to place, as defined by six boxes: Bounding (the default), Art, Crop, Trim, Bleed, or Media.

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Bounding Box: Places the PDF page’s bounding box, or the minimum area that encloses the objects on the page, including page marks. If the PDF you want to place was created using layers (achievable, for example, by selecting the Create Acrobat Layers option of the PDF Export options for InDesign files), you can use the Bounding Box (Visible Layers Only) option, which uses the bounding box only of the visible layers of the PDF file. The Bounding Box (All Layers) option places the bounding box of the entire layer area of the PDF file, even if layers are hidden.

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Art: Places only the area defined by a rectangle that the author created as placeable artwork, which can be designated in Acrobat with the Set Page Boxes command. If no Art Box is designated, it’s the same as your page dimensions.

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Crop: Places the area that is displayed or printed by Adobe Acrobat (or can be designated in Acrobat with the Set Page Boxes command). Basically, the same area as you see when opening the PDF in Acrobat.

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Trim: Identifies the edges where the final produced page will be physically cut in the production process, if trim marks are present. Trim can also be designated in Acrobat with the Set Page Boxes command. If no trim box is designated, Trim is the same as your page dimensions.

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Bleed: Places only the area that represents where all page content should be clipped, if a bleed area is present. This information is useful if the page is being output in a production environment. Note that the printed page may include page marks that fall outside the bleed area.

Media: Places the area that represents the physical paper size of the original PDF document (for example, the dimensions of an A4 sheet of paper), including page marks.

See also: Place Multiple Pages of a PDF In a Grid in InDesign

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Background Options The Transparent Background option does just that—makes the background of the placed PDF transparent, revealing text or graphics that fall beneath the PDF page in the InDesign layout. Deselect this option to place the PDF page with an opaque white background.

See also: A Script to Show Options for Placed Files

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Layer Options If the PDF you’re placing includes layers, you can choose the Layers tab to turn on or off which layers to show, and how those layers are handled if the PDF’s layers are updated.

Parting Thoughts Finally, as my colleague found out, these options are “sticky,” so InDesign will remember what you set the next time you import a PDF file, even after a restart.

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How to Make Nonprinting PDF Objects Mike Rankin | October 8, 2015

Need to have something visible on screen in an interactive PDF but not printable? Here’s a quick and easy way to do it. Select the object, and convert it to a button using the Buttons And Forms panel.

Then, with the button still selected, go to the PDF Options in the panel, and deselect Printable. You might have to expand the panel first by clicking the triangle next to PDF Options.

When you create the interactive PDF (this trick won’t work with a print PDF), the object will be visible on screen but won’t print.

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Notice the print preview in the screenshot below where our longeared friend is gone.

New InDesign Features Revealed at Adobe MAX Steve Werner | October 12, 2015

Adobe demonstrated the upcoming third version of Adobe InDesign CC 2015 (dubbed 2015.2) at Adobe MAX last week. Along with the requisite handful of bug fixes, the update will include features for finding and selecting special typographic glyphs, enhancements to Publish Online, and a new touch-based workspace for Windows users. Here’s a summary of what has been revealed so far.

See also: PDF Button Tips, Tricks and Problem Solving Tip of the hat (sorry couldn’t help myself ) to Bob Levine for this cool technique, which he shared over at the InDesign User Forums.

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New Features for Finding and Selecting Glyphs Users have been complaining that Adobe hasn’t updated InDesign’s OpenType features for many years. Well, let the changes begin! In this new release, it’s now easier to find and select glyphs, especially from OpenType fonts that can contain thousands of them. The InDesign team has added three new features: »» If you know the font that a particular glyph is in, you can use a new feature in the Glyphs panel (Window > Type & Tables > Glyphs): the New Glyph Search Field, which appears below the Recently Used display. You can search glyphs by their name, glyph ID/character ID, or Unicode value. For example, to find the Greek letter psi, you can just type “psi” into the field. You can even

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search based on any combination of glyph number and name. (Read this article to see where to find the glyphs you need.) »» Contextual Menu for Alternate for Selection. OpenType fonts may have many glyphs for the same character—including swashes, small caps, and so on. Previously, you could look for and view them in the Glyphs panel using the Show menu. Now it’s far easier to see them in context as you’re entering text. As soon as you select a character that has alternates available for it, a contextual menu appears showing up to five of the available alternates. If more than five are available, click the arrow at the right end of the menu to view all of the alternate glyphs.

Control panel menus. Now, when you select the same numbers, you will see a contextual menu for applying the OpenType fraction. To return the fraction to the original numbers, use the contextual menu to select that option. (Note that this menu will only apply to fonts that have built-in fraction support.)

It’s now much easier to create fractions from fonts that support them with a contextual menu.

A contextual alternate menu is available for fonts that contain alternate versions of a glyph.

»» Contextual Menu for Fractions. In the past, if you have an OpenType font that supports built fractions, you’ve been able to apply the fraction feature to a pair of numbers separated by a slash by choosing OpenType > Fractions from the Character or

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Publish Online Enhancements The Publish Online feature is a technology preview that provides a way of publishing your InDesign documents online (as HTML web pages) by storing them on Adobe servers. They can be viewed with a modern web browser on computers, tablets, or smartphones, and they include built-in navigation and support many of the interactive features you can create in InDesign—including buttons, animation, slideshows, video, and audio. Unlike some other export formats from InDesign, this technology doesn’t require special file preparation: all you have to

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do is click the Publish Online button, prominently placed on the Application Bar. InDesign’s August update (2015.1) made the feature available for all versions of InDesign (the first release was only for English versions). It added support for multiple page spreads and multiple page sizes. Problems with hyperlinks in text were fixed, and there were improvements in support for mobile devices. For example, the tablet view now includes an easy-to-use scrollable thumbnail view. Now, in this newest release (2015.2), Publish Online offers these new features: »» Update Existing Documents. If you have previously published a document, you now have the option to upload an updated version. You’ll now see this choice in the Publish Online Options dialog box.

When you click Update Existing Document, you’ll see a list of previously published documents so you can select one. You can also edit the title, description, or Advanced options. When you click OK, InDesign uploads the document to replace the previous version. »» Viewing/Sharing Options. When you preview in a web browser or a mobile device, you are given controls to move from page to page. You are also given viewing and sharing options at the bottom of the screen. You can toggle on page thumbnails, or zoom in and zoom out like you can in a PDF document. You can toggle into and out of Full Screen. Volume can be turned off to shut off the sound, and there is a chance to report abuse. There are also Embed and PDF Download buttons described below.

There are now new options for creating an embed code and downloading a PDF when you view a publication.

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»» Embed Options. Clicking the Embed button at the bottom of the preview opens the Embed on Your Site window. This provides an embeddable iframe code that can be included in a website. Just copy and paste into your web page code. There are options for the size of the embed link and the start page. Click the embedded link to view the document full screen, beginning at the selected page, and then click from page to page.

You can create an embeddable iframe code to be included in a website.

»» PDF Download. Previously, you had to view the publication online, which meant you had to have an internet connection. You also couldn’t search for text or copy it. In the new release, when you upload the document, you can enable the “Allow viewers to download the document as a PDF (Print)” option. If you have done so, your viewers will see a Download PDF button. This will generate a PDF (Print) document in your web browser. The PDF is static, but having it will allow you to view the document pages,

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to copy or search text, or to print the document, all without an active internet connection. »» Transparency Effects. Previous versions had some limitations on how transparent effects could be included. The newest version allows more transparency interactions, but caution is still advised. You may see unexpected results when using overlapping transparency effects with text frames, groups, buttons, animation objects, or multistate objects. Windows Touch Workspace If you’ve seen the “touch workspace” for Adobe Illustrator on a touch-enabled laptop or tablet (such as a the Surface Pro), you’ve probably wondered when InDesign will go down that same path. The answer is now. The Windows version of InDesign CC 2015.2 comes with a new Touch Workspace that is supported on all Microsoft Windows touch-enabled devices, including tablets and touch-enabled desktop or laptop computers. Note that the touch workspace isn’t designed to replace the fully-functioning normal workspaces. Rather, it is targeted for creating basic layout comps in much the same way that Adobe Comp CC does on an Apple iPad. (See “InStep: Adobe Comp CC” by Conrad Chavez, in InDesign Magazine issue #77).

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The new workspace can be invoked by: »» Launching the new version for the first time on a touch-enabled device, and you’ll be prompted to try it out »» Clicking the Touch icon to the right of the Publish Online button on the Application Bar »» Unplugging your keyboard on a touch-enabled device. Plugging in the keyboard switches out of the workspace (this behavior can be switched off in preferences) The Touch workspace includes a few InDesign tools and panels to help you build comps, but laid out in a way that is more suitable for using with a finger or stylus. Plus, there is a new gesturebased drawing tool, so you can quickly sketch out shapes that are converted to regular objects.

Tips for Using the Make Grid Script Mike Rankin | October 14, 2015

Last week I posted a tip about using compound frames to create interesting image effects. In one of the comments on the post, someone asked if it was possible to place the image into multiple frames (so each independent frame shows a different part of the image). The answer is to use the MakeGrid script that comes with InDesign, and David replied that he had shown how to do this in a previous post. But I think I can also add a few extra points here. First of all, why would you want to place multiple copies of an image into a grid of frames? Maybe you need to tweak the size, angle, or position of the images within each frame independently.

Conclusion Undoubtedly, there will be more news to report when Adobe officially releases the next version of InDesign. But in the meantime, we have our first glimpse of what’s coming: improvements in Publish Online, a touch workspace, and better ways to insert special characters and make fractions.

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Also notice that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not limited to working with rectangular frames. Any shape, even ones you copied and pasted from Illustrator, or drew with the Pen tool will work.

See also: Fun with the Make Grid script

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Open or closed paths are fine.

And finally, you can change the type of frame when you make the grid. Use the menu in the scriptâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dialog box to choose a different frame type.

And you can make grids of text frames (including the text). Just remember that in order for the change to take place, you also have to deselect the option Retain Formatting and Contents.

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The InDex: InDex Your Key to Our Content Can’t find that article you saw in an earlier issue? Wondering whether we covered that obscure plug-in? Never fear, the InDex is here.

Index for issues 1 through 79 July 2004 — November 2015

MAGAZINE

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The first issue of InDesign Magazine was published in July 2004. Since then, we’ve cranked out thousands of pages on hundreds of related topics. While it’s possible to use Acrobat to simultaneously search all past issues of the magazine for one word or phrase, many readers have clamored for a formal index at the back of each issue. However, with 79 issues to account for, that’s not feasible. Instead, the InDex will live as a PDF you can download for free. If you come across a topic you want to know more about, but it’s in an issue you don’t have, you’re not out of luck. We sell back issues at indesignsecrets.com.

If the topic you’re looking for isn’t in the InDex, you have one more way to search: that PDF trick we mentioned. To make it work, all of your magazine issue PDFs must be in one folder. Open any issue in Acrobat, and then press Shift+Command+F (Shift+Ctrl+F on Windows). In the Search window that appears, be sure that you click the radio button that says “All PDF Documents in,” and in the dropdown menu below that, choose the folder in which you placed your magazine issues. You’re on your way to finding anything in any PDF!

Click here to download the InDex.

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While this PDF is just for you, you can tell your friends about this great discount: $10 off a 1-year membership use coupon code: friend Send them to: indesignsecrets.com/issues

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Coming Soon! MAGAZINE December 2015

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Templating Tips

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