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▶ Table Makeovers ▶ Using CC Charts

M A G A Z I N E 78 October 2015

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▶ Setting Small Type ▶ Chartwell Review


SPEAKERS INCLUDE: DAVID BLATNER ANNE-MARIE CONCEPCION RUSSELL VIERS MICHAEL NINNESS ERICA GAMET KEITH GILBERT CHAD CHELIUS MIKE RANKIN DIANE BURNS

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DENVER

NOVEMBER 16–18

SESSIONS INCLUDE: • INDESIGN POWER SHORTCUTS • MAKING GORGEOUS TABLES • GREP: YOU CAN DO IT! • INTERACTIVE PDFS THAT WORK EVERYWHERE • GET MS WORD AND INDESIGN ON THE SAME TEAM • ACCESSIBLE PDFS • SECRETS OF THE LONG DOCUMENT MASTERS • BRILLIANT TYPE: CRAFTING BEAUTIFUL TEXT

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InSide: Table of Contents 5

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Taking Tables up a Notch Diane Burns shows how to take command of rows and columns in this tabular tour de force.

Best of the Blog  A collection of the most important and informative articles from InDesignSecrets. 52

InDesign New Features Guide Updated for CC 2015.1

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Multiple Artboards: An Alternative Approach to Importing Layered Illustrator Files

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InDesign’s Publish Online Can Now Be Embedded in Websites

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Creating Cross References with Text Anchors

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Adobe Drops Fonts, Leaves Users Stranded

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Creating Custom Default Swatches

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The Riddle of the Inverted Arrows: Contest Answer and Winner!

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How Keep Options Interact

InReview: FF Chartwell Cinnamon Cooper reviews a font that takes the heavy lifting out of creating charts.

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Creating a Cut Out Graphic

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Copying Link Info

GREP of the Month: The Escape Character Simple and powerful, this is your GREP magic wand for turning special characters into literal characters.

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InDex to All Past Issues

Four Fantastic Table Techniques Diane Burns offers up a cool quartet of tactics to get your tables noticed. Turning the Tables Kelly Anton shares a group of table makeovers that prove once and for all that data doesn’t have to be dull. Topping (Off) the Charts in Illustrator Brian Wood charts his coffee addiction, with a little help from the Cloud. InType: Tiny Type Ilene Strizver enlarges on the importance of using the clearest text for the small-screen job so your readers won’t have to squint.

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MAGAZINE

From the Editor in Chief PUBLISHERS David Blatner, Anne-Marie Concepción EDITORIAL Editor in Chief Mike Rankin, mike@indesignmag.com Managing Editor Wendy Katz, wendy@indesignmag.com Senior Editor Sandee Cohen, sandee@indesignmag.com Contributing Writers Kelly Anton, Diane Burns, Cinnamon Cooper, Ilene Strizver, and Brian Wood DESIGN Rufus Deuchler rufus.deuchler.net BUSINESS Contact Information http://indesignsecrets.com/contact Subscription Information indesignsecrets.com/issues Published by InDesignSecrets.com, a division of The Creative Publishing Network, Inc. Copyright 2015 InDesignSecrets.com. All rights reserved. Reproduction and redistribution prohibited without approval. For more information, contact permissions@indesignmag.com. InDesign Magazine is not endorsed or sponsored by Adobe Systems Incorporated, publisher of InDesign. InDesign is a registered trademark of Adobe Systems Incorporated. All other products and services are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners and are hereby acknowledged. Photos on pages 3, 22, 37, 43, 50, 72, and 74 courtesy of Fotolia.com ISSN 2379-1403

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Confession time: I love tables and charts. It’s true. I’m not just saying that because this happens to be the Tables Issue. I love how a well-designed table can bring order to a big pile of data and make it not only immediately understandable but enjoyable to look at. In this age of information overload, tables and charts are more essential than ever. So I’m happy to report that this issue of InDesign Magazine brings you all kinds of information you can use the next time you have to work with tables. And who knows? Maybe you’ll even have more fun in the process. Diane Burns, a veritable Table Queen, kicks things off with a two-part tabular tour de force full of techniques and tips that can transform you into a table maven. Then Kelly Anton brings us inspiring examples and suggestions to help transform no-frills information into appealing, approachable presentations.

Brian Wood bravely shares the news that Illustrator’s CC Charts can add a level of sophistication—and yes, ease—to adding a strong visual element to charts and graphs. In this month’s InType, Ilene Strizver’s exposition on small type will be very useful to anyone working with text-heavy layouts and charts. She covers both how to choose appropriate typefaces and best practices for setting fine print. And if you want to have more control over the creation of your own graphs, Cinnamon Cooper’s InReview shares her assessment of FF Chartwell, a font whose characters represent data in charts via the magic of discretionary ligatures. We’ve got all that, plus a GREP of the Month by none other than Sandee Cohen, and the Best of the Blog. Enjoy!

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UP A NOTCH Tables make you tired? Sharpen your skills, and learn how to use tables in ways that break out of the same old spreadsheet mold. by Diane Burns INDESIGN MAGAZINE  78

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Feature: Taking Tables Up a Notch

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Reviewing the Basics If you haven’t worked much with InDesign tables, there are a few basic things you need to know. Tables work a little differently than other InDesign objects. First, all tables live inside a text frame. No table stands on its own. The text frame can be smaller, larger, or it may be the same size as the table, so that you don’t see it, but it’s always there. Inside the text frame, the table behaves like an inline object; type text before the table, and the table will move along with the text. Second, in order to select a table or table cells to format them, you must use the Type tool. With the Type tool, you can move your cursor to the left or top of the table and click to select a row or column. Click in the upperleft corner of a table to select the entire table. Click in a cell and drag across a group of cells to select them. Once you’ve selected the cell(s), you can then apply formatting.

Single cell power: important keyboard shortcuts for table work » Select a single cell by clicking in the cell and pressing the Esc key. » To format a single cell, you don’t have to select it first. Just click in a cell and use the keyboard shortcut for Cell Options: Option+Command+B/ Alt+Ctrl+B. As you change the formatting, you can see changes more easily than when the cell is highlighted. » Access the Table Options dialog box by clicking in a cell and pressing Shift+Option+Command+B/ Shift+Alt+Ctrl+B. Again, you can see formatting changes more easily than if the entire table is highlighted. » Select the entire table by clicking in a single cell, and pressing Option+Command/Alt+Ctrl+A.

ICONS (ADAPTED) BY SERGEY NOVOSYOLOV AND ARIEL KOTZER, THE NOUN PROJECT

Rows and columns. Columns and rows. Frankly, InDesign’s table feature is not something that excites everyone. Some simply find tables boring, while for others the process of creating tables is confusing and frustrating. I’m a big fan of InDesign tables. I use them all the time, most often for elements in my layout that look like a table, like an Excel spreadsheet—only prettier, of course. But other times, I use them in ways that break out of that mold, and use them in layouts that don’t obviously look like tables. If you think about it, tables have some interesting and unique characteristics: cells can be merged, strokes can be completely re-worked or turned off altogether, cells can be a fixed height or change height based on what’s in them. And underneath it all is this beautiful grid. Throw in the new graphics cell capability, which has all kinds of interesting possibilities by itself, and “tables” can take on a whole new meaning.

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Creating Tables There are three basic ways to create a new table. First, you can create a table from scratch. If you want the table to be in the flow of your text, simply position your cursor on a new line, and choose Insert Table from the Table menu. A dialog box appears that lets you indicate how many rows or columns you want your table to have, and allows you to apply the built-in Basic Table style or any other table style you’ve created. If you want a table that stands on its own and isn’t part of an existing text thread, you can choose Create Table from the Table menu. The same dialog box appears that lets you specify your basic table setup. The overall size of the table depends on what you do next. If you click, the table will fill up the entire area between margins on your page, and will divide the rows and columns evenly. If you click and drag, the table will be the size of the area you draw. In either case, the containing text frame will be the same size as the table.

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Another way to create a table is to convert tabbed text to a table. Select the tabbed text that’s already in your document, and choose Convert Text to Table from the Table menu. A dialog box displays, letting you set the characters that will divide rows and columns—usually a tab character to divide columns and a return character to divide rows. Your tabbed text becomes a table, and you can format it as you would any other table. The third, and perhaps most common, way to create a table is to import an Excel file or a Word table document. When placing

Figure 1: Excel import options allow you to specify which part of the spreadsheet will be imported, and whether or not to maintain any formatting applied in Excel.

these files, it’s a good idea to use the Import Options dialog box. Select the option in the Place dialog box, or hold down the Shift key before clicking Open. The import options let you choose whether or not to bring in the formatting from the Excel or Word file. Excel import options (Figure 1) also let you control which part of the spreadsheet you bring in. You don’t have to import all the data created by the company bean counters!

Table Mechanics 101 Once you’ve created your table, there are some basic mechanics you need to master, such as navigating around a table and moving, inserting, or deleting rows and columns. When selecting a cell, you can select just the content of the cell, or the entire cell. Click inside a cell and use Command+A/ Ctrl+A to select the text only, or press Esc to select the entire cell along with the text inside it. To select a graphic cell, click on

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the graphic frame with the Selection tool. Switch to the Type tool, and drag to select the containing cell. To move from cell to cell, you can use the arrow keys. You can also use the Tab key to move to the next cell to the right, or Shift+Tab to move to the left. Moving rows or columns is easy with drag and drop, first introduced in CC 2014. With the Type tool, select a row or column, and then position your cursor over the selection. A special drag-and-drop cursor ( ) will appear, and you can simply move the selection to another location in the table, as indicated by a dark blue line. To insert a new row or column, click on an adjacent row or column, and then choose the Table > Insert command. A dialog box lets you set how many new rows or columns you want, and if you want them to the left or right of the insertion point. You can also insert rows or columns by duplicating them using drag and drop (see sidebar).

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Duplicating rows or columns »» To duplicate a row that has content in it, whether text or graphics, use drag and drop. Select the row or column, and then mouse over to get the drag-and-drop icon. Hold down the Option/Alt key, and you’ll see a little + sign next to the cursor. Drag to a new position, and your row or column will be duplicated, including its content.

To delete a row or column, select it, and then choose Table > Delete. If you just press the Delete key, only the text inside the cells will be deleted. Or use keyboard shortcuts, Command+Delete/Ctrl+Delete for rows, or Shift+Delete for columns. Once you’ve mastered the mechanics of working with tables, it’s time to have fun with formatting.

Accessing Table Commands There are several ways to access table commands, and you can choose whichever

»» To duplicate/insert a row or column without its content, position your cursor over the bottom or right edge of the cell until you see a two-headed arrow. You can drag the cell’s edge to increase the height or width. But if you mouse down, and then press the Option/Alt key and drag, you’ll duplicate the row or column, including its format, but not its content.

method suits your work style best. There is, of course, an entire Table menu that contains all the options for working with tables. You don’t need to use the menu at all, but there are three commands that are available only on that menu: Create/ Insert New Table, Convert Text to Table, and Convert Table to Text. All other table commands are available in a contextual menu. In order to get the table contextual menu, and not the one for text, you must select at least a cell, not just its content. Once a cell is selected, right-click

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to display the menu. This is probably the technique I use most frequently (Figure 2). When you select a cell or part of a table, the Control panel changes to display most

And finally, there are several keyboard shortcuts that are useful for bringing up the Table and Cell Options dialog boxes (see sidebar page 6).

Table vs. Cell Formatting

Figure 2: Select one or more cells, and then right-click to quickly access table commands using the contextual menu.

of the cell formatting settings you’ll need, such as text insets, vertical alignment, row height and column width, as well as strokes and fills. When it comes to strokes and fills, you can also change settings using the Swatches panel and the Stroke panel. If you like panels, there is a Table panel. You’ll find it under Window > Type & Tables.

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If you haven’t done a lot of work with tables, be sure you understand the difference between table-level formatting and celllevel formatting. Understanding this difference will help you format your tables more efficiently and is essential to successfully setting up Table and Cell styles. If you look at the Table menu, table and cell formatting is clearly divided into two separate commands. Table-level formatting is, of course, formatting that effects the entire table. But not that much formatting actually applies to an entire table. The number of rows and columns is often determined by the information in your table (or they are imported from another source). Just about the only table formatting you’ll do regularly

is to set a border stroke or apply alternating fills or strokes to the entire table. That’s it. Most of the formatting action is done at the cell level, whether applied to a single cell, several cells, or all the cells in a table at once. Cell formatting includes settings similar to text frame options, such as insets, vertical alignment, and first baseline position (Figure 3). Cell options also let you set stroke and fill patterns for individual cells or groups of cells, and allow you to adjust the height of rows or the width of columns.

Figure 3: Cell options for text include settings similar to those for regular text frames, found in the Text Frame Options dialog box.

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Training Strokes to Behave One of the most effective things you can do to improve the appearance of your tables is to change the pattern of row and column strokes. The default, 1-pt black stroke around all cells just screams “boring!” The problem is, working with table strokes is not very intuitive. I remember well the trouble I had understanding them when I first started learning about tables. The key to working with strokes is the stroke proxy. You click to select the strokes of the proxy that represent the table strokes you want to format, and click off the strokes you don’t want to format. The proxy will change its appearance, too, depending on how many cells you have selected. If you select just one cell, there are only four strokes on the proxy, each stroke in the proxy representing a stroke on one of the four sides of the cell. But when you have several cells selected, or an entire table, the proxy has six strokes: four on the outside and two on the inside.

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Each outside stroke on the proxy, again, represents the individual outside strokes of the cells selected (or the border, if the whole table is selected). But the inside horizontal and vertical strokes of the proxy each represent all the inside horizontal or vertical strokes in the cells you’ve selected. One of these proxy strokes can represent many strokes in your table. Sounds simple enough, but it can easily get confusing to turn on and off the strokes you intend to. To avoid confusion, when you’re going to change the overall stroke pattern of your table, try this: start by turning all the strokes off, and then build the pattern. To turn off any stroke, select it in the proxy and set the color to [None]. This also sets the weight of the stroke to 0 (zero). By starting with no strokes, it’s easy to figure out which strokes you want to format. In fact, turning off all the strokes on a table gives you the flexibility to use tables in all kinds of new ways. It’s the first step to

Stroke proxy selection shortcuts It’s good to mix up stroke patterns in your table. But turning on and off parts of the stroke proxy can be tedious. Use these clicking shortcuts instead of clicking strokes one by one. C A B A. Click once at the intersection of

the inside strokes to turn the inside strokes on/off. B. Click once on any corner point to

turn the two adjoining strokes on/off. C. Click twice on any outside stroke to

turn off/on all outside strokes. Triple-click on any stroke or point to turn all strokes on/off.

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Set strokes for an entire table You can use alternating row and column strokes to set stroke patterns for your entire table. In the Alternating Row/Column Strokes tabs of the Table Options dialog box, set the Alternating Pattern to Every Other Row/Column. Set the weight, stroke, and color of the First stroke to be the same as the Next stroke. This technique allows you to create stroke patterns that don’t require cell formatting or cell styles.

freeing your tables from that spreadsheet look, allowing you to use the underlying grid of a table to work for you in other types of layouts that don’t even look like tables at all. On page 13, you can see an example of how I used a table this way in a recent project. It provided the perfect solution to our layout challenge.

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To create a table that by default has no strokes, set Row and Column strokes Color to [None], and set the Border stroke color to [None]. You can easily capture these settings in a table style and use it throughout your document. Or make it the default style by clicking on the style name when no table is selected.

Make Friends with Styles If you create a table only occasionally, you may never need table or cell styles. But they can be helpful in a number of ways. Table and cell styles can help you: »» Apply cell formatting to any table more quickly. »» Speed up the process of applying the same table design across several different tables and help ensure formatting consistency.

»» Maintain formatting when updating a linked Excel or Word table. »» Create cleaner code when exporting to reflowable ePub files. Table and cell styles can be a little tricky at first, though, because while they work similarly to text or object styles in some ways, they work quite differently in others. And it doesn’t help that some of the formatting we can apply via Table and Cell options cannot be captured as part of the style. More on that in a moment. Both table and cell styles can be defined like other styles: by either opening the style option dialog box and specifying various format settings, or by selecting a cell or table that’s already formatted and creating a new style based on that format. Table and cell styles can be loaded into other documents, too, like other styles. Choose Load Styles from the Table or Cell Styles panel menu, and point to the document that contains the styles you want to bring into your current file.

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Cell styles are important to use because they can help you format tables more quickly, even if you don’t use them as part of a table style. Cell styles allow you to define all the attributes found in the Cell Options dialog box, with the exception of row height and column width. Row height and column width have to be set manually, separately from the style. This can be a little confusing at first, but it’s best to just accept it and move on, because cell styles can otherwise be immensely useful. Cell styles do let you apply all text options such as insets and vertical alignment, as well as all fill and stroke options. And a real bonus of cell styles is that they allow you to format the text within a cell by applying a paragraph style as part of the cell style. Table styles let you apply the attributes found in the Table Options dialog box, such as the border stroke, alternating fills, and alternating strokes. You cannot, however, specify the number of header or footer

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rows. You must change the rows using the Convert to Header/Footer Rows command. Table styles’ real power is in the unique ability that lets you assign cell styles to different parts of the table. Once the appropriate cell styles are set up, they can be assigned to five regions of the table: the header row, footer row, the left column, the right column, and the center, or body, cells of the table (Figure 4).

LOCATION

Left column

Footer row

This “zonal” approach to applying cell styles means that you can often use a table style to do all the formatting for you. Table styles can take a little time to set up, and you’ll always have to set the row heights and column widths, and convert header and footer rows as necessary. But then, with one magic click, your table will be formatted. Often, though, you’ll find that a table style can’t format every single cell. Maybe

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Sugarloaf Key, Bow Channel

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Big Coppitt Key

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Body rows Figure 4: A table style lets you assign cell styles to any one of five “zones” in your table.

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your left and right header cells don’t have the same borders as the rest of the cells in the header. Or maybe you have highlight colors on various rows in a pattern that can’t be captured in assigning alternating fills. In these kinds of cases, you may need to create what I call a “fix it” cell style. This is a cell style that takes care of styling cells that don’t strictly adhere to the “zones” formatted by the table style. Still, using a table style with “fix it” cell styles can really speed up the process of applying the same format to multiple tables.

Resizing graphics When you work with multiple images in graphic cells, you’ll often want to resize several images in the same row or column at once. Here’s how. 1. Use the Type tool to select all images.

2. In the Control panel, set all images to

Auto Fit.

3. Go to the Graphics tab of the Cell

Options dialog box, and adjust the insets, or change the insets in the Control panel. The graphic frame will get smaller, as will the images within. Cropping will be unchanged.

Working with Graphic Cells One of the most significant new table features in InDesign CC 2015 is the ability to create graphic cells. Graphic cells make it much easier to work with images in tables. They are also a new object type with some interesting characteristics. Graphic cells can be created in one of two ways. First, you can place a graphic directly in a cell. That’s it. Just choose the Place

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command and place the image—no need to select the Type tool first. You can also create a graphic cell by selecting a cell and choosing Table > Convert Cell to Graphic Cell. A graphics frame is created in the cell. With either technique, a graphic frame is created that has no fill or stroke applied, and has the fitting option Fill Frame Proportionally set. One interesting thing about these graphic frames is that the edge of the

Figure 5: Graphic frames within graphic cells can be modified just as other frames, including changing the frame shape or applying effects.

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graphics frame is “glued” to the cell edge. Resize one, and the other will resize, too. While the sizing of the graphic cell is tied to the cell size, and vice versa, the graphic frame in the cell otherwise functions as any other graphics frame in InDesign. You can resize the graphic within the frame. You can apply a stroke, add points to the frame, or even change the shape of the frame using Object > Convert Shape (Figure 5). You can create and apply object styles to the frame. These kinds of changes have to be applied to each frame one by one, by first clicking the frame with the Selection tool. However, If you select multiple graphic cells using the Type tool, there are other formatting changes you can make. When you select graphic cell(s) using the Type tool, there are three attributes you can control. First, in the Graphic tab of the Cell Options dialog box, you can set insets for the graphic frame. These insets will push the edge of the graphic frame away from the edge of the cell. The two remain connected,

Figure 6: With graphic cells selected with the Type tool, the Control panel lets you set various fitting options and apply effects to the graphics.

though, with the insets applied. Graphic insets can be part of a cell style. In the Control panel, two other settings become available (Figure 6). You can choose different fitting options, such as Fit Content Proportionally, Center Content, or Auto Fit. You can also apply transparency effects, such as Drop Shadows or Bevel and Emboss. These settings cannot be included as part of a cell style, but they are easy to apply to multiple cells at once by selecting the cells with the Type tool first. The Table menu also has commands for converting a graphic cell back to a text cell. In this case, the existing graphic frame will be anchored in the text cell. You cannot convert a text cell to a graphic cell if there is text in the cell; the option will be grayed out. Only empty text cells can be converted.

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If you merge two graphic cells, both graphic frames will be anchored in the cell, with a line break between. This is the same behavior as when you merge two text cells with text in them, i.e, a return or line break will be added between the two bits of text.

Tricks of the Trade Once you start working with InDesign tables and understand all the things you can do with them, you can start busting out some new moves. Here are a few ideas about things you can try, with examples on the following pages. »» Experiment with anchored objects. You can create type in text frames anchored inside a table cell that have a non-rectangular shape, as shown in the example on page 20. »» Create anchored shapes and use them to change the shape of table cells from rectangular to something a little more interesting. See the example on page 21.

»» Don’t get stuck in a traditional row and column grid. It’s easy to merge cells, or to split them horizontally or vertically. I use this all the time, especially with tables that are acting as the invisible grid for a layout, as in the example on page 18. You can use this invisible grid technique, turning off all the strokes and the border, when creating step-by-step instructions that include an illustration adjacent to each step. Create a two-column table: one for the instruction text, the other for the image. It makes the layout easy, and your readers will never realize there’s a table on the page. The possibilities are infinite. I discover new capabilities for tables all the time. As you work with tables, take the time to experiment. Check out the following examples, and have fun taking your tables up a notch!

Other power tips To further inspire your table techniques, click to see these helpful posts from indesignsecrets.com: »» Learn how to use graphic cells to create special “endcaps” in tables. »» Create dynamic, easily updated pull quotes using a table. »» Create a different stroke color for two adjacent cells. »» Use cell styles to create a complex diagram. »» Create a “continued” heading for tables that run over multiple pages. »» Don’t lose your cell formatting when updating tables! »» Transpose row and column data (with a little help from Excel).

n Diane Burns (@dianeburns_sf) is a San Francisco-based consultant and Adobe Certified Instructor in InDesign. She is author of the Lynda.com course InDesign Tables In Depth and co-author of the Adobe Press book Digital Publishing with Adobe InDesign CC.

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Highlight a row or column There are several ways to emphasize data in your table; this is one of my favorites. Format a row or column to appear to be larger than all the others in the table. This technique involves some simple trickery. Add a new row or column, and set the fill and stroke so that it looks like the row or column is longer. Set the adjacent cells in the new row or column to have a fill and stroke of [None]. In this example, the middle column is highlighted using these steps: 1. Make the middle column wider. 2. Add an extra row above the table; move

the “Company” label into the new row. 3. Give all the adjacent cells a fill and stroke of

[None]. 4. Merge the price cell with the now-empty

cell above it. 5. Enlarge the text frame containing the price.

In this example, the text frame is 5-sided, filled with a gradient, and then anchored in the cell.

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Using tables to tame complex layouts I can’t tell you how many times tables have helped me solve complex layout problems for entire pages. Tables help you “freeze” a grid into place and allow you to work within it while maintaining the structure. Here is an example from BioCentury, a company that publishes weekly subscription-based newsletters covering the business side of the biotech and pharmaceutical industries. Their publication Week in Review starts each of four sections with a visual compilation of the data contained in the issue, showing a series of Excel charts or graphs, along with summary information at the top of the page. Because the publication is just one of many that goes out each week, the design of these pages is uniform. The goal was to set it up so that the production staff has to do little or no adjustment to each page. This was accomplished beautifully by setting up each page as a large InDesign

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The cover page for each section of this newsletter contains various charts and graphs, along with headings and a data summary at the top.

The entire page is contained in a table, with all strokes and the border off. Various cells are merged to accomodate the necessary grid structure of the page.

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table. Each table contains seven rows and two primary columns. Because the team creating the data visuals in Excel wanted to bring variety to the way the information is presented week by week, we established five different layouts, each accommodating a different number and size of charts and graphs. Biocentury uses InCopy and a Woodwing Enterprise system, so the tables were set up as InCopy templates, which the data visual team populates with the appropriate charts and graphs, data, and titles. The InDesign production team simply links the InCopy table to their InDesign layout, and their job, on these pages at least, is done. Think about using tables for establishing fixed grids for your pages. They can help keep form and order in a way that regular old text and graphics frames cannot.

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Various layouts were developed, starting with the 2-on-2 grid shown on the previous page, and then merging various cells to create other layouts, such as 2-on-1, 1-on-1, and so forth.

The table was initially set up with seven columns to accommodate these data summaries, the space on either side, and an empty column to enforce the gutter width and maintain the layout grid. Graphic cells are set to Fit Content Proportionally (these are anchored graphics frames in CC2014 and earlier).

Fixed height rows with specific inset settings are used for the page section name and chart titles.

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Tables for ultra-gridify Using graphic cells in tables takes gridify to a whole new level. To create this example: 1. Choose Table > Create Table, and specify

6 rows and 4 columns. Click near the top margin to automatically fill the page with the table. Select all cells in the table, and choose Table > Convert to Graphic Cell. 2. Decide how you want to break up the grid.

Here, we selected the four center cells and merged them, along with two cells in the second row to hold the text. Delete the extra graphic frames before merging to avoid extra returns when you merge.

A table of graphic cells makes it easy to create a grid of images with text interspersed. Merging cells and increasing insets changes the layout of the grid.

3. If you want to make the rounded corners

on each frame as shown in this example, create object styles for each, and apply. 4. Create the text frame separately. Use

Convert to Text Cell, and paste the text frame, which will be anchored in the cell. 5. If you want to increase the space between

images, change the insets for those cells. 6. Change the background color by selecting

the table and applying a fill color.

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Feature: Four Fantastic Table Techniques

Changing cell shapes Here’s a handy trick for using anchored objects to change the shape of your table cells. Draw a shape that will appear at the intersection of cell strokes, as in our example here. This example uses a shape that mimics a rounded corner, but you could also use circles, diamonds, or triangular shapes. The key is to anchor the shape at the beginning of the text in a cell, or its adjacent cell. The top and left insets must be the same for all cells in the table, so that you can set the horizontal position of the anchored shape relative to the Anchor marker, and the vertical position relative to the baseline. If the shape falls at the right edge of a cell, anchor to the cell to the right. That way, even if you change the column width, the shape will be in the correct position. You don’t have to anchor a shape at the cell intersections. You can use shapes anywhere on the cell edge to create the illusion of a non-rectangular cell.

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Shapes are anchored at the beginning of the text in each cell or adjacent cell, horizontally relative to the Anchor marker. This allows columns to be resized while the objects maintain their position relative to the appropriate cell edge. (The image you see below is a composite; you can’t select multiple anchored objects.)

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By Kelly Kordes Anton

Turning the Tables

Tables don’t have to be boring! All it takes is a little effort and a willingness to think outside the box(es). Every time I ask my friend Andrea Späth, a graphic designer from Germany, for samples of great tables in the publications she works on, she sends me pictures of actual tables—coffee tables, dining room tables, end tables. Once we solve the translation problem, she reminds me that her publications involve more furniture than data. Fortunately, other designers I work with have more boring projects that do require tables. And that’s how we all tend to think of tables, right? Boring. As you’ll see here, sometimes the data itself may seem boring, but the design doesn’t need to be. With a combination of tried-and-true graphics principles coupled with the excitement of you-can-break-the-rules-if-you-know-them techniques, you can design clear, inviting, memorable tables. In this article we’ll be looking at a few before-and-after examples and talk about a couple of principles; along the way you’ll see some cool table designs that will inspire you.

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Feature: Turning the Tables

Alternating Colors, and Other Easy Additions Sometimes the best solution to the challenge of a mild-mannered, basic table is, quite simply, to make it into a nicer table. In our first example, admittedly dry data in a Microsoft Word table is transformed into a sophisticated, easy-to-read chart for a stock-photo company (Figure 1). According to Matt Bargell, president and CEO of design firm Norden41, “On tables where I have two rows or more, I almost always stagger each row’s background color from white to a screen of a light color to provide a visual guide for the viewer.”

Figure 1: Alternating soft background colors, a spiffier font, and some color and texture in the heading area make this list of types of photo paper a more pleasant and legible read.

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Feature: Turning the Tables

Appeal to Different Senses In the example above, it seems obvious— almost inevitable, even—that the way to improve the table is to build a better table. But another table isn’t always the perfect design solution. In our next example, Tim Giesen, principal of Straightline Design Co., transformed a typical top-10 list into what he calls a “charticle” with a loose table format. This three-column, 10-row table breaks the grid to engage the readers and bring a potentially dry subject to life. “I am always looking for ways to grab the reader’s attention and provide entry points into the content,” says Giesen. “By breaking the copy into smaller pieces with type elements and smart graphics, we can provide these entry points. And, once engaged by a portion of the content, we find the reader continuing through the balance of the information.” This blog story remains very popular for digital filing-cabinet company FileThis.com (Figure 2).

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Figure 2: Straightline Design broke up the data, added graphics, and played with the type to turn a hot-off-the-daisywheel plain text list into an engaging reading experience.

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Feature: Turning the Tables

Please don’t run away—read me! For a medical newsletter, Giesen took detailed information that was provided in paragraph form, organized the details into a table, and highlighted the information with different type colors (Figure 3). The first column, which shows the topic (such as PSA), features rotated and reversed type. As you can see from the original submission (a Word file), he transformed an intimidating block of text on somewhat stressful subject matter into a welcoming table that seems to say, “Just a few snippets of information. Come on in and take a look.”

Figure 3: What a difference a font makes: Difficult information is more approachable with good visual presentation (but we’ve been telling you that for years).

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Feature: Turning the Tables

Set a strong visual base for differentiation The more sections of data your table needs to show, the more you have to make things easy to find and distinguish—which happens to be something that InDesign tables can really help with. In a brochure for a company that provides color proofs, Matt Bargell imported an Excel file and formatted it with InDesign table and cell styles (Figure 4). Reverse type clearly indicates the table headings, and the generous cell padding throughout makes the small text easy to read. According to Bargell, “As a general rule, I use tables when I have more than six items that I need to show in a matrix. Once you get the hang of it, InDesign’s table features are very flexible for adding rows or columns. I find it totally coolsville that I can simply highlight an entire row (or column) and change text formatting, cell line weights, and color fills.”

Figure 4: Especially with repetitive or very-similar content items, visual formatting distinctions are extremely welcome—and so easy to apply.

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Feature: Turning the Tables

Rules are made to be broken Now we start to break the rules a little more. Tom Visocchi, the art director of the shortlived Denver Magazine, added interest to typical tables with interesting header rows. In the chart in Figure 5, he staggered the height of the headers to match the text. In the project shown in Figure 6, he placed reverse type in rounded-corner frames to really call attention to each column head. In both cases, Visocchi favored white horizontal grid lines and dotted vertical grid lines. In Figure 6, he incorporated images in cells along with images wrapping around text in cells. Both of these tables were textheavy—a full page long—so these design elements help break the information down for the reader.

Figure 5: Break out of the box by expanding header rows into the space above the table.

Figure 6: Pulling out all the stops with rounded corners, a mixture of stroke styles, and an image that spans cells.

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Feature: Turning the Tables

Calendars Tables are ideal for calendar pages. And as we’ve already seen, InDesign really “gets” tables and gives you a lot of room for fun and creativity. Here, Giesen of Straightline Design enlivened the table with both an image and text balloon to really highlight an event on Aug. 1 (Figure 7). Depending on the number of events each month, this newsletter’s calendar is sometimes a simple bulleted list and other times a full-fledged calendar page. The pages often incorporate related graphics from newsletter stories in the issue.

Figure 7: A photo and speech bubble can grab the eye of a reader who might otherwise breeze past the all-too-familiar form of a calendar.

The Art of the Chart Even by looking through just the examples in this article, it’s clear we’ve come a long way in the presentation of concentrated information and “small print.” The latitude and power given to us designers in this area means definitely more fun for us, and, I think, a giant leap forward for everyone who has to read charts and tables.

n Kelly Kordes Anton is a freelance writer who lives in Littleton, Colorado.

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By Brian Wood

Topping (Off) the Charts in Illustrator Yes, I said Illustrator, but bear with me.

Figure 1: Illustrator CC Charts in action.

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People have been clamoring long and loud for better abilities to work with charts and graphs in InDesign. Gosh, you’d think people are interested in conveying data in compelling and attractive ways or some such pipedream. Well, we’re now a big step closer to that goal, with Creative Cloud Charts (Figure 1). Creative Cloud Charts (Preview) is a new service that lets you create and edit Illustrator CC charts using the Adobe Creative Cloud and CC Libraries. The charts you create are stored in a Creative Cloud library and can be brought into InDesign CC or Photoshop CC. Note that CC Charts is a “technology preview,” which means they are not fully baked, as you will soon see, but you

can begin to work with them today if they fit into your project, and like I said, this is a big leap forward. In this article, we’ll explore CC Charts (Preview) in Illustrator by creating, editing, and sharing a chart. If you want to follow along on your machine, you need to be a Creative Cloud subscriber, and you need to have Adobe Illustrator CC (2015) installed.

Creating a chart After you launch Illustrator, currently the first step in working with Adobe CC Charts is to make sure that the feature is enabled in Illustrator CC. Like I mentioned, CC Charts is part of a technology preview, so you can see what is coming down the road, which

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Feature: CC Charts

means the functionality can be turned on and off. With Illustrator open, press Command+K (Mac) or Ctrl+K (Windows) to open the Preferences dialog box. Click on the Technology Preview category. You will see “Enable Creative Cloud Charts (Preview).” Make sure that the option is selected, and click OK (Figure 2). Note: If the Creative Cloud Charts (Preview) option was not selected, you

Figure 2: Set the stage for using Charts.

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will need to restart Illustrator before you continue. With the chart functionality enabled, you can now begin to explore the world of CC Charts. Make sure you have a document open, and also make sure you have an Internet connection. While you can create a chart with no Internet connection, currently most of the power of CC Charts, like managing chart data and other options, lives in the Creative Cloud. With a document open, select the CC Charts tool in the Tools panel (Figure 3). The new CC Charts tool is the default charting tool and the only one that works with Creative Cloud. The charting tools that have been in Illustrator forever are still there under the CC Charts tool, and work pretty much the same way as they have. Click and drag somewhere in the document to create a chart. The size of the area you drag will determine the size of the chart. You can easily resize the chart later, so it doesn’t have to be exacting to start with.

Tip: Like other drawing tools, if you just click with the CC Charts tool, you can set a precise size in the Chart dialog box that appears. After you’re done drawing the chart, something sort of unexpected happens (at least it was unexpected to me). The Document window is covered by a generic

Figure 3: The all new CC Charts tool.

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Feature: CC Charts

“how-to” screen that leads you through the general process for creating and editing a Creative Cloud chart (Figure 4). You can browse through this, and then click the X in the corner, never to see it again (unless you really want to). Tip: You can always get back to the chart how-to by selecting a chart you created in Illustrator CC, and then clicking the “i” icon

Figure 4: A bit of how-to, courtesy of Adobe.

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in the chart menu to reopen what Adobe refers to as “quick-assist screens” (Figure 5). After you dismiss the how-to, you can see a column chart appear, and a series of options above or below it in a menu. By default, CC Charts creates a column chart. At this moment, there are two types of charts available: Scale By Value and Column. As time goes on, Adobe will most likely add more chart types and other functionality (you can see grayed out buttons in the menu for several other kinds of charts). But for now, you can choose between the two functional chart types by clicking the corresponding button in the menu that appears below the chart (Figure 6).

You’re now ready to start customizing your new chart. You can edit the appearance and data using a few methods. Which part of the chart you edit first (data or appearance) is totally up to you. I tend to jump into figuring out the data, and then make it look a little prettier.

Figure 5: How to get back to the how-to.

Figure 6: Picking the right type of chart.

Editing the Chart in Creative Cloud In order to edit the data for the chart, you need an Internet connection, since editing is done in the Creative Cloud. Personally, I

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Feature: CC Charts

would like to edit the data locally, and then when an Internet connection was available the data would be synced from my local copy, but I’m a dreamer (and hey, this is just a technology preview). To edit the chart data, start by taking the Selection tool, and clicking the chart to select the whole thing. When the chart menu appears, click the Edit On Creative Cloud button (Figure 7) to make changes to the data and other appearance changes.

After clicking the Edit On Creative Cloud button, the chart is added to your library in the Libraries panel (Figure 8). This is how it can be transferred between Illustrator CC and the Creative Cloud as well as to other Adobe applications like InDesign CC and

Figure 7: Edit the chart on Creative Cloud.

Figure 8: The chart saved in your Library.

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Photoshop CC. For more information on working with Creative Cloud Libraries, take a look at Adobe Help. Your default browser should also open, logging you in to the Creative Cloud. The chart preview appears on the page that opens, along with options for editing the chart data, chart options, and more. On the right side of the page, you will see Chart Elements (Figure 9, next page). Here you can set appearance options depending on the type of chart selected in Illustrator. After setting chart options, you can also edit the data that appears in the chart. By clicking the Data tab above the chart preview, you can see what looks like a big Excel spreadsheet (Figure 10, next page). There are three ways to get your data into a CC chart: type it, paste it into the cells manually, or import a text file (.CSV, .XLS, or .XLSX files). To import data from a text file, click the + button next to the Data tab or click the Import Data button on the right. I tend not to have very complex charts when I use

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Feature: CC Charts

Figure 9: Start editing the chart in the Creative Cloud.

these, so typically I enter the data by hand, but luckily you have a choice. Some of the data you enter may not need to be in the chart itself. For instance, I might want to add text to the data so I know what it represents, or I may have data for a longer

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Figure 10: Getting your data right

Figure 11: Picking what data to show.

period that I need. You can select all (and only all) of the data you want to be represented in the chart, and then click Apply in the menu that appears (Figure 11). Whatever data is to be included in the chart is highlighted in blue after you apply it. The chart will update in the preview to the right. Tip: You can also add or delete rows or columns and sort different ways by clicking the menu option to the right of the Apply pop-up menu (Figure 12).

Figure 12: Other data options you may find useful.

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Feature: CC Charts

After you’re finished making edits, you can save the chart by clicking Save. The chart is synced with your library and will appear in the Libraries panel in applications like Illustrator CC, InDesign CC, and Photoshop CC. One thing to note is that because it is synced with your Libraries panel, the chart will update everywhere when you make a change later. If you want to avoid this, you can “expand” the chart within Illustrator or embed it in InDesign CC, for instance. After returning to Illustrator to see the chart has updated, I can make some final edits by changing the appearance of the bars in the chart to set them apart. This allows me to match a chart key that I created, so anyone could actually make sense of what the chart data is trying to tell them. By using the Selection tool, with the chart selected, you can click one of the bars slowly, several times, to select the same color bars. Then you can simply change the appearance. I selected the Eyedropper

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Figure 13: Sampling color to change the chart appearance.

tool and sampled the fill color of my key (Figure 13).

Editing the Chart Graphics Like I mentioned previously, you can also change the type of chart from the default Column style to Scale By Value. The Scale By Value chart type uses graphics to represent the values in the chart data. We can replace the base chart graphic with one of our own. For this example, I’ll grab some existing artwork I have. You could just as easily create your own artwork, use a symbol that comes with Illustrator, grab vector artwork from CC Market, and so on. Just know that you

Figure 14: Switch to a “Scale By Value” chart.

currently can’t use raster artwork or really complex artwork that contains things like gradient meshes in the chart. With the chart selected, click the Scale By Value button (Figure 14) in the chart menu to change the chart type. Note: Switching between chart types will also replace the data that you entered previously with default data and that is saved as a new chart in the Libraries panel. If you

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Feature: CC Charts

Figure 15: Add your own artwork to a “Scale By Value” chart.

need to get the previous chart back, you can always drag it from the Libraries panel into your document. With your artwork ready to go, drag it onto the chart, and release when you see the message to “Replace Artwork” (Figure 15). The default artwork is then replaced with your new artwork. It may look a bit odd to start with (as in Figure 16), but you can make some fixes shortly. What I love is that you can go into the artwork while it’s in the chart and make edits. In my example, you can see that I have a color key I created for the chart separately (the types of caffeinated beverages). I want to edit both the

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Figure 16: You probably need to fix the default appearance of your data graphic.

Figure 17: Adding a bit of data to a “Scale By Value” chart on Creative Cloud.

data and the chart graphics so that each is unique and represents a part of the data. After you edit the appearance of the chart graphics, you can then edit the chart data by clicking the Edit On Creative Cloud button in the chart menu (Figure 17). Scale By Value charts have different options like scaling artwork and alignment, and like the column chart, they have a data section for editing the chart data. After you finish, once

again, you can click Save to save the chart and return to Illustrator to see the result. With the Direct Selection tool, you can select part of the chart artwork and make changes to each part. You can also select part of the chart artwork and use the Eyedropper tool or styles to apply formatting (Figure 18, next page). I’m making changes to the artwork since each graphic in the chart represents something unique.

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Feature: CC Charts

Figure 18: Make the chart pretty by sampling some color to match your key.

If a chart doesn’t really fit into the area you have for it in your design, you can always resize it, but be careful not to stretch it too much. I prefer to resize the chart when editing it on the Creative Cloud (in your browser), since it can do a better job.

Bringing CC Charts into InDesign With a chart created and saved in the CC Libraries panel, you can access it from any application that supports libraries, like InDesign. In InDesign, if you open the CC Libraries panel (Window > CC Libraries),

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you can drag the chart out onto the page and then click to place it. The chart is placed as a linked PDF that you’ll find in the Links panel. If you need to edit the data in the chart, you can always double-click the chart thumbnail in the CC Libraries panel to edit the data in your default browser. Currently, if you want to edit the appearance of the chart, you’ll need to go back to Illustrator (right-click the thumbnail, and then choose Edit). After you save the changes, the chart shows as modified in InDesign.

ins and outs, check out the Creative Cloud Charts help page at Adobe.com.

n Brian Wood is a web developer, the author of eleven books including Adobe Illustrator CC Classroom in a Book, and the author of numerous training titles for lynda.com, HOW Design University, and others. In addition to training many clients, including Nordstrom, REI, Boeing, Starbucks, and many others, Brian speaks at conferences, such as Adobe MAX, HOW Interactive, as well as events hosted by AIGA and other industry organizations. Brian has a YouTube channel and you can find him at brianwoodtraining.com.

Up in the Clouds and Still Climbing I really like where charts are headed, but I must say they have a way to go in my opinion. I definitely won’t use them in every project, but I have found myself needing to create some simpler charts for marketing materials lately. These will go a long way to fill that need, especially once they move out of their “technology preview” status. If you want to learn more about the specific

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By Ilene Strizver

InType: Tiny Type

Polish off your loupe and turn up the lights; it’s time to peer at puny print. Don’t worry; I promise this isn’t going to be a rant about the eyesight of the aging population and their impatience with type just getting smaller and smaller all the time. The fact is, there are many instances of design that call for the use of very small, if not tiny, type, and it’s not only on the geriatric prescription notifications. In print, these can include captions, credits, newspapers, dictionaries, manuals and directories, and instructions, as well as miniature books. Digital uses include ebooks, mobile applications, and just about anything that might be read on smartphones and small tablets. As more and more people—of all ages—use mobile

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devices to view digital matter, it is vital to consider how any text looks on these smaller screens. For this reason, fonts for small type in both print and digital usage need to maintain their clarity and readability at this range of reduced sizes.

One Size Does Not Fit All Although some fonts work well at small sizes due to the characteristics of their design, others don’t. When selecting fonts for these instances, the best results frequently come from using those that are specifically designed for this purpose. Typefaces designed or optimized for very small sizes need to have some or all of the

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InType: Tiny Type

following characteristics in order to display clearly and maintain their readability: »» Taller x-height »» Wider letterforms »» Open counters and interior spaces »» Conservative stroke contrast »» Generous letterspacing Here is a sampling of fonts intended for tiny type for both print and digital usage: The Font Bureau’s Reading Edge (RE) Series (Figures 1 and 2) are web fonts designed or adapted specifically for small sizes on screen. The collection consists of ten families, all of which provide reliable performance in the 9 –18 px range. Some are optimized versions of designs

Figure 1: The effects of rasterization at 9 px in Mac OS X with Benton Modern (left) and its Reading Edge counterpart, Benton Modern RE (right), illustrating the value of screen-specific design variations.

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originally created for print, while others are standalone web fonts. Although it is often believed that sans serifs have the highest degree of legibility on the web, this collection includes some excellent serif options that are extremely readable due to their skillful design. On the print side, Poynter Agate is a typeface designed to perform well when set at the smallest sizes on newsprint and printed at high speeds. This 20-version family is part of the Font Bureau Readability Series. Monotype’s eText fonts (Figure 3) are preexisting designs that have been

optimized specifically for very small sizes in digital environments. The series includes classics such as ITC Galliard, Baskerville, and Sabon, as well as newer designs such as Malabar and Ysobel. These “rebooted” typefaces have been specially crafted to

Figure 3: Monotype’s collection of eText fonts intended for small text on the web and other digital devices.

Figure 2: Two of the Reading Edge Series fonts from Font Bureau.

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InType: Tiny Type

display clearly on the full range of reading devices (Figure 4).

Figure 4: Lowercase characters for the eText version of Baskerville are taller, and hairline features and serifs are heavier.

Hoefler & Co. offers several Agate and Micro designs intended for sizes smaller than the average print text, including Chronicle, Mercury, and Gotham. Their ScreenSmart Fonts collection is designed for smaller than the average text sizes on the web. This group includes the previously mentioned Chronicle, Mercury, and Gotham as well as Archer, Whitney, and several others (Figure 5). Gemeli Micro by Production Type is another font family designed for diminutive type. It was designed with an enlarged

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Figure 5: Both the Chronicle and Mercury families from Hoefler & Co. include Micro versions.

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InType: Tiny Type

x-height, shortened extenders, a wider body width, loosened spacing, and simplified forms. While Gemeli Micro was designed for type smaller than 8 pt, it also works for headlines and wordmarks, as can be seen in their logo (Figure 6). Freight Micro was designed for high impact at tiny sizes for both print and digital applications. As part of the Freight superfamily, this Micro design (Figure 7) has angular forms, asymmetrical serifs, and calligraphic italics, all of which create an appearance that “whispers very loudly.” Minuscule was inspired by Émile Javal, a 19th-century opthalmologist who was the first to analyze how we read. Thomas Huot-Marchand, the designer, describes Minuscule (Figure 8) as “a typeface for extremely small sizes that can be used under the commonly acknowledged threshold of legibility (around 7 points). At this stage, the loss is so important during the shift to a lower size that I quickly decided to design a master for each size.” For this reason, he

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Figure 6: Gemeli Micro by Production Type

Figure 7: Freight Micro

Figure 8: Freight Minuscule

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InType: Tiny Type

created five versions optimized for use in 6 (Minuscule Six), 5 (Minuscule Cinq), 4 (Minuscule Quatre), 3 (Minuscule Trois), and 2 pts (Minuscule Deux). Bell Centennial (Figure 9) is a typeface designed by Matthew Carter in 1976 for AT&T as a replacement for their then-current telephone directory typeface, Bell Gothic. At the time, Carter was working for the Mergenthaler Linotype Company, which eventually licensed the face for general public use. This sans serif family maintains legibility at very small sizes while saving space with its condensed design. It is available in four variants: Number, Address, Listing, and Sub-caption. Another good alternative for tiny type is the Caption fonts option (Figure 10, next page) found in some font collections. These optically-sized fonts are size-specific versions whose details have been tweaked to maximize the legibility and suitability for very small type. Font families with Captions fonts include Adobe’s Arno, Brioso, Cronos,

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the search button to the left of the font name field.

Guidelines For Setting Tiny Type Setting tiny type isn’t as simple as selecting a font and a size. Even when using a typeface designed for the smallest of sizes, there are still factors that will affect its sharpness, legibility, and readability. Here are some pointers for the best results:

Figure 9: Bell Centennial

Chaparral, Fairfield, Garamond Premier, Jenson, Kepler, Minion, Sanvito, Warnock, and Utopia, Terminal Design’s Consul, and Google’s PT Sans. To quickly locate fonts with caption styles, use InDesign’s font search feature by typing the word “caption” in the font family field (Figure 11). You might want to confirm first that the search preference is set to Search Entire Font Name by clicking

Figure 11: Use the font search feature to quickly locate your available caption fonts in InDesign.

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InType: Tiny Type

Web and digital devices »» Review the appearance of your chosen font at the smallest size and the lowest resolution it might be viewed at so that there are no surprises. »» Be sure to see how your type looks in both a Mac and a Windows environment, as they each render type differently, especially at smaller sizes. »» Don’t forget the hardware: view the text in question on a variety of mobile devices, especially the predominant ones used by your audience. Print »» During the design process, be sure to print the project out at the highest possible resolution to get the most realistic idea of the results you’ll get when your work is professionally printed. »» When printing on surfaces that will affect how the ink is accepted, such as very Figure 10: When looking for a font to use with tiny type, don’t overlook the caption fonts you may already own.

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InType: Tiny Type

porous or very glossy paper, plastic or acetate, glass, cloth, etc., check with your printer or supplier to see how your small type will behave when printed. In some instances the type will spread, and in others it might thin out—either of which might affect your chosen font and specs. All Media »» Maintain generous line spacing for optimum readability. »» As type gets smaller, some fonts will need their letter spacing (tracking) opened to maintain optimum readability. »» Use colored type conservatively and with maximum contrast, especially when printed RGB or CMYK (rather than solid, spot colors), as the layered dots will reduce the sharpness of the letterforms, further decreasing legibility. »» The goal is to know ahead of time what your type will look like to all readers, whether the type is printed or on a screen. Research and total preparedness

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on your part are the best defenses against any unexpected surprises. The fonts featured in this article are just a sampling of those designed or optimized for tiny type, with more and more being added to the mix all the time. Keep in mind that whether they’re used for print or digital, the smaller you go, the less readable some fonts will become—even those specifically intended for tiny type. For that reason, be sure to explore all fonts you are considering at the smallest sizes they might be used for. Although they may not thank you directly for it, it’ll be a service to your readers—yes, of all ages.

n Ilene Strizver, founder of The Type Studio, is a typographic consultant, designer, writer, and educator specializing in all aspects of visual communication, from the aesthetic to the technical. Her book, Type Rules! The designer’s guide to professional typography, 4th edition, has received numerous accolades from the type and design community. She conducts her widely acclaimed Gourmet Typography Workshops internationally.

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By Cinnamon Cooper

InReview: Chartwell

InDesign lacks dedicated tools for making and editing charts and graphs, but this set of innovative fonts fills the void with OpenType features to instantly convert number sets into a variety of chart styles. Chartwell http://www.fontfont.com $25 per font $129 for the full set of desktop fonts Mac and Windows Rating:

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Making high-quality charts and graphs can be a difficult and time-consuming task when using InDesign alone. Most people will make a pie chart, bar graph, or other basic chart in Illustrator, and place it in InDesign. Over the years, there have been several scripts, workarounds, and tweaks devised to get around the difficulty of creating accurate charts in InDesign. Thankfully, Travis Kochel imagined a different type of solution for this problem. Instead of creating a massive graphics plug-in or a series of scripts, he developed a set of fonts called Chartwell, which utilize

discretionary ligature options in Adobe applications to create charts that are customizable and easy to build. The fonts, originally created at TK Type Foundry, are now sold through Monotype. In all, there are seven different Chartwell fonts that you can use to create different types of charts (Figure 1, next page). The desktop fonts can be purchased individually for $25, or as a set for $129 from fontfont.com. Web versions are also available as a separate purchase, with pricing (based on monthly page views) that ranges from $25–$5000 per font.

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InReview: FF Chartwell

FF Chartwell Lines

FF Chartwell Radar

FF Chartwell Rings

FF Chartwell Bars

FF Chartwell Bars Vertical

Getting Started

FF Chartwell Pies

FF Chartwell Rose

Figure 1: The seven Chartwell fonts and graph styles.

While it is a better deal to purchase the full set of fonts, it’s great to have the option to buy just the font(s) for the type of charts you need. You can recoup the small

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investment in a single-font license after creating just two or three charts (or even just a single chart, if you have to update it frequently). And since there aren’t any similar options that exist for InDesign (the fonts also work in any application that supports OpenType ligatures), Chartwell is the best solution I’ve seen for creating charts as an InDesign user. I would also say it is simpler than using Illustrator’s built-in chart tools (or the new Creative Cloud Charts features discussed in Brian Wood’s article). And if you’ve ever tried to create a pie chart in Photoshop before, I suspect you’ll find Chartwell to be a huge upgrade.

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Installing the Chartwell fonts is just as easy as installing any other OpenType font you might use. If you want to use a font management solution, try FontBook (Apple’s built-in font management tool for Mac OS) or any cross-platform third-party font management software like Suitcase Fusion,

Font Agent Pro, or Font Explorer X. Once the fonts are active and available to you in InDesign (Figure 2), you’re ready to create a text frame, type in a string of numbers separated by “+”, and choose OpenType > Stylistic Sets > Set 1. (Side note: I found that having Ligatures turned on was all that was necessary to make charts with Chartwell fonts. I saw others in online forums mention that Discretionary Ligatures was required.)

Figure 2: The InDesign fonts menus: The only user interface you need to use Chartwell.

I created the charts shown in Figure 1 using the same values and colors for each one. The values I used were: 15+25+15+20+15+10. I changed the fonts, but kept the font size at 80 pt, with no letterspacing or scaling applied. However, Vertical Bars, Radar, Rose, and Rings didn’t work well with lower values. This shows that not every chart is valid

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for every data set. I increased the values (40+40+60+70+80+90); the larger values worked better. While it is very easy to get started using the charts, and it takes very little information ahead of time to do so, it is a good idea to read the document that comes with the fonts. This four-page document shows examples of the charts on the first page. The second page provides the four basic steps required to get up and running (always set kerning and tracking to 0, use values of 0–100, apply colors to numbers, and turn on Stylistic Set 1), along with a little more history and information about how the charts are best used. The third and fourth pages provide a few more tips about each chart type. I think this information was added more recently, since I’d seen a few complaints that it was unclear how to create a pie chart with a hollow middle (Figure 3). Spoiler alert: The trick is to add a letter at the end of the string of chart data; the size and color of the “hole” is determined by the letter

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Figure 4: Three varieties of charts with background grids.

Figure 3: A Pie chart with a hollow middle, achieved by adding a letter to the end of the chart data.

you use and the color you apply to it. I’d also seen complaints that for the Line chart, you couldn’t use 0 as an initial number, but this works now. The Rose, Rings, and Radar options are somewhat less intuitive to create and also require you to use letters in addition to numbers. Figure 4 shows examples of each of these type of charts, with a background grid in each. This grid is created by applying a letter (or in the case of the Radar, two letters) followed by a plus sign (+) before the string of number values. If you prefer a visual jump-start, there is a 4.5-minute video created by one of the technicians who worked on this font

that will take you through the basics. You can check it out at Vimeo.com. I also have to thank Travis Kochel and his team for creating documentation that isn’t a horribly designed list of steps. If you’re used to getting documentation in a traditional stepby-step format, you may be a little confused and dismayed. But if you like getting information that is grouped visually by topic and presented in quickly scannable and digestible nuggets, then you’ll be pleased. It makes sense that a designer working to make it easier to share infographics would take care in how the information for this font set is shared.

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Adjusting Charts I’m sure there are many hacks and tweaks that can be applied when creating a chart. One in particular that I discovered seems obvious and useful for the vertical bars chart. In this chart style, the spacing between the bars can be changed by adjusting the tracking. On the other charts, changing the tracking from something other than 0 causes the information to be displayed in invalid ways. But for the vertical bars chart, changing the tracking with a negative value moves the bars closer together, and applying positive tracking moves the bars farther apart. Knowing this will make it easier to adjust your chart to fit your space and the content. To adjust the size of the other charts, you simply adjust the size of your font. If you have a chart with its final edits in place and you really need to adjust the size of the chart without adjusting font size, you can convert your text to outlines, group the item(s), and

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Choosing a chart style While the basic video and the PDF included with the Chartwell fonts are both great, they don’t actually explain when to use each type of chart. If you need help choosing a chart style, a site created by Bryan Connor may be just the ticket. Bryan runs The Why Axis, where he documents “the rise of data visualization in the digital age.” His basic descriptions provide a perfect overview of how and when to use each chart style, and you can also learn alternate names for the chart styles, which will assist you in doing further research. For example, it helps to know that a line chart is also called an “area chart.”

then adjust it the way you would any other vector graphic. As someone who has balked for decades about having fonts converted to outlines, I finally have to acquiesce that this is a great feature to have available. Another key tip for adjusting charts is to use InDesign’s Story Editor to see the chart values and edit them without having to unmake the chart by turning ligatures off (Figure 5, next page).

Limitations One of the downsides of Chartwell is that the numbers you input to create the chart objects are not displayed visually as numbers. This may be fine for many situations, but if you need these objects to be labeled, you’ll have to make callout text frames and arrows yourself. Also, if you create a vertical bars chart, you’ll still need to create the underlying grid to show

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Figure 5: Use the Story Editor to access and edit data in existing charts.

tick-marks for numbering and to share what the content is for the x- and the y axes. But this is hardly a deal-breaker, in my opinion. And if you create a lot of these charts, it would make sense to create a library of basic structures and callouts. Unfortunately, there is one issue that may be a real deal-breaker for people who need

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to chart very precise data. Chartwell fonts currently work only for whole numbers. So if your data includes any decimal values that you need to chart, you’re sadly out of luck. We asked Travis Kochel if there were plans to add support for working with decimals, and this was his reply: “There is a new version in the works that will round decimals to the nearest whole number. I wish it were possible to accurately reflect the decimals, but I haven’t found a way to do it within the limitations of the glyph count in a font.” Until a way to represent decimals is added to Chartwell, you’ll have to take a manual approach and convert your item to outlines and then tweak the chart, which is not ideal, but is still faster than creating something from scratch within InDesign.

Outputting Charts Since content that begins in InDesign rarely stays in InDesign, I had to see how easy it was to get the chart content out of InDesign.

And I was relatively happy with what I found. Everything I printed, on a variety of printers, came out as expected. I feared that older printer-drivers wouldn’t be able to handle the font, but even the almost-dead inkjet printer that I’ve had for 10 years was able to process my page. I also exported my test as a PDF and was thrilled with the results I got using a variety of the built-in PDF settings that ship with InDesign, as well as my custom settings that I use regularly. I also had no problem exporting my CC2014 file and opening it in CS 5.5. The one area where you might run into problems is if you have to output your file as a reflowable EPUB. In order to get your charts to appear in the EPUB, you need to use Object Export Options (choose Object > Object Export Options) to rasterize the container (in this case, the text frame containing the chart data) (Figure 6, next page). Chartwell charts export just fine to fixed-layout EPUB.

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Figure 6: Use Object Export Options to get your charts to appear in reflowable EPUBs.

(Almost) Off the Charts Despite a few hiccups, Chartwell fonts still offer you an elegant chart-making solution that more than pays for itself in a short amount of time. I’m amazed at the innovation that went into the process of using type and ligatures to create the chart objects. And I’m not the only one to think so. Since 2011, the Chartwell fonts have earned several awards from groups like Communication Arts and Fast Company, who gave them the Innovation by Design

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award. Since the fonts have been out for several years, there are quite a few blog and forum posts related to their usage, including several on InDesignSecrets.com and some lynda.com tutorials as well. So, if you are having a hard time getting something to work, there is a good chance someone had that problem and posted a solution for you. Because of the inability to use decimals to create charts, and the need to purchase web versions of the fonts separately, I can’t quite give Chartwell a perfect rating. But I am still very excited about what these fonts can do. And I’m looking forward to using them to take the time and aggravation out of creating and editing charts and graphs right in my InDesign documents.

n Cinnamon Cooper creates streamlined templates and concise instructions at Houghton Mifflin Harcourt by day. And by night she herds cats while designing and producing handcrafted bags for Poise.cc.

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GREP of the Month

The Magical Escape Character

Certain characters perform special functions in GREP. So how do you search for the actual uses of those characters? GREP Level: Easy Some characters, known as metacharacters, have special meanings and functions in GREP searches. For instance, a period (.) will find any character—letters, digits, spaces, tabs—anything except a paragraph return. Parentheses are used to group search strings together: \s(\u|\d)\s creates a group to find any uppercase letter or any digit surrounded by spaces. The vertical line (|)indicates “this or that.” In all, there are 13 metacharacters that have special meanings in GREP expressions: . $ ? ^ * ( ) [ ] { } + |. But what if you want to search for any of these actual characters in your text? For instance, you might want to find periods

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at the end of a sentence, not the “any character” code. That’s where the backslash (\) or “escape” character saves the day. For example, I recently wanted to apply a GREP style to the hundreds of figure labels in 16 documents of a book. These were an uppercase letter and a period surrounded by parentheses—(A.), (B.), (C.), etc. Typing (\u.) in the GREP style field doesn’t work. It completely ignores the parentheses, and then it finds any uppercase character followed by any other character. So it would match A., B., and C., as well as the An in Anyone, I’ in I’m, and my initials, SC. To get around this problem, I need to use the backslash character. Adding the

backslash in front of a metacharacter removes the special meaning and makes it act like a literal character. So \( finds an opening parenthesis, \) finds the closing parenthesis, and \. finds actual periods. The complete code for my GREP Style was \(\u\.\). It’s easy to remember the backslash escape character, because you see it so often in GREP. But if you need a visual cue, think of it as a magic wand that you can wave to convert an ordinary character such as u or d into a magical GREP code \u or \d, or to reverse the spell, and turn the thirteen metacharacters into ordinary characters. —Sandee Cohen

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S N O I S S E S INCLUDE:

ers: ues n g i s or Ded Techniq f p o sh ips an Photo and ial T r t B n e d s Es os an g o L ing Buildtity ner g i s e ry D Iden e v E ques i n h c Te orld W s K CMY Need a n i RGB g n i s U

s You t i b a ting H i d E Old to Break y in h p a r Have pog y T d n Text aoshop ues q i n h Phot Tec g n i h c Retouesigners for D

8 1 – 6 1 r e b m o e d v a o r o N l o C , r e v n De INDESIGN MAGAZINE  78

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S R E K A E SP INCLUDE:

d n a l l e l C c M h Deke t i m S n i l o C r e d i n S a s Le e s r e v n o C s y Chri e l e e S n i t Jus s p a e H k r a M h c n e r F l e Nig 51


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A collection of the most important and informative articles from InDesignSecrets. If you want to add comments or ask questions, just click the title of the article to view the original post in your web browser. InDesign New Features Guide Updated for CC 2015.1

Be sure to check out the bookmarks that you can use to jump to the details of any version.

Mike Rankin | August 13, 2015

James Wamser has updated his indispensable InDesign New Features Guide so it includes CC 2015.1.

The 101-page interactive PDF is free and a must-have quick reference for hardcore, get-a-life InDesign geeks…not that I know anyone who fits that description ;)

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And in addition to being a history of InDesign, it also includes a clickable index of features,

Multiple Artboards: An Alternative Approach to Importing Layered Illustrator Files Ravi Kiran | August 17, 2015

In this article, we will look at how to use the multiple artboards feature of Illustrator for placing different versions of a piece of art in InDesign. As you’ll see, it can be a very useful alternative to using Illustrator layers and layer overrides in InDesign. In Illustrator, we’ll start by creating a document with three artboards. We want to work on a shirt design and create three color variations of the shirt. …and a list of InDesign resources on the web, which you can add to by using an email link to send James your favorites.

Like the Page tool and Pages panel in InDesign, there is an Artboard tool and Artboards panel in Illustrator. We’ll be using these while working on this shirt design. I create the design of the shirt on the first artboard. I’ll rename the artboard, which can be done in two ways: first, when you select the Artboard tool, the name of the active artboard is shown in the Download the InDesign New Features Guide

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Control panel where it can be renamed, or you can double-click the name in the Artboards panel and edit it there.

I select everything on the artboard by choosing Select > All on Active Artboard; then I switch to the Artboard tool, and choose Fit to Selected Art from the Presets list in the Control panel.

Artboard name in Control panel

With the shirt still selected, I choose Edit > Cut, and then Edit > Paste on All Artboards. I change the color of the shirt on the other artboards, and then rename the artboards. Later on, we’ll see why it’s worth taking the time to name your artboards properly. You can

Naming in Artboards panel

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also choose Rearrange Artboards from the Artboards panel flyout menu to tidy up the layout of your artboards.

as you click Open in the Place dialog box). Choose All Pages, and place the individual shirt designs in the document.

If you need a new color variation of the shirt later on, you can go back to Illustrator and do the following: select one of the artboards Now let’s save this Illustrator document to take it into InDesign. Here we can take two slightly different approaches: »» Save with default options »» Save each artboard as a separate file Saving with default options in Illustrator For this approach, after saving with default options in Illustrator, select Show Import Options while placing in InDesign (or hold Shift

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in the Artboards panel and drop it on the New Artboard button, change the shirt’s color, rename the artboard, and save the file.

appended to the parent filename. You can then select and place all those individual files (Red/Green/Blue/Yellow).

Even though you’ll see out-of-date alert icons for the instances of the linked AI file, no harm is done to the existing instances on updating the links—they remain as they were when placed initially. If you wish to bring in the new color version, place the file again, choose the corresponding artboard in the Place PDF dialog box, select Previewed Page, and click OK. Save each artboard as a separate file In the second approach (saving each artboard as a separate file by selecting this option in the Illustrator Options dialog box), the individual files get saved with the respective name of the artboard

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If new color variations are added as new artboards in Illustrator, it’s a breeze to place them, since you can identify them by their individual filenames. Use Illustrator layers when you need them in Illustrator As you can see, throughout this exercise, I worked on the default layer in Illustrator and did not bother creating multiple layers for the different color variations. Of course there are many reasons why you might want to create layers in your Illustrator files. Just realize that you don’t always have to do it for the sake of placing different versions of the artwork in InDesign. And since you can create up

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to 100 artboards in an Illustrator file, this alternative method can handle plenty of versions of your artwork. The next time you have to create and place several versions of an Illustrator file, consider the multiple artboards approach instead of layers. I think you’ll be glad you did!

Of course, first you need to publish your document and view it in a web browser. Then you’ll see that icon. When you click it, InDesign provides an embeddable iframe code:

InDesign’s Publish Online Can Now Be Embedded in Websites David Blatner | August 19, 2015

Adobe has been quietly rolling out new features as part of their Publish Online service, which lets InDesign CC users upload their documents as freely accessible web documents. Because Publish Online is handled as a service, Adobe can update features without users having to update InDesign itself. For example, yesterday morning, they added an Embed button to the Publish Online screen:

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Just copy and paste that into your web page, and it shows up like this (click to view the document below full screen and flip from page to page):

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Of course, there are some caveats: You need to keep your Creative Cloud account up and running (because the document is published on Adobe’s CC servers); and because Publish Online is a work-in-progress (Adobe calls it a “technology preview”), it may change significantly over time. That said, we’re really pleased that Adobe is continuing to improve Publish Online. It’s a terrific way to publish your InDesign documents and make them available to anyone with an Internet connection.

depending on where it falls in the document). However, you can see in the image below that the words “flightless birds” doesn’t even appear on my page! So I’m going to make a text anchor by placing my cursor in the text somewhere, and then choosing New Hyperlink Destination from the Hyperlinks panel menu:

Creating Cross References with Text Anchors David Blatner | August 20, 2015

InDesign’s Cross-References panel lets you create x-refs such as “see Oranges and Apples on page 23.” But cross-references have two important limitations: »» In general, the text you’re referencing needs to be on the page (“Oranges and Apples” in the example above) »» In general, the text has to have a paragraph style applied to it However, I say “in general” because there is an easy workaround to both of these: use text anchors instead of relying on paragraph styles. For example, I want to create a cross-reference that says “See ‘flightless birds’ on page…” (where the page number changes

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That lets me insert a text anchor at the text cursor position. Name the anchor exactly how you want the text to appear in the cross-reference:

When you click OK, the anchor will be placed, but it’s invisible. If Type > Show Hidden Characters is enabled, you’ll see a little colon

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at the position of the anchor. Or, you can see it clearly if you open Edit > Edit in Story Editor:

You can see above that the anchor is in a paragraph that doesn’t even have a heading paragraph style applied to it. (I normally would always use paragraph styles, but I’m just pointing out that it works even if you don’t.) Okay, once the anchor is in place, you can position your text cursor wherever you want the cross-reference to be. Then open Window > Text & Tables > Cross-References, and click the New Cross Reference button at the bottom of the panel. In the New Cross-Reference dialog box, choose Text Anchor from the Link To pop-up menu, choose the anchor you just made from the Text

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Anchor pop-up menu, and then choose Text Anchor & Page Number from the Format pop-up menu—like this:

When you click OK, InDesign adds your cross reference into the text. Here you can see that it’s inside parentheses, which I typed before adding the x-ref:

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Of course, I should probably also go back and add the word See before that x-ref. That’s easy to do. Why bother with cross-references like this? Because page numbers change! If you have 10 or 100 of these, you don’t want to have to update them manually whenever the document is edited. Cross-references take care of all of that for you.

Adobe Drops Fonts, Leaves Users Stranded David Blatner and Anne-Marie Concepcion | August 21, 2015

We wish this were one of our infamous April Fool’s Day jokes, but it’s not. At some point in the near past, sometime after InDesign CC was released, Adobe quietly stopped installing almost all the fonts that used to come with the program. Mike wrote that up here. At a time when Adobe has repeatedly announced its intentions to provide more robust typographic features and support customers better, we have to say that in our opinion, this move is a big mistake. We realized the impact of this decision just recently, when AnneMarie found that at some of her training engagements, students were flummoxed about missing font alerts in sample files that she had used trouble-free for years. The common denominator was that the client companies were new to Adobe products, or the students were in on-site training labs, where hard drive images were installed fresh for every class.

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Here’s the problem: If you install InDesign CS6 (or you’ve been using any earlier version of InDesign), you get a wide array of fonts, such as Chaparral, Caslon, Minion Pro, and a whole bunch of language-specific fonts (for Arabic, Korean, and so on). But if you do a clean install of InDesign CC, on a machine that never had Adobe software on it before, you’ll get: »» Minion Pro Regular »» Myriad Pro Regular, Bold, Italic, and Bold Italic »» Letter Gothic Regular, Slanted, Bold, and Bold Slanted »» and a bunch of language-specific fonts In other words, Adobe basically just gives you the fewest fonts they possibly could to launch the application. Look, we don’t need Giddyup and Birch. But come on… not even providing the italic, bold, and bold italic fonts from Minion Pro?! That’s unbelievable. We all know that one of InDesign’s biggest strengths is its ability to create elegant typography. But Adobe appears to be telling us to do that with Minion Pro Regular, four faces of Myriad Pro, and Letter Gothic. That ain’t gonna happen. To be fair, we fully acknowledge that a CC subscription includes access to more fonts (via Typekit syncing) than you ever used to get with InDesign. And you can read Adobe’s position at their Creative Cloud Fonts FAQ. It boils down to “just sync the fonts you want from Typekit.” But there are big problems with this approach:

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»» A surprisingly large number of InDesign users (especially students and people working in larger companies) can’t grab Typekit fonts whenever they feel like it. As Claudia McCue wrote recently: “In the classes I teach for the continuing ed arm of a local university, we’re going to be fontless when the IT guy wipes out the computers before the fall session and does a fresh install. Instructors do not have access to the Adobe ID/password used to set up the computers, and never will, so no TypeKit. Guess the students will just have to get used to missing font alerts and the festive Pepto-Bismol pink highlighting that follows.” »» Trainers need to create documents that new users can open without horrible missing-font errors. For example, even Adobe’s own Classroom in a Book templates had to be reworked and dumbed down to deal with the lack of fonts. »» InDesign users make use of a lot of fonts. We’re designers. Forcing us to go download even basic, core fonts literally one at a time from Typekit is like telling us that we’re PowerPoint users. »» Not everyone has access to Typekit. If we can’t access the Internet, or we’re behind a firewall that blocks our use of Typekit, then Adobe’s policy means we literally cannot set type in Minion Pro Italic. WTH?! You might say, “you can download all those fonts in other ways” (as Mike’s article described). But that, too, misses the point: Yes, there are always workarounds, but 90% of users aren’t going to

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know about them, much less attempt them. We’re not concerned about experts or others “in the know;” we’re concerned about beginners and people who don’t have the flexibility that we freelancers often do. We have been Creative Cloud supporters since the beginning, but this is an alarming decision that shows either a lack of understanding or concern for the impact it has on both loyal customers and new folks just getting started with InDesign. If there’s anyone from Adobe out there reading this, we strongly encourage you to rethink this, and at least supply a basic set of professional OpenType fonts spanning the fundamental categories of font designs: »» The full Minion Pro family [classical serif design] »» Myriad Pro, including Semibold and Condensed! [sans serif ] »» Chaparral Pro family [slab] »» A script face (perhaps Bickham or Caflisch Script) »» Tekton Pro [handwritten font] »» Zapf Dingbats [a quality pi or dingbat font]

Creating Custom Default Swatches Eugene Tyson | September 2, 2015

When you open InDesign, you are greeted with a few default swatches, styles, and other things already pre-loaded into the panels. Unfortunately, the default swatches you get aren’t the most

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inspiring or useful set of colors you could have at your disposal. So let’s see how to change that default set for the better, and how to include swatches in a CC Library to make them even more handy throughout your workflow. Swatches and Preferences With no documents open, whatever settings you change in InDesign’s panels become the defaults for all new documents. That means existing documents will not be affected, and won’t have the new settings (including swatches); only your new documents will have them. Note that resetting your preferences will cause the panels to be reset to their original defaults. This means you’ll lose any customized settings, including swatches.

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You may need to reset your preferences from time to time if InDesign is acting wonky. And sometimes installing an update, a plug-in, etc., can cause your panels to reset. Creating Swatches When creating custom swatches, I start by creating a new swatch for my rich black, because that’s what I really want for lithographic printing for large blocky text over 18 pt (as a guideline, not a rule!), or for large areas of black ink coverage on a sheet. Note that there are many variations of rich black for different printing conditions. The only general rule is to not go above your ink limit. Don’t know your ink limit? Ask your printer! They can tell you the best rich black formula for their machines and the paper you’re printing on!

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I deselect the Name With Color Value option to access the Swatch Name field, and give all my swatches descriptive names.

So I usually turn this feature off and just add my frequently used swatches to the Swatches panel at first.

New to the Swatches dialog box is the option Add to CC Library. If you have more than one CC Library, you can choose the one you want from the pop-up menu. My one pet peeve about this feature is that it automatically switches you to the CC Libraries panel, taking you away from the Swatches panel, which I find frustrating.

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Saving Swatches Locally Once you have created the desired swatches, save them locally in a swatch exchange (.ASE) file.

Saving Swatches to a CC Library One of the things I appreciate about the latest version of InDesign is that you can now add swatches to your CC libraries. What I don’t appreciate as much is that I can’t do this from the Swatches panel menu. Check out the screenshot to the left. There’s no option to add swatches to a library. Instead, you have go to Window > CC Libraries, and then click the arrow beside “My Library,” (you may have it called something else).

After you save the swatches, you can then load them the very same way via the Load Swatches option in the panel menu. You can also load those swatches into Illustrator and Photoshop, using the same method. And you can even send your swatches to another person, by attaching the .ASE file to the email.

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Then the option for Create New Library appears, so you can create a new library to store your company colors, for example.

And there’s good news in the Swatches panel. There’s a little Cloud icon at the bottom of the panel in the CC 2015 version of InDesign. Select the colors you want (holding Shift allows you to select colors in a range, holding Ctrl/Command allows you to select colors that are not next to each other in the panel).

At this point, you can’t really do much with swatches in the CC Libraries panel. For example, you can’t drag your swatches from the Swatches panel to the CC Libraries panel, which frustrates me, because I live in a drag-and-drop world. But you can add swatches to a library via the buttons at the bottom of the CC Libraries panel.

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Click the Cloud Icon, and they whiz through the air and onto the Cloud to live there.

Limitations of Swatches in CC Libraries Currently, there is no way to get your swatches from the CC Libraries panel to your Swatches panel without having a document open. If you want to have swatches appear as defaults when you open InDesign, you’ll need to load your swatches via a swatch exchange file as noted above. However, you may not need to load them at all if you just want them in a specific document, because you can apply swatches to objects in your layout directly from a CC Library. Just select the object, and click the swatch in the library that you want to apply.

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Benefits of Swatches in CC Libraries One of the nice things about putting swatches in CC libraries is how portable it makes them. Your CC Library travels with you whenever you’re connected. It’s always in the Cloud, and if you work with a team using the same CC login, you can all have access to the CC Library for those critical times like when the company colors change. Even better is that you can choose to share a library, via the Share Link option in the CC Libraries panel menu. I’ve made this one public here.

This means you can share your company colors with anyone in the world. You can update your company colors anytime— just be sure be sure to let your clients/designers/printers know that you’ve altered your colors. Remember, library items are not

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swatches—they are information stored in the Cloud, so changes to them won’t automatically show up in your InDesign documents. Another benefit of swatches in CC libraries is how easy it is to use them in other applications. Go ahead and open Photoshop or Illustrator, choose Window > CC Libraries, and find the Company Colors you created. It’s great to have important colors available in those apps without having to fiddle around with loading and saving swatch exchange files. You can even log in to your Creative Cloud account and go to My Libraries and look at your swatches there—very handy if you’re in a meeting and you can’t recall a specific color you need to discuss with a designer or printer! One thing that frustrates me a bit is that on the CC website you can’t see the breakdown of the color values at first. For example, with my rich black, I can just see the name “Rich Black” and a black square, but no other information.

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I have to click on the swatch to get the details, and even then I only see RGB and Hex values, not CMYK.

If this limitation bothers you, include the color breakdowns (or the Proper Pantone name) in your swatch naming convention, so that information will always be available. And remember, you can see the color breakdown in InDesign if you move your cursor over a swatch in the CC Libraries panel.

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The Riddle of the Inverted Arrows: Contest Answer and Winner!

Choosing Object > Paths > Reverse Path accomplishes the same thing.

Mike Rankin | September 2, 2015

It’s time to reveal the solution—and the winner—for this month’s InDesignSecrets contest! This time, you had to figure out the quickest way to reverse a set of arrows, so the arrowheads pointed in the opposite direction. It was awesome to receive so many correct entries! You folks really nailed this one. It makes me think that almost everyone has had to deal with backwards arrows at one time or another. And the winner is… Rin Hunt Rin wins a 3-month subscription to DTP Tools Cloud!   The answer was to select the arrows and click the Reverse Path button in the Pathfinder panel. Thanks to everyone who entered, and be on the lookout for another contest with a new great prize next month!

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How Keep Options Interact by: Mike Rankin | September 9, 2015

InDesign’s Keep Options are great typographic tools. They can help you prevent widows and orphans in your layouts, by forcing lines of text to stay together. Keep Options can also help articles stay intact by forcing headlines and following text to stick together. On the other hand, Keep Options can also be the source of confusion if you’re working with a document you didn’t create and you don’t know why text is overset or jumping to another frame in a story. So it’s worth knowing how Keep Options interact, and which takes priority when more than one is in use. In the Keep Options dialog box (via Paragraph Style Options, the Control panel menu, or press Command+Option+K/Ctrl+Alt+K), you have four main options: Keep with Previous, Keep with Next, Keep Lines Together, and Start Paragraph.

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Keep Lines Together is your widow/orphan control. You can set a paragraph (or even better, a paragraph style) to keep up to 50 lines at the start or end of the paragraph together. So there will be no sad and lonely lines of text at the top or bottom of any page.

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When All Lines In Paragraph is selected, an entire paragraph will jump to the next frame in a story, or disappear altogether if any of the paragraph text is overset in a single-frame story.

But if Keep With Previous is also selected, it will override All Lines In Paragraph, and the text will jump back to stick with the previous paragraph.

Note the yellow highlighting in the screenshot above, which indicates a Keep Violation (that all lines in the paragraph aren’t in the frame). You can turn this highlighting on or off in Composition preferences.

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Note that Keep with Previous has no effect on widow and orphan prevention. The number of lines you set at Start/End Of Paragraph will still be honored.

This can be the reason why a text frame suddenly goes overset when you move it from one page to another.

The Start Paragraph settings at the bottom of the dialog box trump everything else. They’ll move entire paragraphs to the next column, frame, or page. And you can even specify an even or odd page, if you’re creating something like a chapter or section opener where the title should always appear on the same side of a spread.

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Creating a Cut Out Graphic Mike Rankin | September 10, 2015

create an object style (to apply the dashed stroke, fill color, frame fitting options, paragraph style of the text inside the cut out, etc.),

Ever need to create a graphic that shows where to cut something out of paper, like coupons, cards, or game pieces?

Of course, you can just apply a dashed stroke to a frame and find a piece of scissors clip art or a glyph from a font like Zapf Dingbats. Position the scissors somewhere along the dashed stroke and you’re good to go.

…plus a paragraph style to apply the font, color, and positioning of the scissors.

See also: Making Numbered Tickets But if you need to make a bunch of cut out graphics of different shapes and sizes (and especially if you think you might need to change the design at some point), consider a more structured solution. Place the scissors graphic as type on a path, and then

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See also: Setting a Dash Stroke with Exact Gap and Dash Values

If you want to rotate the scissors graphic, place it in its own frame, and then paste that frame as type on path.

You can also move the scissors along the cut line by dragging the type on a path margins.

See also: Putting Images on a Stroke

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That way, with just a couple clicks, you can turn any frame into a cut out graphic.

Copying Link Info Mike Rankin | September 17, 2015

If there’s one thing I like even better than sharing tips and tricks in the InDesign Tip of the Week email, it’s getting a response from someone with an even better tip. And that’s what happened last week when I got this email from Mary Posner about the tip I sent out on copying a file path from the Links panel: You probably already know about this, but you can also copy any information from the Links panel by right-clicking on the item you want to copy in the Link Info window.

Just beware of any deals that seem too good to be true.

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Thanks for a great tip, Mary! Indeed you can set up the Links panel to show all kinds of information about a placed file, and then copy that information as text to use in InDesign or anywhere else. To customize the Link Info

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section of the Links panel, go to the panel menu and choose Panel Options (or just right-click in the Link Info section).

Then, to copy a particular piece of info about a placed file, click on the filename in the Links panel, move your cursor to that item in Link Info (your cursor has to be over the text; if you’re just next to it you won’t see the option to copy specific info), and then right-click and choose the appropriate Copy option.

Then in the dialog box, select the items you want to appear in/ copy from Link Info, and click OK.

The info will be in your clipboard to paste into InDesign or elsewhere.

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Or if you want to supersize it, you can copy and paste all the link info at once.

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The InDex: InDex Your Key to Our Content Can’t find that article you saw in an earlier issue? Wondering whether we covered that obscure plug-in? Never fear, the InDex is here. The first issue of InDesign Magazine was published in July 2004. Since then, we’ve cranked out thousands of pages on hundreds of related topics. While it’s possible to use Acrobat to simultaneously search all past issues of the magazine for one word or phrase, many readers have clamored for a formal index at the back of each issue. However, with 78 issues to account for, that’s not feasible. Instead, the InDex will live as a PDF you can download for free. If you come across a topic you want to know more about, but it’s in an issue you don’t have, you’re not out of luck. We sell back issues at indesignsecrets.com.

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If the topic you’re looking for isn’t in the InDex, you have one more way to search: that PDF trick we mentioned. To make it work, all of your magazine issue PDFs must be in one folder. Open any issue in Acrobat, and then press Shift+Command+F (Shift+Ctrl+F on Windows). In the Search window that appears, be sure that you click the radio button that says “All PDF Documents in,” and in the dropdown menu below that, choose the folder in which you placed your magazine issues. You’re on your way to finding anything in any PDF!

Click here to download the InDex.

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While this PDF is just for you, you can tell your friends about this great discount: $10 off a 1-year membership use coupon code: friend Send them to: indesignsecrets.com/issues

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October 2015

Coming Soon! Tablet Apps InDepth MAGAZINE October 2015

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