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M A G A Z I N E 77 September 2015

● Awesome Add-Ons ● Publish Online ● Adobe Comp

Fresh Tips


SPEAKERS INCLUDE: DAVID BLATNER ANNE-MARIE CONCEPCION RUSSELL VIERS MICHAEL NINNESS ERICA GAMET KEITH GILBERT CHAD CHELIUS MIKE RANKIN DIANE BURNS

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DENVER

NOVEMBER 16–18

SESSIONS INCLUDE: • INDESIGN POWER SHORTCUTS • MAKING GORGEOUS TABLES • GREP: YOU CAN DO IT! • INTERACTIVE PDFS THAT WORK EVERYWHERE • GET MS WORD AND INDESIGN ON THE SAME TEAM • ACCESSIBLE PDFS • SECRETS OF THE LONG DOCUMENT MASTERS • BRILLIANT TYPE: CRAFTING BEAUTIFUL TEXT

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InSide: Table of Contents 64

How to Install InDesign CS6, CC, or CC 2014

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Making a Line Along the Left Side of a Paragraph

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Cool Use for InDesign’s New Graphic Table Cells Feature

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Undocumented Feature: Export to “Fixed-Layout HTML”

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The Riddle of the Hidden Characters: Contest Answer and Winner!

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Making a Charlie Brown Shirt with Conditional Text

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A Size Trap When Exporting JPGs for On-screen Use

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Dynamic Pull Quotes

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Using the Links Panel to Locate the Original Raw Image

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InDesign CC 2015.1 Released

Best of the Blog  A collection of the most important and informative articles from InDesignSecrets.

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Creating Smarter Text Styles for Long Documents

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InDex to All Past Issues

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27

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Fresh Tips An all-new collection of tips to help you take full advantage of InDesign’s latest features. Awesome Add-ons to Supercharge InDesign Erica Gamet teaches us how make use of addons so as not to reinvent the hammer. InStep: Adobe Comp CC Conrad Chavez shows how to sketch layout mockups on an iPad for production in InDesign. GREP of the Month: Custom Keyboard Shortcuts Guide Jean-Claude Tremblay shows how to create a greatlooking guide to your custom keyboard shortcuts. InDesigner: Publish Online Intrepid designers go where no designer has gone before, and reap the benefits.

Make a Continued Heading in a Table

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MAGAZINE

From the Editor in Chief PUBLISHERS David Blatner, Anne-Marie Concepción EDITORIAL Editor in Chief Mike Rankin, mike@indesignmag.com Managing Editor Wendy Katz, wendy@indesignmag.com Senior Editor Sandee Cohen, sandee@indesignmag.com Contributing Writers Masood Ahmad, Chad Chelius, Colin Flashman, Nigel French, Keith Gilbert, Erica Gamet, Cari Jansen, Eugene Tyson, and Kelly Vaughn DESIGN Rufus Deuchler rufus.deuchler.net BUSINESS Contact Information http://indesignsecrets.com/contact Subscription Information indesignsecrets.com/issues Published by InDesignSecrets.com, a division of The Creative Publishing Network, Inc. Copyright 2015 InDesignSecrets.com. All rights reserved. Reproduction and redistribution prohibited without approval. For more information, contact permissions@indesignmag.com. InDesign Magazine is not endorsed or sponsored by Adobe Systems Incorporated, publisher of InDesign. InDesign is a registered trademark of Adobe Systems Incorporated. All other products and services are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners and are hereby acknowledged. Photos on pages 1, 5–27, 87, and 89 courtesy of Fotolia.com

Some words get used so much we forget how powerful they can be. Take “tip,” for instance— it sounds so cute and little. But little things can be powerful… don’t make me bring in the David and Goliath analogy, or the acorns and the oaks, or even the pebble in the pond. But seriously: one little thing you read, one change to a common practice, and you might take hours off your workflow, streamline a project, improve your home life, or otherwise make yourself smile. Just one of the services we aim to provide here at InDesign Magazine. We know (please don’t ask why) that sometimes you think it’ll take more time to learn an efficient new method than to just slog through a repetitive procedure. Fear not—it’s always easier to tell someone else what to do than to convince yourself, so we’re the bad cops today. Read these tips! Our feature article brings fresh tips in the ever-important areas of text and tables, color, layout, interactivity, and user interface.

Elsewhere in the issue, the tips get more specific—we’ll tip you off about a cool new way to publish to the web, that you may have at your fingertips already, directly from InDesign CC 2015. And speaking of fingertips, in our InStep with Conrad Chavez you can learn how to use Adobe Comp to sketch out your design, yes, with your fingertip, on an iPad. Kiss those cocktail napkins sketches goodbye! All that, plus a round-up of some musthave add-ons for InDesign courtesy of Erica Gamet, a cool extended GREP of the Month from Jean-Claude Tremblay that features push-button design (well, push-button with some planning aforethought) and of course the Best of the Blog, where you’re always sure to learn something new. Don’t forget to tip your waiter. Enjoy!

ISSN 2379-1403

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h s s e p i r F T

In this age of the Creative Cloud, new features appear in InDesign all the time. So to help you keep up with the latest and greatest, here’s a fresh batch of tips from some of the world’s best InDesign experts. D e s i gn by

Pam Sparks

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Text & Tables View Custom Baseline Grid Only When you create a custom baseline grid for a text frame (Object > Text Frame Options > Baseline Options), and then choose View > Grids & Guides > Show Baseline Grid, you see both the frame’s grid and the document’s grid (Figure 1), which is governed by settings in Preferences > Grids.

Figure 1: Seeing two different sets of baselines at the same time can be distracting, to say the least.

Tiplet: Empty frames don’t show custom gridlines. Add some text to the frame to see the grid. Thomas Dahm, an InDesign user on Twitter (@thomasdahm), whose eyes were

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crossing with all these gridlines, asked if there was any way to show just the frame’s custom grid, and not the document grid. After a bit of noodling, I discovered that starting in InDesign CC 2015, custom baseline grids ignore the View Threshold percentage in Preferences > Grids. That is, frame grids are always visible (when you’ve enabled Show Baseline Grid) regardless of how much you’re zoomed in or out. Document baseline grids, on the other hand, wink in and out of view based on how much you’re zoomed in. The default View Threshold is 75% for baseline grids. Assuming Thomas was most often viewing his layout at 100% or so (zooming in for detail work), the answer was to change his Preferences > Grids > View Threshold setting to something like 150% or more. That way, the document baseline grid would not be visible most of the time, but the custom frame grids (which ignore the View Threshold setting now) would always be visible (Figure 2).

Figure 2: Changing your View Threshold settings will clear up some visual clutter by displaying just the custom baseline grid, not the document default.

This undocumented factoid about custom frame grids ignoring the View Threshold is new to CC 2015. Bug or feature? I call it a feature, and @thomasdahm and I decided it’ll be called the Dahm View. Click here to read the full Twitter conversation.  —AC Create a New Table There’s a much faster way to create a new table in an InDesign document. Instead of creating a text frame and then choosing Table > Insert Table, you can skip creating a text frame first and simply press Command+Option+Shift+T (Mac) or Ctrl+Alt+Shift+T (Windows). This opens the Create Table dialog box, where you can choose the number of columns and rows

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you want. After you click OK, you can then simply drag out the new table to the size you want it to be.  — N

Make the Paragraph Stand Out (On Screen) You can make paragraph styles really stand out on screen (for easy identification) by

giving them background colors, but of course you wouldn’t want those colors to print out or show up in exported files. Try this: Add paragraph shading to the paragraph style definition… and turn on the “Do not print or export” checkbox (Figure 3). This way, the paragraph shading is very obvious on screen, especially when you zoom back to fit one or more pages in the window (Figure 4), but won’t show up in your final output.  —DB

Figure 4: In a text-heavy situation, temporary formatting to call out headings or other important markers could be a helpful production tool. Figure 3: Select “Do not print or export” in the Paragraph Style Options dialog box to keep your visually-helpful paragraph style formatting as a personal, not a public, tool.

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Duplicate Table Rows and Columns by Opt/Alt Dragging Got a table row or column you want to duplicate? Don’t bother with copy and paste. In InDesign CC 2014 and later, you can select a table row or column (click just above a column or to the left of a row), and then hold Option/Alt and drag the copy where you want it in the table.  — R Quickly Turn a Text Cell into a Graphic Cell (InDesign CC (2015)) InDesign CC (2015) introduces graphic cells. A quick way to turn a text cell into a graphic cell is to use the familiar File > Place command. Choose File > Place, navigate to an image on your system, and double-click the image. Position the loaded graphic icon over a text cell in the table, and then click (Figure 5).

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Use the Selection tool to select the Content Grabber and reposition or resize the graphic within the graphic cell.  —CJ

Figure 5: Just do it—click the loaded graphic icon in a text cell within a table.

The image is placed into the table cell, which is automatically converted to a graphic cell (Figure 6).

Figure 6: The placed graphic automatically converts the text cell into a graphic cell.

Power Grid Need a flexible layout grid? Here’s an approach that works well: Start with a 12-column document, and then, on your master page spread, add guides to subdivide these into 3- and 4-column versions. To cut down on clutter, add these guides to their own layers: Create a new layer and call it 3 column. Choose Layout > Create Guides, and choose 3 columns. You’ll want to be sure of two things: first, that the gutter width is the same as gutter width you specified in the new document setup, and second, that the guides are fitted to the margins rather than the page. Repeat this for the 4-column grid (Figure 7). With 3- and 4-column guides on separate layers, you can show and hide these layers as appropriate.

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If you need to, you can further subdivide the 12 columns: into 2 × 6, 6 × 2, or 5 × 2 + 2. Optionally, you can color code the guides: choose Layout > Ruler Guides, and then

choose different colors for each. Using this approach, a single master page spread can serve many functions—and your layouts will have both variety and consistency.  —NF

Figure 7: For easy flexibility, create separate layers to hold variations of your guide setups.

Get Rid of Ghostly Content Are you seeing ghosts in your InDesign files? By “ghosts,” I mean things like phantom spell check errors, mysteriously bloated hyperlink destination lists, and zombie-like swatches and styles that refuse to die. These can all be the result of tracked changes. Open the Track Changes panel, and click the Show Changes button. Then put your cursor in a text frame, and open the Story Editor (Command+Y/Ctrl+Y). Chances are you’ll see the deleted text that used those styles, swatches, hyperlinks, etc. Use the Track Changes panel to accept changes, and you’ll bust those ghosts.  — R Selecting a Graphic Cell in a Table and Adjusting its Cell Options Before you can adjust the cell options for a graphic cell, the cell must be selected. There are two quick ways to select the graphic cell again and adjust its cell options:

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1. With the Type tool, drag across the graphic cell (Figure 8), or 2. With the Selection tool, click on the graphic cell, and then press Esc (Figure 9). Note that the Type tool becomes selected when you use the second technique.

Figure 10: Selected graphic cell (left). Graphic cell options with inset set to 2mm (right). Figure 8: Drag across the graphic cell with the Type tool.

Figure 9: Click the graphic cell with the Selection tool, and then press Esc. Hey, how did the Type tool get selected?

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With the graphic cell selected, you can now choose Table > Cell Options > Graphic to adjust the cell options for the graphic cell (Figure 10).  —CJ Multi-Column Mastery Use Span columns and Keep Options to quickly format multi-column text. In this cookbook, the text is created within a single five-column frame (Figure 11, next page).

The first three paragraphs span all columns, the ingredients span two, and the instructions span three. To move the first instruction to the third column, a Start Paragraph in Next Column Keep Option is included in the paragraph style. The advantage of this approach is that you don’t have to fuss about threading text from one frame to the next—just apply the paragraph styles, and everything falls into place.  —NF

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Figure 11: What look like 2 distinct frames of text in this cookbook are actually 5 columns within a single frame.

Prevent Packaging Problems Fonts synced from Typekit cannot be packaged with an InDesign file to archive or send to someone else in your workflow. So you may want to avoid Typekit fonts in some situations. And you may want InDesign to warn you if a Typekit font shows up in a document. For that, create a custom preflight profile that will flag protected fonts as an error (Figure 12).  — R

Figure 12: A simple custom profile could alert you, painlessly, when your file contains protected fonts.

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Get Granular with Grids In addition to your layout grid and baseline grid, you need to use a document grid to really make efficient use of the smallest building block of space (Figure 13). For best results, set the grid increment to your body text leading value with a subdivision of 1. If your page width and height are divisible

by your leading value, you’ll have an even number of grid squares on the page. If necessary, you can reset the zero point to the top left margin to align the document grid to the type area; unfortunately, the document grid does not reset itself on the facing page.  —NF

Figure 13: The document grid completes the triad of grids that can help you get peak performance from your layout.

Script to Change Cases in Character and Paragraph Styles If I need to change styled headings that have been typed in uppercase to sentence case, I can use a modification of Dave Saunders’ “change case” script to change the case of a chosen character or paragraph style. The modified script can be found here. Gabe Harbs from In-Tools offers a similar but more powerful script that can also ignore specific words or letters. More information on that script can be found here.  —CF Script to Map GREP Styles to One (or Many) Paragraph Styles Ever made a GREP style, only to realize it has to be applied to other paragraph styles? Unless the styles are based on each other, the only other way to do this is to go into each paragraph style and make the GREP styles all over again. That was, until this free GREP style-mapping script was made. It works by selecting the paragraph style

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containing the desired GREP styles, and then selecting the desired paragraph styles that the GREP styles need to be applied to. The script is available here.  —CF Automatically Adjust Text Frame Height for Sidebars and Break-Out Text Frames Do you find you frequently have to resize (and resize and resize) the same text frames containing break-out text or sidebars in your publication, as a result of client changes coming through? If so, the Auto-Size feature may become one of your best friends.

Start by selecting the text frame, and then choose Object > Text Frame Options to open the same-named dialog box (Figure 14). 1. Click on the Auto-Size tab. 2. From the Auto-Sizing menu, choose Height Only. 3. From the grid image, select the point from which you want to size the frame. In our example (Figure 15), you’ll see that the top of the frame keeps its position, and the bottom is pushed up or down depending on text decrease or increase.  —CJ Figure 14: The Height Only option in the Text Frame Options dialog box is a real time-saver.

Show Locally Formatted Text Easily with a Startup Script It can be difficult to know what text has been formatted properly with styles, and what text has been formatted locally. Scripter Marc Autret of Indiscripts created a script that highlights locally formatted text with a red strikethrough, available from indiscripts.com. The script was built upon by Gabe Harbs of InTools, who made a version that is instead installed into the startup scripts subfolder of the scripts folder, allowing the script to become part of the user interface. That version is available from in-tools.com.   —CF

Figure 15: The amazing autoexpanding (or decreasing) text frame!

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Aligning Captions The challenge of using a baseline grid is working within its constraints and still having design flexibility. An issue that frequently comes up is how to combine captions or supporting text with the body text, especially when these paragraphs are side by side. If you align the captions to the

grid, the leading is too loose, if you don’t, well, you’ve broken the grid—and not to good effect. There is the “third way”—aligning the first line only. That is, you align the first baseline of the caption to the baseline grid, and after that, the leading does its own thing. To really get the most from this feature, the

Figure 16: Align the first baseline of the caption to the baseline grid to keep your layout “compliant” yet flexible.

leading of the caption should resolve with the baseline grid on every third or fourth line. All it takes is some simple math to make this happen: If your body-text leading and baseline grid are both 12 points, then make your caption leading 9 points. The caption will resolve with the baseline grid on every fourth line: 3 × 12 = 36, 4 × 9 = 36. If your numbers are not conveniently rounded, you can use the Control panel to do the math for you. To determine the caption leading, in the Leading field, enter your baseline grid *3/4 to resolve on every fourth line (Figure 16).  —NF

Color Organize Your Swatches with Color Groups Do you have a swatch list so long that you sometimes have a hard time locating the swatch you want? Organize those colors by putting them in color groups. Shift-click (or Command/Ctrl-click) to select the swatches

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you want to group. Then right-click and choose New Color Group.  — R Deleting the Undeletable Cyan Since the introduction of paragraph shading in InDesign CC 2015, there has been an unusual side effect when deleting unused colors. For example, in a new document with nothing selected, choose the Select All Unused option from the Swatches panel menu. Apart from the default colors that cannot be deleted (the ones in the square brackets), notice that the default cyan is not selected. This is because it is used as the default paragraph shading color in the paragraph style called [Basic Paragraph]. If you’re a neat-freak like me and you want to see only truly-used colors in a palette, close any open documents, go to the Swatches panel, select all colors that are not in square brackets, and then click the trash can at the bottom of the panel. In the dialog box that pops up, choose Defined Swatch: Black to replace the

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deleted swatches wherever they were used (Figure 17). Then press the D key on your keyboard to switch back to default stroke and fill values. From this point onwards, your new documents will start out with just the truly

Figure 17: Delete the default cyan swatch (used for paragraph shading) and replace it with black.

undeletable swatches (Registration, Paper, and Black). Note that when you enable paragraph shading, it will be 100% black at first. Reduce the tint and/or choose a different swatch to make your text readable.  —CF Sample Colors from Anywhere on Your Screen In InDesign CC 2014 and later, there is a little eyedropper icon in RGB swatch-options dialog boxes that you can click and drag to sample a color from anywhere on your screen! (Figure 18)  — R

Figure 18: Use this new-color-swatch eyedropper to sample RGB colors from anywhere on your screen.

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Merging Color Swatches You notice halfway through a design job that you’ve used several colors that are very similar, and you want to quickly change the colors on all objects you’ve used to just the one color and remove the similar color swatches from the Swatches panel in the process. First determine which of the swatches you’d like to keep, and make sure that you don’t have any objects selected (Edit > Deselect All). Select the swatch you want to keep, and then press Ctrl (Windows) or Command (Mac OS), and click on the other swatches that are similar. From the Swatches panel menu, choose Merge Swatches (Figure 19).  —CJ Creating a Color Theme from a Selection By default, when you click with the Color Theme tool on an image, the tool analyzes all of the colors in that image, and

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Figure 20: Color theme from the full image.

Figure 19: The Merge Swatches option makes it easy to coordinate and clean up your use of similar colors.

Figure 21: Color theme from a selection.

then generates themes (Figure 20) based on that data. But what if you want to create a color theme from just a section in an image? Just select the Color Theme tool, and drag a marquee around the area from which you want to generate the new theme (Figure 21).  —CJ

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Applying Colors from the Color Theme Panel With the Color Theme tool, you can select colors from your document (or another document), and add a color theme to the CC Libraries or add swatches to the Swatches panel. You can also easily apply sampled colors from the Color Theme panel to an object’s fill or stroke, or to text (Figures 22–24). 1. Keep the Color Theme tool selected and the Color Theme panel open.

2. Click on the color you want to apply, and then position the cursor over the object you want to apply the color to. Keep a close eye on the cursor, as it will reveal whether you are applying the color to a stroke, fill, or text.  —CJ Adding One Color from a Color Theme to the Swatches Panel Want to add only one of the colors of a color theme you captured with the Color Theme tool to your Swatches panel instead of adding the full theme as a color group? 1. Select the swatch in the Color Theme panel. 2. Alt- (Windows) or Option- (Mac OS) click the Add Theme to Swatches button

in the Color Theme panel, or, alternatively, drag and drop the swatch from the panel into the Swatches panel (Figure 25).  —CJ Creating a Color Theme Based on Choosing an Individual Color and Selecting a Color Rule When clicking on an image with the Color Theme tool, a set of five different themes is provided from which you can choose, Figure 25: Keep your Swatches panel tidy by adding only the colors you want from a color theme.

Figure 22: Getting ready to add a fill color.

Figure 24: Finally, selecting a color for the text.

Figure 23: Now a stroke.

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ranging from Colorful to Bright, Dark, Deep, and Muted (Figure 26). But did you know you could also use the tool to create themes based on color rules that are created by sampling one color in your document? Press the Shift key while clicking a color area in an image to source the base color around which the different color rules will be created. Then, from the menu in the Color Theme panel, choose the color rule that works best for your designs (Figure 27). To capture a color theme for future use, add it to the

Swatches panel as a color group, or to the currently active CC Library . The latter lets you to share color themes across different applications and with other users.  —CJ

Layout Spacing Out Multiple Selected Items You’ve worked hard to distribute a series of objects in your layout, all of them aligned at their tops and equally spaced. You then realize you need a bit more space between each object. So you select the farthest

Figure 26: Five variations are available for every generated color theme.

Figure 27: A single color that you choose can be the basis of multiple color themes.

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object on the right, move it a bit to the right, select the rest of the objects, and then click the Distribute Horizontal Centers button in the Align panel. Then you repeat all that again because the spacing between the objects still isn’t quite right. Sound familiar? There’s a better way—use a hidden feature called Live Distribute! Simply select your objects. Then, click and hold on a transformation handle, and then hold down the spacebar as you drag. Voilà! Instead of resizing the selected objects, you resize the space between them. For extra bonus points, pause for a second after clicking on the transformation handle before dragging. Pausing first will allow you to see the objects as you redistribute them (Figure 28).  — N

Figure 28: To use Live Distribute, select some objects, click and hold on a transformation handle, add the spacebar, pause for a moment, and then drag.

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Placing Multiple Objects in a Non-Rectangular Shape Here’s a quick way to create a badge-type design using an image and a text frame placed in a circle. First, get the design elements ready: the artwork and the circle. With the Selection tool, drag over the objects that are to be inserted into the circle to select them. Next, choose Object > Group to group those objects together (Figure 29).

Create (if necessary) and position the circle above the grouped objects, so that you’re happy with the overall composition. Note that to see the circle better I’ve given it a temporary 1-pt Paper stroke (later to be set back to [None]). With the circle positioned, click on the grouped objects (Figure 30), and choose Edit > Cut.

Figure 31: Once the artwork is pasted, you can finesse the newly-grouped design with effects.

To edit the text within the group later on, select the Type tool and set text insertion point (Figure 32).  —CJ Figure 32: Even within this close-knit grouping, it’s still easy to go in and edit the text.

Figure 30: The selected grouped object, just before cutting (the circle is not selected).

Figure 29: Group together the artwork elements you’ll want in your “badge.”

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Now for the magic: Select the circle shape again, and choose Edit > Paste Into. Because InDesign remembers the position of the group in relation to the circle, the grouped content is positioned as intended (Figure 31).

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Set the Size of a Text Frame with an Object Style As you know, you cannot set the size of a frame by applying an object style, because the object style definition has no way to specify width and height. But when it comes to text frames, there is a clever workaround! When you make your object style, choose the Text Frame General Options pane, set the Columns popup menu to Fixed Width,

the number of columns to 1, and the width you want your frame in the Width field (Figure 33). Then, in the Text Frame Auto Size Options pane, set the Minimum Height to your desired height (Figure 34). When you apply this object style to an empty frame, it magically changes to the size you defined! Unfortunately, if you put text into it, the frame could grow taller (there is no “maximum height” feature).  —DB

Figure 33: In Text Frame General Options, set the text frame to have one fixed-width column.

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Quickly Select One or More Objects that Overlap It can be frustrating working with objects that are overlapping, especially when you need to edit them. So how can you select objects through stacks and layers? Here are two techniques. Press the Ctrl (Windows) or Command (Mac OS) key and, with the Selection tool, click on stacked objects until you have

Figure 34: In Text Frame Auto Size Options, allow resizing in Height Only, and set the minimum (desired) height.

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Figure 37: Be sure you’ve selected the item you want, and not everything in the layer.

the object selected that you want to edit (Figure 35).

Figure 35: Ctrl- or Command-click to cycle through stacked objects until you’ve selected the one you want.

Or, you can use the Layers panel. Click the expansion triangle to the left of a layer name to see the objects, images, groups, or other items in a layer. Then click the blank box to the right of the object to select the object (Figure 36).

Figure 36: Locate the desired object hierarchically using the Layers panel.

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When you click the similar box next to a layer name, all the objects in that layer become selected (Figure 37). Note: Keep in mind that objects that are locked or hidden won’t be selected using this technique.  —CJ

Interactivity Add Signature Fields to PDFs Right in InDesign You can add a digital signature field to contracts, agreements, and other documents with a couple of clicks right in InDesign (CS6 and later). Just draw a

rectangle where you want the signature to appear, right-click on the rectangle, and choose Interactive > Convert to Signature Field. Then, after you export your document as an interactive PDF, you can use Acrobat’s nifty Send For Signature workflow to obtain the required signatures.  —KG Attach an Animation to a Button The Fixed-Layout EPUB format has brought life back into InDesign’s Animation panel (Figure 38, next page). I often need to initiate an action using a button, and I dreaded the steps involved to do so until I came up with this easy way to attach an

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Figure 38: The often-overlooked (but highly useful!) Create Trigger button in the Animation panel

animation to a button. Apply the animation to the object that will be animated. Keep that object selected. Now click the Create Button Trigger button, and then click on the object in the InDesign document that you want to become the button that triggers the animation! Quick and easy!  —CC Moving Content to iBooks Author Got content in InDesign that you need to use in an iBooks Author project? Export the document as IDML. Then, in iBooks Author, choose Insert > Chapter from InDesign File (IDML) (Figure 39).  — R

Figure 39: Export your InDesign content as IDML for use in iBooks Author.

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User Interface Open Book Documents Before Syncing Here’s the best tip you’ll ever read for working with InDesign books: open all the InDesign documents before you synchronize them. It’s way faster than waiting for InDesign to open and close everything in the background, and you gain the option of cancelling an unwanted change by closing documents without saving or reverting.  — R Customize your Control Panel When you have text selected, some of the paragraph-level text controls no longer fit in the Control panel at the top of the screen when you’re using a small laptop screen. One way to manage this is to customize the icons that appear in the Control panel. Choose Customize from the Control panel menu (at the far right side of the Control

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panel). Then, turn off the sections of the panel that aren’t as important to you. Here is how I have mine set up (Figure 40). This allows the contents to fit on my MacBook Pro 15-inch screen.  —KG

app window, and choose Preferences. Then choose Creative Cloud > Fonts, and in Typekit On/Off, click Off (Figure 41). Wait a minute, and then click On. All your Typekits fonts should now be synced.  — R

Figure 40: To save valuable Control panel real estate, show only the sections and functions you use most.

Figure 41: Restart font syncing in a CC app if your Typekit fonts haven’t been resyncing.

Restarting a Stalled Sync Typekit fonts won’t sync? Try turning font syncing off and then on again in the CC app. Click the gear icon at the top of the

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Use the Character and Paragraph Panels Many people no longer use the Character and Paragraph panels, found in Window > Type & Tables, since most of their functionality is found in the Control panel at the top of the screen. I suggest you keep these panels handy, however. They provide at least one big benefit that you don’t get with the Control panel: When you have a table cell, row, or column selected, most of the type options no longer display in the Control panel. But the Character and Paragraph panels let you change the type options for multiple table cells at one time.  —KG

U-Turn in Find/Change When using the Find/Change dialog box, you can press Command+Option+Enter (Mac) or Ctrl+Alt+Enter (Windows) to toggle between searching forward and backward.  — N

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Create a Project Font Menu with Favorites Want to show just the fonts for a particular project in the Fonts menus of the Control panel and Character panel? Mark those fonts as favorites by clicking the star to the left of each name in the menu. Then click the star next to Filter at the top of the menu (Figure 42). InDesign hides all the fonts that aren’t tagged as favorites, and you have a project-specific font menu.  — R

Figure 43: Select all of the objects, but then left-click on the object that is to become the key object. Choose the appropriate align options from the Align panel. In this case those opions are Align Bottom Edges and Distribute Horizontal Space (of 3mm).

Figure 42: Filtering just your “favorite” fonts creates a streamlined font menu for a specific project.

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Align to Key Object Introduced in CS6, this feature has been available in Adobe Illustrator since version 9, but I’ve found it has been barely mentioned at all for InDesign. For those unfamiliar with this feature, it allows objects to be aligned based on one

key object that determines the position of others. For example, in the illustration above, I would like all objects to align to the bottom of the orange object and be spaced out with 3mm between each (Figure 43).  —CF

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Use the Split Window View Many people overlook the Split Layout command (introduced in CS6), but with today’s large-screen monitors, this feature is a productivity boon! With a document open, just click the Split Layout icon in the bottom-right corner of any document window (Figure 44). This splits the window into two separate views. You can manipulate the views independently. For example, you could be zoomed in on one side, and zoomed out on another. Or you could work on a master page in one view while viewing a document page in the other view. To “unsplit” the layout, either click the icon again, or double-click the vertical dividing line between the two views.  —KG Figure 44: Click the Split Layout button to open a second (adjustable) view of your document.

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Quickly View or Change Your Live Preflight Profile The handy Live Preflight feature has been around for some time, but in the past you never knew if the correct Live Preflight settings were being used to check your document-in-progress. But InDesign CC displays the active Preflight profile in the lower-left corner of the screen (Figure 45). The indicator also includes a drop-down list so you can quickly change the profile that is being used.  —KG

Quick-Paste Copied Information Oftentimes when doing a find/change in InDesign, you need to copy text from one location and paste it into the Find field of the Find/Change dialog box. Rather than manually do a copy/paste, try this: When you open the Find/Change dialog box, select the text in your document that you want to find or change. Press Command/ Ctrl+F1 to insert the selected text into the Find field, or press Command/Ctrl+F2 to insert the selected text into the change field. Easy! Keep in mind that on a laptop, you may need to add the fn key to those keyboard shortcuts.  —CC

Figure 45: Finally—you can always see what profile is being used to preflight your open document.

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The Tipsters David Blatner is the co-founder of the Creative Publishing Network and InDesign Magazine. He is the co-host of The InDesign Conference and InDesignSecrets.com and the author of 21 titles at lynda.com.

Colin Flashman is a prepress operator and graphic designer for a South Australian commercial printer, with close to 20 years of experience in the trade. He is a regular contributor to InDesignSecrets.

Anne-Marie Concepción is the owner of Chicago-based Seneca Design & Training, a lynda.com author, and the co-founder InDesignSecrets.com. To learn more about InDesign and the fixed-layout format, watch her new course on lynda.com, “Creating Fixed-Layout EPUBs with InDesign CC.”

Nigel French is a graphic designer, photographer, author, and teacher living in Lewes, UK. He is the author of InDesign Type and Photoshop Unmasked, both from Adobe Press, as well as more than 50 titles in the lynda.com online training library, including InDesign Typography.

Chad Chelius is an Adobe Certified Instructor, author, and consultant in the Philly area and is the Managing Editor of incopysecrets.com. He has authored several titles for lynda.com including his most recent title, Creating Accessible PDFs. You can reach him at chad@cheliusgraphicservices.com.

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Keith Gilbert is a digital publishing consultant and educator, Adobe Certified Instructor, Adobe Community Professional, conference speaker, and an author and contributing writer for various publications. Follow him on Twitter @gilbertconsult and at blog.gilbertconsulting.com.

Cari Jansen is a technical writer, Adobe Certified Instructor, Adobe Community Professional and User Group Manager, with a passion for Adobe creative workflows and applications. Learn more about Cari and her work at carijansen.com. Michael Ninness has 20+ years experience building and leading content strategy, product management, and user experience teams at Adobe, Microsoft, and lynda.com. He is currently the Senior Director of Product Management for the Design products at Adobe, including InDesign, Illustrator, and Muse. Mike Rankin is the author of several lynda.com courses and Editor in Chief of InDesignSecrets.com, CreativePro.com, and InDesign Magazine.

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By Erica Gamet

Awesome Add-Ons to Supercharge InDesign If you were shown a nail for the first time and told to put it in a wall, you’d probably be able to find an object heavy enough to smash it in. Or, if you’re the slow, patient type you might decide to keep twisting it until the nail was in far enough to stay put. Of course, anyone living in modern times would think, “Why aren’t you using a hammer to do that?” That scenario is probably a little basic, but that’s kind of how I feel when I’m giving an InDesign class and ask, “How many of you use InDesign addons?” and look around to see maybe one or two timid hands going up. But by the end of the class, if I’ve done my job well, they’re all excited about using add-ons.

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Add-ons is a catch-all phrase for scripts, extensions, and plug-ins which add extra functionality to InDesign. I like to think of them as “InDesign’s little helpers.” They can do the heavy lifting on repetitive tasks and access functionality not otherwise accessible. If there is some repetitive task you’re doing, or need to automate a series of actions, chances are the correct tool for the job is an add-on. Here are several that might be useful in a production workflow.

Attachments Attachments is an InDesign plug-in that, as the name suggests, lets you send attachments. Much like an email attachment,

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Add-Ons to Supercharge InDesign

the files attached to your InDesign document can be of any kind (Figure 1). At first glance you might think, “Why wouldn’t I just place the files I need as a link?” If you’re working with graphics, that might be the best route. But what if you want to send a formatted Word file for reference, another InDesign file that contains styles and swatches, or a file full of notes about the current project? These are items that pertain to the project or InDesign file, but don’t need to be a part of the document. Figure 1: The Attachments plug-in lets you attach any file to an InDesign file for easy portability.

plug-in that limits the attachments to two items with a 1MB limit, and the full version is only $6 from the Adobe add-ons site.

Speeech! Sometimes a script can help you add a little whimsy to your documents. For instance, maybe you need to add cartoon-like speech bubbles to a photo to make a point. The free Speeech! script from Indiscripts performs this task easily. Simply choose a shape— any polygon, text frame, or custom shape—and an overlapping straight line, then let the script do the work for you. If you don’t choose a straight line first, the script will create the connector section of the bubble for you (Figure 2). Figure 2: Just a small sample of the many uses of the Speeech! script.

I can envision using the Attachments plug-in to send a whole slew of possible photos to a team member in charge of choosing the final photos—without having to actually place all of those images within the file. If you use the plug-in with other people, each person will also need to have it installed to detach the accompanying files. When they receive the file, they simply save the files on their end wherever they wish. There is a trial version of the

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The curvature of the resulting connector “tail” is controlled by values defined within the script. If you’re feeling adventurous, you

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Add-Ons to Supercharge InDesign

Figure 3: The ShowFonts script adds back in information missing from InDesign CC’s Find Font dialog box.

can easily change that value by diving into the script file. There is a little tutorial on the Indiscripts site to help with that. I’ve found that running the script more than once on an object creates multiple connector points, making interesting shapes. Also, you can run the script on the same object, choosing a new connector line each time.

ShowFonts

MasterMatic

Adobe giveth and Adobe taketh away. We’ve all had that moment when we realize a feature has been ripped from the newest version of our beloved InDesign. Such was the moment when I launched the Find Font dialog box and noticed that I no longer had access to certain font information. In CC, the dialog box shows fonts being used in the document and an option to sync the font via TypeKit, but it no longer displays the type of font or its status (except to warn you that it’s missing). Lucky for us, Peter Kahrel wasn’t going to stand for this and gifted us with another helpful free script. ShowFonts brings back that information for all the typefaces used in a document. Running the script from the Scripts panel brings up a dialog with typeface name, style, type, and current status (Figure 3). Types indicated include TrueType, OpenType, Type 1, and more while the status will show if the font is installed, missing, substituted, “fauxed,” or unknown. Sometimes a one-trick pony can be the star of the show.

The MasterMatic script from Bookraft Solutions gives you the ability to have a master page automatically assigned to document pages, based on page content. The script looks for either paragraph styles or object styles that you indicate on each page. When it encounters one of the designated styles, it assigns a specific master page (Figure 4).

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Figure 4: The MasterMatic dialog box with options for assigning a master page based on paragraph style or object style.

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For example, if the first page in a chapter contains text styled with a “Chapter Opening” Paragraph style, the “Chapter Opening” master page will be automatically applied. Or you could tell the script to assign a “Photos” master to any page using your “Photo Frames” Object style. The potential uses are endless. A few killer features of the professional MasterMatic script ($59), are the ability to assign specific master pages to blank pages and remaining pages, as well as the option to ignore a set number of pages at the start of a document. When used in conjunction with the Primary Text Frame on a master page, the script becomes even more powerful. But I think the pièce de résistance from the MasterMatic script is the auto updating of master pages. When text reflows, or styles change, the script continues to maintain the proper master on each of the document pages.

Creating font fusion is easy with the help of this script: Just choose the base typeface and style, then individually enter the characters that should come from the second font. I’ve found it to be handy when I don’t like a special character—such as the ampersand—when creating a logo (Figure 5). Or maybe you’d like to create a special set of numbers or the current typeface’s dollar sign is lacking flair. Just don’t abuse your new powers and go crazy creating monstrous Frankenfonts. If you limit yourself to giving a typeface a more perfect @ symbol or putting a little more oomph in a logo, FontMixer is the perfect ingredient. Figure 5: Example of a replaced ampersand character in the new composite font.

FontMixer Take one full serving of vanilla-flavored typeface, then slowly blend in certain characters of your favorite spicy typeface, to create the perfectly delectable superfont. What? Heresy! I know you’re thinking this is a recipe for disaster, but hear me out. Sometimes you just need to borrow a couple of characters—or in many cases add in ones missing altogether—to your current font. Originally created as a companion for the IndyFont script, Indiscript’s free FontMixer also stands on its own.

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Add-Ons to Supercharge InDesign

CoverBuilder We are all acquainted with the old saying, “Never judge a book by its cover.” However, it’s totally fine to judge a book project by how complicated the layout of the cover can be. It’s not nearly as eloquent a saying, but what it lacks in finesse it makes up for in truth. In short: Setting up a book cover in InDesign can be a hassle. There are many considerations to be made concerning spine width, flaps, and bleeds to start with. What if there was an add-on to do the grunt work for us? Cue the trumpets: The CoverBuilder plug-in from Bruno Herfst ($20) takes the reins and lets us focus on creating the cover artistry. The different segments such as front cover, back cover, and spine are created as individual pages set in a spread, making it easy to output or export just the segment you need. The plug-in is accessed through the File menu, where you choose New > Cover. Items that can be set in the resulting dialog box include number and size of flaps for a dust jacket, margins, bleeds, and whether or not there is a spine (Figure 6). CoverBuilder makes it easy to re-size the spine—in the event the client changes paper stock or pages are added to the text— by re-running the script. The plug-in even lets you create a blank document with placement guides which can then be exported to Photoshop, if creating the artwork in that app is the better choice.

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Figure 6: CoverBuilder’s New Cover dialog box options.

LiveTOC If you use the built-in Table of Contents (TOC) feature in InDesign, you know what a timesaver it can be. But if you use it often, you’re probably also painfully aware of some of the limitations. For me, I know sometimes it’s easier to format the text manually after generating the TOC. Unfortunately, all that formatting is lost when you have to update the TOC to reflect page changes. The LiveTOC script from ID-Extras ($49) keeps the formatting intact and dynamically updates the links in the table of contents. The automatic updating comes courtesy of InDesign’s cross references, which the script creates for the page numbers (Figure 7, next page). In addition, hyperlinks are created for use in EPUB and PDF export if you choose that option in the script’s dialog box. One of the best features is that you can use this script on the automatically-generated TOC, or one that you create yourself. And

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Add-Ons to Supercharge InDesign

since it’s employing cross-references, you can re-order the entries as you need and all of the links remain with the text. LiveTOC fills in the gaps left by InDesign’s native Table of Contents feature, creating the perfect combination. Figure 7: Set options in LiveTOC’s dialog box.

Paragraph panel that tells InDesign to “Never let short last lines happen!” Well, the Widow Fixer script from Dan Rodney takes the place of that absent magic button. Note: what Dan calls a “widow” (a short last line of a paragraph) is called a “runt” by many folks. There are certain ways to get rid of widows/runts without buying a $10 script, but many other solutions are incomplete. Widow Fixer uses a GREP string within a chosen paragraph style to apply a character style that incorporates a no break command (Figure 8).

Figure 8: The Widow Fixer script makes sure you never leave a lonely widow by ­herself.

Widow Fixer Earlier I called a script a “one-trick pony” but I don’t mean that in a negative sense. In fact, I wish there were more such ponies in InDesign. I’ve often wondered why there isn’t a checkbox in the

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You can easily apply this styling to all paragraph styles in your document at once, or to an individual style, via the script’s dialog box. While you have the dialog box open, you can also choose to remove trailing whitespace within styled text. If you haven’t used

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Add-Ons to Supercharge InDesign

styles (gasp!), you can apply the script to the [Basic Paragraph] style. To always enable this widow-free option, apply it to the [Basic Paragraph] style with no documents open, so it’s automatically a part of every style you create going forward. BOOM! Now you have a “Never let widows happen. Ever!” button.

Figure 9: Sample of a starburst after applying the Explode script (left); and the Fractalize script (right).

Silicon Publishing Scripts The last item I want to cover is actually a collection of free scripts. Created by Silicon Publishing for their own publishing workflow, the scripts are available as open source code for anyone to use and alter. The first thing you’ll notice is that there are several scripts in this group. While the ones for creating publications that deal with indexes, HTML tags, and index notes are very useful to the right group, the ones that caught my eye were the scripts for creating delightful graphic elements. The Explode script takes a shape from InDesign like a polygon or ellipse and breaks out the individual paths at intervals you determine. Fractalize creates fractal patterns from a selected shape. I’m not sure I’ve ever wrapped my brain around fractals, but I’m having a lot of fun making intricate patterns with this script (Figure 9). The MysticRose script creates shapes—or rather one continuous shape—that mimics string art (Figure 10). And the NINA script creates spirographs that remind me of one of my favorite childhood toys (Figure 11). I’m not a mathematician, so I’m really

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Figure 10: Shape created by the MysticRose script.

Figure 11: Shapes created using the NINA (spirograph) script.

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thankful for the UI on these scripts. I am able to experiment with the different values, then make changes to the individual paths they create. One note, these scripts don’t come packaged in a neat little wrapper, so check out the sidebar on how to roll your own.

Help! All I See Is A Bunch Of Text! If you’ve clicked on a link to a script expecting to download a ready-to-use product, but all you see in the browser window is a bunch of text, don’t panic! What you’re seeing are the script’s inner workings, and—like the great and powerful Oz— seeing what’s behind the curtain can be disappointing. If the script was written as JavaScript, you can simply copy the text, then paste it—as plain text—in your preferred text editor. Lastly, save that file with or change the file name to have the .jsx extension. In that same manner, if you download a script that has a .jsx.txt extension, just rename the file by removing the .txt portion. Need help installing a script? Check out this post at InDesignSecrets.

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It All Adds Up Chances are you won’t want or need all of these add-ons, but hopefully some will find their way into your InDesign toolbox or at least inspire you to go in search of the perfect one for your next project. Whenever I am faced with a task that seems to be taking an unnecessarily long time, I investigate whether there is an add-on that can do the work for me. Not because I’m lazy, but because I’d rather focus my creative energy elsewhere on a project and let InDesign work for me. So don’t try hitting that nail with a shoe, a frying pan, or a wrench. Look in the magic toolbox that is the internet and research which hammer is best, then show that nail who’s boss.

n Erica Gamet is a speaker, writer, and trainer, focusing on Adobe InDesign and Illustrator, Apple Keynote and iBooks Author, and other production-related topics. With over 25 years experience in the graphics industry, she is a regular contributor to CreativePro.com. After living as a nomad, she recently put down roots in El Paso, Texas, where she hikes and bikes every chance she gets.

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By Conrad Chavez

InStep: Adobe Comp CC

Quickly sketch layout mockups on an iPad for production in Adobe InDesign.

A tabloid-sized layout device I sketched decades ago in high school. The slot on top is for floppy disks.

Back in high school I was on the yearbook staff—an early publishing experience that’s apparently common among many InDesign users. It was the B.C. era (Before Computers), so we drew placeholder boxes on printed layout grids. We filled in those placeholders by using hot wax to paste down printed galleys of typeset text and photo prints from the darkroom—a lot of tedious manual work. Because I was into science fiction and video games at the time, I imagined how future yearbooks might be laid out more easily with some kind of computer. I sketched an idea for a flat tabletop device large enough to lay out a double-page yearbook spread at actual size,

and proposed that objects might be moved around its screen with a joystick. When the digital future of page layout arrived just a few years later, it was a lot better than I imagined. The mouse turned out to be a more powerful and agile layout tool than the joystick, and page layout software such as Aldus PageMaker and Adobe InDesign swept away all the knives, paper type galleys, and waxers. I didn’t anticipate that digital page layout could become completely portable, first with laptop computers and now with mobile tablets. With Adobe Comp CC on the Apple iPad, we can design layouts with nothing more than fingers on a touchscreen.

Page layout in Adobe Comp CC on the Apple iPad.

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InStep: Adobe Comp CC

Hands-On Design Adobe Comp CC brings back the fluidity of designing in a paper sketchbook, but with the advantages of digital assistance and connectivity. This free app lets you use touch gestures to work out page layout ideas on the iPad, and you can fill in the placeholders with real content. What advances Comp beyond being a mere toy is that you can send layouts to Adobe InDesign, Adobe Photoshop, or Adobe Illustrator as fully editable documents that you can take through production and final output. Let’s take a look at how Adobe Comp CC might help work out ideas for the opening page of a feature story while meeting with a magazine’s art director.

1. Set up Adobe Comp CC

A magazine graphic I added to the Libraries panel in Adobe Illustrator will be available to Adobe Comp when I design a new magazine layout.

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Setup is simple. Install Adobe Comp CC from the iOS App Store, and then sign in to your Adobe Creative Could account from inside the app. Comp is connected to Creative Cloud libraries, so you can be more prepared for the meeting by using Adobe InDesign, Adobe Photoshop, and Adobe Illustrator to add that client’s graphics, colors, and character styles to a Creative Cloud library in advance. After I sign in with my Adobe ID, Adobe Comp CC is ready to use and gains access to Creative Cloud online resources including CC Libraries, Typekit fonts, and assets from Creative Cloud Market.

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InStep: Adobe Comp CC

2. Make a new layout

I tap the plus sign to create a new layout.

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When you open Adobe Comp CC, you see a sliding gallery of sample layouts. To make a new blank layout, tap the plus sign at the left edge of the screen to see the mobile, print, and web formats you can use, and then tap the format you want. This example involves a vertical magazine page that doesn’t match any of the preset formats, but I can tap a New Format icon and enter the page dimensions in points, the only unit of measure you can use. Each layout can be only one page. This is partly because Comp is intended for working out layout ideas and not for production of a complete publication.

The page size of the magazine doesn’t match any of the presets, so I tap the New Format icon (the last one) and enter custom dimensions.

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InStep: Adobe Comp CC

3. Sketch a graphics placeholder

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You can sketch on the layout when the little tab on the left edge of the screen is blue with an X in it. If the tab is gray with an open rectangle, tap the tab to switch to drawing mode. Now you can draw specific gestures to create different types of objects. Sketch an X where a photo should be, and Comp converts it into a perfect rectangle placeholder.

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InStep: Adobe Comp CC

If you’re new to Comp, you won’t know which gestures you can draw, so tap the help icon at the top to display the Drawing Gestures screen. If a gesture involves more than one line, such as the X that creates an image placeholder rectangle, draw each line in quick succession and Comp will know that they’re part of the same shape. If you wait too long after drawing the first line, Comp will think you’re done, and will try to interpret the first line by itself. Comp ignores gestures it doesn’t recognize. If you’d rather sketch with a stylus instead of with your fingers, no problem. Comp doesn’t currently take advantage of a pressure-sensitive iPad stylus, so you don’t need a fancy one; any iPad-compatible stylus will do.

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InStep: Adobe Comp CC

4. Move and resize objects

Sketching is imprecise by nature, so when Comp converts your sketch into an object you’ll probably need to adjust it. You can do this in layout mode, where the tab on the left edge of the screen is gray. If the tab is blue, tap it to get into layout mode. Tap any object to display its handles. Drag the object to reposition it; you’ll see smart guides temporarily appear to help you align it with other objects on the layout. If you move an object so that it’s almost centered over another, the smart guides appear and help you snap the object to the other object’s center. You can rotate objects with two fingers. Drag an object’s handles to resize it. As you resize, dotted guides appear to help you constrain the shape to its existing proportions or to 1:1 proportions (for example, a perfect square or circle). Drag near a dotted guide to snap your drag along the guide.

As I drag the bottom left handle of the graphics placeholder, Comp displays smart guides indicating vertical alignment with the layout edges and center. If I continue to drag the handle along the diagonal dotted line, the shape’s original proportions will be maintained. A tool tip indicates the dimensions of the placeholder.

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InStep: Adobe Comp CC

5. Sketch and edit text placeholders

In drawing mode, I sketch the Comp gesture that creates body text.

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Sketch a rectangle containing horizontal lines to create body text—again, much like you would on paper. Comp also provides gestures for creating headlines and multiline text. Double-tap a text placeholder to edit the text. All placeholder text is replaced as soon as you start typing. If you delete all of your own text from the object, the placeholder text returns.

Comp converts the sketch into body text paragraphs.

Switching back to layout mode, I adjust and duplicate the body text, sketch to add a headline and another text placeholder, and enter text into the headline to replace the placeholder text.

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InStep: Adobe Comp CC

6. Change type

specifications

Tapping the T icon reveals the type spec options.

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When a text object is selected, you can edit type specs by tapping the T icon at the bottom of the workspace. You can add fonts from Adobe Typekit, synced to your iPad by Creative Cloud. If you created character styles from InDesign and added them to a Creative Cloud library, you can also apply those here.

In addition to the already-available fonts, you can add fonts from Typekit.

If I just want to adjust the size of the text, I can drag a vertical slider that appears to the right of a selected text placeholder.

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InStep: Adobe Comp CC

7. Edit a graphics

placeholder and add more graphics

By tapping the first icon on the bottom, I can insert an image into the selected placeholder.

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You can drop an image into a graphics placeholder by tapping the Graphics icon at the bottom (the first one) to choose a source and an image to import. While you can add more shapes by switching over to drawing mode and sketching them, in layout mode you can also tap the Shapes icon at the top of the workspace. You can change the appearance of a selected shape the same way you can edit type specs: tap one of the icons along the bottom of the workspace.

I use the Shapes menu to quickly add a rectangle instead of sketching it.

To change the fill color and opacity of the selected rectangle, I tap the first two icons at the bottom.

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InStep: Adobe Comp CC

8. Erase, undo, review

In sketch mode, draw a squiggle over one or more objects, and Comp erases them in real time—an effect that’s kind of fun to watch. If you’re in layout mode, you can just select an object and tap the delete icon (trash can) at the bottom. If you delete something by accident, swipe two fingers left to undo your last edit. To redo, swipe two fingers to the right. Need to undo or redo more than one step? Swipe three fingers horizontally to scrub through the undo history. The three-finger history scrub is also a great way to review the progression of thought that led to the current design.

The red triangle isn’t working out, so in sketch mode I delete it by drawing a squiggle over it.

As I drag across the screen with three fingers, I scrub backward and forward through the undo history, which is indicated by the scroll bar across the top.

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InStep: Adobe Comp CC

9. Add a graphic from a

Creative Cloud library

We need to see how the layout looks with one more graphic that the magazine uses, so I tap the Graphics icon and then tap My Libraries.

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When you tap the graphics icon at the top of the workspace in layout mode, one of the sources you can choose is My Libraries, which leads to your Creative Cloud libraries. If you don’t have any assets on your iPad or in Creative Cloud but you still want to fill out the layout with more specific visuals, you can add graphics from the Creative Cloud Market of member-submitted content, or take a picture with the iPad camera.

I add Illustrator artwork from a Creative Cloud library named Magazine.

It’s a simple matter to resize the graphic and reposition it in the top right corner of the layout. It’s a little easier after using a two-finger pinch to zoom in.

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InStep: Adobe Comp CC

10. Create a different take on the same idea

11. Send to InDesign

If the art director wants to see something a little different, you can try again using an existing layout as a starting point for another idea. Tap Close to back out to the main screen, and then tap the Duplicate icon in the layout you want to copy. The Send feature is what sets apart Adobe Comp from other mobile sketching apps. Just tap the Share button, and then tap Send to InDesign CC. If you’re sitting in front of your computer, after a few moments you’ll see InDesign open, and then the Comp document will open in InDesign. While this is obviously a simple operation, it still looks like magic when you see the document open itself in InDesign straight from your iPad.

To create a variation on the design, I tap the Duplicate icon to copy the layout.

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This is the design we settle on, so it’s time to take this layout to production. With the layout open, I tap the Send icon at the top, and then tap Send to InDesign CC.

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InStep: Adobe Comp CC

Send to InDesign is such a great time-saver because you don’t have to manually and tediously transcribe paper sketches into a production-ready document in Adobe InDesign, Adobe Photoshop, or Adobe Illustrator. Instead, your Comp sketch is already part of a fully digital workflow that continues on through production to final output.

12. Finish the document in InDesign

When you send a Comp document to InDesign, it opens as an untitled document, and all images are embedded. Choose File > Save As to name and save the document to a folder. If you want to replace the embedded images with linked files, open the Links panel menu (Window > Links), and use the Unembed Link or Relink commands. Or just drag and drop local versions of the files into the graphics frames.

The Comp document arrives in InDesign. All text and graphics elements are fully editable, separate objects contained within one InDesign layer.

The Links panel reports that all imported graphics are embedded. I can manage a selected graphic by clicking the Links panel menu.

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InStep: Adobe Comp CC

You can go on to refine each object’s position and size, apply styles, and add any bleeds or other media-specific adjustments required to complete production of the layout. If there’s one piece of advice I’d give about using Comp, it would be “don’t overthink everything.” Don’t waste time worrying about precise measurements, advanced typography, or production details like bleeds; you wouldn’t worry about these if you were sketching on a napkin. You can work out those details later and more efficiently after you send the Comp layout to InDesign. Comp works best when your iPad is connected to the Internet. Although it’s possible to use Comp without an Internet connection after you’ve signed into Creative Cloud, you’ll probably encounter messages encouraging you to connect to a network so that Comp can reach services such as Typekit fonts. Adobe Comp CC is available for any iPad that can run iOS 7.1 or later. Adobe has not announced availability of Adobe Comp CC for other mobile platforms, but Android users may note that Adobe has begun to release Android versions of some of their mobile apps. It would be fun to go back in time and show my high school self that the future of digital design would be cooler than I ever dreamed of, and a prime example would be Adobe Comp CC.

n Conrad Chavez has provided education and training for digital media and publishing for over 20 years. His work includes the last three editions of the book Real World Adobe Photoshop for Photographers and the video Color Management for Photographers and Designers. He also contributes articles to publications including InDesign Magazine, CreativePro.com, and Peachpit.com, and is a photographer. To learn more about Conrad, please visit conradchavez.com.

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By Jean-Claude Tremblay GREP Level: Medium Download an IDML file to follow along

Figure 1: The default text file listing keyboard shortcuts isn’t exactly what you’d call “eye candy.” But we can fix that!

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C   reate the best-looking keyboard  shortcuts guide ever… with GREP! Y   our keyboard shortcuts can be practical, helpful, and beautiful.

InDesign has a lot of shortcuts. Close to 400 come in the shipping product, but you can assign shortcuts to more than 1500 functions in the application. To see which shortcuts are predefined and which can be configured, go to the Keyboard Shortcuts dialog box (Edit > Keyboard Shortcuts). For some of us, this is a very exciting dialog box—because here we can make our very own custom keyboard shortcut set! But looking at the various areas, scrolling up and down isn’t fun. That’s where the Show Set button comes in handy. If you click on it, you get a plain text file with all the commands, including those that don’t have default

shortcuts. But this plain text file isn’t much to look at either (Figure 1). One night I was looking at that file, and said to myself, let’s try to make this text not only easier to read but also easier to use. And if you knew me, you wouldn’t be surprised when I decided make this happen with the power of GREP styles. (Now don’t run away…using GREP styles is good for you! I promise, if you follow along, you’ll thank me later.) For the purpose of using GREP styles, our “work unit” in this project is a one-line paragraph. And each of these units contains several parts, which we’ll identify with character styles. Since GREP styles apply

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formatting via character styles, let’s start by creating the character styles we need (Figure 2). These character styles will apply different colors to: »» The shortcut set name »» The product area section titles »» When there is no default shortcut (none defined) »» Each context where the shortcut works (Default, Tables, Text, Presentation Mode, XML Selection, Alerts, Dialogs)

I’ve created dedicated color swatches for each part of my text, including the main text (Paragraph Text Color). That way I can easily change any colors in my shortcuts guide (Figure 3). Figure 3: Swatches that correspond to each of the character styles, plus one for the basic paragraph text

Some of the character styles apply only point size and color, but a few also apply a font style (bold, italic, etc.) or all caps. Now the most fun part: the GREP style! I’m using the free tomaxxiGREP panel that you can download from Adobe Add-ons (Figure 4). You don’t need tomaxxiGREP to work with GREP styles, but I highly recommend it, because it allows you to edit and preview GREP styles without having to open the Paragraph Styles panel.

We’ll also create a character style for turning the three dashes into one. Figure 2: The character styles needed to format the shortcuts guide

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In my example, I called the main paragraph style “Keyboard Shortcuts,” and set it to use Source Sans Pro Regular. The ten character styles use variants of light, bold, or black, so the look of the entire file can be changed by just by choosing a different font in the paragraph style.

Figure 4: The tomaxxiGREP panel

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GREP Style Details Let’s look at some of the GREP styles: The first one looks for \A.+ . This finds any character, one or more times, at the beginning of a story (by default, GREP searches only a single paragraph, so there’s no need to tell it to stop at the end of the line of text). This expression finds the shortcut set name data and applies the appropriate character style to it (Figure 5).

When a command doesn’t have a shortcut, you see the words [None Defined]. In our fourth GREP style, we’ll format this phrase using the expression \[.+\]. This tells InDesign to look for an opening bracket followed by any characters, one or more times, and a closing bracket (Figure 8). Figure 6: The Product Area GREP style

The third style cleans up the three dashes that appear between each command and its shortcut. It selects the first two dashes, and applies –300 tracking so the dashes overlap and look like a single character (Figure 7). Figure 8: A style to find any characters in brackets

Figure 5: The Shortcuts Sets Name GREP style

The second GREP style looks for: ^P.+ . This one works by looking for a paragraph that starts with a capital P followed by any characters one or more times (Figure 6). In our text file, the Product Area paragraphs are the only ones starting with a P. All others start with a tab or other letters.

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Figure 7: A GREP style to consolidate three dashes into something that looks like a single character

The remaining GREP styles apply a specific character style to each context type. Since a shortcut can be used for different commands based on context, we need to make sure we apply the styles correctly. I’ll explain how it works for the first context, Default (the remaining GREP styles are all based on the same logic).

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Here’s the code: ((?<=--- )|(?<=, ))D[^,]+

We’re looking for text starting with a capital D, followed by one or more of anything that is not a comma [^,]+. We do this because we want the formatting to stop if there is a second context entry separated from the first by a comma. We’ve also added a Positive Lookbehind condition. For the GREP to match text, that text must be preceded by either three dashes and a space or a comma and a space (?<=--- )|(?<=, ) (Figure 9).

Figure 9: The GREP styles for the contexts search for the first characters of the context name preceded by dashes or commas, via Positive Lookbehinds.

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With this GREP expression, the text containing Default : keyboard will be matched, and the character style applied to it. The remaining five GREP styles are built the same way to apply the corresponding formatting to all of the contexts.

Creating the Guide So now that our powerful paragraph style is built—let’s apply it !

Choose Edit > Keyboard Shortcuts. Select your set. Click Show Set. In the text file that opens, select all and copy. 5. Switch back to InDesign, paste the text, and apply the Keyboard Shortcuts paragraph style. Et voilà! You now have the most attractive keyboard shortcut list on the block (Figure 10). And in the process, you’ve

1. 2. 3. 4.

Figure 10: Now that’s more like it! A custom shortcuts guide with all the GREP styles working their magic.

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performed a pretty slick piece of GREP formatting that you probably can’t wait to show your friends. Well, at least your InDesign geek friends.

Bonus Tip: Only Include Active Shortcuts If you want to display just the commands with shortcuts assigned, and remove all with [none defined] and empty Product Area lines—do a Find/Change two times with this GREP: ^(.+\[.+\]\r)|^(P.+\r\r) and replace with nothing. Now you can have a guide that contains just your active keyboard shortcuts. Before

After

n Jean-Claude Tremblay is the owner of Proficiografik, where he spends time helping creative people in the graphic industry to work faster, better, and more efficiently by offering coaching, technical support, and custom training. He is the founder/ manager of the Montreal & Quebec City Adobe Community Usergroup, as well as a lover of type, GREP, and homemade breads. Visit his LinkedIn profile for more information.

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By Anne-Marie Concepción

InDesigner: Publish Online Pioneers

A few intrepid designers are using this beta to the max InDesign CC 2015 users: have you noticed the big new button on the right-hand side of the Application Bar? It’s just to the left of the workspace name and online help field. The “Publish Online” button is like a siren call—one-button online publishing? Am I dreaming?—but if you hover over it for a second, you’ll see Adobe’s caveat in the tooltip: “Technology Preview.” Yes, it is a one-click magic online publishing button. It does work—just not in the fully-fledged way that Adobe intends, not yet. In the meantime, though, they invite you to use it as you wish, because it’s fully baked enough for many professional publications, as you’ll see in this article.

A page from PoetsArtists magazine, available as a Publish Online document (see page 57 for more samples from this magazine).

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When you click the Publish Online button (or choose File > Publish Online (Preview)), InDesign exports a design-replica rendition of your layout to the Adobe servers dedicated to the Publish Online service. You’re given a permanent, unique URL that you can paste in any browser to see your publication with fonts, images, interactivity (object hyperlinks, animations, buttons, slide shows, videos) all intact. A-maz-ing. You can share the URL with anyone: colleagues, clients, or the world at large. Readers can page through your publication in their browser, play videos, and zoom in and out, without needing any special plug-in.

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I call it a “design-replica rendition” because at this point, it’s nothing we’ve seen before, and Adobe hasn’t come up with a snappy name yet for this file format. It looks like—but it’s not—a PDF in a browser. Nor is it a DPS publication. It shares a lot of attributes with Fixed-Layout EPUBs, but it’s not an epub. And it’s not a website, though I’m pretty sure a combination of HTML5, CSS3, and JavaScript is the secret sauce. Let’s just say that Publish Online publishes your file on the web with a click. A few cautions. While users can see the publication online, they can’t download it for offline viewing. Also, nothing is selectable in the publication, so users can’t copy and paste a text selection for safekeeping, nor can they search for text in the file. No doubt, many of these obstacles will disappear as Adobe continues working on Publish Online, turning it from a Technology Preview to a fully functional cutting-edge publishing platform.

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Let’s take a look at what a number of InDesign users are already creating with the Publish Online technology preview. Use the links in the captions to fully experience these publications in your browser.

Okefenokee: Land of Trembling Earth is a highly interactive Publish Online publication. Starting with the slowly scrolling background image on the cover, Okefenokee is a showcase for author Diane Burns’ mastery of InDesign interactivity. And the photography by her and Denise Lever is spectacular, too. More spreads appear on the following page. See it online at http://j.mp/diane-okee.

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Pages from Okefenokee: Land of Trembling Earth.

Right, top and bottom: The “Gators” page opens with the title and a large, screened-back woodcut illustration; then (through the magic of InDesign animation exported as JavaScript), the woodcut solidifies and scales down to tuck into the lower-left corner, while text and image content fade in, scale, and slide in to fill the page.

Above: Readers can tap the grid icon at the bottom right of the Publish Online screen to toggle thumbnails on and off.

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InDesigner: Publish Online

Didi Menendez is the publisher, editor, and creator of PoetsArtists magazine, which comes out 6 to 8 times a year. Issues of the magazine can be purchased in print or interactive PDF format, or viewed online free (for now) as an interactive Publish Online document. Here is the cover and a spread from the Publish Online version of issue 66, whose theme is “Destroying the Figure.” You can view the entire issue online at http://j.mp/poets-artists_66, and visit the magazine’s website at http://www.poetsandartists.com/.

Above: The cover page for issue 66 of PoetsArtists magazine. The page opens with a subtle animation and a short, powerful “you’ve arrived” chime. Clicking the thumbnails icon allows you to see and navigate among miniature previews of inside spreads. Publish Online creates the thumbnails on its own. Left: A sample spread renders with a gentle animation of the artwork slowly appearing on screen. Double-tapping, using a pinch gesture, or clicking the Zoom In icon a few times allows readers to see fine details of the artwork.

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InDesigner: Publish Online

Design Portfolio: Not everything has to be a magazine! Copenhagen-based designer Karen Oline took the ball and ran with it, making her portfolio available online at http://j.mp/karen-port.

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InDesigner: Publish Online

Create an “App”: Here’s a clever idea. Use InDesign to create a mock-up of a smartphone app, complete with buttons that bring users to different pages (screens). When users go to your file’s Publish Online URL in their phone’s web browser, they can choose to save it to their home screen (right), which puts an icon of the publication right on their phone (above left, circled). This particular mock-up is of a marine field guide for mobile devices. It was built to introduce the app (which is still in development) at a teacher’s conference, and to get feedback from the group of marine educators on what worked well and what could be improved. We can’t share the Publish Online URL, since the design is proprietary, but the staff at http://sea-media.org were happy to share these screen shots, and they invite you to learn more about what they do at their site.

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InDesigner: Publish Online

Client Education: Michela DiStefano, owner of Italy’s Studio361, creates digital publications for companies. To show prospective clients how static content can be enhanced with InDesign animations and interactivity, she put together some dazzling examples in her Publish Online document, “InDesign Animations.” You can see her animation portfolio at http://j.mp/michela-anim.

n Anne-Marie Concepción is the co-publisher of InDesign Magazine. She has been creating ebooks and other digital publications out of InDesign layouts for over ten years, and loves to teach other publishers how to do the same.

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S N O I S S E S INCLUDE:

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S R E K A E SP INCLUDE:

d n a l l e l C c M h Deke t i m S n i l o C r e d i n S a s Le e s r e v n o C s y Chri e l e e S n i t Jus s p a e H k r a M h c n e r F l e Nig 61


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Best of the Blog

A collection of the most important and informative articles from InDesignSecrets. If you want to add comments or ask questions, just click the title of the article, or click the Feedback button to view the original post in your web browser. Make a Continued Heading in a Table David Blatner | July 18, 2015

You probably already know that InDesign has a feature that lets you put headers at the top of each table, even when the table spans across two or more columns, text frames, or pages. But what if you want a slightly different header at the top of subsequent pages— for example, a regular heading on page 1 and then a header that says “continued” on the other pages. Here’s how to do it: First, we need to duplicate the row that we want to turn into a table header. I’m going to do that by selecting the whole row (just click to the left of the row to select it), and then place my cursor over one of the selected cells, and Option/Alt-drag down just a little. That duplicates the whole row. (In the following image, you

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can see my cursor immediately after I made the duplicate, and the new row is selected, so it appears tan-colored.)

(That Option/Alt-drag trick only works in CC 2014 or later. If you have an earlier version, you can duplicate the row by copying it, inserting a new empty row, selecting the empty row, and then pasting.) Now that we have the basis for two headers, I’m going to edit the one on top—the first row. I’ll just add “continued” to one of the cells.

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Next, I need to change that first row into a real header row, which you can do by placing your cursor in the row (or selecting it), and choosing Table > Convert Rows > To Header. Now that it’s a “header row” it will show up at the beginning of every new frame of this table.

But of course, it shows up at the top of the first frame, too, right? So you need to get rid of that one, which you can do by choosing Table > Table Options > Headers and Footers, and then turning on the Skip First checkbox.

When you click OK, you’ll see that we have only one header on the first page, and a different one on the subsequent pages!

(Note that in the above image, I’m showing two threaded text frames on the same page, but it would look the same if the second frame was another a different page.)

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How to Install InDesign CS6, CC, or CC 2014 Mike Rankin | July 23, 2015

3. On the right side, there is a blue filtering menu. By default, it says All Apps. Click it, and then click View Previous Versions at the bottom of the list.

The details of how Creative Cloud subscribers can install older versions of InDesign have been mentioned here before in other posts, but since the question comes up a lot (and Adobe is always tweaking things), I thought the topic should have its own post, which I will try to keep updated. Also, I’ve included instructions for uninstalling apps at the end of this post. Installing Previous Versions of Creative Cloud Apps Here is the current process for installing InDesign CS6, InDesign CC, or InDesign CC 2014 via the Creative Cloud app. 1. In the Creative Cloud add, click Apps. 4. Click the InDesign Install button. You’ll see a list of available versions.

2. Click Find Additional Apps.

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5. Click the one you want. If you already have that version installed on your machine, you will get an alert telling you that your current copy of that version will be overwritten if you continue.

3. In the Manage Application pop-up, click Uninstall.

4. You’ll get a dialog box asking if you want to keep your preferences or trash them, as well as one last chance to cancel the uninstall operation. Choose No to keep your preferences. Choose Yes to remove preferences. Uninstalling Creative Cloud Apps Need to uninstall an app? Here’s how. 1. Find it in the CC app by clicking either Latest Version or Previous Version. 2. With your cursor over an app, a small gray gear icon appears. Click it.

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Making a Line Along the Left Side of a Paragraph David Blatner | August 5, 2015

Sometimes a design calls for placing a line along the left or right side of a paragraph, often for emphasis or to indicate that something in the paragraph has changed. But InDesign doesn’t have a “draw a vertical line along the side of a paragraph” feature. I showed three ways to create this effect in this old post. But now, in InDesign CC, there’s a new option I wanted to share: using paragraph shading. InDesign’s paragraph shading feature is awesome because it lets you put a colored box behind any paragraph. But actually, the paragraph shading doesn’t have to just be behind the paragraph; you can put it anywhere you want… even outside of the text frame. For example, here’s a paragraph with paragraph shading:

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And then, simply by changing the Left and Right offsets (here I’m using a 1p6 Left offset and a –12p6 Right offset), you can turn the “box” into a line:

One of the best parts about creating “lines” with the Paragraph Shading feature is that they can span across more than one column, or even across threaded text frames:

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Pretty cool, eh? It just goes to show that sometimes you have to think outside the… groan!… box!

Cool Use for InDesign’s New Graphic Table Cells Feature

The typical use case for a graphic cell is to easily place images in table cells. But here’s another use. I was helping a customer create a document that contained dozens of tables like this one:

Keith Gilbert | July 27, 2015

One of the great new features of InDesign CC 2015 is a new type of table cell called a “Graphic Cell.” To use this feature, just select any table cell, and choose Table > Convert Cell to Graphic Cell. This command adds a graphic frame to the cell that is “stuck” to all four sides of the table cell. When you make the column or row wider or taller, the size of the graphic frame grows with it.

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Note the down-pointing arrows near the bottom of the table. The customer needed an easy way to create these arrows so that as rows and columns were added and deleted, and as column widths changed, the arrows would still be perfectly aligned. Here’s how we did it. 1. Create a blank row for the “arrowheads.” 2. Select a cell, and choose Table > Convert Cell to Graphic Cell.

4. Choose Object > Convert Shape > Triangle.

5. Choose Object > Transform > Flip Vertical.

3. Press the Esc key to select the graphic frame inside the table cell. 6. Fill the triangle as desired.

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7. Select the cell (not the graphic frame), and paste the cell in other locations as needed (pressing the Esc key cycles you between selecting the frame and selecting the cell).

8. You will need to flip each of the copies vertically again.

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9. Note that if you merge a cell with a cell to the right, the graphic frame occupies the new merged cell.

10. A  s you change column widths and row heights, the graphic frames scale.

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This approach opens up all kinds of creative possibilities for the “ends” of table rows and columns. In the example below, the ends of the shaded rows are graphic cells containing rectangles with two rounded corners.

Undocumented Feature: Export to “Fixed-Layout HTML” Keith Gilbert | July 30, 2015

I was digging around in the InDesign CC 2015 “Object Model” today while working on a complicated script project, and I ran across this: 

For those unfamiliar with scripting, this might not look like much. But it stopped me cold. This command didn’t exist in previous versions of InDesign. The documentation for the command simply says “Exports to XHTML FXL format.” Wondering what “XHTML FXL format” is, I decided to try it with a simple script. Lo and behold, this command adds an undocumented export type to InDesign. When used in a script, it outputs the file as an HTML file with proper supporting CSS and JavaScript to a “fixed layout” type of HTML format, that looks and behaves just like a fixed layout EPUB, with the big exception that each page is output as a single HTML file. Animation added via the

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Animation and Timing panels appears to be fully supported, as well as text and object hyperlinks. Click here to download a script you can use to try this out for yourself. The script asks you to choose a folder to save the HTML files into, and then names each file the same as the InDesign file with an .html filename extension.

While this is pretty amazing, it is no substitute for products like in5, since there is no way to automatically link the HTML pages together, no control over how the HTML is positioned and sized within the browser, and more. Another caveat: At this point, it’s not clear how publishing documents this way fits (or doesn’t) with your font licenses. So it would be safest to limit your early explorations with this feature to documents using free or open source fonts.

The Riddle of the Hidden Characters: Contest Answer and Winner! Mike Rankin | July 30, 2015

It’s time to reveal the solution—and the winner—for this month’s InDesignSecrets contest! This time, you had to decipher the meaning of this image (with a little help from the InDesignSecrets Guide to Special Characters.)

I thought I’d share this because I thought it was interesting, and it might be useful for someone in some way. I suspect this command is “under the hood” in InDesign due to the “technology preview” of the new Publish Online feature in the English versions of InDesign CC 2015.

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As many of you wrote, the image shows an em space = an en space + a quarter space + a thin space + a thin space. Or, 1 = 1/2 + 1/4 + 1/8 + 1/8 And the winner is…Marina Thompson

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Marina wins a copy of WordsFlowPro from Em Software! Thanks to everyone who entered, and be on the lookout for another contest with a new great prize next month!

Making a Charlie Brown Shirt with Conditional Text Kelly Vaughn | July 31, 2015

You may be aware that I love conditional text. My latest creation is composed of four objects.

Conditional Text Squiggly

Because conditional text squiggles do not scale (meaning that the squiggle is the same size whether your font size is 2 pts or 200 pts), I had to make the shirt very small in order to get the squiggle to be the right size proportionally.

Layers

The shirt serves as the container for the conditional text squiggly. I had to add a space at the beginning in order to add a little kerning to get the squiggle to be centered on the shirt. Then I added a right indent tab and applied a condition to it.

Transform Settings

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The vertical placement of the conditional text squiggle is relative to the point size of the characters, so by making the characters very small I could place them vertically where they needed to be.

So the advertisement was created in an InDesign file with these dimensions and exported to JPG at 96ppi. Character Settings

And for your amusement, here is the Conditional Text Charlie Brown Sweater, as an InDesign snippet.

A Size Trap When Exporting JPGs for On-screen Use Colin Flashman | August 3, 2015

My colleague recently alerted me to a strange behavior in InDesign when creating an advertisement for a website. The client had supplied a brief to create an advertisement with specific measurements: 728 × 90 px at 96 ppi.

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But when the file was opened in Photoshop to confirm the image size, something was quite odd. Rather than being 728×90 px at 96ppi, it was 971×120 at 96ppi.

The fix for this problem was to go back to InDesign and export again to JPG, but this time at 72ppi.

In Photoshop, the size of the advertisement was now correct, but the ppi was incorrect...

Fortunately, you can change the ppi from 72 to 96 easily in Photoshop in the Image Size panel. Uncheck the Resample checkbox, and change the resolution from 72ppi to 96ppi. How InDesign Handles Resolution and Image Size for Export So what is going on here? Well, it isn’t a bug, it’s a behavior of InDesign. When using pixels as a measurement, InDesign assumes that the ppi of these documents will always be 72ppi. The easiest way to demonstrate this is to make a new Web or Digital Publishing document in InDesign. Notice there is no option to choose a resolution in the New Document dialog box. In the new document, drag out a guide to 72px, and then change the measurements used

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in InDesign to inches, and note the measurement of the guideline: 1 inch.

setting the resolution in the JPG export to 72ppi, and leaving the checkbox Use Document Bleed Settings unchecked.

Dynamic Pull Quotes This behavior extends to the JPG export. Rather than understanding that the image is already at the correct size in pixels, InDesign thinks the image is just over 10 inches wide by 1.25 inches high as a print document. So when asked to export a JPG at 96ppi, InDesign is thinking it is a print document 10 inches wide by 1.25 inches high at 96ppi, and this—when measured back into pixels in Photoshop—is 971×120ppi. Despite all of this, what really matters for on-screen publishing is the finished size of the artwork in pixels, not the pixel density in ppi. Because of the way InDesign behaves, it is important to make sure the artwork is exported at the correct pixel width and height by

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Masood Ahmad | August 6, 2015

A pull quote is a common element of good design, adding visual interest and emphasizing key information. There are various styles available today, and people are always developing new creative ways to format their pull quotes. But in general, it can be hard to create a good-looking pull quote style that is easily repeatable in a template. There are several bits of information grouped together to give a pull quote an aesthetic look (the quotation marks, the quote itself, and so on). And, the length of the quote text often varies in width and height. I have recently discovered that working on a pull quote can be much easier if I convert it into a table. For instance, in the

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example below there are three elements grouped together: the opening quotation marks, the quote text, and the closing quotation marks.

The middle row is set to have an auto height, which will help the row to expand or shrink to fit the text. You can also change the color of the Pull Quote text frame.

This works well if all the quotes in the document are of equal length. But since this is not true, we have to manually adjust the positioning of the closing quotation mark. In order to overcome that problem, I converted this to a 3×3 table (three rows by three columns):

The very interesting part about this is that it is just one single text frame. Things becomes much easier if I change the text, and the table shrinks to fit the quote:

In the example below, the table expands automatically to fit the larger text:

The first cell in the top row holds the opening quotation mark, and the last cell in the bottom row holds the closing quotation mark. I set these cells at an exact height and width to avoid further movement, and made some adjustments to the quotation marks.

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Not only this, but you can easily change the width of the column if your text is too small to fit the current width of the column:

Of course, you don’t have to only use quotation marks! There are many variations on the pull quote designs you can come up with. Here is an example where the “bracket” design is created by the fill color of table cells:

And here’s a 1-column, 3-row table, where the top and bottom cell are filled with parentheses… but the text in the cell is rotated 90°.

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While most simple pull quote designs don’t require a table, you should consider using a table for interesting designs like these. It makes styling and updating the pull quotes much easier! You can also download the InDesign file that I used for these examples here.

Using the Links Panel to Locate the Original Raw Image Kelly Vaughn | August 10, 2015

Have you ever worked on an InDesign document and needed to locate one of the original images? Take, for example, this InDesign layout (see next page). It has a nice photo, but the photo is too small, and I want to locate the larger version of it. I know I have the original photo somewhere, because I took the photo. But I want to get a larger version of the photo printed, and this 135-ppi version just won’t do. Notice the small frames in the top right corner of the image. Those tags are courtesy of FrameReporter, by Rorohiko. You

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can add a variety of small, non-printing tags to your frame, which display all sorts of useful info.

(It’s important to note that the same XMP File Info dialog box that’s in InDesign is also available from Photoshop, but it’s nice to know I can access this info from InDesign.)

As you can see by the date, I took this photo over five years ago, and have since misplaced the original RAW file. A couple things to note: »» I am 100% positive that I did not keyword the photos. »» I am also 100% positive that I took the photos in RAW format. But did you know that InDesign can help you locate the original RAW file? First, go to the Links panel > Utilities > XMP File Info.

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Then you’ll get this dialog box. If your image was so blessed to have been given keywords, they would also show up here.

Several of the sections in the XMP dialog box come prepopulated with useful information, such as Camera Data...

Basic Info Tab

Camera Data

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... and Raw Data.

Camera Raw Filename Raw Data

What’s so useful about the Raw Data is that I know my camera’s raw files begin with DSC. So when I type DSC in the search field, it takes me right to the camera raw filename.

And then all I have to do is search my hard drive for that filename, and it quickly locates only two possible matches on my hard drive. (Note: if you’re curious how I got the InDesign icons at the top of my finder window, you can read about that here.)

Search Results

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Similarly, the same information is available in Bridge.

»» Multiple page spreads »» Multiple page sizes »» Text hyperlinks (including TOC markers, index markers, and cross references) »» Support for 96 PPI image resolution »» Sharing via Twitter and email »» Improved support for gestures CC Library Enhancement »» An Edit Charts in Creative Cloud option appears in the context menu of the CC Libraries panel, enabling you to edit charts directly in the Creative Cloud.

Camera Raw Data in Bridge

So now that I have my original image, I can go and make the large print that I wanted!

InDesign CC 2015.1 Released Mike Rankin | August 11, 2015

The 2015.1 release of InDesign (11.1.0.122) is now available. Ladies and gentlemen, start your updaters.

Better Handling of Layers in Placed Graphics There is a new option in File Handling preferences you can enable to hide layers that are added to placed Illustrator and InDesign files (but not Photoshop files yet). With this turned on, added layers in these files won’t disrupt the appearance of your InDesign layout

What’s New? Publish Online got some new features, including: »» Support for all locations (previously it was limited to English versions only)

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when you update the links. This should save a lot of unwanted trips to the Object Layer Options dialog box for some folks.

»» »» »» »» »» »» »»

Crashes on saving documents Crashes when canceling a Package operation Undo only changing a single character Blurry images in interactive buttons Books with three-page spreads not exporting correctly Hyperlinks not working in PDF and EPUB output Smart Dimensions Smart Guides are fixed

Discoverability When you install the update, Adobe is keen on you discovering the new (and newish) features, so the CC Libraries panel pops open and InDesign’s Welcome screen returns, even if you’ve turned it off previously. If it annoys you, remember that you can turn it off again by clicking the checkbox at the bottom right.

Bug Fixes Adobe reports that several bugs were squashed, including: »» Crashes when duplicating text containing tables with graphic cells via drag and drop »» Crashes when publishing a document with both transparency and hyperlinks

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Troubleshooting Try these steps if you’re on a Mac and your CC app appears empty, or just sits there with an endless spinning cursor. 1. Quit out of all your Adobe apps. 2. Quit out of the Creative Cloud app.

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3. Delete the opm.db file located at ~/Library/Application Support/ Adobe/OOBE/opm.db. You may also need to use the Activity Monitor application to quit a stalled Creative Cloud process.

4. Restart your computer. 5. Start up CC. You should get the sign-in screen. Once you’re signed in, you can see and install the update.

Creating Smarter Text Styles for Long Documents Eugene Tyson | August 12, 2015

not use this fantastically time-saving function, but it can be an incredibly powerful tool, especially if you deal with long documents, or documents with strict specifications for text formatting. What is a Parent Style? A Parent Style is a style that acts as a master for the subsequent styles that are “Based On” the Parent Style. For example: Header Master (Grandparent) Heading 1 (Parent) [based on Heading Master (Grandparent)] Heading 2 (Child) [based on Heading Master (Grandparent)] Heading 2 numbered list 1 (Grandchild) [based on Heading 2 (Child)] Heading 2 numbered list 1.1 (GreatGrandchild) [based on Heading 2]

Working as both a designer and prepress specialist, I receive a lot of files that I wish were built better, smarter, and with intelligence working in the background. All of which can be accomplished with strategic use of the Based On feature for styles. A lot of people do

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Body Style Master (Grandparent) Body Text (Parent) Body Notes (Child) [based on Body Text] Body Text Level 1 (Child) [based on Body Text] Body Text Level 2 (Grandchild) [based on Body Text Level 1] Body Text Level 3 (Grandchild) [based on Body Text Level 1] Body Bullet (Child) [based on Body Text] Body Bullet Level 1 (Grandchild) [based on Body Bullet] Body Bullet Level 2 (Great Grandchild) [based on Body Bullet Level 1] Body Bullet Level 3 (Grandchild) [based on Body Bullet Level 1] Body Number (Child) [based on Body Text] Body Number Level 1 (Grandchild) [based on Body Number] Body Number Level 2 (Great Grandchild) [based on Body Number Level 1] Body Number Level 3 (Great Grandchild) [based on Body Number Level 1]

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This might seem like overkill and needlessly complicated, but it’s not—setting these styles up is the biggest timesaver especially when it comes to making future edits to a document that’s hundreds of pages long! Do you really want to go through each paragraph of text to adjust the leading by .5 pt? Or increase the size of the text by 1 pt? How are you going to fit all the text on 198 pages and when it’s currently spilling over into 204 pages? Hopefully you’re not going to go through it all page by page—and you don’t have to, if you use the Based On feature properly. How to set up Based On styles Let’s set up the Header Master style first. Just be sure NOT to base it on the Basic Style, whatever you do. For the details of what can go wrong, check out this post. Create a new document—you don’t need text, although it can help visually. 1. Choose Window > Styles > Paragraph Styles.

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2. Choose New Paragraph Style from the panel menu.

3. Click OK. The new style is saved. Now that simple step is out of the way—on to the rest. 4. Create another new style—this time name it Heading 1—but note that you’re going to select the option for Based On: Header Master.

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This means that Heading 1 will have the same style properties as Heading Master. We can go ahead and create the rest of the styles this way until you have something like this:

The panel isn’t great—it would better if Adobe indented the styles that are Based On others—but hey, this is what we have to work with… If you want a visual representation of the Based On relationships of your styles, check out the free script by Harbs at In-Tools: Show Paragraph Based On.

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When you begin to work on the Body Styles, make sure that you start off with Body Style Master, and Based On: No Paragraph Style, as shown below.

Until you have something like this:

Then keep building your styles as you see fit.

Now what I have is a structured smart set of family related styles, where the headings are independent of the body styles, and they can all be altered in a flick of the main Master style (Grandparent) all the way down to the tiniest change in the child or grandchild or even great-grandchild stage.

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Here’s an example of how this is an advantage:

Edit Body Style Master and change the font size—notice how the text changes in the other styles.

Even the bullets changed size, which is fantastic. That happened because the Bullets styles are based on the Body Text style, which is based on the Body Text Master style. What to Watch Out For Nothing is foolproof, and there is always a caveat. With the Based On feature, the styles are linked, but parts of the styles become unlinked when you make changes. For example, the Heading 1 style is pink, and thus so is Heading 2—at first. But if I make the

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Heading 2 style blue, the colors of the styles are no longer linked. So If I want them both to be green at some point in the future, I’ll have to make that change in both styles separately. So try to think ahead and be aware that making changes to your styles makes them less connected. You can see another example of this in the screenshots above. The Body Notes text did not change text size when I changed the master style, because the font size had already been changed to distinguish it from body text. This unlinked the text size from the master style. The Body Notes style still keeps the same leading, the same color, and other characteristics of the master styles, but not the font size.

wherever you want it in your document (or every document in an InDesign book when you synchronize styles)! And don’t forget, this applies to every kind of style available in InDesign—character styles, object styles, cell styles, and table styles. To get the complete roundup of how all this works, I highly recommend Michael Murphy’s book, Adobe InDesign CS4 Styles: How to Create Better, Faster Text and Layouts. Trust me—the time you spend mastering Based On styles will save you many hours in design and production work!

The Power of Based On Styles The advantages to using Based On styles are endless. What if you have ten heading styles and someone wants you to change them all to a different color? Some people would edit ten different styles to apply the same color. Other less fortunate people who don’t even use styles would go manually, line by line, changing the color. Ugh! In a nutshell, with smart use of Based On in the paragraph style settings, you can base your styles on other styles so that you can make a change in one place and instantly have that change applied

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The InDex: InDex Your Key to Our Content Can’t find that article you saw in an earlier issue? Wondering whether we covered that obscure plug-in? Never fear, the InDex is here. The first issue of InDesign Magazine was published in July 2004. Since then, we’ve cranked out thousands of pages on hundreds of related topics. While it’s possible to use Acrobat to simultaneously search all past issues of the magazine for one word or phrase, many readers have clamored for a formal index at the back of each issue. However, with 77 issues to account for, that’s not feasible. Instead, the InDex will live as a PDF you can download for free. If you come across a topic you want to know more about, but it’s in an issue you don’t have, you’re not out of luck. We sell back issues at indesignsecrets.com.

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If the topic you’re looking for isn’t in the InDex, you have one more way to search: that PDF trick we mentioned. To make it work, all of your magazine issue PDFs must be in one folder. Open any issue in Acrobat, and then press Shift+Command+F (Shift+Ctrl+F on Windows). In the Search window that appears, be sure that you click the radio button that says “All PDF Documents in,” and in the dropdown menu below that, choose the folder in which you placed your magazine issues. You’re on your way to finding anything in any PDF!

Click here to download the InDex.

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While this PDF is just for you, you can tell your friends about this great discount: $10 off a 1-year membership use coupon code: friend Send them to: indesignsecrets.com/issues

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September 2015

Coming Soon!

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