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July 2015

C C

M A G A Z I N E 75

The Ultimate Guide to

Marquand Books   Timeless Features Making a Houndstooth Pattern


MAGAZINE

From the Editor in Chief PUBLISHERS David Blatner, Anne-Marie Concepción EDITORIAL Editor in Chief Mike Rankin, mike@indesignmag.com

Source: xkcd.com

Managing Editor Wendy Katz, wendy@indesignmag.com Senior Editor Sandee Cohen, sandee@indesignmag.com Contributing Writers Keith Gilbert, Adam Jury, Kelly Vaughn, Wendy Katz, Erica Gamet, Ilene Strizver, Theunis de Jong, Alan Gilbertson, and Glenn Fleishman DESIGN Rufus Deuchler rufus.deuchler.net BUSINESS Contact Information http://indesignsecrets.com/contact Subscription Information indesignsecrets.com/issues Published by InDesignSecrets.com, a division of The Creative Publishing Network, Inc. Copyright 2015 InDesignSecrets.com. All rights reserved. Reproduction and redistribution prohibited without approval. For more information, contact permissions@indesignmag.com. InDesign Magazine is not endorsed or sponsored by Adobe Systems Incorporated, publisher of InDesign. InDesign is a registered trademark of Adobe Systems Incorporated. All other products and services are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners and are hereby acknowledged. Photos on pages 22,23, and 53 courtesy of Fotolia.com

Yep, that comic from xkcd really captures my feelings about kerning. You don’t have to look very hard to find examples of bad kerning—they’re everywhere. But to a nondesigner’s eye, these typographic misdeeds are all but invisible. Most folks only know if something looks good or bad, professional or amateurish. For their sake—and ours— it’s up to us to help rid the world of lousy letterspacing. So for this issue, we got type expert Ilene Strizver to share her secret techniques in the Ultimate Guide to Kerning.

InDesign CC 2015 doesn’t have any new features to help you kern type, but it does have some very welcome additions and enhancements, and Keith Gilbert brings you all the details in his article. Then we go from the timely to the timeless, when Adam Jury serves as your guide to InDesign features that are like buried treasures right under your fingertips, some of them dating all the way back to CS2! Of course, all the features in the world won’t make you a happy and successful InDesign user. For that, you need a workflow that works, industry insight, and strong professional connections. That’s what events like PePcon are for, as Erica Gamet describes. In this month’s InDesigner, Wendy Katz shows off the wares of Seattle’s venerable publisher, Marquand Books. We’ve got all that, plus an InStep, GREP of the Month, and Best of the Blog! Enjoy!

ISSN 2379-1403

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InSide: Table of Contents 5

16

23

35

42

49

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InDesign CC 2015 Keith Gilbert walks us through the new features and doesn’t pull any punches.

Best of the Blog  A collection of the most important and informative articles from InDesignSecrets. 61

How to Check Tint Shades Using the Separations Preview Panel

67

How to Magnify Your Screen Display

69

Yes, InDesign’s Radial Gradients are Insane (it’s not you)

Timeless Treasures Adam Jury reminds us that some of InDesign’s best features are the old standbys.

72

Creating Drop Words with InDesign

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Finding Type on a Path

PePcon 2015 Recap Philadelphia welcomed the sixth edition of the Print + ePublishing Conference.

78

The Mystery of the Missing Frames

79

The Incredible Shrinking Italic Small Caps

GREP of the Month: Case Sensitivity Theunis “Jongware” de Jong shows how to switch case sensitivity on or off at any point in your GREP searches.

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Skip to the Leading, My Bonny Loose

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Numbering Paragraphs… on their right side!

InDesigner: Marquand Books Inc. Wendy Katz introduces us to the world(s) of Marquand Books.

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InDex to All Past Issues

InType: The Complete Guide to Kerning Ilene Strizver has big things to say about little spaces. InStep: Creating a Houndstooth Pattern Kelly Vaughn helps you snazz up your InDesign wardrobe with a customizable, natty houndstooth pattern.

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Check out the All-New CreativePro.com! Where Creatives Go to Know

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By Keith Gilbert

The InDesign CC 2015 release

Newest version of InDesign brings enhancements to CC libraries, tables, and more Delivering on the Creative Cloud promise of more frequent product updates, on June 15th Adobe announced the first “2015” version of InDesign (along with new versions of Photoshop, Illustrator, and other apps). For those with Creative Cloud individual plans or Creative Cloud for Teams, the update is available by visiting the CC desktop app. If you work for a larger company and have an enterprise installation of InDesign, you may need to wait for your IT staff to roll out the upgrade. Regardless of how you get it, this is an update that you don’t want to miss. In it, Adobe has added some interesting new features and refined existing features in ways that InDesign users have wanted for a long time.

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Paragraph Shading The best new feature in InDesign CC 2015 is the ability to add automatic paragraph shading behind paragraphs without having to create a separate frame. Book publishers have been wanting this capability for years. Even Microsoft Word has had a similar feature, so it’s time that InDesign caught up. To apply paragraph shading, place your cursor in a paragraph, select Shading in the Control panel, and then choose a swatch from the adjacent Fill Color drop-down menu (Figure 1, next page). The shading that appears behind the paragraph will move with the paragraph and grow and shrink in dimension as the paragraph is edited or reformatted.

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Feature: ID CC 2015

The advanced options for paragraph shading can be accessed by either Option/ Alt-double-clicking the icon to the left of the Fill Color drop-down menu or choosing Paragraph Shading from the Control panel menu. By default, the paragraph shading extends from the left to right edges of the text column in which the paragraph resides, and from the ascenders of the type in the first line of the paragraph to the descenders

Figure 1: Easy access to the paragraph shading controls is found in the Control panel.

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in the last line of the paragraph. But you have full control over the exact behavior of the shading in the Paragraph Shading dialog box (Figure 2). While InDesign has long had a Paragraph Rules command that allows you to add automatic rules above and below paragraphs, there is still no feature in InDesign for creating an automatic rule around a paragraph. That would seem to be a natural extension of the paragraph

shading capability. Perhaps we’ll see this in a future version. Any color swatch can be used for a paragraph fill, including radial and linear gradient swatches. But you cannot use the Gradient Swatch tool with paragraph shading, so you have no control over where the center of a radial gradient is, or the direction and angle of a linear gradient. So, for now, linear gradients in paragraph shading will always run left to right.

Figure 2: The Paragraph Shading dialog box gives you full control over the shading attributes. Here I’ve added a small amount of top and bottom offset. Left and right paragraph indents have been applied to the paragraph to move the text away from the edges of the column, but the left and right edges of the paragraph shading remain the width of the column due to the Width option being set to Column.

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If you’ve applied paragraph shading in Microsoft Word, that shading will translate to automatic paragraph shading in InDesign if you set your Import Options to retain Word formatting when you place the file into InDesign.

For the times when you have to have it all A paragraph can now have both automatic paragraph shading and automatic paragraph rules. Some fussy setup is required, but the results can be very nice.

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The people who will really love this feature are those that need to do repetitive shading in long documents, so, thankfully, paragraph shading can be incorporated in a paragraph style. And, equally thankfully, paragraph shading exports to both reflowable and fixed layout EPUB, as well as to HTML output.

A New File Format, Again? Because paragraph shading is an entirely new “thing” in InDesign, it required an extension of the InDesign file format. And you may, or may not, recall that an InDesign file is actually a database of objects, along with their location on the page. When new types of objects are introduced, the file format must change to accommodate them. Typically, when the file format changes, it makes it impossible for older versions of InDesign to open files from the new version. But not this time! In the 2014.2 version of InDesign CC, released in February 2015, Adobe quietly

introduced an important new feature: the ability for older versions of InDesign CC to be able to open files created by newer versions. How does this work? When a user of InDesign 2014, for example, tries to open an InDesign 2015 file, they will see a warning dialog box (Figure 3). If the user clicks Convert, the InDesign file is sent to an Adobe server, exported as an IDML file, sent back to the user, and opened in their version of InDesign. In a perfect world, Adobe would never change the .indd file format. But this feature removes a lot of the pain.

Figure 3: This dialog box is displayed if a user of an older version of InDesign CC tries to open a file that was created in a newer version.

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You can still downsave a file manually by choosing File > Save As and choosing “InDesign CS4 or later (IDML)” from the Format menu. With either of these methods, if you’ve used some of the newer features such as paragraph shading, the formatting associated with that feature may be lost when the file is opened in an older version.

Enhancements to CC Libraries The CC Libraries panel (Window > CC Libraries) was first added to InDesign CC 2014.2. If you haven’t tried this yet, you need to check it out. This feature has changed the way I work. And now CC Libraries have been greatly enhanced in InDesign CC 2015. CC Libraries are like the standard InDesign Libraries (File > New > Library) that we’ve had for years, but with at least three differences. First, CC Libraries can store color swatches, character styles, and paragraph styles, in addition to InDesign objects.

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Second, CC Libraries can be easily shared with other Creative Cloud members (CC Libraries panel menu > Collaborate). Third, CC Libraries work across applications. So objects and colors that you add to a library in InDesign can be used in Illustrator and Photoshop, and vice versa. Paragraph and character style support In InDesign CC 2015, the CC Libraries panel fully supports InDesign character and paragraph styles. I use a CC Library to keep a core set of paragraph and character styles handy and ready to use at all times. It’s also a simple way to share paragraph and character styles with other Creative Cloud users. There are at least three ways to add character and paragraph styles to the CC Libraries panel: »» Select some text, and click on the icons at the bottom left of the CC Libraries panel. If the selected text has a style applied, the style is added to the CC Libraries panel. If

no style is applied to the text, a new style is added to the CC Libraries panel. »» Select one or more styles in the Paragraph or Character Styles panel, and then click the Creative Cloud icon in the bottom left corner of either panel; the selected styles will be added to the active CC Libraries panel. »» The New Paragraph Style and New Character style dialog boxes contain an option to add new styles to the CC Libraries panel as they are created (Figure 4, next page). Unfortunately, you can’t manually sort the order of items in the CC Libraries panel, nor can you have style groups there. So unless you name your styles carefully and smartly, it can be difficult to find individual styles in a CC Library. To reduce confusion, it is helpful to remember that the CC Libraries panel is not related to the currently displayed document in any way. In other words, while the Character and Paragraph Styles

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panels always display all the styles for the document you are working on, a CC Library may contain none of the styles for the working document, some of the styles, or all of the styles—it’s up to you. When you apply a style to text directly from a CC Library, that style is always added to the InDesign Character or Paragraph Styles panels for that document. There is no “link” between the styles saved in a CC Library and the styles in your Paragraph or Character Styles panel. If you update, rename, or redefine a paragraph style in the Paragraph Styles panel in a particular document, it isn’t automatically updated in your CC Library. To update a style in the CC Libraries panel you must delete the style from the CC Libraries panel, modify the style in the Paragraph or Character Styles panel, and then add it to the CC Library again. Be careful—changes to the CC Libraries panel are not un-doable. I assume this is because CC Libraries are not

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Figure 4: Three ways to add a Character or Paragraph style to a CC Library.

document-related. So when you delete styles or other items from a CC library, they are gone for good. New ways to add colors to CC Libraries When you use the Color Theme tool (new in InDesign 2014.1), you can now add the sampled color theme to your current CC Library with a single click (Figure 5). Similarly, you can select one or more colors in the Swatches panel and add them

Figure 5: The new Creative Cloud icon in the Color Theme tool display allows you to send the current theme to a CC Library with a single click.

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to a CC Library by clicking the Creative Cloud icon in the bottom-left corner of the Swatches panel. And, just like with the Styles dialog boxes, the New Color dialog box gives you the option of adding a color to a CC library as the color is created. To add an individual color from the theme to the Swatches panel, apply the color from the CC library to a page item, and the color will be automatically added to the Swatches panel. There is no easy way to quickly add an entire color theme from a CC Library directly to the InDesign Swatches panel. Ability to place a linked graphic from a CC Library Any selected InDesign page object(s) can be stored in a CC Library. When you drag these objects from a CC Library onto a page, the actual InDesign objects reappear, just as if you had gone back to the original file, copied some page objects, and pasted them into the new document.

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But graphic assets can also be added to a CC Library from Illustrator or Photoshop. By default, if you just drag an Illustrator or Photoshop asset out of a CC Library onto an InDesign page, it appears as a linked graphic. But linked to what, you might ask? The objects in CC Libraries reside “in the cloud” and don’t have a normal file path. If you look in the Links panel, you’ll now see a Cloud icon displayed to the right of these types of objects to indicate that they are linked to a Library asset in the cloud. You can also right-click an asset in the CC Libraries panel in InDesign and choose Place Link or Place Copy. Place Copy places the asset as an embedded graphic (Figure 6). If you are used to how linked images work in InDesign, images linked to CC Library assets work exactly the same way, except that CC Libraries can be shared with others. If you share a CC Library with someone else, they could right-click on a Library asset in Illustrator or Photoshop and choose Edit. This will allow them to edit

the asset directly. When they save the file, the link will be out of date in your InDesign file, and when you update the links, the modified image will appear. InDesign assets stored in a CC Library are always placed as an embedded copy, so there is no way to create a link to an InDesign asset that will update on the page when the asset in the CC Library changes.

Figure 6: Four images used in an InDesign file. From top: An embedded image, a linked image that links to a file path on a server or hard drive, a linked image that links to a CC Library asset, and a linked image that links to a CC Library asset but the asset is out of date.

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Images in Table Cells In the past, if you wanted to add an image to a table cell, you had to add the graphic as an inline anchored graphic. Resizing and cropping the image independent of the table cell was tedious and inconvenient. InDesign CC 2015 features two types of table cells: text cells and graphic cells. When a table is first created, it’s business as usual…all the cells are text cells. But placing an image in a cell via drag and drop or with a loaded place cursor will place the image in the cell, and convert the cell to a graphic cell. The placed image is initially sized so that the width of the image fits the width of the cell. A graphic cell behaves like a graphic frame whose edges are glued to the edges of the cell. Changing the width and height of the column or row changes the dimensions of the graphic frame in the cell (Figure 7). Once an image is placed in a graphic cell, you will want to know a few shortcuts. Clicking on the cell with the Selection tool

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selects the graphic frame in the cell. Doubleclicking with the Selection tool selects the contents of the frame. Pressing the Esc key repeatedly toggles between selecting the cell and selecting the graphic frame. Selecting an empty text cell and choosing Table > Convert Cell to Graphic Cell converts the cell to a graphic cell containing an empty graphic frame. The graphic frames that are in graphic cells are fully functional graphic frames. They can have rounded corners, can be converted to polygons, and can have framefitting options or drop shadows applied. There is a new dialog box located in Table > Cell Options > Graphic that allows you to set an inset to keep the edges of the graphic frame from the edges of the cell, as well as a Clip Contents to Cell option. This command is useful if you have applied a drop shadow or other effect that “sticks out” beyond the edges of the graphic frame and you want the effect cut off by the edges of the table cell (Figure 8, next page).

Figure 7: Graphic cells make it easy to place and position images in tables.

Publish Online In the English versions of InDesign 2015, Adobe is including a “technology preview” of a feature called Publish Online. This cool feature provides easy publishing of any InDesign document to an online viewing experience that works in most desktop and mobile browsers. Publish Online is accessed via File > Publish Online (Preview) as well as a

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Publish Online button in the Application Bar at the top of the screen. When you choose either option, a dialog box appears that asks which pages you want to publish, if you want individual pages or spreads, what image quality to target, and so forth. After clicking OK, you’ll see the dialog boxes shown in Figure 9. InDesign converts the pages to a package of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, and sends the package to an Adobe server. The URL can then be shared with others. Any document size, orientation, and aspect ratio can be published using this method. There are no font limitations or licensing issues. The Animation and Timing panels are supported, as well as buttons and multi-state objects. The Book panel is not supported by Publish Online. If for some reason you don’t want Preview technology to appear in the menus, you can turn it off in Preferences > Technology Previews. Keep in mind that Publish Online is a technology preview. Adobe is still

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developing the feature, and will no doubt be adding refinements and features in the upcoming weeks and months.

Improved Performance Adobe promises improved performance in this release, specifically in zooming in and out, scrolling using the mouse wheel or using the Page up and Page down keys, and generating page thumbnails in the Pages panel. This performance increase may be more noticeable for those with high-resolution displays, such as the newest MacBook Pro models.

Figure 8: The new Graphic tab in the Cell Options dialog box.

Figure 9: The dialog boxes presented during the Publish Online process.

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Adobe Stock InDesign CC 2015 includes access to a new service called Adobe Stock (Figure 10). You can access Adobe Stock in at least five places in InDesign, such as File > Search Adobe Stock and via the “St” icon at the bottom of the CC Libraries panel. Using any of these methods launches your default web browser and logs you in with your Adobe ID to stock.adobe.com. This is a portal to “40 million royalty-free, highquality photos, illustrations, and graphics.” So, another stock image service. But there are two things that are unique about Adobe Stock. First, your Creative Cloud membership gives you a discount to monthly plans on Adobe Stock. Second, Adobe Stock is seamlessly integrated with InDesign, Illustrator, and Photoshop. Here’s how it works in InDesign. 1. You access Adobe Stock using one of several paths to the service from InDesign.

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Figure 10: The Adobe Stock website.

2. Through keyword searching and browsing, you locate the image that you want to use in your layout. 3. With a couple of clicks, Adobe Stock lets you save a preview of the image to any one of your CC Libraries.

4. Back in InDesign, drag the preview version out of the CC Libraries panel into your layout. 5. Repeat this for as many Preview images as you wish. Preview images are free, low resolution, and watermarked.

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6. Once you’ve settled on the image you want to use, with a couple of clicks in the CC Libraries panel you can purchase the image (Figure 11). When the image is purchased, the preview image in your CC Library is replaced with the unwatermarked, high-resolution image.

7. Because the Preview image is linked from your CC Library, you will see an out-ofdate link icon in the Links panel. When you update this link, the watermarked image will be replaced with the highresolution, unwatermarked image in your layout.

One more thing There is one more simple, small improvement that Adobe made, that will be greatly appreciated by many. When you choose File > Export, and select Adobe PDF (Print) as the Format, you now have the ability to choose the default, initial view of

How long has THAT thing been in here? Curious about InDesign version numbers, dates, or when a particular feature first appeared in the program? Download James Wamser’s interactive PDF of InDesign new features and versions at bit.ly/InDesignNewFeaturesGuide.

Figure 11: You can now license stock images through the CC Libraries panel.

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the resulting PDF (Figure 12). This eliminates the additional step of opening the PDF in Acrobat and making the change there.

The Voice—and the software—of the People People sometimes ask me “Why is Adobe spending all this time developing feature ‘x’ when I want them to work on feature ‘y’?” Remember, the premise of Creative Cloud and more frequent version updates is that you may not need to wait as long for your hoped-for feature to be implemented. If you have a feature request that you are passionate about, make your case at indesign.uservoice.com or adobe.ly/ BugReport, and while you’re at it, make some noise about it on the InDesign Forum at forums.adobe.com/community/indesign!

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Figure 12: A new addition to the print PDF export dialog box—viewing options that control how the PDF will be displayed when it is opened.

n Keith Gilbert is a digital publishing consultant and educator, Adobe Certified Instructor, Adobe Community Professional, conference speaker, and an author and contributing writer for various publications. His work has taken him throughout North America, Africa, Europe, and Asia. During his 30 years as a consultant, his clients have included Adobe, Apple, Target, the United Nations, Best Buy, General Mills, Lands’ End, and Medtronic. Follow him on Twitter @gilbertconsult and at http://blog. gilbertconsulting.com.

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By Ilene Strizver

The Ultimate Guide to Kerning

Even the smallest of spaces can have the biggest impact on the appearance of type. Here’s how to always get it right.

Figure 1: Left: 72-point Garamond Italic metal type demonstrates the large space between the unkerned lowercase s and an apostrophe. Center: An s kerned by cutting away the side of body, or shank, resulting in an overhang that will sit atop the apostrophe sort. Right: A lowercase p cast with the kerning of the descender, which now extends off the sort. Photo by Ray Nichols of LeadGraffiti.

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Have you ever been reading something, innocently absorbing information, when you come across something that just doesn’t seem right—like a word that looks more like amica when you expected to see arnica? Or dang when you expected clang? You’re not alone—you’ve just experienced a Kerning Problem. Kerning in the digital world refers to the addition or reduction of space between two specific characters, often referred to as a kern pair. Kern pairs are necessary to balance the white space between certain letter combinations in order to create even typographic color and texture as well as to optimize readability.

The term kern originated in the days of metal typesetting, when a kern was the part of the metal type that overhangs or extends beyond the body (or “shank”) of the metal type (or “sort”) so that it could rest on the body of an adjacent character, allowing for closer spacing and better letterfit. Although kerning originally referred to the cutting away of the body of the sort, “to kern” type came to mean the removal of space between two characters, as shown in Figure 1. Now back to today: in a professionalquality digital font, each character is spaced to create optimum overall fit with as many characters as possible. The spacing of

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InType: Kern…Kern…Kern…

a character consists of the width of the actual glyph plus the space that is (most often) added to the right and left side (also called “sidebearings”) in order to keep the characters from crashing into each other when typeset. (Visualize this as an invisible box around each character consisting of the character plus the space on both sides.) But due to the quirks of our Latin-based alphabet (and many others as well), there are many combinations that don’t naturally fit together well and need adjustments. Therefore, kern pairs of both positive and negative values are built into a font to improve its overall spacing. A high-quality font can have thousands of built-in kern pairs, but this alone doesn’t mean it will look good. Note that if you place the cursor between any two characters and look at the kerning field in the Character panel, any built-in kerning values will appear in parentheses (Figure 2). If a typeface isn’t spaced well to begin with, it will need many more kern pairs than

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a properly-spaced font. In addition, if a font is sized much larger than its intended range—like setting a body text font at a large display size—the spatial relationships between the characters can optically change and appear uneven, necessitating some additional custom kerning to balance out the negative spaces between some letter combinations.

The Principles of Custom Kerning The goal of kerning, as well as of proper letterfit in general, is to create an even sense of typographic color, texture, and balance between all characters. In order to achieve this, all character pairs should theoretically have the same volume of negative space between them. I stress theoretically as this is not actually possible with all character pairs, but it is a good place to start in order to understand the goal of good kerning and of spacing in general. Another way to help visualize this principle is to imagine

Figure 2: Default kerning values are displayed in the Character panel when you put your type cursor between two characters.

pouring sand in between each pair of characters: every space should theoretically have roughly the same volume of sand. This might sound easy to achieve, but in reality it can be difficult, if not impossible in some cases, due to the idiosyncrasies of the individual characters. Here are five important guidelines when considering custom kerning: 1. Proper kerning begins with an understanding of the spatial relationship between straight-sided characters, such as H or l, and rounded characters, such as

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InType: Kern…Kern…Kern…

O (Figure 3). There are three basic classes of character relationships: »» Straight to straight: requires the most open space of the three »» Straight to round (or round to straight): slightly tighter spacing than straight to straight »» Round to round: slightly tighter spacing than straight to round The operative word here is slightly, as round-to-rounds are often over-kerned by those unfamiliar with proper kerning principles. (And of course, many characters are a combination of straight and round shapes, such as b, d, g, p, and q.)

Figure 3: These three relationships are essential to understand in the execution of proper kerning: straight to straights are one distance apart, straight to rounds (and vice versa) are slightly closer, and round to rounds are slightly closer than that.

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2. Like, or similar, neighboring shapes should have like, or similar, spacing. That is, a round to a straight character combination, such as or, should have the same spacing as a straight to a round, such as le. 3. Serifs of straight-sided characters should not touch each other. (Neither should rounds, for that matter.) Diagonals can touch or overlap slightly, as well as some other combinations whose shapes create large negative spaces, but it’s a question of taste, not a hard and fast rule (Figure 4).

4. Strive for visually even negative space between all characters. Don’t over-kern. “Less is more” when it comes to proper kerning. When in doubt, go without… custom kerning, that is. 5. Consistency is critical! When kerning, review your work often to make sure you maintain consistent negative spaces, especially between the same or similar characters (Figure 5). You can train your eye to see spacing more acutely by observing character shapes and their spacing all around you—in magazines, book covers, posters, packaging, menus, logos, and so on. Some find it helpful to turn the type upside down to more easily see the special relationships without being

Figure 4: Rounds should never touch; nor should the serifs of straight-sided characters, as shown in the upper example. The lower image illustrates the proper relationships.

Figure 5: The two RA combinations are spaced differently in this example of inconsistent kerning. Although both are acceptable solutions, they should look exactly the same.

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distracting by reading the actual words. Others like to squint their eyes so they can see the “gray” of a word or phrase. Just as musicians practice their instruments, or athletes practice their sport, observing your surroundings with a critical eye will help you to do your job with more finesse. You’ll learn to see spatial relationships that you might have trouble seeing now, which in turn will help you to properly kern your typography. Kerning in Action Figures 6–8 illustrate how to apply these important principles. Keep in mind that

Try the Three-letter Approach As previously mentioned, the goal of kerning is to create even color, texture, and balance between all characters. All character pairs should theoretically have the same negative space between them. But analyzing the spacing of many characters and/or several words at once can be overwhelming without a strategy. That’s

where the three-letter technique can make the process easier. The technique goes like this: when looking at a headline or display setting, start from the beginning and isolate three letters at a time, either by blocking them off with your hand, two pieces of blank paper, or, as you become adept at it, just mentally. If you’re looking at a computer screen, enlarge the type as much as necessary to get a more accurate representation of the actual outline of the characters as well as the space between them. Just make sure you can still see the entire word. Look at the negative

Figure 6: All-cap settings can present spacing challenges. Resist the urge to jam or over-kern parallel diagonals, as well as rounds, as shown in the upper image. Keep their negative spaces balanced with the rest of the word.

Figure 7: The upper setting has inconsistent spacing between like combinations (po and og, ph and ic) as well as very open spacing between the Ty and the yp—all improved in the lower image. The Ty and the yp pairs overlap, which is acceptable with diagonal strokes.

Figure 8: You can adjust uneven word spacing as well as punctuation (upper) with the kerning feature (lower). To kern a word space, place the cursor between the character and the word space (or vice versa) and kern as you would two characters.

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while there’s tasteful kerning and poor kerning, there’s no one single correct way of kerning, but rather a range of acceptable solutions.

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spaces between each pair of letters, and determine if they’re relatively even. If the negative spaces are noticeably different, you might need to open or close one or both letter pairs. But before you make any changes, use the three-letter technique for the entire word or several words to get a feel for the rhythm, flow, and balance of the headline (Figure 9). The optimum overall spacing depends on the typeface (serif, sans, and overall design characteristics) and on the intended size of the actual type. Once you get a sense of the overall rhythm of the spacing, begin to open or close some of the worst spacing. Then step back, take a look, and go through the process again, adjusting as much as necessary to create even typographic color. Print out the type often during this process for a more accurate representation. Note that certain character pairs, such as Ty and rk, always have a lot of negative space between them. Don’t over-tighten them, and don’t use them as a guide for

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the rest of the character combinations. Once you become adept at this technique, kerning a headline will undoubtedly become faster and easier, and you will be able to kern without fear. Remember, when it comes to custom kerning, don’t err on the side of overdoing it. Kerning too many pairs too much— especially before one develops a trained eye—can be worse than not kerning at all. In most instances, less is more, especially until your eye begins to see the spatial relationships between characters more easily and accurately. In time, your eye will become highly trained, and fine-tuning type will become second nature to you.

Metrics vs. Optical Kerning in InDesign InDesign has two options for controlling automatic kerning: Metrics and Optical (Figure 10, next page). The Metrics setting, which is the default, uses a font’s built-in kerning pairs. If the font has adequate kern

Figure 9: The three-letter technique makes it easier to identify unbalanced character pairs, which can then be opened or closed for a better overall result.

pair tables (as do most professional-quality fonts from reputable type foundries), this setting is usually the best choice, especially for small body text. The Optical setting, on

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InType: Kern…Kern…Kern…

the other hand, overrides a font’s built-in kern tables, and replaces it with values determined by an InDesign algorithm based upon the character shapes. This can be useful when a font has few or no built-in kern pairs, or when the overall spacing seems uneven. However, the real value of the Optical setting is that it automatically adjusts the letterfit when you combine different fonts, or different sizes of the same font (Figure 11).

To apply Metrics kerning 1. Select text, or insert the text insertion point between the characters you want to kern. 2. In the Character panel or Control panel, choose Metrics from the Kerning menu. To apply Optical kerning 1. Select text, or insert the text insertion point between the characters you want to kern. 2. In the Character panel or Control panel, choose Optical from the Kerning menu.

Adjust kerning manually 1. Place an insertion point between two characters. 2. Either use the Character panel’s Kerning drop-down menu to select a preset or to insert a value, or, my preferred method, use the keyboard command (Alt/ Option+Left Arrow or Right Arrow). Note you can change the default keyboard kerning increment of 20/1000 em to a smaller value for more control; this is located under Preferences > Units & Increments > Keyboard Increments (Figure 12).

Figure 12: You can change the default keyboard kerning increment to a smaller value under Preferences > Units & Increments > Keyboard Increments.

Figure 10: InDesign’s kerning features can be found in the Character panel and the Contol panel.

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Figure 11: InDesign’s Optical kerning, used for the Wi combination only (the rest of the word looks fine), improves the spacing between two different typestyles and sizes, although it might still need some tweaking.

In closing, here are a few final things to remember when you’re kerning text: »» Both Optical and Metrics kerning can be selected from within style sheets.

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InType: Kern…Kern…Kern…

»» You can combine Optical and Metrics kerning in any given setting. »» If you change fonts or versions, be sure to double-check the type’s spacing, as what looks good for one weight or version might not look good for another. »» And ultimately, no matter which settings you use, don’t be afraid to add manual kerns as needed. The more you practice, the more you’ll develop an eye for kerning and the result will be better looking type in your documents.

n Ilene Strizver, founder of The Type Studio, is a typographic consultant, designer, writer, and educator specializing in all aspects of visual communication, from the aesthetic to the technical. Her book, Type Rules! The designer’s guide to professional typography, 4th edition, has received numerous accolades from the type and design community. She conducts her widely acclaimed Gourmet Typography Workshops internationally.

where creatives go to know INDESIGN MAGAZINE  75

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By Kelly Vaughn

InStep: Creating Houndstooth Patterns Tables are the prefect tool for creating patterns in InDesign, even ones as seemingly complex as the hallowed houndstooth. First worn by Scottish shepherds in the early 1800s, houndstooth is one of the most distinctive and popular patterns in the history of fashion. In textiles, the traditional houndstooth pattern is made by weaving alternating bands of four black and four white threads, although other colors can also be used. This classic pattern is often seen in sport coats and hats. And lately it has made a resurgence as a popular pattern in clothing and home fashion, finding its way onto everything from rugs to high heels to luggage. And In this lesson about creating patterns in InDesign, we’ll see how to make a perfect houndstooth.

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You might think that the most obvious way to create a pattern like houndstooth would be to create a single black shape and then use Edit > Step and Repeat it to make a grid. Like so:

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InStep: Creating a Houndstooth Pattern

But the step-and-repeat technique doesn’t lend itself to be customized or edited very easily. Instead, I want to show you how to deconstruct this pattern and create it using tables, cell styles, and stroke styles. The houndstooth pattern is well suited for being created with a table because it is essentially a repeated grid of four squares, with a different design in each one of the squares.

1. Start with a table

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Let’s start by making a table with square cells. Give it 16 columns and 16 rows and make the cells exactly 20 points square. Make sure there are no strokes on the table cells.

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2. Create solid-color cell styles

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Now make some solid-colored cell styles. The first cell style will be named Black and will have a black fill. The second cell style will be named White and have a white fill… at least eventually. For now, give it a magenta fill so that you can see it better. We’ll change it back to a white fill later.

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InStep: Creating a Houndstooth Pattern

3. Plan some striped stroke styles

4. Make the striped stroke

Notice how there are two distinct (although similar) striped cells within our pattern. Both striped cells consist of four stripes, each occupying 25% of the total stripe width. The pink square below shows how the cell begins with a black stripe in the top left corner and ends with a white stripe in the bottom right corner. The cyan square shows how the cell begins with a white stripe in the top left corner and ends with a black stripe in the bottom right corner. We’ll make two striped stroke styles that will do just this.

Choose Stroke Styles from the Stroke panel flyout menu, and then choose New.

styles

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InStep: Creating a Houndstooth Pattern

Change the stroke type from Dash to Stripe. We can set two things in this dialog box: the start of each stripe, and the width of each stripe. These striped stroke styles have only two true stripes (which are represented by the black stripes). The white area creates negative space that will be visually filled by whatever lies beneath it.

Stripe 1, First Stripe Settings

Stripe 1, Second Stripe Settings

Next, make the second stroke style according to the following settings.

Stripe 2, First Stripe Settings

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Stripe 1, Second Stripe Settings

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InStep: Creating a Houndstooth Pattern

5. Apply diagonal lines to the first striped cell

Start with the second cell in the first row. Now, you might think that you should apply the Stripe 1 stroke style, because you want the top left corner to be black, and the beginning of the Stripe 1 stroke style is black. But alas, that’s not how it works. InDesign applies stroke styles to diagonal lines starting at 100% and then goes backward from there. Like so:

So if you want the top left corner of the cell to begin with a black stripe, you need to choose the stroke style that ends with a black stripe; which in this case is Stripe 2. So how do you apply a diagonal line to a cell? From the Table panel flyout menu, choose Cell Options > Diagonal Lines…

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InStep: Creating a Houndstooth Pattern

‌ and then apply the following settings:

6. Apply diagonal lines to the second cell

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Put your cursor in the first cell in the second row, and apply diagonal lines, using the following settings:

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InStep: Creating a Houndstooth Pattern

7. Make cell styles for the first striped cell

With your cursor in the first striped cell, go to the Cell Styles panel, and Option-click or Alt-click the New Style button at the bottom of the panel. This will let you make a new cell style with the current settings, and bring up the New Cell Style dialog box at the same time. In this dialog box, change the Based On option to White. (Remember that you started out with a cell style named White even though it had a magenta fill—so it would be easy to change the color of the design later on.)

Notice the little plus sign next to the style name? That means there is an override. InDesign is even nice enough to tell you how this cell is different than the style that has been applied to it. In this case, this cell has a fill color of None.

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InStep: Creating a Houndstooth Pattern

Option- or Alt-clicking the little plus sign will clear the overrides and let the fill color of the parent cell style show through.

8. Make cell styles for the

With your cursor in the second striped cell, create another cell style in the same manner.

second striped cell

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InStep: Creating a Houndstooth Pattern

9. Copy the top four cells

10. Fill the table with the pattern

Zoom out, and select the top left four cells that you just applied styles to. Copy them.

Select all the cells in the table, and paste. Even though you only had four cells on your clipboard, InDesign repeats them to fill the table.

Click here to download an IDML file of the finished pattern that you can open with CS4 or later.

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InStep: Creating a Houndstooth Pattern

11. Change colors as desired

12. Change the vertical orientation of the shapes

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Because both striped cell styles are based on the White cell style, changing the color is as simple as editing the cell fill color of that style. Now, you may notice there are some hairlines of color peeking through between the black cells and the stripes next to them, but that’s just an InDesign preview issue. The pattern exports to PDF beautifully, without any hairlines.

If you want to flip the vertical orientation of your shapes, simply change the direction of the diagonals to be left-slanting instead of right-slanting in the Cell Style Options dialog box.

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InStep: Creating a Houndstooth Pattern

13. Change horizontal

If you want to flip the horizontal orientation of your shapes, swap the two striped cell styles.

orientation of the shapes

14. Have fun!

By mixing up which striped cell styles are applied to which striped cell, you can create even more interesting patterns. You can even edit the stroke style to increase or decrease the number of stripes. All of the patterns below were made using a grid of four squares; I simply edited the diagonal lines and stroke styles.

n Kelly Vaughn (a.k.a. “Document Geek”) has over a decade of print and design experience. She holds Adobe Expert Certifications in InDesign, Illustrator, Photoshop, and Acrobat, and specializes in writing and designing technical manuals for the marine industry. She is the chapter representative for the Raleigh, North Carolina, InDesign User Group. You can find more of Kelly’s articles at her Document Geek blog and InDesignSecrets.

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By Adam Jury

Timeless Treasures

Like friends and wine, some of the best InDesign features are the ones that have been around for quite a while. An office that hopefully isn’t a cube Cavern of

Object Styles Lantern of

Live Preflight The Gulch of

Spans & INDESI Splits TR E A S GN HU NUT R E INDESIGN MAGAZINE  75

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Radiant Folio of

Document Fonts

CC 2015 and beyond ...

In the game-design world, one of the mantras is: “Simple to learn, difficult to master.” A well-designed game can usually be picked up quickly, but years down the road, you’re still trying new strategies and adapting to the other players around the table. And that’s InDesign for you: a tool (game) that is evolving on a yearly basis for our jobs (players) that are also continually evolving. How can we claim mastery of it? If you skipped over one or more updates in the last 10 years, you may have never learned about one or more of the features introduced in it. Does your copy of InDesign contain hidden treasure and secrets to unlock? I guarantee it. And even better: some of these treasures are even more valuable when combined! Let’s go back in time. Bring a few documents along, but nothing too valuable—treasure hunting is risky business.

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Feature: Timeless Treasures

Creative Suite 2 Treasure: Object Styles I hope that by now you’ve discovered object styles! They are the number one tool for quickly formatting objects, both text and images. The Object Styles panel is found under Window > Object Styles, and works much like the Paragraph Styles panel. To start experimenting with it, open one of your existing documents, select an object with some formatting, and choose New Object Style from the panel’s flyout menu. Give the new style a name, and click OK. You can then create a brand-new object and apply the newly-created object style to it, and you’ll see that much of the formatting has come alone for the ride. With your new object style applied, double-click its name in the Object Styles panel to open the Object Style Options dialog box. Select the Preview checkbox in the bottom-left corner, and explore the options! Many of these options have

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obvious visual effects on components of your document, such as fill, stroke, effects, columns, insets, and text wrap. You certainly know what these do—you’ve just never applied them so quickly before! When it comes to naming your object styles, think about what the object actually is or does, not what it looks like. It’s tempting to use names like “Blue Sidebar” or “Anchored Yellow Example”—but if the design changes, you’ll be left with names

that are unhelpful or misleading. So give your styles functional names: “Sidebar” and “Anchored Example” are better! CS2 also introduced the Next Style functionality, which allows you to logically chain paragraph styles together. An object style containing a paragraph style and the Apply Next Style option will allow you to quickly format sidebars that contain multiple styles (Figure 1).

Figure 1: All the text formatting in this sidebar can be applied with a single click, thanks to an object style that applies paragraph styles with the Next Style option.

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Feature: Timeless Treasures

Object styles have a lot more subtle uses, as well. There are three sets of export options that will be applied when exporting to PDF or EPUB/HTML, and the Story Options section contains the critical Optical Margin Alignment option. Finally, one of the best object style features wasn’t introduced in CS2, but in CS6, and that’s Auto-Size Options, which will grow or shrink your objects when you add or remove text. See issue 47 for the details of working with Auto-Size (and all the other new features in CS6). Object styles will speed up your prototyping and document production, and as an added bonus they’ll help you keep your documents more consistent. What don’t object styles do? Sadly, the treasure you have found isn’t perfect: you can’t apply dimensions or locations yet. So you can’t use a style to set all objects to default to a particular size or

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location on the page. Object styles also can’t be used to place an image inside the object. Want even more tips and tricks for using object styles? Check out David Blatner’s article “Get in the Fast Lane With Object Styles,” in issue 40.

Creative Suite 4 Treasure: Live Preflight I love big documents and eschew InDesign’s “book” feature as generally creating more trouble than it’s worth. But as documents get larger and more complex, proofing

them manually gets less and less reliable. If only we had a powerful machine that could automate much of it! Oh—did you think I meant that we didn’t have such a tool? We do; it’s called Live Preflight. Live Preflight lives under Window > Output > Preflight, and you can also get to it via the menu items tucked in the status bar at the bottom of each document’s window. Open up a complicated InDesign document, one that’s in progress, and peek at the preflight section near the bottom of the document window. Is there a profile being applied? By default, the [Basic] profile is applied to new documents. You may see another profile applied, and that’s due to a handy feature: preflight profiles can be embedded into documents! This allows you to configure a document-specific profile and know that whoever ends up working on the document will have access to the same important preflight settings.

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Feature: Timeless Treasures

To the right of the preflight profile’s name, you’ll see a green dot (good job!) or a red dot (uh-oh!), and to the right of that, the number of issues detected by preflight (Figure 2). To bring up those issues, click the little triangle to show the Preflight flyout menu, and choose Preflight Panel from that menu to open the Preflight panel. Within the panel, errors are divided into the relevant categories and display a brief description. To the right is the page number where the violation occurs—click on it to take you directly to the source of the problem. Big documents will behave more slowly when Live Preflight is enabled, so sometimes you’ll want to temporarily disable it. To do so, deselect Preflight Document in the status bar’s flyout menu. The status bar will now display “Preflight off.” It’s good practice, if you receive a document from a client or colleague and preflight is off, to immediately turn it on and see what’s up! You can also configure preflight to only analyze a specific range of pages, which

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Figure 2: With InDesign’s Live Preflight features, you can tell at a glance if your document is clean (left) or if you have some fix-up work to do (right). Note that these two images show two different presets analyzing the same document.

speeds it up and keeps you focused on the part of the document you’re working on. To delve deeper into Preflight, select Define Profiles from the panel, and create a new profile by clicking the plus button in the bottom-left corner; then give your profile a name. (Remember that profiles can get embedded in documents and kept around for years and years … so your cheeky joke might not be appropriate. This time.) Once you have created your profile, the options on the right side of the dialog box are your many-layered preflighting onion, from links of all types, to allowable color spaces, transparency, proportional

images, missing fonts, and more. The options that are relevant to you are, of course, dependent on the work you produce and the complexity of your workflow! My personal strategy for Live Preflight is to have two main profiles. One contains few settings and is active most of the time I am working. It checks for mistakes such as overset text, missing fonts, missing links— the type of big problems I would want to resolve sooner rather than later. The second profile is stricter, checking for color space issues, image resolution, nonproportional scaling, broken cross-references, and more. I use this profile less often, but more

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Feature: Timeless Treasures

frequently close to the end of a production cycle, when I am trying to nail down every possible error. Preflight profiles can be exported and loaded from the Preflight Profiles dialog box, so you can share profiles with colleagues and freelancers. For a step-by-step tutorial on creating custom preflight profiles, check out Kirsten Rourke’s article in issue 61.

Creative Suite 5 Treasure: Document Fonts This feature is simple: If your InDesign file is in a folder that contains a subfolder named

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“Document fonts,” any fonts inside that folder will be automatically available inside that InDesign document, even if you add those fonts to the folder when InDesign and the document are open. This works regardless of the font type, and it functions on top of any font management software you may have installed. There are three good ways to get fonts into a Document fonts folder: 1. Manually copy them there in the Finder or Windows Explorer. 2. Package an InDesign file with the Copy Fonts option selected. A Document fonts folder will be created and populated automatically (Figure 3). Note that fonts synced from Typekit cannot be packaged. 3. Use the Copy InDesign Fonts to Folder script from Ajar Productions. It copies every font in a document to a folder— ideal for creating a Document fonts folder when one doesn’t already exist! You may already have font management software installed, and you may feel that

Figure 3: A packaged InDesign document and its Document fonts folder.

all this is unnecessary. For a long time, I felt the same way. Then I moved all of my production files into Dropbox to make better use of InCopy, and my editor and I instantly began to see what a time-saver this feature was, as the relevant fonts were always available to us both.

Creative Suite 5 Treasure: Spans and Splits Before Creative Suite 5, if we wanted to have a header span multiple columns of text, it would require two text frames—one for the

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Feature: Timeless Treasures

header, and one for the body. If the desired effect was a sidebar or other graphical entity, it was usually best to then add a third frame for the background, border stroke, and so on. Creative Suite 5 brought us Spans and Splits, one of the finest unsung hero features in recent memory. Spans and Splits can be applied from the Paragraph panel, but you’ll probably use this feature most often within paragraph styles. In both instances, the option is described only as Span Columns, but Split Columns is an option under the Paragraph Layout dropdown menu inside Span Columns. Spans have the most obvious options: you can specify how many columns are spanned (2 or higher, or simply choose All), and you can also set a Space Before and Space After the span, which functions like a normal paragraph space before/after, but applies to all lines of text above/below the span, if it is larger than the paragraph space for that paragraph style.

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Splits are most often used to create fauxtables or lists in the middle of text flow when a detailed/formatted table is not required. In addition to the number of splits (columns), you have the usual space before/ after settings, and the ability to set the width of both the outside and inside gutters. Remember that if you build tables of contents, you may need to include multiple paragraph styles in the Table of Contents style to catch all the span/split variations.

For more on using spans and splits, see Claudia McCue’s article “You’re Going to Love CS5” in issue 35.

Bringing it all together Combine object styles, paragraph Next Styles, and spans and splits to easily format sidebars. A few paired styles can let you bounce between single, double, triple, and more columns in your sidebars, so you can optimize for the text you’re flowing!

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sp sig ace i n u s lim p t it od ed ay !

Feature: Timeless Treasures

“X”   Marks the Spot (And You Are There) For every piece of treasure we’ve found on this hunt, there are a half-dozen still uncovered! Some of them, like Sticky Previews (CS5) passively help you get work done more efficiently, while others, such as Quick Apply (CS2) or Anchored Objects (CS2), require some study and practice before they revolutionize your work. As mentioned in Keith Gilbert’s article earlier in this issue, one great place to learn more is James Wamser’s InDesign New Features Guide, which catalogs every new feature from version 1.0 (1999!) all the way to the just-released 2015 edition. And of course, consult the InDesign Magazine index to find information on just about every InDesign feature in existence.

--

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No matter which version of InDesign you’re using, there are always new things to discover. More hidden gems await! To find them, all you need is some curiosity, creativity, and persistence. And maybe a snack. You wouldn’t want to hunt for treasure on an empty stomach.

n Adam Jury is a graphic designer, a publisher of tabletop games, and a co-owner and founder of Posthuman Studios. As a designer, Adam creates books, cards, boxes and other game components, and games. As a publisher, he produces print and electronic books and games, often under a Creative Commons license. He blogs at adamjury.com.

X

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July 2015

The Essential Events for Designers, Publishers, and Creative Professionals

DENVER November 16–18, 2015 InDesignConference.com • PSDcon.com

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By Erica Gamet

PePcon 2015 Recap

The sixth edition of The Print + ePublishing Conference brought networking, knowledge, and newsworthy tech to The City of Brotherly Love Another exciting PePcon: The Print + ePublishing Conference has come to a close. Put on by the Creative Publishing Network, and spearheaded by David Blatner and Anne-Marie Concepción, it truly is the brightest star in the print and publishing conference constellation. If you’re not familiar with PePcon, think of it like a big family reunion—that is, if your family was comprised of 450 of the smartest, funniest, funnest, most creative people around, and if you actually looked forward to seeing that family each year. That’s what PePcon has become to its many attendees, speakers, and vendors. As a PePcon speaker myself, I view the conference as a big, fun-filled,

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exciting homecoming. And I’m certainly not alone in this thinking.

The Core of PePcon The driving force behind attending any conference is the amount and depth of sessions that are offered. PePcon certainly checks that box, with its two full days’ worth of hour-long and 20-minute focused sessions. The offerings at this year’s conference—held in the heart of beautiful Philadelphia—ran the gamut from printcentric topics like RGB vs CMYK workflows and print’s importance in the digital age to digital publishing-specific gems dealing with video, tablet effects, and working with

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PePcon 2015 Recap

eBook vendors. InDesign-specific sessions dealt with animations, fixed-layout EPUBs, alternate layouts, and using InDesign with Illustrator, Photoshop, and Bridge. In addition to the two days of information-packed sessions, PePcon features three half-day pre-conference and six half-day post-conference tutorials. The pre-conference sessions this year covered

topics such as HTML and CSS, EPUB, and DPS in a longer (four hour) format. The last day saw three-hour sessions on publishing to the Kindle, creating long documents, working with interactive PDFs, and publishing interactive tablet apps. Additionally, on that final day, the co-located Creative Developers Summit offered sessions geared towards developers

The people behind the Creative Publishing Network (from left): Mike Rankin, David Blatner, Tammy Nicklas, Anne-Marie Concepción, and Tivi Jones.

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who create products for the creative market—think add-ons for Adobe products and server integration. One of PePcon’s appeals is that its audience is quite varied. You’re not just going to be attending with 400 other graphic designers. That type of audience makeup often fosters a guarded atmosphere, lest we accidentally give away

At PePcon, some of the most valuable information exchanges happen at lunch, where attendees can easily find and chat with like-minded folks.

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PePcon 2015 Recap

what’s on the horizon, and meet those people that are either already involved, or to find a partner to help you navigate this brave new world with you.

Coming Together at PePcon

Keynote speaker Mark Heaps dispenses wit and wisdom for dealing with clients large and small.

our great secrets for success to a competitor. No, what PePcon does with its broad range of session offerings is bring in a diverse group of people from up and down the entire design and publishing stream. Whether you’re a content producer, such as an author, or the designer who will bring someone else’s creation to life, there will be sessions that interest you. As lines become blurred between producer, creator, author, and designer, learning new things becomes more crucial. PePcon is the place to learn

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If you think that PePcon is just about sitting in sessions and filling your brain to capacity with publishing goodness, you haven’t been listening. There is so much co-operation and symbiosis going on at Erica Gamet shares her methods for getting the most out of InDesign’s Alternate Layouts.

Kat Topaz offers advice and best practices for designing publications for mobile devices.

the conference that an outsider would think this was some massive team-building exercise. The difference being, attendees want to participate in all that PePcon has to offer. To start with, breakfast and lunch are provided—and we’re not talking boxed lunches here, folks—and so is the interaction with fellow attendees. The conference days start with a sponsored breakfast, with one of the incredible sponsors informing the attendees of how

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PePcon 2015 Recap

their products fit into the publishing workflow. Again, PePcon isn’t the type of conference where sponsors are there to hand out flyers and hard-sell their products. These are the people you want on your team, the people that can solve your nagging issues. The sponsored breakfast allows them to get that info out, while enjoying delicious food (did I mention the food is always wonderful?). At lunch, there are “table assignments,” according to occupation or focus and even hobbies. Attendees and speakers, or as one PePcon veteran dubbed us, “PePconians,” aren’t forced to sit at those tables, but it sure helps steer you to people who speak your language, or that might be facing the same hurdles as you. The fun doesn’t stop once the clock strikes five, either. The first night always features a casual mixer featuring PePcon Bingo, where people rush around trying to fill their bingo card. Because this is a conference for creative types, the bingo

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All eyes are on David Blatner for his presentation, InDesign Tips, Tricks, and Techniques.

squares are populated with phrases like, “Find someone who can hum the InDesign Secrets podcast theme” and “Find someone who owns a pet with a computer-related name.” One of the biggest draws happens later on the first night: “Ignite InDesign!”

This event is open to anyone who isn’t an “official” PePcon speaker. It’s a chance for anyone else to get up and speak on a topic relating to InDesign or design in general. And in case you think this could be a train wreck in the making, you’re oh-so-wrong!

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PePcon 2015 Recap

Based on the Ignite events that happen monthly around the world, each speaker is given 5 minutes to talk. In addition, each speaker has 20 slides that auto-advance every 15 seconds. Whether or not they can keep up is part of the fun. Topics have ranged from solving particular issues with InDesign to troublesome clients to how design relates to beer. Some former Ignite

Sponsors like Rorohiko offer solutions for a vast array of publishing needs.

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Networking is the name of the game at PePcon.

speakers have even ended up on the “main stage” in subsequent PePcons. A new feature, “Three Minutes Max,” was introduced this year. Instead of simply hurling a ton of tips and tricks at the audience on the last day, eight of the speakers were asked to come up with a tip that they could show in three minutes. I have to say, as one of those presenters, I’m not sure if it was as fun for the audience, but it was exciting and nerve-wracking all at once to set up and demo a wow-theaudience tip. Sticking to the time allotment wasn’t the only stressor, as each of us was

playing for a member of the audience, with prizes being awarded for the best tip. No pressure! This kind of bringing together of everyone at PePcon is what sets the conference apart from all others. For me, one of the greatest advantages is that there is such access to the experts. Whether you’re an attendee and you want to talk

David Blatner argues that in modern publishing workflows, RGB is the best color space for most folks to use.

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PePcon 2015 Recap

When developers put their minds together at PePcon, amazing things happen.

more in-depth with a presenter after their session at the Meet the Speaker table, or if you’re a presenter and you want to have a little one-on-one time with the engineers and others from Adobe, PePcon makes it easy to have that interaction. A perfect example of that is the CreativeWow! session, where developers listen to problems that need solving, attendees vote on the most important of these, then the developers

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Publishing is storytelling, and everyone at PePcon has a story to share.

create a software solution during PePcon! And, of course, getting to converse and commiserate with David and Anne-Marie, the faces—and voices—of all things InDesign, is always time well spent.

The Community of PePcon PePcon’s slogan is “Come for the content, leave with a community!” That’s quite a rallying cry, and one that lives up to the

hype. Every year, the thing I hear most is how people have made new friends and added people to their creative network. Most of the community-building starts way before PePcon even kicks off, on the community message boards on the PePcon website. Conversations about where to eat, how to get to the hotel, roommate needs, photo walks, and who’s up for running at 5AM are flowing weeks or even months

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pre-conference. There are discussions on topics, sessions, speakers, and specific issues, as well. The interactions begin early, so arriving at PePcon is like meeting up with old friends, some of whom you’ve never even met! Then there are the after-hours outings, because no one wants the PePcon fun to end. There is always a group—or five— hanging out in the hotel lobby, discussing the day’s sessions (or, you know, playing Cards Against Humanity). This year, a large group participated in a ghost tour of

historical Philadelphia. And there were also not one, but two, karaoke nights. The rules of PePcon don’t allow me to discuss any of the karaoke details publicly; you’ll have to attend yourself to be privy to those!

Is It 2016 Yet? So, what are you doing June 5th through 8th next year? PePcon 2016 will be held in sunny San Diego, California, on those days, so mark your calendar. This conference has gotten better every one of its six years, and I would expect nothing less for Lucky Number Seven. If you are working in print or digital publishing, you really owe it to yourself to attend at least one PePcon— you’ll get hooked—to feed your brain the knowledge it needs, with side servings of fun and creativity. And, of course, finish that feast up with a desert full of warm fuzzies from a creative community like no other.

n Erica Gamet is a speaker, writer, and trainer focusing on Adobe InDesign and Illustrator, Apple Keynote and iBooks Author, and other production-related topics. With over 25 years of experience in the graphics industry, she is a regular contributor to CreativePro.com. After living as a nomad, she recently put down roots in El Paso, Texas, where she hikes and bikes every chance she gets. All photos by Paul Gargagliano, Hazel Photo

The duo of Chris Converse and Justin Putney share techniques for converting InDesign documents into interactive HTML5 apps for the web and tablets.

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GREP of the Month

Case Sensitivity

Sometimes case matters, and sometimes it does not—even in a single Find/Change operation. GREP Level: Easy

can find both “Case-insensitive On” and “Case-insensitive Off.”

By default, a regular Find Text operation in InDesign is case insensitive (that is, it ignores all capitalization). To make it case sensitive, you can click the little [Aa] button below the Search menu.

In contrast, the GREP Find What field in the same dialog box behaves the exact opposite: it is always case sensitive—but there is no [Aa] button to allow you to turn case sensitivity off! So what can you do when case matters? A clue is in the dropdown menu, under “Modifiers:” there you

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This inserts the code (?i) for insensitive on (i.e. “case sensitive off”, the reverse of what you might think!) and (?-i) to switch case insensitive off (i.e. “case sensitive on”). To  search for “Text” case insensitive, you can use (?i)Text (or (?i)text, or any other combination of uppercase and lowercase letters, e.g. (?i)tExT. But since you’re using a command, you can switch the modes inside a single Find at will! You can search for both “the AMA”

and “The AMA” at once using this: (?i)the (?-i)AMA—and it will not match the start of “the amazing cat”. That is not something you can do with the regular Find Text! Another neat trick is that you can use parentheses to group some text inside the command itself, after a colon: (?i:the) AMA does the same as the example above. If there is any text inside the command switch, the switch will be ‘activated’ only for that text inside, and everything on the outside will use the setting that was active before this last command. You can even invert the settings: (?i)the (?-i:AMA) globally switches case sensitivity off, finds “the”, then switches case sensitivity on again to find only the literal all-caps “AMA”.  Very important note: this GREP code does not work in the Change To field. Any text in the Change To field will always be inserted exactly as you entered it there. Unfortunately, the GREP engine used in InDesign simply cannot change case. —Theunis “Jongware” de Jong

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By Wendy Katz http://marquandbooks.com

InDesigner: Marquand Books

Where the container and the content are both artful When you look at the products of some publishers, you experience a certain amount of visual consistency—reassuringly familiar turf. With Marquand Books, it’s rather the opposite—no two books are ever likely to resemble each other. That’s the transporting world of the fine art book publisher. Faces, fruit. Buildings, bodies. Modern icons, medieval manuscripts. Familiar, foreign. Located in Seattle, Washington, Marquand Books has been publishing fine-art books since the mid-’80s, producing 40–50 titles a year, some for individual projects or artists, some as catalogs for special exhibitions at museums and universities large and

From folk art to fine art

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small. The unifying quality of all of these projects and products is the care with which they are crafted, sometimes with uncommon and tactile details, always with discriminating typography, and all of them a visual indulgence. Clients approach Marquand secure in the knowledge that they’ll be well supported— design, editorial, production, even shipping, all under one umbrella. And—another thing that reassures clients they are in good hands—meticulous attention to detail. For example, just because these are “art books” doesn’t mean that less attention will be given to the quality of the typography, or even the text itself. In fact, says Melissa

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InDesigner: Marquand Books

Duffes, Managing Editor, typesetters are trained as editors. “Being able to typeset the text with an editorial eye has proven very useful, particularly with word choice and flow,” says Duffes. “If text is having a hard time fitting into the layout, the typesetter can make changes and suggestions that could help both the layout and the text itself. Many of our freelancers (design, typesetting, editorial) were once Marquand employees, so they know the process, how we think, etc.” The Marquand staff and their pool of freelance designers all use InDesign CS6.

“It’s a tricky thing, working with people around the country and elsewhere,” says Jeff Wincapaw, Design Director, to make sure that files are being checked in and out properly, and that the right people are working on them at the right time. Standardizing on a single version of InDesign means one less variable that needs to be juggled, one less moving part in a multi-step process. “There are always enough variables to keep it interesting,” says Wincapaw. “There’s such a variety of personalities and content, but also of communication and

collaboration styles and how we end up getting that beautiful final book. It takes months to get from the initial contact to the delivered book—could be six months, could be a year and a half—that’s the real joy, putting these things together with other creative minds.” Not surprisingly, all Marquand books go through several rounds of discussion and development in the conceptual stage. But if you think then the book would be ready for production, think again—it’s time for the mockup stage, and more back and forth.

Beauty Reigns: A Baroque Sensibility in Recent Painting (for the McNay Art Museum)

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InDesigner: Marquand Books

Once the mockup is approved, production can finally begin. Actually, the books undergo two review processes simultaneously: the visual—prepress, color proofs, the works—and the editorial—a black-and-white proof with imagery in place but not taking center stage, so that both aspects receive the concentrated and patient attention that perhaps explains all those awards they’ve racked up.

While these reviews go on, designers focus on end sheets, cover, and the like— the “case materials” that are components of many hardbound books. Materials and processes may involve cloth, foil stamping, debossing, or other unusual tactile components or procedures. Even though many of the books aren’t text-heavy, “typography is a huge aspect of the books,” says Wincapaw. “InDesign was

EPUBs Is EPUB a four-letter word for this, or any, fine art book publisher? [Surely not, if you read our last issue. –Ed.] “Often an institution wants both,” says Wincapaw. “We hope to [continue to] expand on and understand better.” Marquand has recently completed an epub version, with MFA Boston (and Tina Henderson), of a print book they also recently finished up. And there’s also one in the works for the Dallas Museum, though it’s supplemental, complementary material rather than a repeat of the companion print book. “It’s not a big part of the work we do right now, but it does seem to be increasing.”

Marquand’s books have received the George Wittenborn Memorial Book Award, the Alfred H. Barr, Jr. Award, as well as awards from the America Association of Museums, AIGA 50 Best Books, The American Association of University Presses, and several others.

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InDesigner: Marquand Books

a breath of fresh air for us, for everybody, I think. Creating a grid, selecting typefaces, developing a color palette. One of the real benefits of the software—so broad, so deep—is how it lets us use object styles and text styles, to improve our performance. Some of our users are more adept than others—it’s like using 10% of your brain—and some use it at a much deeper, expanded level. A huge part of our bookbuilding process is the development

Proof: The Rise of Printmaking in Southern California (for the Norton Simon Museum)

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Support your local traditional photographers (as they go digital) Digital photography is no longer a new phenomenon— indeed, digital cameras have been more popular than film-based cameras for about a decade now—but that doesn’t mean they’ve been universally understood. For some, it was “a tough change, going from film to digital… so we ran into the same discussion about resolution and file size and format,” says Design Director Wincapaw. Marquand has addressed this issue, at least partially, by creating an extensive style/process guide that documents techniques and deadlines and a deep technical discussion about what to supply. “This has been critical when putting together image-heavy publications with firm deadlines. No one wants to waste time, going back and getting higher-resolution files. The style guide is very useful when getting materials from multiple sources, sometimes from other countries. Image acquisition needs to get started up front… It takes time to do that, so anything we can do to streamline the process makes our job easier and more efficient.”

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InDesigner: Marquand Books

of the typography and the styles, so easy to capture on screen.” While the word “artisan” has been working overtime these days, it really does seem apt for Marquand’s methodical, patient process of book development. Like other products that earn that moniker, these books can’t be rushed, are highly satisfying when finally obtained, and of course no two of them will ever be quite the same. The Marquand staff is talking about producing a more graphic presentation of the nuts-and-bolts production guidelines that continue to trip people up; for example, what an ink dot really looks like, what happens when you submit too-small images—a visual cheat sheet to benefit the clients. Wincapaw thinks that generic/ written information can certainly be useful, but “if they can see a specific application visually, I think it’s gonna stick. It seems to happen repeatedly—‘you just did a book, you should remember this!’—but for people who aren’t publication specialists,

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“One of the real benefits of the software…is how it lets us use object styles and text styles, to improve our performance.”

it’s not in their bandwidth to deal with [this information regularly]. That’s why if we have something they can visually refer to, maybe it’ll really help. It’s nothing new— and something [many of us] know, but there are people that understand print, and some who really understand digital and electronic

pubs, and they don’t necessarily see both or understand one over the other.”

n Wendy Katz is the managing editor of InDesign Magazine.

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“I find it interesting how people develop a set of codes that works for them,” says Wincapaw. “That’s one of the things I like about working with new people; they come in with new sensibilities, different skill sets, maybe more evolved.”

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InDesigner: Marquand Books

Cover and details from Surf Craft: Design and the Culture of Board Riding

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InDesigner: Marquand Books

Cover and details for David Lynch: The Unified Field

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InDesigner: Marquand Books

Local clients have a tactile advantage in that they can come in to look at paper and cloth, not having to send samples back and forth. Some clients find it helpful to have their own sample books for cloth and foil.

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Cover and details for Letters to Ellsworth

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Dream Cars: Innovative Design, Visionary Ideas (for the High Museum of Art)

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InDesigner: Marquand Books

Come As You Are: The Art of the 1990s (for Montclair Art Museum)

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Best of the Blog

Best of the Blog

A collection of the most important and informative articles from InDesignSecrets. If you want to add comments or ask questions, just click the title of the article, or click the Feedback button to view the original post in your web browser. How to Check Tint Shades Using the Separations Preview Panel Kelly Vaughn | May 4, 2015

I recently designed a large table (900+ cells) for a client. I used cell styles, paragraph styles, and character styles. We went through several iterations as the client decided how she wanted various tints to appear in the design.

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At the very end of the project, the client asked me to doublecheck the tint shade of the gray cells. I had originally set up the table using Custom Alternating Fills.

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But I also knew that I had a number of local overrides in the table. Rather than click inside each cell to see if there was an override, I decided to use the Separations Preview panel. What’s not apparent at first glance is that this panel does more than preview separations. In the View drop-down menu, there is also an option to display Ink Limit. Normally, Ink Limit is used for offset printing. If too much ink is used, it won’t dry correctly, and the colors will appear muddy. Or in the case of digital printing, the ink will crack more easily over folds because of the excessive amount of toner laid down.

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But in my case, I just need to see how much ink is used over various areas of the image. InDesign gives you a range of choices in the drop-down menu, but you can also type in whatever numbers you want.

Any areas that exceed the specified ink limit appear in red. Because nothing is red in the image below, it is clear that nothing is over 300% ink coverage.

Ink Limit 300%

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For demonstration purposes, I next chose a 200% ink limit.

Ink Limit 200%

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And here is 100% ink limit.

Ink Limit 100%

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Here is 20% ink limit. Notice that the cells that I set up with the Custom Alternating Fills are not highlighted in red yet.

of 5. So at 20%, my gray cells are still below 20%. But at 15%, the gray custom cells are now highlighted in red, indicating that they are greater than a 15% tint.

Ink Limit 20%

If you use the arrow keys to increase or decrease the percentage in the Ink Limit field, note that the numbers will jump in increments

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Ink Limit 15%

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So I go back to 20% and start testing each percentage. At 18%, the gray custom filled cells are not yet highlighted.

But at 17%, all the gray cells are highlighted in red, indicating that they all exceed the ink limit of 17%.

Ink Limit 18%

Ink Limit 17%

So within a matter of about one minute, I was able to verify for my client that all the gray cells had the same tint of the same color. Feedback Off to the press! 

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How to Magnify Your Screen Display Mike Rankin | May 7, 2015

Sooner or later, it happens to most of us. No matter how good your eyesight once was, that day comes when small print and other fine details become hard (if not impossible) to make out. Fortunately, whether you’re using Mac or Windows, your computer comes with a built-in magnifier that you can use to make those tiny pixels appear a lot larger. Magnifying the Screen in Mac OS If you’re working on a Mac, you can enable magnification by opening System Preferences and clicking on Accessibility. Then click on Zoom.

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Be sure Use Keyboard Shortcuts to Zoom is selected, and note the keyboard shortcuts: »» Option+Command+8 for Toggle Zoom »» Option+Command+= for Zoom in »» Option+Command+- for Zoom out »» You can have the zoomed area sharp and pixelated or smoothed with the shortcut Option+Command+\ »» With the Zoom Style menu, you can choose to zoom the entire screen (Fullscreen), or just a portion of it around your cursor (Picture-in-picture). Click on More Options. A new dialog box appears where you can set options like the amount of magnification.

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And if you’re using the Picture-in-picture option, you can click on Adjust Size and Location, and then drag a side or corner to resize the magnified area.

When it’s the size you want, click OK and then Done. I haven’t figured out how to get a screenshot of the magnification effect (it disappears whenever I invoke any of my usual screenshot tools), so I resorted to just taking a picture of the screen with my phone to illustrate it.

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Also, Anne-Marie reminded me that you can make your cursor larger in the Mac’s Accessibility > Display preferences. Click on Display, and then drag the Cursor Size slider till you’re satisfied. The size ranges from Normal (which is actually kinda small) all the way to Large (which is ginormous).

Magnifying the Screen in Windows Windows also has a rather nifty built-in magnification tool. Just search for “Magnifier,” and click on the app in the search results to launch it.

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The Magnifier has a simple set of options, including buttons to control the percentage of magnification, three styles of Views (Full-Screen, Lens Mode, and Docked Mode), as well as controls for changing the shape and size of the magnified area in Lens Mode.

So never again will you have to squint, stare, or guess what it is you’re clicking on in InDesign or any other app on your computer.

Feedback

Yes, InDesign’s Radial Gradients are Insane (it’s not you) David Blatner | May 11, 2015

InDesign’s Gradient feature has bothered me for a long time, and I finally figured out part of the problem!

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I don’t make a lot of radial gradients (or blends or vignettes or whatever you want to call them)—you know, oval or circular blends. But when I do, I’m often stymied in getting them right. I actually wrote about making and adjusting radial gradients here. But something never seemed right about making radial gradients. I thought maybe it was me, that I was just not making them right. But today I realized that it’s not me. It’s InDesign. The way InDesign makes radial gradients is fundamentally broken, and has been for over a decade… maybe since InDesign 1.0. The problem comes down to the shape of your object when you first apply the radial gradient: »» If the object is square or wider than it is tall, then the radial gradient is circular. That is good. »» If the object is a little bit taller than it is wide, then the radial gradient is oblong. That is weird. »» If you apply the radial gradient when it is wider than it is tall, and then resize the frame to be taller than it is wide, then the circular gradient becomes oval. That is also weird. »» If the object is a lot taller than it is wide, then the radial gradient is washed out, looks like crud, and makes you want to bang your head on the desk. That is really bad. If this is not a bug, then it was designed by sadists. Here are some examples to illustrate the problem:

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I selected all four of the frames above and applied the same radial gradient in the Gradient panel at the same time. In my humble opinion, all four gradients should look exactly the same, but they obviously don’t. Not even close. [Okay, here’s my crackpot theory: The “squishity” of the oval (that’s the technical term, I think… some people call it eccentricity) is linked to the slope of the hypotenuse of the frame… so a slope over 1 equals a higher squishity value.]

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Meanwhile, you can try to use the Gradient Swatch tool to adjust the gradient in the frame, but if the radial is already squished, then it’s too late. You can’t even create a square or wide frame, apply the gradient, and then resize it. The only solutions (if you want a circular blend in a tall frame) appear to be the following: »» Make a wide frame, apply the gradient, and then rotate it.

the radial gradient. Adjust the inner frame to reposition or resize the gradient.

»» Make both a wide frame and a tall frame, apply the gradient to the wide frame, cut and paste the wide frame into the tall frame, and then fill the tall frame with the color used in the outside of

»» Make the tall frame part of a compound path that is at least as wide as it is tall, and hide the other part of the compound path with other elements in your layout or put it out on the pasteboard. Sure, it’s crazy, but so are InDesign’s radial gradients.

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Feedback

Creating Drop Words with InDesign David Blatner | May 14, 2015

One of the top wishlist items for InDesign has long been “drop words,” which is a feature required for Hebrew typesetting. (I’ve never heard of it used in other typesetting, but if you use it for something else, leave a comment below.) A “drop word” is like a drop cap, but instead of making one or more characters large, it makes a space for the letter or word, but leaves the word a normal size:

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I’m told by a reader, Ari Singer, that the drop word effect was designed “to display clarity and hierarchy in the text, especially in the olden times where space on a page was precious and extra space between paragraphs were not an option.” In other words, instead of indenting the first line of the paragraph (as we normally do), you indent the second line! Fortunately, there are three good ways to create this effect: »» The Dropwords plug-in from In-Tools »» Make your own paragraph and character styles and apply them manually »» Auto-apply styles with a script The plug-in is certainly the most robust way to handle this, letting you automate the process. But the second two aren’t that hard if you don’t mind putting some work into it; they both rely on building your own styles. Here are the steps to follow. 4. Make a character style First, create a character style to handle the look of the drop effect:

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6. Make more paragraph styles Once you have a main “dropword” paragraph style, you need to make more—each one for a different-length word. This is the tedious part, but it only takes about 5 minutes to make a bunch of them. I suggest making them based on the first one you made, and then just change the number of characters.

The main things you need to change in the character style are the size (it should be much smaller than the normal text—for 12 point text, I use only 4 points) and the baseline shift, which you’ll have to figure out by trial and error—I used 14.5 pt. You can change all this later, so just start with these values for now. 5. Make a paragraph style The paragraph style should include a drop cap of 2 lines and some number of characters. I’m using three, for a 3-letter word. Most importantly, you should have the drop cap apply the character style automatically:

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By the way, the 3-letter drop word paragraph style will be applied to a 2-letter word; the 4-letter paragraph style will be applied to a 3-letter word. Why? Because it is being applied to the word plus the space after it! 7. Apply the paragraph styles Once you have the paragraph styles set up, you can apply them quickly by applying keyboard shortcuts to them or using Quick Apply. (Or use the “auto apply” feature, which I’ll talk about in the next section.)

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Here’s how the text looked before, with just the “dropword” style applied to some paragraphs:

A FindChangebyList trick for drop words Okay, obviously, applying the proper paragraph style based on the length of the first word is easy if you have just a couple of pages. But you don’t want to have to apply all those for a long document, right? Fortunately, you can use a script that is built into InDesign to do it for you… the FindChangeByList.jsx script. We’ve written and talked about FindChangeByList in the past, so I won’t go into too many details here. Here’s the quick version. First, open your Scripts panel (Window > Utilities > Scripts) and go to Application > Samples > Javascript. Then right-click on the FindChangeSupport folder inside the panel and choose Reveal in Finder.

Now here’s how it looks after applying the different styles, based on the length of the first word:

Inside the FindChangeSupport folder, create a backup of the “findchangebylist.txt” by changing its name to something like

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“findchangebylist_orig.txt,” then duplicate it and give the duplicate a different name, such as “findchange_dropwords.txt.”

applies a drop cap of 4 letters, so that it includes the space after the word): grep {findWhat:"^\\w{3}\\s", appliedParagraphStyle:"dropword"} {appliedParagraphStyle:"dropword3"} {searchBackwards:false, includeLockedStoriesForFind:false, includeLockedLayersForFind:false, includeHiddenLayers:false, includeMasterPages:false,

Now you need to edit that findchange_dropwords text file. You must use a text editor that cannot apply any formatting (I use TextWrangler on the Mac). Get rid of all the find/change queries in there, and replace them with your own. Your query should search for every place where a paragraph style such as “dropword” is applied, and then change it to a different paragraph style based on the length of the first word. So, for example, this crazy code below will search for 3-letter first words and apply the “dropword3” style (which, remember, actually

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includeFootnotes:true, kanaSensitive:false, widthSensitive:true} //3 letter first word

You need a line like this for every paragraph style you’ve created—you just need to change the names of the paragraph styles and the length of the word. (The length of the word is the part that says \w{3}—that just means a 3-letter word.) When you’re done, save the text file, and run the script by double-clicking on FindChangeByList.jsx in the Scripts panel. Because you renamed the original findchange text file, the script won’t know which one to use, and it will ask you. Choose the new one you made, of course, and click OK.

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Download my sample files If you want to test this out for yourself, you can download my Feedback sample files here. 

For example, type on a path will be entirely left out of a reflowable EPUB…

Finding Type on a Path Mike Rankin | May 18, 2015

When you’re exporting a layout to reflowable EPUB, InDesign will warn you if the content includes things that cannot be represented with CSS, and therefore won’t appear the same—or at all—in the EPUB unless you convert them to images with Object Export Options.

…unless you use the Rasterize Container feature in EPUB and HTML Object Export Options.

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But what if you get that error message when exporting a file where you didn’t think there was any type on a path? It’s fairly easy to create type on a path accidentally. All you have to do is press Shift+T when your cursor is not in a text frame, and you’ll switch to the Type on a Path tool. Then if you click on any line or frame, voila, you’ve just created type on a path (even if you don’t add any text). It would be nice to know if the type on a path is really empty, or if there is a problem you should fix before exporting to EPUB. So here are a few ways to locate and remove type on a path in your document. »» If you just want to find type on a path, make sure there are no locked frames or hidden frames/layers, and then Select All on the spread. The presence of handles on text-threading in and out ports, plus the third handle you can grab to reposition type on a path, is a dead giveaway.

»» If you’re sure you just want to remove type on a path as quickly as possible, Select All on the spread, and choose Type > Type on a Path > Delete Type from Path. Repeat for every spread. »» If you just want to find frames where you accidentally clicked with the Type on a Path tool, you can search for empty stories with GREP. Search for \A\Z to find all empty stories.

Feedback

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The Mystery of the Missing Frames David Blatner | May 20, 2015

Every InDesign user knows that part of the job is figuring out what you’re seeing on screen—but sometimes it’s a matter of figuring out what you know is there but that you don’t see on screen! So for this month’s InDesignSecrets contest, here’s one of my favorite “what you see is not what you get” troubleshooting mysteries. Take a look at my screen, below:

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I have one frame selected on the page. However, I happen to know that there are two more empty frames on this page (a graphic frame and a text frame). So why can’t I see them? Here are a few additional details: »» No, the frames are not behind the panel! »» The frames are fully on the page (they’re not even touching the pasteboard). »» View > Extras > Show Edges is enabled, so we should be able to see the frame edges. »» No objects or layers are hidden or locked or anything else weird. »» If you hover your cursor over the frames, they highlight until you move your cursor off them. So… again… why can’t I see those frames? And the answer is… Overprint Preview (or Separations Preview). When you have either of these enabled, frames that won’t appear in printed output disappear—unless you select them. Since the unselected frames had no stroke and no fill, they vanished when Overprint Preview was turned on. Note that this is different from the Preview mode that you can enter by choosing View > Screen Mode > Preview (or by pressing W with nothing selected). In that case, you wouldn’t see the page margins like you do in the screenshot. Several folks also came up with a clever solution that we hadn’t considered: that the visible frame had a Paper fill, and the other two

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frames were precisely positioned underneath it. While this wasn’t what we had in mind, it can in fact yield the exact look you see in the screenshot. So in fairness to those folks, I counted their entries as correct. OK, now for the winner (chosen at random from the correct entries): Erica Plante Congratulations, Erica! You win a 2-seat license for the amazing Feedback in5 from Ajar Productions! 

style that renders the first line of a chapter in small caps. Here’s an example using dummy text:

The Incredible Shrinking Italic Small Caps

So far, so good. During the proofing, it turned out that a word in the first line of one chapter was supposed to be italicized, which had been omitted from the submitted copy. “No problem!” I thought, and applied my “Italic” character style. The result wasn’t quite as expected:

Alan Gilbertson | May 20, 2015

When everything in a project proceeds according to plan, that’s great. It’s business-as-usual and all’s right with the world. But once in a while something doesn’t go according to plan, and that’s when knowing what’s happening under the hood can help you out. Here’s a little gotcha I came across on a current project. The typeface I chose for the body copy is Adobe Text Pro, a wonderfully readable typeface by Robert Slimbach with only one purpose: to be a wonderfully readable typeface. Like any robust OpenType text face, it includes true small caps, making it possible to use a line

Shrunken italics? What’s up with that? There’s no “+” after the character style or paragraph style. The text is 13 point. The

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Character panel says the italic text is also 13 point, but it definitely isn’t. So what gives? A quick trip to the Glyphs panel solved the mystery.

Adobe Text Pro’s roman weights include glyphs for small caps, but the italic doesn’t. This is not something you want to discover when you’re well into typesetting a 10-volume, 3,000-page project. (Yes, I know. Cold, shivery feeling, as if someone just walked over your grave, right?) Faced with this dilemma, InDesign substitutes regular capitals from the italic font and scales them down according to what is set for Small Caps in Preferences > Advanced Type. What’s a designer to do? The project is too far advanced to even consider changing the text face; the client has signed off on the design and too much work has already been completed. Can’t ditch the small-caps line style, for the same reasons. Fortunately, this is a

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single word in the opening line of one page among 3,000 or so. It’s possible and excusable to fudge things a bit. In most cases, lack of true small caps looks hideous when a line of type starts with a full capital. The initial cap looks as if it’s semibold, or the rest of the line looks wimpy, or both. Here’s Baskerville OldStyle:

The effect is made obvious (it’s worse in sans than serif ) because the initial cap and the characters that follow are all upright (roman), and the eye expects an even “type color,” not a single anemic line in an otherwise-robust array of text. But when there’s a change from roman to italic, the character of the glyphs changes. The reader understands that the italic word is intended to look different from the roman; a slight imperfection won’t catch the eye (unless you’re a typographer and you’re looking for it). In this case, changing the Small Caps scale in Preferences to 74% and adding a stroke of 0.05 points tweaks it to the right height

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and weight to pass muster. A little tracking (+10) compensates for the faux weight.

If you have to do something like this, print it out to make sure, on the highest-resolution printer you have available. It’s not possible to verify a match like this on screen, even zoomed in all the way, and a standard 600 dpi laser is no more than barely adequate. The takeaways? One, be happy your typeface has true Small Caps, but verify all the weights and always check the italics! Two, in a desperate situation it is okay to fake it, if you do it carefully. (But don’t make a habit of it. Just because you can doesn’t mean you Feedback should.) 

Skip to the Leading, My Bonny Loose Glenn Fleishman | May 25, 2015

I cut my teeth on desktop publishing: QuarkXPress 1.0, PageMaker 1.0… anyone remember Ready, Set, Go? But I was baffled when I recently opened InDesign after several months of not touching it.

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While delighted with its new performance and new EPUB features (which have made it far simpler than even a year ago to produce a workflow for a single document to head to print on demand, PDF, and EPUB output), I had a problem. The captions below anchoredobject figures were snapping to some unseen grid. Here, for example, was what I was seeing:

The red arrow above is pointing to the wrong amount of space. I knew it was wrong—the proper amount of space was smaller—and trying to change the amount of space was fruitless. Using the InDesignSecrets forums, Adobe’s help forums, and other pages I found across the web—and my slightly out-of-date knowledge—I tried all the usual culprits. Were the Anchored Object settings out of whack? No. Did I have Align to Baseline Grid set in the paragraph style or through an override? No. Was something

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wacky with Text Wrap? No, no, no. I spent an hour trying to sort this through to no avail. Fortunately, an old friend suggested Skip by Leading, in the Composition settings of InDesign’s Preferences dialog box. Sure enough, it was selected, and deselecting it solved the problem. Less space now, see?

and with other looser parameters, I had avoided using a baseline grid or other options to preserve perfect alignment across pages. Even in a PDF, I don’t expect people to use facing pages, and in a reflowing EPUB, there’s no concept of that. Print-on-demand users might see some slight variation, but not much. The fussiness wasn’t worth the overhead compared to having a flexible and perfectly flowing document. My problem with Skip by Leading isn’t that it exists. Rather, it’s that there’s no visual or panel display to let you know it’s in use, and that it’s hidden deep enough so that most InDesign users never consider disabling it. That’s an hour I’ll never get back, but with my friend’s help, mystery solved—and I hope some of you are smacking your head right now (or in the future) as a lightbulb goes on about an Feedback inexplicable leading issue you’ve had in the past. 

The Skip by Leading feature is not new—it’s been around in page layout apps since the ’90s. It ensures that even with a text wrap, and even without a baseline grid defined, paragraphs remain in integral units of the leading you set. Of course, I should have guessed this, but I had completely forgotten about it, hiding deep in the preferential depths. In a book destined for print, Skip by Leading makes a lot of sense. But in this particular book, designed primarily to be read in EPUB

Numbering Paragraphs… on their right side!

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David Blatner | June 3, 2015

You know that InDesign can automatically number paragraphs, but it always places the numbers at the beginning of the paragraph— which is the left side in most languages. But what if you want the numbering at the end of the paragraph instead of the beginning?! The solution for this problem is based on an amazing trick that Bart Van de Wiele described in InDesign Magazine Issue 56 (The

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Type Issue), when we explained how to put a special character, such as a bullet, on the right side of a heading. It’s a tiny bit complicated, but once you get it working, you can use it over and over again very easily, because it’s saved in a style. The trick is based on something I said above: numbers and bullets are placed at the beginning of the paragraph, which is the left side in most languages. But it’s not the left side in all languages! In some languages (those that read right to left), the bullets and numbering begin on the right side. So you need to make a paragraph style that is based on a rightto-left reading order. Here’s how you do it. 1. Make some Arabic or Hebrew text. Make a text frame, and with the text cursor flashing in it, hold down Command (Mac) or Ctrl (Windows) and select Type > Fill with Placeholder Text. That forces InDesign to open the placeholder options dialog box, where you can choose either Arabic or Hebrew:

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2. Give it Automatic Numbering. Just click the Paragraph Numbering button in the Control panel (when it is in Paragraph formatting mode). The number shows up on the right, see?

3. Make your paragraph style. While your text cursor is in one of these right-to-left paragraphs, make a new paragraph style. It will pick up the right-to-left world-paragraph-composer formatting of the text in frame, as well as the numbering. 4. Edit your style. Now you can change the paragraph style to whatever you want, including changing the font, size, indents, and so on. Make sure you set the horizontal alignment to Left (instead of right).

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5. Adjust the Numbering. You also probably want to change the Bullets and Numbering pane of the Paragraph Style Options dialog box, so that the Number field doesn’t include a tab. In the following image, I’ve changed the code in the Number field so that it will separate the number from the text with an em space. Note that you can also apply a character style to the number if you want (but I haven’t done so here).

6. Apply the paragraph style. Now, whenever you apply this paragraph style to text, the numbering will show up on the right side, like this:

Now, there are a couple of problems here. If you look closely at the last paragraph, you’ll see the period (dot) is at the beginning of the paragraph instead of the end. So… don’t put punctuation at the end of the text! Second, and perhaps an even bigger problem: it doesn’t really work when you have more than one line of text. The number is placed to the right side of the first line of text. However, for single-line headings with no punctuation at the Feedback end, this can work great. 

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The InDex: InDex Your Key to Our Content Can’t find that article you saw in an earlier issue? Wondering whether we covered that obscure plug-in? Never fear, the InDex is here. The first issue of InDesign Magazine was published in July 2004. Since then, we’ve cranked out thousands of pages on hundreds of related topics. While it’s possible to use Acrobat to simultaneously search all past issues of the magazine for one word or phrase, many readers have clamored for a formal index at the back of each issue. However, with 75 issues to account for, that’s not feasible. Instead, the InDex will live as a PDF you can download for free. If you come across a topic you want to know more about, but it’s in an issue you don’t have, you’re not out of luck. We sell back issues at indesignsecrets.com.

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If the topic you’re looking for isn’t in the InDex, you have one more way to search: that PDF trick we mentioned. To make it work, all of your magazine issue PDFs must be in one folder. Open any issue in Acrobat, and then press Shift+Command+F (Shift+Ctrl+F on Windows). In the Search window that appears, be sure that you click the radio button that says “All PDF Documents in,” and in the dropdown menu below that, choose the folder in which you placed your magazine issues. You’re on your way to finding anything in any PDF!

Click here to download the InDex.

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While this PDF is just for you, you can tell your friends about this great discount: $10 off a 1-year membership (use coupon code friend) Send them to: indesignsecrets.com/issues Coming Soon!

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Idm issue 75