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& Using

Alternate Layouts

& MathTools

M A G A Z I N E 74 June 2015

Review

& InQuestion

Flipbooks


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MAGAZINE

From the Editor in Chief PUBLISHERS David Blatner, Anne-Marie Concepción EDITORIAL Editor in Chief Mike Rankin, mike@indesignmag.com Managing Editor Wendy Katz, wendy@indesignmag.com Senior Editor Sandee Cohen, sandee@indesignmag.com Contributing Writers Kevin Stohlmeyer, Erica Gamet, Rudi Warttmann, Peter Kahrel, Alan Gilbertson, Eugene Tyson, Keith Gilbert DESIGN Pam Sparks Rufus Deuchler rufus.deuchler.net BUSINESS Contact Information http://indesignsecrets.com/contact Subscription Information indesignsecrets.com/issues Published by InDesignSecrets.com, a division of The Creative Publishing Network, Inc. Copyright 2015 InDesignSecrets.com. All rights reserved. Reproduction and redistribution prohibited without approval. For more information, contact permissions@indesignmag.com. InDesign Magazine is not endorsed or sponsored by Adobe Systems Incorporated, publisher of InDesign. InDesign is a registered trademark of Adobe Systems Incorporated. All other products and services are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners and are hereby acknowledged. Photos on pages 1, 4, 20, and 71 courtesy of Fotolia.com

We all love our screens, in part because they make it so quick and easy to access incredible amounts of content. Just imagine having to lug around physical copies of all the books, magazines, and newspapers you read on your favorite device. Still, I think something fundamental to the experience of reading is lost when we read long documents on a screen. Some little part of us craves the simple pleasure of turning a page. And that is why flipbooks, with their animated interactive effects, remain popular even while clean, minimal designs are so trendy. There are many options for creating flipbooks in PDF or HTML, and in our feature article, Kevin Stohlmeyer takes you through the choices and the process. Erica Gamet truly is the Queen of MultiTasking, as demonstrated by her pair of articles in this issue. First, InFocus brings you the coolest news and products for InDesign users. Then, Erica shows how to make one

document serve multiple uses for print and/or digital with InDesign’s Alternate Layouts features. The prospect of creating professional quality math typesetting can be daunting, but with the right tools, you can accomplish amazing results, even if you think Pi is something you eat with a scoop of ice cream. And in this month’s InReview, Rudi Warttmann takes a look at a powerful math typesetting solution: movemen’s MathTools. Sandee Cohen is back with another InQuestion full of answers to your trickiest InDesign dilemmas. In the GREP of the Month, Peter Kahrel details an advanced technique for limiting matches so you can target things like just the first set of parentheses in a paragraph. And of course, we have a fresh batch of Best of the Blog from InDesignSecrets. Enjoy!

ISSN 2379-1403

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InSide: Table of Contents 6

20

30

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Creating Flipbooks Kevin Stohlmeyer shows how to create documents with page-turning interactivity in PDF from InDesign, and surveys the third-party tools for achieving the effect in HTML. Alternate Layouts Erica Gamet shows everything you need to know about this powerful feature for re-purposing layouts for multiple print and digital outputs. InQuestion You have InDesign questions, and Sandee Cohen’s got the answers. InReview: MathTools V2 Rudi Warttmann reviews a plug-in that takes the pain out of professional quality math typesetting.

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InFocus Erica Gamet strews fertilizer on a diverse and organic garden of tools and accoutrements.

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GREP of the Month: Limiting Matches Peter Kahrel shares a technique for targeting a specific instance in a repeating pattern of text.

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Best of the Blog  A collection of the most important and informative articles from InDesignSecrets. 56

Work Faster with Long Documents

59

Keeping Long Text Fields on One Line When Using Data Merge

61

Getting the Color Theme Tool Out of Your Way

62

Controlling Line Breaks with Nested Styles

65

The Mystery of the Upside Down Master Page Contest

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An Unexpected Use for the Hyperlinks Panel

69

When InDesign’s Find/Change Gets Really Slow

70

InDex to All Past Issues

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Check out the All-New CreativePro.com! Where Creatives Go to Know

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June 2015

5


Creating

PDFs from InDesign, with the animation provided by Flash

day do you click or tap to navigate through

(which means they won’t work on mobile devices). Or

content on all the screens in your life?

you can enlist the help of a third-party service to create a

Moving through digital documents silently and instantly, exerting almost zero physical

flipbook that will work on the web and on mobile devices. In this article, we’ll take a look at both options, so you can

effort certainly has its upside. You can’t beat the convenience, and you’ll never get a paper cut. But after a while, do you start craving the look and feel of interacting with a physical book? We are analog creatures, after all. And all this digital activity is a relatively new phenomenon. The tiny act of turning a real page can be satisfying in a way that an effortless click cannot. When you turn a page, you bid adieu (or good riddance) to what you have just seen, while your eyes are drawn to the new content

decide which is best for any given project.

Skinny on Skeuomorphism Want your next project toThe simulate the The page-turning animations in a flipbook are a experience of turning pages a book?This odd-sounding term refers to any design form ofin skeuomorphism. elements which serve to make the user more comfortable by mimicking older, more There are plenty of options to choose familiar objects. Think of the old Mac Address Book app, which was wrapped in from, in both PDF and HTML. detailed graphics resembling paper pages with thumb tabs and a stitched leather

being gradually revealed. So how can you re-create a little bit of that engaging experience in digital form? One way is by creating a flipbook, where the reader can click or drag to trigger a page-flip animation.

By Kevin Stohlmeyer

There are two main approaches to creating flipbooks. You can create them as interactive

Photo Credit: TTerlizz, via Wikimedia Commons

Click. Tap. Click. Tap. How many times a

cover. Or even something like the camera shutter sound your cellphone makes when you take a photo, or the iBooks interface, which once resembled a wooden bookshelf. Nowadays skeuomorphism is fading in popularity, as minimalism and “flat design” are in. But the page-flip animation in flipbooks seems to have found a lasting niche in catalogs, flyers, and other publications. For information, including history, examples, and pros and cons of skeuomorphism, check out the fun interactive infographic at templatemonster.com.

Design by Pam Sparks

INDESIGN INDESIGN MAGAZINE  MAGAZINE 74 74

June June 2015 2015

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PDFs from InDesign, with the animation provided by Flash (which means they won’t work on mobile devices). Or you can enlist the help of a third-party service to create a flipbook that will work on the web and on mobile devices. In this article, we’ll take a look at both options, so you can decide which is best for any given project.

The Skinny on Skeuomorphism The page-turning animations in a flipbook are a form of skeuomorphism. This odd-sounding term refers to any design elements which serve to make the user more comfortable by mimicking older, more familiar objects. Think of the old Mac Address Book app, which was wrapped in detailed graphics resembling paper pages with thumb tabs and a stitched leather cover. Or even something like the camera shutter sound your cellphone makes when you take a photo, or the iBooks interface, which once resembled a wooden bookshelf. Nowadays skeuomorphism is fading in popularity, as minimalism and “flat design” are in. But the page-flip animation in flipbooks seems to have found a lasting niche in catalogs, flyers, and other publications. For information, including history, examples, and pros and cons of skeuomorphism, check out the fun interactive infographic at templatemonster.com.

Photo Credit: TTerlizz, via Wikimedia Commons

Click. Tap. Click. Tap. How many times a day do you click or tap to navigate through content on all the screens in your life? Moving through digital documents silently and instantly, exerting almost zero physical effort certainly has its upside. You can’t beat the convenience, and you’ll never get a paper cut. But after a while, do you start craving the look and feel of interacting with a physical book? We are analog creatures, after all. And all this digital activity is a relatively new phenomenon. The tiny act of turning a real page can be satisfying in a way that an effortless click cannot. When you turn a page, you bid adieu (or good riddance) to what you have just seen, while your eyes are drawn to the new content being gradually revealed. So how can you re-create a little bit of that engaging experience in digital form? One way is by creating a flipbook, where the reader can click or drag to trigger a page-flip animation. There are two main approaches to creating flipbooks. You can create them as interactive

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PDF Flipbooks PDF flipbooks are by no means something new. In fact, you could create one all the way back in InDesign CS5. But recently they have seen a resurgence in popularity on tablet devices and larger online documents, such as catalogs. Flipbooks can drive customer engagement and boost online sales by giving customers the familiar feel of a page turn instead of a flat, click-through PDF experience. Flipbooks can include options like audio and video, links to web content, e-commerce, and more. Creating your own PDF flipbook can be fairly simple depending on the platform(s) on which you choose to display the finished product. The more accessibility you want to have, or platforms you want to reach, the more steps you will need to take. The good news is, you can still create your own PDF flipbook using just Adobe InDesign.

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Creating a Flipbook Using Adobe InDesign Five main steps are involved in creating a flipbook in interactive PDF format: creating your layout, adding interactivity, exporting to SWF, placing that SWF into a new InDesign document, and finally exporting to PDF. Let’s take a look at the details of each step.

Getting started Begin as you would for any other printbased InDesign layout. First, choose an appropriate page size, using the presets in the New Document dialog box. If you intend to present your document on a tablet device, you may want to consider using the Digital Publishing presets—they will give you options for popular devices like iPad and Android 10” screens (Figure 1). Choose carefully, because selecting an appropriate size now will help you avoid the need to scale or downsize your document later, when you export to SWF.

Figure 1: Digital Publishing presets in the New Document dialog box.

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Next, you may want to consider using a facing-page layout, so the document will be designed in spreads. A flipbook designed in spreads bends at the spine, giving the reader the illusion of a page turn. Larger single pages can be hard to “turn” depending on the device. You will lay out your InDesign document in reader spreads, not paginated pages or printer spreads. Finally, you may want to utilize an RGB color space, since the first portion of this project is Flash-based. Working in CMYK can lead to color shifts in the digital document.

Interactive features InDesign documents support interactive features like movies, animations, and buttons. One nice feature of InDesign CC2014 is that in you do not have to export out separate Flash animations to re-import into InDesign, because the new Animation panel (Figure 2) uses HTML animations. Movie formats supported in InDesign and Acrobat PDF are Flash Video (.FLV or .F4V),

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Figure 2: Animations you create with InDesign’s tools are now HTML-based, and will work on mobile devices like an iPad.

MP4 (H.264), and SWF files. Audio files are MP3. Since our intermediary file will be a SWF document, you should avoid using QuickTime (.MOV), AVI, and MPEG formats.

Figure 3: In the Media panel you can choose a movie poster (the static image displayed before the movie plays).

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Though supported in interactive PDFs, they will not carry over through the SWF format. To place a movie or audio file, use File > Place to import like any other graphic file. Place in a frame in InDesign and resize. Use the Media panel (Window > Interactive > Media) to preview and add a poster image (Figure 3, previous page). You can also choose the type of controller or have the movie play on page load. To create a button in InDesign, use the Buttons and Forms panel (Window > Interactive > Buttons and Forms, Figure 4). Simply select the item you wish to convert into a button, and click the Convert to Button icon located in the lower right corner of the panel. From there, you can name your button and choose your action. Make note of the different options when choosing your action—some are specific to PDF only, and again, while our end document will be a PDF, the first step we will take is exporting as a SWF file, so avoid those features.

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Figure 4: With the Buttons and Forms panel (above left), you can convert regular InDesign objects into interactive objects that can trigger Actions (above right).

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Exporting to SWF Once your design is complete, you will need to export your InDesign document as a Flash SWF file. Choose File > Export, and then choose Flash Player (SWF). In the

Export SWF dialog box (Figure 5), you can choose to scale or fit your document to different preset sizes; however, this step is not necessary if you have designed your document to the appropriate size. Exporting an actual-size document will not only simplify the workflow, but will look better compared to a scaled document. Next, be sure to select Include Interactive Page Curl at the bottom of the dialog box. This will export a Flash Player document along with the HTML page to view. Review the document in your web browser, and make sure the page curl is active in the SWF document and that all interactive features are working. Once you have reviewed it, the HTML file can be discarded.

Figure 5: The Export SWF dialog box.

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Adding SWF to InDesign Our next step is to bring the exported SWF file back into InDesign. Start by creating a new single-page InDesign document. Deselect Facing Pages, and make the page size the same height but twice the width of your original document page size. You will need to accommodate the entire spread view of the SWF in the document. Finally, change all your margins to 0, and then click OK. Once you have created the document, draw an empty frame the size of the page, and use File > Place to import the SWF file into the full-page frame. At first, you will not see the SWF file, only a default view of the file with the Flash logo at the top left. Use the Media panel (Window > Interactive > Media) to add a poster to the file. You have several options to choose from: »» Standard shows the default view with the Flash logo.

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»» From Current Frame takes a snapshot of the current spread. »» Choose Image allows you to upload a graphic file as the preview. Keep in mind that the poster will be the first page your customers will see when

they view the PDF, so be sure to choose an appropriate poster image or frame (Figure 6). For instance, choosing a frame capture from an interior spread will make it appear as though they opened the document in the middle of the publication,

rather than the cover image they might have expected. When choosing an image, make sure it is the same size as the spread size, not just a single page. If the size does not match or is designed as a half of the spread, it will stretch disproportionately when exported. Finally, select Play on Page Load so the SWF document will be live immediately when readers open the PDF, instead of them having to click the document to activate the SWF file.

Exporting to PDF

Figure 6: The poster you choose will act as the cover for your SWF-based flipbook.

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To complete the process, export your InDesign document as an interactive PDF, not a print PDF. In the Export dialog box, you can choose either pages or spreads— since this is a single-page document, it will not matter. Be sure to check Embed Page Thumbnails and choose the initial view when your reader opens the PDF. Preferred choices for creating a PDF with a page flip are View: Fit Page and Layout: Single Page.

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These ensure that the entire document will be in view when opened. Another choice is whether you want to open the PDF in

Full Screen Mode (Figure 7). Click OK to export the PDF, and then preview it in Adobe Acrobat or Acrobat Reader. The SWF

Figure 7: If you want your flipbook to take over the whole screen, select the Open in Full Screen Mode option in the Export to Interactive PDF dialog box.

Figure 8: The interactive page curl effect is displayed when a reader clicks and drags the corner of a page.

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file should load immediately, allowing you to pull on the corner and view your PDF flipbook (Figure 8).

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PDF flipbooks on Mobile Devices

Flipping Book (flippingbook.com)

There are some considerations to note when creating PDF flipbooks for mobile devices. In order to create the page curl, we had to export as a SWF file, and while the end format is PDF, the contents are Flash-based, which will not run on an iOS device such as the iPad. If you must deliver a document that works on mobile devices, consider a plug-in or service to convert your standard PDF file (with no SWF content) to a PDF flipbook that will run on all devices.

Flipping Book’s Publisher converts your existing PDF (or other document formats) into a flipbook readable on iOS, Android, Mac, and Windows platforms (Figure 9). However, the software is available only

on Windows. Once a document is loaded into the publishing software, users can add page flips and change the interface and background to a custom viewer (other options are available at different price points). Users can also add media to

Using Plug-Ins and Services An alternative to creating your own Flashbased PDF flipbook is to use a third-party plug-in or service to convert your static PDF into an interactive flipbook. This is a great option for catalogs and other larger PDF documents created in InDesign. The services and plug-ins previewed here are not meant to be a complete list and, as always, you should do your own research to make sure these options are best for your situation.

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Figure 9: Flippingbook.com, an option for Windows users.

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the publication, such as music or movie files. Flipping Book also has e-commerce capability, which appeals to catalog clients. As with most of these solutions, analytics are available via Google Analytics. Distribution can be handled on a self-hosting basis or through the App Store or Google Play. One fun feature is that the page turn has an audio component that sounds just like a magazine page turn.

has a subscription feature that allows users to automatically get new updates.

ePaperFlip (epaperflip.com) ePaperFlip is another HTML solution for flipbooks. The interesting difference with ePaperFlip is that it uses a Flash-based

player on desktop computers and HTML on mobile devices (Figure 11, next page). As with the other solutions, in this one users can add multimedia and links after uploading their PDF document to the service. ePaperFlip also has a development service, where their team

FlipHTML5 (fliphtml5.com) FlipHTML5 is an HTML cloud-based platform that allows users to upload PDFs or other files to the FlipHTML5 site (Figure 10). Once uploaded, users can add multimedia, animation, and more, depending on price points. FlipHTML5 also offers a standalone app feature for iOS that allows the reader to view the flipbook offline. One unique feature of FlipHTML5 is the ability to integrate Google AdSense into the document to display advertising as the reader views the flipbook. FlipHTML5 also

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Figure 10: Fliphtml5.com has integrated advertising features and offers offline reading of flipbooks.

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will take a static document and convert it to a rich HTML app, even submitting it to the appropriate stores. ePaperFlip also has a proprietary e-commerce solution that integrates with the document, allowing easier tagging for click-through sales. With colleges and automotive companies like Honda and Chevy as clients, this

solution is definitely geared towards the magazine and catalog industries.

eDocker (edocker.com) eDocker has one great feature that is lacking in some others: it allows you to start inside a native InDesign document instead of having to export as PDF to

begin (Figure 12, next page). The eDocker TOOLS! plug-in has similar options as Adobe Digital Publishing Suite, including slideshows, video/audio support, and other interactive features. Once the interactive layers are added to an existing InDesign document, you simply export as an eDocker file and upload to the eDocker PUBLISH! servers. From there, users can add additional interactive overlays including pop-outs, video embeds, and more. The end result is a web app that the client can self-host, or it can be output as a branded native app for iOS and Android. eDocker is available as a subscription only.

Figure 11: Epaperflip.com offers dual functionality: taking advantage of a Flashbased player on desktop computers while using HTML on mobile devices.

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Figure 12: Available via subscription, eDocker allows you to create a flipbook from an InDesign document without having to export as PDF.

in5 (ajarproductions.com) in5 is another InDesign plug-in, available from Ajar Productions (Figure 13). in5 has full InDesign support of interactive features and folio overlays. Not only can users utilize DPS features like scrollable frames, slideshows, and pan and zoom, but they can also use animations in CC2014 thanks to the conversion from Flash animations to HTML5. in5 also supports buttons, multi-state objects, and embedded multimedia files. Once the document is completed, users can export to multiple formats from directly inside InDesign, including web-based apps for iOS,

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Android, or multi-device and HPUB Baker Framework, which is suitable for magazines. You can add a page flip effect to in5 output with the help of a JavaScript library like turn.js.

Figure 13: Ajar Productions’ in5 supports a wide range of interactive features and allows you to work directly in InDesign.

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issuu (issuu.com) issuu is another popular subscription-based solution using either a PDF or InDesign document (Figure 14). While there are options to produce standalone apps for devices, issuu is mostly known for their web-based viewing solutions. issuu has a limitation of 500 pages and 100 MB in file size, which can be problematic for catalog

publishers with larger files. However, for monthly publications, issuu is definitely one of the more well-known solutions. issuu is pretty bare-bones, with limited interactivity features, including embedded links and the “clip” option that allows users to copy portions of the document page into a clipboard to view later. It does not have support for multimedia at this time.

Figure 14: With over 21 million publications to date, issuu.com is one of the most popular digital publishing platforms, despite not offering as many features as its competitors.

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However, the simplicity and price points for issuu keep clients coming back for more.

3D Issue (3dissue.com) Not to be confused with the previous company, 3D Issue is my pick for the best flipbook solution on the market (Figure 15, next page). Touting an impressive client list including Macy’s, the NFL, and others, 3D Issue has a lot going for it. Not only will it convert your PDF into a flipbook, but it also has a single-license purchase price starting at under US$500, making it one of the more affordable options. Each price point creates a flipbook with Flash, HTML, and eBooks, includes Google Analytics, and allows for self-hosting. However, the mid-range professional level is required to include rich media and create your own iOS and Android app that you can submit to their stores. Some of the features that separate 3D Issue from its competitors are reader credentials, which allow for private distribution; Facebook

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API integration; embedding a reader onto a client’s Facebook page; shopping cart support; and more. Heck, if Google uses this for its own training guide, it’s good enough for me.

Turning the Page Whichever route you take—either creating your own PDF flipbook using InDesign or purchasing a service or plug-in—you will find that converting your existing print

documents to a rich interactive PDF based experience will not only engage your readers, but can also bring new life to what was once just a flat viewing experience. I hope you’ve found this overview of techniques and services as interesting as I did researching it.

n Kevin Stohlmeyer is an educator specializing in production with over 20 years experience in the design field and has been teaching professionally for over 14 years. A self-proclaimed geek, his experience with publications, workflow, and illustration enhances his credibility as an Adobe Certified Instructor and Adobe Community Leader.

Figure 15: 3D Issue is an affordable option for creating flipbooks integrated with Facebook and Google Analytics from your InDesign documents.

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By Erica Gamet

Alternate Layouts

Reach for these tools any time you need to use the same content in a different size or format. When first introduced, the main purpose for Alternate Layouts in InDesign was to ease the pain of having to create individual files for both landscape and portrait orientations of each article that would be published for digital consumption, using Adobe DPS or a similar method. Having to maintain both a wide and a tall layout—and possibly in several sizes for different tablets—was a big chore which I’m sure drove more than one designer to pull out copious amounts of hair. Luckily, the InDesign team wasn’t going to stand for such a de-folliclizing of the design community, and they gifted us with Alternate Layouts. Many of us without aspirations of publishing the next big rival to Vogue or National Geographic paid little attention to the addition back in InDesign

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CS6, and we went on, blissfully unaware of the production time we could be saving in our ever-so-slightly less lofty publications.

Alternate Layouts for the Rest of Us I first started poking around with Alternate Layouts during a print production job where I had several different layouts that shared common text. I was curious to see if I could save some time. And did I ever! I now use Alternate Layouts in many different print-only jobs, as well as in those jobs that will produce a printed piece and a digital version. Gone are the days of me waiting as long as possible to split the document into print and digital documents, all the while praying to Vicissituda—the Goddess

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Feature: Alternate Layouts

of Eternal Edits—that the client was done making changes. The modern miracle (OK, I may be overselling it just a bit) that is Alternate Layouts makes it possible to have ads of varying sizes in one document. You can have posters, postcards, flyers, and full-page ads in one file and maintain consistent changes across all the pieces (Figure 1). Even a novel bound for print and EPUB can live side by side in the same document. Now that I’ve got your attention, I have to warn you that working with Alternate Layouts takes a little planning and a healthy dose of patience, but—in my experience, at least—the extra effort pays for itself time and time again.

like Sherlock and Mycroft Holmes: One is smarter, but the other has his name all over the books. I’m not going to go into deep

detail on LPRs in this article, but you can check out my series of articles on them at CreativePro.com.

Figure 1: The same content, served three ways, courtesy of Alternate Layouts. Notice the swappedout image of the elephants, which fits better in the wide layout.

It All Starts with Liquid Page Rules Liquid Page Rules—which I will lazily abbreviate as LPRs—are the less famous, yet equally talented, sibling to alternate layouts. In fact, they are actually the brains behind the operation. It’s kind of

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Feature: Alternate Layouts

What I will tell you here is that you have one rule to govern each page, so you’ll need to look at each page and decide what rule will give you the best results. The rules are applied either to a whole page, or individual objects, depending on the rule chosen (Figure 2). They tell InDesign what to do with the items in the new layout, and sometimes the best way to figure out which one you need is simply to experiment.

Creating Alternate Layouts After you’ve applied all the proper rules to pages and items, you need to decide if you’re at the right point in your workflow to jump in and make new layouts. It’s usually a good idea to wait until your existing layout is fairly well along in its editorial journey. While making editorial changes to existing text is easy—and one of the great advantages to using Alternate Layouts—adding new text frames and other elements after creating new layouts

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Figure 2: The size and position of this object in an alternate layout will be determined by the Object-based rule (chosen in the Liquid Layout panel).

can add a significant amount of work to the production process, as we’ll see later. So for the sake of our example, let’s assume you know there will be only “slight changes” from this point—said every client ever—then you’re ready to actually create a new alternate layout. From the Pages panel menu, choose Create Alternate Layout. The resulting dialog box presents us with several options (Figure 3). The top section asks you to create a name for the new layout. It automatically assumes

Figure 3: The Create Alternate Layout dialog box.

you want to create a layout with the same measurements as the original, but in the opposite orientation (going from landscape to portrait or vice versa). You can change the name of the new layout to whatever you want. In fact, you can change the name of the original layout here, too. Indicate size and orientation for the new layout; then you’re ready to move to the second part of the dialog box.

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Feature: Alternate Layouts

In this section, you need to tell it how to handle objects on the page when that page gets duplicated in the new layout. Remember, you should have already assigned LPRs to the page or to individual page elements. Here you can decide to leave them alone (by selecting Preserve Existing) or make one blanket rule for the entire new layout by choosing a rule from the pull-down menu. For this demo, let’s preserve existing rules and leave all the options below the menu selected. We’ll take a look later at what each option controls, and you can decide if your projects require you to deselect any of them. In the resulting alternate layout, if you set up your LPRs well, you have a decent second (or third or fourth) version of the original layout (Figure 4). If not, you might need to go back and re-examine how you applied LPRs and make any necessary changes. One thing you can do to avoid the “Wow! That’s so not what I thought it

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Figure 4: Multiple layouts, differing in size and orientation, in the same document.

was going to look like!” exclamation is to employ the Page tool before generating the new layout. So, step backwards in time with me to a point just before you made your alternate layout. Select the Page tool from the Toolbox (Shift+P), and you can see that your page now has eight rectangular handles around it. If you drag any of them in or out, your page size changes and objects move—or don’t—around the page. This shows you what will happen when you create a new layout (Figure 5, next page). If eyeballing this feels too haphazard, feel free to indicate specific new dimensions and orientation in the Control panel, which displays these options when the Page tool is selected. One caveat: if you change anything in the Control panel, you are actually changing that page’s layout. I prefer using the less accurate “drag it all around the pasteboard” option, because when I let go, the page snaps right back into its original dimensions!

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Feature: Alternate Layouts

Styling and Editing the New Layouts Assuming the layout rules you chose have resulted in additional layouts you are happy with, you can next start customizing the layouts to suit your purposes. The first thing you’ll notice is that the magic the rules delivered is rarely perfect. You will most likely need to make tweaks to the resulting layout, and this is a good time to do that. Once you’ve done that housekeeping chore, turn your attention to the text and any edits that might need to be made. When you created the new layout, Link Stories was selected by default in the Create Alternate Layout dialog box. This provides you with a link from the text stories in the original layout to their counterparts in the child layouts. You now have an easy way to make sure that edits in the original layout ripple down to all the children with minimal effort on your part. After you make changes to text in the parent layout, take a peek in the Links panel. You’ll see the child

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Figure 5: Use the Page tool to view how your page will be affected when creating a new alternate layout.

text frames are now listed as modified links that you need to update. Just like with a modified graphic, double-click the yellow triangle icon to update those links (Figure 6). Repeat this technique if more text edits are made. When you created your new layouts, you selected Copy Text Styles to New Style Group. That gave you separate paragraph and character style groups for each layout. Your Body Text style in the parent layout

Figure 6: The Links panel displays text frames that have been modified in the parent layout. Double-clicking in the panel updates the text frames in the child layout.

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Feature: Alternate Layouts

spawned a Body Text style in the child layout, and each of those styles can have its own definition (Figure 7). What works well for a headline in your 11 × 17 poster (parent) layout might be too large for the headline on your 8.5 × 11 flyer (child) layout. You can define them each with their own characteristics as needed for each layout, but the story is still linked, so text edits continue to trickle down through all layouts.

Adding Items After Creating New Layouts What if you need to add entirely new text stories to your layouts? There’s a reason it’s a good idea to wait until your layout is as complete as possible before basing new layouts on it: making additions takes a few extra steps. If you want a new item to appear on all layouts, first create and style the item on the original layout. Next, select the Content Collector tool in the toolbox, and click on the item to add it to the Content Conveyor. You can even select multiple items in this way. Switch to the Content Placer tool (press B), and jump to the first child layout that you want to add the item to. At the bottom of the conveyor, choose Create Link and Map Styles; then click to place the items where you want them on the page. These items are now linked in the same fashion as if they were created when the child layout was created. This technique is also handy if you want to add an item only to certain layouts, and still retain the ease of editing in one frame and having all matching frames update. Use the Content Collector and Content Placer tools to add linked items between layouts after the initial new layout creation.

Figure 7: Choosing Copy Text Styles to New Style Group results in separate groups of styles that you can define differently in each layout.

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Feature: Alternate Layouts

Maintaining image edits is just as easy as the text edits you’ve made. In fact, there’s really nothing special about maintaining image links in a document with alternate layouts compared to doing the same in a single layout document. All of the images placed into your file now show in the Links panel as having multiple instances (Figure 8). The Links panel also helpfully organizes these multiple

instances into folders. What this gives you is an easy way to update the images across the multiple layouts, or to have different images in the individual layouts. To update an image across all layouts, select the folder for that image in the Links panel. From the panel menu, choose Relink All Instances of [filename]. If you want different images in each layout, click the disclosure triangle to reveal the individual links, choose the one you want to update, and choose Relink from the panel menu.

Preflighting

Figure 8: The Links panel displays all the instances of images in the entire document. Update and relink images individually, or for all instances.

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I previously mentioned that one huge advantage to using Alternate Layouts in your InDesign file was that you could maintain one document destined for different outcomes. One of the best ways to make sure you’re always headed down the right path is to take advantage of Live Preflight. With this option enabled (Window > Output > Preflight), you can make sure each layout is optimized for its

destination, whether that’s the web, a tablet, print, or an EPUB reader. Live Preflight allows you to check your files by layout, meaning that you can have a specific set of parameters for the pages going to print and another set for those going to an EPUB. If you haven’t done so already, you’ll need to set up preflight profiles for each of your layouts (see Kirsten Rourke’s article in Issue 61 for the details of creating custom preflight profiles). If your file contains a layout for print and a layout for PDF export that will be read on a device such as an iPad, make sure you have preflight profiles for each particular output. For instance, the print profile might flag images with less than 225 ppi effective resolution, while the PDF-to-iPad profile would flag spot colors. In the Preflight panel, select the profile you wish to use, and then click the radio button at the bottom right (by default it displays the words “All Pages”) and use the pull-down menu to choose a layout (Figure 9, next page). Any

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Feature: Alternate Layouts

items that fall outside of your given criteria will be flagged as an error. Click on the troublesome item, and check the Info pane for a description of each problem and a helpful fix. After fixing any issues, choose the PDF for iPad profile in the Preflight panel, choose the appropriate layout in the Pages pull-down menu, and fix any problems you encounter.

Printing and Exporting Printing from a file with multiple layouts is super easy and allows you to use individual presets for each layout. From the Print dialog box, make your way down the General pane to the Page Range field. Use the pull-down menu to choose an individual layout. This gives you the flexibility to send your 8.5 × 11 flyer to the office inkjet but the oversized poster layout to the wide format printer. Each output will be optimized for the specific output device and can take advantage of the capabilities of each printer.

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Figure 9: Use the Preflight panel controls to choose a profile and a layout to check.

If you just want to print specific pages, without regard to which layout they live in, you can do so. By default, InDesign is set to use section numbering, but you can

change that in your General preferences to be absolute numbering. With section numbering chosen, printing specific pages means you’ll have to indicate the actual page names, which might be as cumbersome as “Letter Wide V:1-Letter Tall H:3.” No fun. Luckily, even with section numbering turned on, you can employ absolute numbering on the fly while printing. To choose the range covering the third actual page in the document to the eighth page in the document (which may or may not span different layouts), simply enter “+3-+8” in the Page Range field. Exporting to PDFs works in pretty much the same manner. Choosing page ranges or exporting by layout works the same, and you can choose a different PDF preset for each layout you need to export. Now, what about that example of having a print version of a book in the same document as one destined for EPUB? Again, a little bit of work ahead of time makes this

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possible. You can export the print layout to PDF as described above, using the proper PDF preset. The tricky part comes when you want to export to EPUB. By default, exporting to EPUB sends everything in the InDesign document to the resulting EPUB. The solution is to use the Articles panel to control what gets exported to EPUB. By only putting items from the EPUB layout into the Articles panel—and choosing Same As Articles in the EPUB export dialog box—you can be sure nothing from the print layout hitches a ride to the EPUB file.

More Fun with Alternate Layouts

»» Setting a maximum column size in Text Frame Options will force new columns to be added in layouts where that text frame becomes wider. This will keep your layout from having awkwardly wide, hard-toread columns (Figure 10). »» When creating an alternate layout, you have the option of using Smart Text Reflow, which will add pages to accommodate any overflow text in the new layout. However, Smart Text Reflow works only if you already have at least two

linked text threads, or if you employ the Primary Text Frame. »» You don’t have to duplicate every page from the parent layout when creating a child layout. In the Create Alternate Layout dialog box, indicate which source pages to duplicate. By default, InDesign wants to pull from the entire layout. Choose a single page or page range (using section or absolute numbering), and indicate those pages in the Source Pages field. If you duplicate only page 3 in

Figure 10: Setting up Text Frame Options, such as a maximum column width, allows text frames to fit the new layout more easily.

Use these extra tips to get the most out of your alternate layouts. »» Use the Span/Split Columns feature to control how lists will appear in subsequent layouts. Remember to preview the results with the Page tool, applying different Liquid Layout rules.

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sp sig ace i n u s lim p t it od ed ay !

Feature: Alternate Layouts

your parent layout, it becomes page 1 in the child layout, which can be confusing. To overcome this, simply change the page numbering in the Pages panel (as long as you’re not using auto-numbering). »» Liquid Page Rules aren’t just for Alternate Layouts! If you set up LPRs on your page or page items, then change the size of the layout, the rules go to work and make the necessary changes for you. I have InDesign template files for a set of ads that I have to size to fit multiple publications—in both landscape and portrait orientations—with the rules already diligently applied. When I need a wide ad, I open the wide template, change the document size and PRESTO!! Finished ad, ready to export to PDF!

I hope that this look at Alternate Layouts has your production wheels spinning and you’ll be able to see ways in which they can streamline your workflow. I don’t want to say I’m lazy—that’s what friends are for—but I love any tool that keeps me from having to perform the same task over and over and is willing to do the work for me.

n Erica Gamet is a speaker, writer, and trainer, focusing on Adobe InDesign and Illustrator, Apple Keynote and iBooks Author, and other production-related topics. With over 25 years’ experience in the graphics industry, she is a regular contributor to CreativePro.com. After living as a nomad, she recently put down roots in El Paso, Texas, where she hikes and bikes every chance she gets.

The Essential Events for Designers, Publishers, and Creative Professionals

DENVER November 16–18, 2015 InDesignConference.com • PSDcon.com

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By Sandee Cohen

InQuestion

InQuestion is a regular column devoted to answering your questions about working with InDesign. Mysterious indent in text frame Q. There’s something wrong with one of my text frames. The first line is slightly indented when it should align with the rest of the paragraph. I’ve checked and double-checked, but the first-line indent is set to 0. And I’ve looked all over and there is no text wrap object or anchored object or anything that might cause the indent. I’ve taken a screenshot of the frame to show the problem.

A. I got stung by this one a few weeks ago, so I feel your pain. It’s not the settings for the text, it’s the ones for the frame. You’ve applied a rounded corner and an inset to the frame (Figure 1). That’s good. But you haven’t made the text frame inset large enough to avoid a problem. Select the problem frame, and zoom in on the indented first line. You’ll see that the first line is ever so slightly pushed over to the right. But then look even closer.

Lyman Frank Baum (May 15, 1856 – May 6, 1919) was an American author of children’s books, best known for writing The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. He wrote thirteen novel sequels, nine other fantasy novels, and a host of other works.

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Figure 1: It’s very slight, but the first line of text is indented from the rest of the paragraph.

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InQuestion: Send Sandee Your Queries

Notice that the frame has a roundedcorner effect applied. It’s that corner effect that is the culprit. There is a text inset applied to the frame that also has a rounded-corner applied to it. In fact, you can actually see a rounded corner applied to the text inset (Figure 2). No wonder the first line has an indent! The tiny rounded corner is forcing the first line of text to indent.

Figure 2: An extreme closeup on the first line of text shows the problem indent.

The reason this happened is that the size of the rounded corner is larger than the size

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of the text inset. Even a difference of a single point can cause the text to be pushed in. The best way to avoid the indent is to make the size of the text inset at least the same size as the rounded corner. With the object selected, go to Object > Corner Options. Note the size of the corner effect (Figure 3). Click OK. Go to Object > Text Frame Options and click the General tab. Set the Inset Spacing to the same amount as the Corner option (Figure 4). As long as the size of the text inset is at least the same as the size of the rounded corner, your text will align correctly. Where is the text wrap coming from? Q. I’ve got an image grouped with a caption. The text on the page is jumping to the next column around the group. But I can’t find anything with a text wrap applied. It’s not applied to the group; it’s not applied to the image frame; it’s not applied to the caption frame.

It’s got to be coming from a text wrap somewhere, because when I choose Ignore Text Wrap in the Text Frame Options dialog box, all the text flies behind the group. But where could it be? A. Congratulations, you knew enough to recognize that a group can have a text wrap

Figure 3: In order to fix the indent, check the size of the corner effect applied to the frame.

Figure 4: When the Inset Spacing is smaller than the corner effect, there is only one inset field available. Increase it to fix the text indent.

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InQuestion: Send Sandee Your Queries

or the individual elements in a group can have their own text wrap settings. What you didn’t look for is text wrap applied to the graphic inside the frame. That’s what’s happened here. Click with the Selection tool on the Content Grabber (donut hole) for the image. That selects the graphic that is inside the frame (Figure 5). Now look at the Text Wrap panel. Ta-dah! You’ve found the source of

the text wrap. You’ll also see the path that defines the text wrap. What can be very confusing about this type of text wrap is if the image has been cropped by the frame. In that case, the text wrap will extend way beyond the boundaries of the image frame. How did this happen? Most likely you didn’t realize you had selected the image when you applied the text wrap. Relink to a different format? Q. Our book, with hundreds of graphics, is almost done, and we just found out that the print shop doesn’t want images in the PNG format. That’s all we have! I was able to create an action in Photoshop to batch process converting the PNG files into TIFF images. But is there a way to replace hundreds of PNG files with their TIFF versions?

Figure 5: Use the Content Grabber to select a placed image to change the text wrap that has been applied to the image, not the frame.

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A. I’ve been tripped up by that one myself in the past, when I worked with freelancers

who saved graphics in PNG format when my publisher’s print shop wanted TIFF images. (Although from what I can gather, there is absolutely nothing wrong with using PNG images for print work.) Start by putting all the converted images in the same folder as the originals. Next, select all the images in the Links panel that you want to change. Then choose Relink File Extension. A dialog box appears which explains just what I’ve written here. Type in the extension of the new file, (in your case, TIFF). Then click OK. Whoops! You may get an error message saying that InDesign couldn’t find any files with the extension that you specified. That’s happened to me when the batch processed files I got from Photoshop were “tif” images, but I typed in “tiff” (note the double f ) in the Relink File Extension dialog box. So be careful with files, such as TIFF and JPEG, that can have different extensions.

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InQuestion: Send Sandee Your Queries

Deleting a master page item from the document page Q. I inherited a document from a co-worker who was laid off abruptly. He must have known something was about to happen, because the opening page of the file he was working on has a nasty note in a text frame.

I tried to delete the frame, but I couldn’t select it. I checked, and it wasn’t locked. I tried Command+Shift+click (Mac) or Ctrl+Shift+click (Windows) and still couldn’t get rid of it. Finally I found it on the master page and was able to delete it. But how come the keystroke to release an item from the master didn’t work?

Figure 6: Deselect Allow Master Items Overrides on Selection to add an extra degree of protection to ensure that a master page item will not be accidentally altered on a document page.

A. Ha! That guy knows the ins and outs of InDesign. He found the command that prevents a master page item from being overridden on a document page. Start by selecting the item on the master page. Go to the Pages panel menu, and deselect Master Pages > Allow Master Items Overrides on Selection (Figure 6). This adds another layer of protection to guard against the items inadvertently being selected and moved on the page. The keystroke command won’t release the object, nor will the Pages panel menu command Override All Master Page Items. This setting should be applied to items such as background colors or page numbers that must never-ever-ever be moved or disturbed.

n Sandee Cohen is the author of the InDesign CC 2014 Visual QuickStart Guide as well as the co-author, with Diane Burns, of the new book Digital Publishing with Adobe InDesign CC.

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By Rudi Warttmann

MathTools V2: Bringing Together InDesign CC, Mathematical Typesetting, and MathML Numerators, Radicands, and Derivatives, Oh My!

MathTools V2 movemen GmbH http://www.movemen.com 189€ Mac and Windows, InDesign CS6–CC 2014 Rating:

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Mathematical typesetting has been a very special discipline in the publishing area. To be proficient in this area, you not only need a good knowledge of your standard tool— InDesign—you also need a strong grasp of mathematical knowledge. And you also need a suitable tool to help you rearrange characters, put them on top of each other, align them vertically, draw lines, insert special characters, and of course save all settings for consistent use throughout one or more documents. One of these tools is the InDesign plug-in MathTools V2.

For very simple mathematical typesetting, you can use all the techniques included in InDesign, or even standard glyphs included in your font. Many modern fonts contain glyphs for proper fractions like “one half” or “one third” (Figure 1, next page). You can even find fonts that have more complex math symbols in them. However, when it comes to advanced mathematical typesetting, or typesetting with a high quality of typographic design, you will need special software that shifts or replaces characters so that you’ll get a real

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InReview: MathTools V2

Figure 1: Many fonts include glyphs for certain simple fractions. The Unicode standard contains many proper fractions with denominators of 2 through 10.

mathematical notation. In Figure 2, you’ll see that you can achieve (1) and (2) easily by standard InDesign means, but (3) and (4) only with the aid of a special tool. Two Approaches You can take two different approaches to mathematical typesetting with InDesign: you can generate equations in a graphical editor outside of InDesign and place them as a graphic (Figure 3) or you can use InDesign’s native text editor techniques to shift and/or rearrange characters, maybe to add some special characters, so that they all look like a real mathematical equation (Figure 4).

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Figure 2: Different representations of the same thing: a quarter of something. From left to right, it turns from human-readable into computer-readable. Column (4) shows how the fraction would appear written in the MathML language, which requires a special tool to interpret, just as a web browser is required to interpret HTML.

Figure 3: A placed anchored graphic, typically a WMF or EPS, containing an equation from an external equation editor.

Figure 4: Performing mathematical typesetting solely by the InDesign native text editor: characters are shifted and rearranged, and some special characters are inserted. The light blue characters are visible only when Type > Show Hidden Characters is enabled.

Placing equations as graphical elements presents some issues you need to keep in mind: you need special software to have a chance to edit them afterwards—if that’s even possible; you generally don’t have a

chance to adjust font, font size, color, etc.; you always have to be careful about the proper vertical alignment in relation to the baseline of your text; and you have possibly dozens or even hundreds of placed graphics

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InReview: MathTools V2

that you or your editorial team need to administer, back up, and otherwise tend to. Besides that, you might encounter technical problems like character conversion or quality issues when placing the equations. Given all of that, from a production standpoint I believe that the smarter way to compose and manage the mathematical stuff is by using native InDesign text. And that’s exactly the first challenge that the MathTools V2 plug-in meets. The second challenge is clearly to establish a high level of usability by offering a sophisticated user interface with which everyone can cope. A third challenge—courtesy of the advent of multi-channel digital production— is the capability to import and export mathematical expressions, from widely-used software, like MS Word, to a format that most other applications can understand: MathML. V1 versus V2 The MathTools plug-in has been on the market, in one form or another, since 2003.

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Up until InDesign CS4 was released, it was named InMath. Starting with CS5, it was rebranded as mt.editor, which later became part of MathTools V1. The MathTools V1 package is available up to version CS6, and MathTools V2 is for CS6 and CC. MathTools V1 and V2 are substantially different. V1 was designed to achieve a mathematical notation and to save settings as styles; the intent of V2 was to cover all needs of an automated, MathML-based production, and therefore has a number of functions and options that may look strange at first. MathTools V2 is available in a PRO edition that is likely sufficient for most users and an Enterprise edition that comes with additional workflow capabilities, such as a scripting interface. Important Note: To open InDesign documents containing MathTools V2 equations, you must have, at least, the free MathTools Reader module installed. Otherwise, all mathematical information can get lost and can’t be restored.

How MathTools V2 Organizes Mathematical Expressions MathTools V2 introduced several new modules to perform, simplify, organize, and sometimes automate different functions and produce beautiful and correct equations. Math Templates and MathStyles MathTools V2 puts together each mathematical expression using two kinds of components: content boxes and connecting elements. In a simple fraction, for example, we have two content boxes—the numerator and the denominator—and one connecting element: the fraction bar. Content boxes are components that you can fill with text (including anchored frames); the connecting elements are governed by the plug-in. Each content box is constructed like a character. It has a baseline, an ascender, and a descender. In all MathTools expressions, you can precisely adjust the vertical

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InReview: MathTools V2

alignment of the content box in relation to surrounding elements, for example the baseline of the text around the equation. A complete arrangement of content boxes and connecting elements is called a Math Template. Based on a Math Template, you can define as many MathStyles as you need—it’s exactly the same procedure as when you define paragraph or character styles. MathTools V2 comes with 15 Math Templates, each of them suitable for a wide variety of uses (Figures 5 and 6). MathZones and Math Expressions If you are used to MathTools V1, you should know that due to a completely new data structure and MathML compatibility, MathTools V2 organizes equations and series of equations in a completely new way. There is now a new box called a “MathZone” around the entire mathematical expression. Within a MathZone stand single Math expressions, but also standard text

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Figure 5: Fifteen versatile Math Templates, which you can customize to define as many Math Styles as you need.

(Figure 7). The idea is that the content of one MathZone will be treated as a complete mathematical unit that can contain everything from a single fraction up to a multi-line series of equations. A Math Expression is an arrangement of characters to which you’ve applied a MathStyle, for example a square root including its radicand.

Figure 6: You can adjust each element of each MathStyle very precisely. In this example, the numerator will be scaled to 85% of its original font size, and some offset will be added on both sides.

Figure 7: MathTools V2 shows a light brown rectangle around the complete MathZone. A MathZone can even span multiple lines of text.

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InReview: MathTools V2

Mathematical Typesetting With MathTools V2 So much for telling you about what MathTools V2 does—you’re probably wondering how do actually use it. Is it easy? Time-consuming? Let’s take a closer look. First step: Prepare your InDesign document In order to avoid the well-known warning message regarding missing plug-ins when opening a document, MathTools V2 takes the clever step of remaining completely in the background until you tell InDesign to use it on a document. That way, your InDesign document will initially not contain any specific MathTools information, and everyone will be able to open your InDesign document without the warning message— even without having MathTools installed at all. However, that changes after you “switch on” MathTools for the document. To activate all MathTools-related functions in a new document or in a

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document that hasn’t had contact so far with MathTools V2, choose Math > Enable Math for Current Document (Figure 8). MathTools V2 will then perform a so-called “bootstrap,” meaning that it will add all necessary plug-in information to your InDesign document, as well as a large set of basic MathStyles to your Math Styles panel. In addition to that, the plug-in will create a folder with a number of special character styles for mathematical composition within your Character Styles panel. If you open a legacy InDesign document containing equations made by InMath (up to CS4) or mt.editor (= MathTools V1, up to CS6), you have basically two choices: either you just continue with your V1 equations, leaving the document a “V1 document” where everything behaves as you’re accustomed to; or you convert the document to a “V2 document” by choosing Math > Support > Convert mt.editor V1 doc. With this conversion, V2 will build MathZones around all existing equations.

Figure 8: The very first step to activate all MathTools functions.

However, you still need to reconstruct some types of equations manually if you want to export them as MathML later. At this point, the MathTools Enterprise Edition can help you, with its scripting interface. InDesign documents from CS2 onwards will be opened and converted seamlessly. (Even InDesign CS1 documents open just fine, with very few exceptions.) Second step: Access the Math Styles panel To open the Math Styles panel, choose Window > Styles > Math Styles. With the bootstrap, MathTools V2 has added a large number of MathStyles, properly organized in style groups, with which you can immediately start working. This is one thing

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InReview: MathTools V2

I like very much—you have one MathStyle for virtually any mathematical expressions at hand. Just click the small triangle at the left in order to open or close a style group. In the Math Styles panel menu, you can find all familiar menu items like New, Duplicate, or Load MathStyles. The option to export Math Styles settings in order to import them on a different computer is especially helpful (Figure 9). Third step: Type a math expression and apply a MathStyle Working with MathStyles is pretty similar to working with character styles: you can enter text following a specific syntax, select this text, and apply a MathStyle on the selected text. An example: if you enter 1/23, select these four characters, and apply the MathStyle “Fraction (Stacked)” to the selection, InDesign will show the fraction “one twenty-third.” You can also nest MathStyles in any order, as shown in Figure 10.

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Figure 9: The Math Styles panel menu contains all functions that you know already from the Paragraph or Character Styles panel menu.

Figure 10: Step by step, you can nest MathStyles and compose complex mathematical expressions.

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InReview: MathTools V2

Fourth step (if necessary): Edit your mathematical expression directly in InDesign With MathTools V2, you can edit any of your mathematical expressions at any time, just like you edit standard InDesign text. Just place the cursor into the mathematical expression. You will see that MathTools V2 automatically switches from the Text tool to a new tool in your Tools panel, which looks like a capital M (as in “Mathematics,” of course). This new tool makes sure that you’ll get various pieces of optical feedback while editing a mathematical expression: the complete MathZone is surrounded with a light brown rectangle, the baselines are indicated, and a vertical thin red line indicates the current cursor position. MathTools V2 also exactly surrounds, with a dashed rectangle, the content box in which the cursor is active (Figure 11). All these markers make it fairly easy to make any changes within a mathematical expression.

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Figure 11: Don’t get scared off by the many additional optical elements. Green shows the surrounding baseline and your current mouse position. Red shows the subexpression’s baseline and the current cursor position. If you type, say, b in this situation, an additional b will be added in front of the first b in the numerator.

Special functions—new in MathTools V2 Due to the commitment to MathML, MathTools V2 offers a number of templates that were not included in earlier versions. These include, for example, arrows with text above and horizontal curly braces (“underbrace” and “overbrace”), as shown in Figure 12. Large brackets and parentheses are now composed of multiple characters, so the appropriate characters don’t need to be stretched in a way that they look ugly. For this technique, though, MathTools V2 needs a special set of mathematical fonts called STIX fonts. These fonts are available for download from the STIX fonts project

Figure 12: A single MathZone containing a superscript expression and an underbrace expression. You won’t need additional anchored text frames with stretched curly braces or other fancy techniques for expressions of this kind any more.

website. Yes, the fonts are Open Source, and you may use them in any project for free. The Subscripts/Superscripts template section has been significantly extended and contains additional templates, one of them for so-called “overscripts.” Using this template, you can easily place a bullet point, a caret character, or other characters above other characters. A typical application is the depiction of derivations in physics (Figure 13, next page). Two-dimensional expressions Another brand-new functionality has been added to MathTools V2 which allows you to

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InReview: MathTools V2

compose and manage real two-dimensional expressions. Expressions of this kind usually occur in higher mathematics, for example as matrices or determinants. Up to V1, you needed to arrange multiple stacks side by side in order to put together these expressions; now you can compose the complete matrix or determinant using one single Math Style (Figure 14). Limits and issues Note that while you can use many different fonts for mathematical typesetting, there are some fonts that will not work—not for optical, but for technical reasons. Generally, the problem results from the nonbreaking space (fixed width) character, which doesn’t have the expected properties, especially not the expected width, or it results from different widths of figures. One prominent font with the space-character issue is the Google font Noto Sans (Figure 15). Another limitation of MathTools V2 involves placing equation numbers. In

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Figure 13: With MathTools V2, you can easily stack any characters to depict specific formulae.

Figure 15: Mathematical expressions can be misaligned if the nonbreaking space character of the particular font does not have the expected width.

Figure 14: On the right, a typical determinant which you can now compose as one single expression using a standard Math Style, fencing it with vertical bars using another Math Style.

Figure 16: A mathematical expression with empty content boxes, illustrated by gray rectangular placeholders. You can then fill in the frames, tabbing from one to the next.

academic text, you often need to number equations at the right edge of the line. Unfortunately, InDesign can place an automatic number only at the very beginning of a paragraph. MathTools doesn’t include a function to number equations, either. When your mathematical expressions become very complex—say, for example, in vector algebra or in probability

calculations—you might find it easier to compose them using a graphical interface. However, MathTools offers various ways to mimic this kind of interface, including the possibility to enter expressions with empty boxes in which you can add content later. You can hold down the Alt/Option key and click on a MathStyle in order to insert an expression with empty content boxes which you can fill one by one (Figure 16).

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The Tab key brings you from one box to the next. Using this technique, you don’t need to memorize and enter any specific mathematical syntax. This function is definitely one of my favourites!

Equation Import from MS Word Probably the most frequently requested function up to MathTools V1 was seamless equation import from MS Word documents.

Now, with V2, you can start writing your manuscript in MS Word using Equation Editor or—if you need the full variety of mathematical expressions—MathType (Lite). Afterwards, you can place the MS Word document into InDesign as usual. MathTools V2 will automatically jump in and convert the MathType equations into MathZones (Figures 17 and 18). However, there are two situations where you should instead open your MS Word

documents with a full version of the current MathType 6 and convert all equations to real MathType equation objects prior to placing them into InDesign: first, if you want to place older MS Word documents containing equations from former MathType versions (5 or earlier); second, if you’ve composed your equations with MS Word 2007 or later with the standard Equation Editor as OMML equations. The best starting point is in fact an MS Word document where all equations

Figure 17: Text in MS Word. The equations have been composed with the full version of MathType 6. Figure 18: The placed text in InDesign. MathTools V2 fully automatically converted the MathType equations to MathZones, applying appropriate MathStyles and character styles.

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InReview: MathTools V2

have been composed with the full version of MathType or with MathType Lite. (MathType Lite is simply a non-licensed version of MathType, and therefore having a slightly reduced functional range.) Please keep in mind that MathType isn’t based on Unicode yet (this is announced for the next major release—version 7) and that you therefore may have to face character-conversion issues. One prominent example is the character Δ, which stands for delta, or a difference; in many scenarios, InDesign will show you the famous pink rectangle instead of the expected character because of this Unicode font problem. Also, there are still some minor conversion issues if you use MS Word on a Mac. At the end of the day, you can assume that, in general, equations in MS Word documents can be correctly converted, but that there still remain exceptions where this is not possible due to technical issues or incompatibilities.

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How MathTools V2 Integrates MathML As I mentioned earlier, MathTools V2 has been specifically designed to support MathML. Hence, each equation can be exported and imported as MathML code, so every other application that understands MathML can receive and further work with your equations composed in InDesign. For the MathML encoding, MathTools V2 uses the so-called “presentation markup,” which means that the focus is clearly on depicting or typesetting equations. It is not designed to export or exchange equations, for example with calculus software, to have expressions actually evaluated or solved. Transfer single mathematical expressions as MathML It’s easy to export a single expression as MathML and view it in, say, a web browser. A right-click on a MathZone shows an extended contextual menu: at the very

bottom, MathTools V2 added a couple of menu items related to the MathZone. Choose Math > Copy as MathML (Figure 19). Now you can open, for example, a standard text editor (not MS Word), paste the MathML code, add <html><body> before and </body></html> after the pasted code, save the file as plain text with an .html extension, and, finally open the file in Safari or Firefox, as shown

Figure 19: The contextual menu offers a large variety of functions related to this specific MathZone. Of course, you can assign an individual keyboard shortcut to frequently used menu items.

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in Figure 20. (Note that Chrome does not currently support MathML. Check caniuse.com for details of support for MathML in other browsers). XML export with MathML MathTools V2 enhances the standard XML export and import by automatic MathML conversion. You can perform an XML export or import just as usual, and MathTools V2 will fully automatically encode or decode contained equations. You can see an illustrative example in Figures 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;23. The MathML conversions work seamlessly and reliably. Having complemented InDesign with MathTools V2, you have what

Figure 20: You can transfer any of your equations directly from InDesign to the web using MathML. The equation is not a graphic, but rendered by Firefox from the MathML code.

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Figure 21: After having tagged the story, you can choose Export XML as usual.

you need to be a part of any XML-based workflow. MathTools V2 is therefore the tool of choice, not only if you need to import MathType equations coming from MS Word, but also if you need to convert equations of any kind from and to MathML (presentation markup). Plus, MathTools V2 integrates seamlessly into the standard EPUB export as well as into Adobe DPS folios.

Figure 22: The resulting XML code. MathTools V2 has automatically converted the equation into MathML code. This is clearly meant to be read by a computer and therefore not really pretty (unless you love XML).

Support and Training Resources The sophisticated composing and editing functions in MathTools V2 make it fairly easy to produce even complicated mathematical expressions. Only a few feature requests remain, for example the possibility to assign individual keyboard shortcuts to MathStyles.

Figure 23: After re-importing the XML file into a new InDesign document, MathTools V2 imported all math-related XML tags and composed the equation automatically.

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The Math Type import as well as the MathML conversion capabilities make it possible to be a part of nearly any automated workflow with InDesign. MathTools V2 can also be used in combination with editorial systems like vjoon’s K4. Curiously, there is no installer for MathTools V2. Instead, you need to download, decompress, and copy a folder hierarchy into your InDesign or InCopy program folder—which might require administrator rights. After this, you need to generate a license report and email this report to the developers at movemen. In turn, you’ll receive a license file, which you have to copy into the plug-in folder. Unfortunately, MathTools V2 doesn’t follow the InDesign / InCopy licensing model (one machine plus one machine as a backup), but binds the license to one specific computer. However, you can transfer your license onto another computer on request.

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Unfortunately there is no elaborate user’s guide available. The only thing you can find is a number of partly incomplete FAQs on the developer’s website. So if you are completely new to MathTools V2, you will definitely need hands-on training in order to get over the first hurdles and understand the plug-in’s functionality. There seem to be no instructional videos or other resources available, either. MathTools V2 is available as a perpetual license for CS6 and costs 589 Euro (about US$618). For CC users, MathTools V2 is available as a yearly subscription at 189 Euro (about US$200) per year. MathTools Enterprise Edition is at 1,049 Euro (about US$1,112) for CS6, or at 599 Euro (about US$635) per year for CC. The plug-in is available from the developer’s shop at www.movemen.com. A 14-day demo version is available on request. I gave MathTools V2 my official-butpersonal InDesign Magazine rating of four

out of five butterflies; to be more specific, I give it a technical rating of ten stars, usability 8, and 4 for the documentation and manual which are available at the moment. I really like this product, and I think you will too.

n Rudi Warttmann M.Sc., Adobe Certified Instructor, is a professional typesetter and holds a Masters degree in Technical Communication. He offers consulting and handson user training in mathematical typesetting and database publishing with InDesign/InCopy worldwide. He has run his company topset since 1992. Editor’s note: Rudi was involved with the development of InMath, but he has no financial bias or connection with MathTools now.

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By Erica Gamet

InFocus

With the help of these nifty tools, you can bring your creativity and productivity into full bloom.

After spending much of this spring exploring public gardens and botanic trails in my new town, I continue to marvel at how much variety there is. I am still taken aback by the beauty and diversity that exists, even among something like cacti. I tend to spend my visits saying, “That’s my favorite!” only to exclaim the same thing again three feet down the path. I sometimes feel that same way with all the options we have when adding tools to our creative toolshed. In this month’s InFocus, I hope to introduce you to some new blossoms and help you cultivate your InDesign garden so it becomes a place of creative, expressive growth.

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Rename Styles with a Script One of the highlights of PePcon 2014’s Creative Wow! portion of the conference was the scripting challenge. The event was a friendly little competition for scripters and developers, in which attendees would come up with needed scripts, rank the submissions, and then give the developers a few hours to write and deliver the finished piece. One of the winning scripts was Rename Styles, from the fertile mind of Peter Kahrel. This free script cleans up style names, whether those styles are paragraph, character, text, cell, or object styles, and

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makes them HTML- and CSS-friendly. The script replaces spaces with underscores, removes diacritics (there goes my Anne-Marie Concepción tribute style), and converts all names to lowercase (Figure 1). Conflicts are handled by the addition of suffixes to the style name. Styles named “Captions” and “captions” (since each would first be converted to “captions”) would become “captions” and “captions_01” in the resulting HTML and CSS. The appended files could certainly get a little confusing, so trimming down and streamlining style names before export would still be a wise move.

Figure 1: The Rename Styles script strips out all special characters from style names.

AnyFont Any creative pro who does professional work using a mobile device knows how frustrating it is to be limited by the selection of fonts on

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that device. With more and more apps that work across the mobile and desktop platforms, it’s annoying to have to stop the workflow because of an unavailable font. That’s where the handy AnyFont app for iPad and iPhone comes in. This little gem gives you the ability to load any font (as its name suggests) on your device. Well, any font in TrueType or OpenType format and that you have permission to use, of course. For a mere $1.99, and a little voodoo, you can now use Comic Sans in Word for iPad (but please don’t) or load up that custom handwriting font and use it in your Keynote presentation. This app takes advantage of configuration profiles, available in iOS 7 and later. While you’re still stuck with the system font for sending email, you can use your added fonts in any app that allows font selection and changing. You’ll have to send the fonts to your iPad via iTunes, Dropbox, email, or a similar route, and then add the fonts in the AnyFont app. Preview the font if you want, and then select a font to install (Figure 2, next page). The app takes a side trip to Safari, then jumps to the profile in the devices settings. Tap “install” (you may have to tap through several screens, approving each) and eventually you will be sent back to AnyFont, where your newly installed font will show in the “Already Installed Fonts” section (Figure 3, next page). AnyFont offers an in-app purchase of a 1,000-font bundle for a paltry 99 cents. The app also lets you view all fonts loaded on the

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device, regardless of how they ended up there. To remove a font— you can only remove user-added ones—you’ll have to manually remove the configuration profile from within the device’s settings, and not in the AnyFont app.

Comic Parchment

Figure 2: Previewing a font in AnyFont before loading it onto the iPad.

Figure 3: Looking at all installed iPad fonts, including user-added ones.

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We all knew this would happen at some point—that two typefaces we love to hate would end up finding solace from our bullying and turn to each other for support. Well, now look what a monster we’ve created: the Comic Parchment typeface. This typographic lovechild of two loathed creatures is a mash-up of Comic Sans and Papyrus (Figure 4). Why not call it Comic Papyrus, then? Ben Harman, the type’s designer, did name it that originally, but let’s just say the legal whims of type foundries are ever-vigilant and won’t stand for such shenanigans.

Figure 4: Comic Parchment combines the best qualities of two oft-maligned typefaces.

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Legal dealings aside, this typeface is a loving nod to two faces that designers tease mercilessly. And to combine the whimsical hand-written look of Comic Sans, while lovingly applying the rich ancient texture of Papyrus, that’s pure typographical genius! See? We hate each of these typefaces separately, but together they shout irony from the rooftops! The typeface is available from Creative Market for a mere $5 and is available only in TrueType format. I predict that Comic Parchment will be the next “gotta have it” typeface that all the cool kids will be using. Just you wait.

TomaxxiPLACE

Figure 5: TomaxxiPLACE lets you choose and apply object styles when placing images.

If you’ve ever taken the time to lovingly craft object styles in your InDesign file, you know the disappointment of placing an image and having InDesign ignore your request to style that object’s frame on place. It’s one of those annoying little habits that we have just learned to live with. Lucky for us, Marijan Tompa—known by his scripting superhero name Tomaxxi—doesn’t think we should take such abuse from our favorite software, and has created a free tool to overcome this limitation. TomaxxiPLACE is a nifty little extension that allows you to place an image—or many images—and assign an object style on the fly (Figure 5). If you’re like me, you haven’t set up image frames and styled them ahead of time, but prefer to work more freeform, placing images as you see fit in the moment. After installing

TomaxxiPLACE, there is an addition to the Object Styles panel that lets you enable or disable the extension. Enabling it allows you to load up multiple images and choose a style for each image before placing on the page. When you’re ready to go back to having images placed into frames sans fill and stroke, simply disable TomaxxiPLACE from the panel menu.

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Battery Chargers Conference season is in full swing, and these days we are all lugging more and more tech along with us to workshops, seminars, and conference sessions. Many conference spaces haven’t kept up with the demand, so we spend our learning time huddled around the two available outlets at the back of the room, jockeying for prime

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charging position. Smart attendees come with fully-charged devices and a backup power source to keep their tech juiced throughout the day. I realize I just advocated carrying even more tech in your pack. But the trick is to find a charger that provides the power you need, without adding too much excess weight, and delivering that for a price that fits your budget. There is a wide range of options for chargers, but for a conference-goer, portability is of prime importance. One of the most important things to look for in a charger is the number of USB ports, because you could have a phone, a tablet, and a stylus all in need of charging at the same time. Also, knowing how many device charges you can get off one full charger juice-up will give you an idea of how often you can be completely untethered from the wall. Bigger isn’t always better, and lighter weight doesn’t mean the device is a charging lightweight. Some of the best-reviewed and recommended chargers include AmazonBasics’ line of portable chargers and the Anker® 2nd Gen Astro 6400mAh (Figure 6). The AmazonBasics 10,000 mAh charger features two USB ports, auto-off in case of overload, and allows for multiple charges of devices. The Anker® 2nd Gen Astro 6400mAh is super small (about the size of a small stack of business cards), charges one device at a time, and can detect what type of device you’re charging and adjust charging accordingly. If you want to go even smaller, you might check out the new TravelCard charger

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(Figure 7). The size of a credit card, this mini device-dependent charger easily slips into your wallet, promises extra hours of talk time, and is rechargeable via computer USB port.

Figure 6: The AmazonBasics 10,000 mAh charger (left) lets you charge two devices at once. The Anker 2nd Gen Astro 6400 mAh (right) offers a small lightweight charging solution.

Figure 7: The TravelCard charger slips easily into a wallet or pocket for quick phone recharging.

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InFocus

Search in Styles If you use paragraph styles in InDesign (which of course you do, right?!) you know that keeping track of all the attributes and cascading styles can get overwhelming at times. Style groups are a great way to organize styles, but they don’t let you see exactly what each style is made of. As luck would have it, there’s a script for that! The folks over at Id-Extras have created the Search in Styles script that elevates paragraph style management to an art form. For a reasonable $49, it packs a wallop by letting you change style attributes, as well as style names, in bulk without having to go into each individual style definition (Figure 8). The Search in Styles script is launched from the Scripts panel and works in tandem with the Find/Change dialog box. To find every style that is formatted with 10 pt type over 12 pt leading, for example, simply put that criterion into the Find Format field within the Find/Change dialog’s Text search. Jump back into the Search in Styles dialog box to update the list of styles that fit that criterion. You can then pick and choose which styles to update— or simply choose to update all at this point—and those styles will be redefined and reapplied throughout your document. You can also rename styles using the script. Using a little GREP (still within the Text tab) you can find all style names fitting a specific pattern and make style name changes across the board or individually. You can even combine the two functions and have it look for all styles

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with the word “header” in the name and change the styling to bold, for example.

Figure 8: The Search in Styles script can find and bulk modify style names and attributes.

Infographic Designers’ Sketchbooks In recent years, our collective attention spans have shriveled to the point where we expect to have our info served up in an endless stream of terse tweets, sound bites, and Instagram photos. Even when it comes to more serious or broad-reaching information, we want it delivered concisely and (if it’s not too much trouble, please,

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sir) beautifully designed and presented. I think that’s part of the appeal of infographics. I am certainly capable of wading through pages of white papers on a topic, or skimming through a longwinded Wikipedia entry, but I definitely prefer the crisp, colorful, icon-heavy presentation of an infographic to explain a topic. And while I love to view them, I’m not that great at creating them. I recently discovered the book that should help with that: Infographic Designers’ Sketchbooks by Steven Heller and Rick Landers (Figure 9). In its 350+ pages, the book covers the creative process that is involved in creating data visualization, and showcases the final products. The authors highlight the steps taken by the likes of Massimo Vignelli, Deborah Adler, and others as they work raw data into comprehensive visual understandings of that data. The book allows the reader a glimpse into private sketches, doodles, Figure 9: Infographics Designers’ and notebooks of the designers working Sketchbooks in this field. If you want to hone your infographic-making skills, or if you’re like me and just have an all-consuming interest in infographics, be sure to check out this “behind-the-scenes” source of inspiration.

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Pantone Stationery I firmly believe that we designers can never have too many Pantonethemed items. As someone who cut her graphics teeth in the dusty prepress room of a print shop, I am not afraid to admit that nostalgia fuels my love of Pantone colors. I’ve recently taken to writing thankyou cards to my friends, family, and clients—the old-fashioned way! Now I can combine my love of Pantone and my newfound habit for sending thanks via the post with Pantone-inspired stationery. The Pantone Postcard box delivers 100 notecards, each in a different Pantone hue. Set to mimic the classic chip sample, the color field on the design side takes up most of the 4.5 × 6.5" cards, with the Pantone name and color designation finishing the look. If you’ve got more to say—or prefer more privacy than a postcard Figure 10: The Pantone Stationery Set comes with 16 sheets and envelopes allows—maybe the Pantone and Pantone swatch stickers. Stationery Set is more your style (Figure 10). Each set comes with 16 sheets of writing paper, adorned with photo representations of the iconic chips. In addition, the set has

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InFocus

16 gray envelopes, with color chip stickers to liven them up. The stationery set will run you about $12 and the postcard set about $15. Both are available from Amazon.

Badia Big Picture I know people who can’t live without Adobe Bridge, but I’ve never been a big fan of using it. Maybe that’s because I don’t have massive amounts of photos that live all over my computer or that I need to manage to such a degree. My workflow is more limited to having many assets for a specific project that all sit in my current client’s folder. What I do often have to contend with is many images in the InDesign file I’m currently working with, and I am often overwhelmed by the amount of images, especially when it comes time to relink and manage those images. The Big Picture app from Badia gives users that level of document-specific image management (Figure 11). Big Picture is a standalone Mac-only app, installed in your Applications folder, but also easily accessed from right within InDesign. The first thing that hits you when using Big Picture is that you have larger image thumbnails than you’ll find in the native Links panel. In fact, you can view a full-sized image preview from the viewer window. Selecting an image in the viewer will display information such as height, width, scale, angle, and default application as well as the usual effective and actual resolution, file

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format, full path, and color space. The app’s contextual menu lets you hide from view any duplicate images, those that live on master pages, and ones that you’ve left scattered all over the pasteboard. Where Big Picture really shines is its batch relinking and renaming functions. It can automatically check folders where you reunited missing images to see if others are there, and link those back up. You can have the app update all modified links at once. It can also collect (by moving or copying) all links to a new folder, while keeping the links intact. This will save you time if you often find yourself packaging up an InDesign file for the sole purpose of having all your images in one folder. The batch renaming function is also super convenient, especially if you’ve gathered images from multiple sources and you’d like to have a consistent naming strategy.

Figure 11: Badia’s Big Picture lets you view images in a document, batch rename and relink images, and view full-size previews.

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A limited functionality trial version is available, and the featurerich full app is $79 from Badia’s website (at the time of writing, the app available via the Mac App Store did not support InDesign CC).

Seed Ya Later Thanks for taking some time to tiptoe through the tulips with me. Be sure to check back next time to see what else has sprouted in our little creative garden.

n Erica Gamet is a speaker, writer, and trainer, focusing on Adobe InDesign and Illustrator, Apple Keynote and iBooks Author, and other production-related topics. With over 25 years experience in the graphics industry, she is a regular contributor to CreativePro.com. After living as a nomad, she recently put down roots in El Paso, Texas, where she hikes and bikes every chance she gets.

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GREP of the Month

Limiting Matches

Among a plethoric passel of parentheses, how do you find the one you want? GREP Level: Medium Copyeditors dread bibliographies, especially if a publisher insists on their own format. That insistence can easily lead to many repetitive corrections that numb both the mind and the fingers. But we can use that repetitiveness to our advantage, because where there’s a consistent pattern of errors, there’s an opportunity to fix them with GREP. One type of correction that regularly occurs is the use and placement of parentheticals, such as publication years and names of publishers. These are often wrong, and in order to fix them, we typically need to find just the first parenthetical in a paragraph or only the last one. But GREP expressions are gluttons—they want to

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consume as much content as possible—so if you look for something like \(.+?\), you end up with all parentheticals. If you want to match just the first, or just the last, parenthetical, you need to take some special measures. To find only the first parenthetical in a paragraph, the idea is to look for an opening parenthesis which has no other opening parenthesis between it and the beginning of the paragraph. This GREP expression does that: ^.*?\K\(.+?\). The expression works as follows: from the start of the paragraph (^), we match any sequence of characters (.*) until we hit the first opening parenthesis. Then we discard whatever we matched so far: that’s what \K, the magnificent and only recently discovered modifier, does (see InDesign Magazine 73).

From there, we match up to the next closing parenthesis. Because the part between the beginning of the paragraph and the first opening parenthesis is discarded, we in effect match just the first parenthetical. Matching only the last parenthetical in a paragraph is in a way the mirror image of matching only the first one: find a parenthetical such that there is no opening parenthesis between the matched closing parenthesis and the end of the paragraph: \([^)]+\)(?=[^\(]+$). The first part of the expression, \([^)]+\), matches a parenthetical. The part of the expression that ensures that we match just the last parenthetical is (?=[^\(]+$), which reads “from here to the end of the paragraph, and no character is (.” —Peter Kahrel

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Best of the Blog

Best of the Blog

A collection of the most important and informative articles from InDesignSecrets. If you want to add comments or ask questions, just click the title of the article, or click the Feedback button to view the original post in your web browser. Work Faster with Long Documents Alan Gilbertson | April 8, 2015

InDesign has a number of great features to help make book and other long-document production simpler. Besides syncing styles and master pages across documents, InDesign can automatically add blank pages to the end of a chapter when your last page lands on a recto. It can also update page, chapter, and section numbers on the fly. This not only saves time; it can save you from embarrassing mistakes. You can enable these features in the Book Page Numbering Options in the Book panel flyout menu.

This stuff is really handy when you begin pouring text into your chapters, but you’ll find that things can slow down dramatically as you edit the copy, adjust spacing and margins, or add and remove images. The more linked files you have in your chapters, the worse things get. If you have cross-references or other internal hyperlinks, InDesign can really slow to a crawl. To understand why, we have to dig into what InDesign is doing behind the scenes. It’s doing a lot more than meets the eye. Willy Wonka’s industrious Oompa Loompas had nothing on the feverish activity that is InDesign in Long Document mode. Inside the Document Factory Let’s say you have a fairly small book: 20 chapters plus front matter. Automatic pagination is turned on, and the author has added a paragraph to the Preface in the front matter, which results in an extra page. In order to keep things up to date, InDesign must now open the next document, Chapter 1, update its page numbers,

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save the changes, and close it again. Then it has to do the same for Chapter 2, and Chapter 3… twenty times in all! That’s a lot of disk activity. With a fast hard drive such as an SSD, it might not be too bad if that were the only thing going on. But it’s not the only thing, not by a long shot. In the File Handling section of InDesign’s preferences, there is a seldom-noticed section called Links. By default, Check Links Before Opening Document and Find Missing Links Before Opening Document are turned on. For most documents, this is what you want, but when InDesign must update chapters of a book, and those book chapters have linked illustrations, graphics, or photographs, that might mean checking for a dozen or more other files for each chapter.

Then there’s the matter of cross-references, if your book has them, or internal hyperlinks to text anchors in another chapter.

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Creating them tends to be a tedious process, but it’s not made any more enjoyable by having to browse for the document that contains the destination. There is a command in the Book panel menu: Update All CrossReferences. You might think that means “update all things related to cross-references only when I click this,” but it doesn’t. Buried in the InDesign Help under Managing Cross-References is this little gem: “If the destination moves to a different page, the cross-reference is updated automatically.” [Emphasis mine.] Oops. That means that every time the page count of a chapter changes, InDesign will update the later page numbers and comb the entire book to update any cross-references. If a paragraph in Chapter 20 is referenced from Chapter 1 and you change the page count of Chapter 5… well, you begin to see where this is going. Before long, InDesign is spending most of its time opening, updating, rewriting, and closing files in a valiant attempt to wear out your hard drive before its time. Even something simple, like synchronizing styles in the book documents, can take a very long time—go-make-some-coffeeand-come-back kind of time—if the book is very large and has lots of illustrations.

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Managing the Madness Turning off automatic page numbering and link checking, once your chapter count gets large, can certainly help to calm things down, but any operation that involves updating chapters other than the one you have open can still take a while. You must also keep track of the preferences you’ve now turned off, and you still haven’t touched that automatic updating of hyperlinks and cross-references. There is another potential downside to all this behind-thescenes updating: because documents are being opened, saved, and closed in the background, there is no Undo. If you need to undo some global change in just one of the chapters, you’ll have to open it and change it back manually. The elephant in the room is all that disk activity, and the simplest way to make almost all of it go away is to open all the book documents and keep them open while you’re working. Unless you’re working with a very limited amount of RAM, all of your documents will be in memory, and nothing need be written to disk except InDesign’s recovery files until you Save All (Ctrl+Alt+Shift+S/Command+Option+Shift+S). Suddenly things will start to go a lot faster. Synchronizing styles across all chapters takes half to one-tenth the time if all documents are open. Cross-references can be created in minimal time and update immediately any time there’s a change

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in page count. Automatic page, section, and chapter numbering is seamless. There is a potential hidden bonus with regard to hyperlinks and cross-references. There were many reports of bugs with crossreferences that spanned documents in earlier versions of InDesign, but the only time these ever showed up in my work was when I didn’t have all the book documents open. Keep them open, then, and you’re much less likely to hit problems. You can also turn off automatic pagination in the Book Page Numbering Options, if your system isn’t fast enough and you really can’t stand the lag. Hidden Shortcuts that Help One thing that makes people avoid opening dozens of documents at a time is the tedious process of saving and closing them. That’s where two useful keyboard shortcuts that are (for no good reason I can think of ) missing from InDesign’s File menu come to the rescue. Ctrl/Command+Alt/Option+Shift+S saves all open documents. Ctrl/ Command+Alt/Option+Shift+W closes all open documents. To open all of the documents in a book, highlight them all in the Book panel, and then double-click one document. Why there is no “Open All Book Documents” command in the Book panel menu is another mystery. But at least now you know what you can do to get better performance and fewer problems working with long Feedback documents in InDesign. 

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Keeping Long Text Fields on One Line When Using Data Merge

And in this example, the text “Andrew Young International Boulevard” should appear on one line, not two.

Eugene Tyson | April 15, 2015

Using InDesign’s Data Merge features can be tricky at times. Fortunately, there are plenty of good data merge tips [here] at InDesignSecrets and at Adobe.com. Recently, I came across a trick that I thought was worth sharing. My particular problem was that the text frame wasn’t big enough for a long field in my data merge. The Problems You can see the problem in the screenshot below—the text “United States of America” should appear at the bottom of the address. But it’s missing because the text frame is overset.

Problems like these can be hard to notice, especially when you’re working with a database of 10,000 addresses! It would be very difficult and time consuming to proof the output and fix any mistakes you find. Overset Text Reports InDesign will inform you of overset text, but only after the merge is complete! From the flyout menu in the Data Merge, panel choose Export to PDF.

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Usually your Data Merge will look something like this:

Using the Auto-Size Text Frame Option Select the text frame with the Address Fields, and then you can go to Object > Text Frame Options. The third tab over is called Auto-Size. In this case, I chose to resize from the top right corner, and selected the option for No Line Breaks.

When you export to PDF, InDesign creates a report. If there is overset text, each example is noted.

In this case, the overset happened because my text frame was not large enough. So I need to come up with a solution that fixes the overset text problem and keeps each data field on one line. InDesign has a great feature to combat this, which was introduced in CS6: Auto-Size.

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Now all my text frames expand from the top right to fit all the text for each data field on the one line without spilling over to the next.

Getting the Color Theme Tool Out of Your Way Mike Rankin | April 17, 2015

I am a fan of the Color Theme tool that first appeared last October in InDesign CC 2014.1.

And if you’re wondering what the finished file looks like, you can Feedback download it here! 

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I love the ability to just click on a photo (or drag over any number of objects on a page) to sample a set of colors from it, and then add those colors to my Swatches panel as a group. You can read more about using the Color Theme tool in David’s tip here (and sign up for the Tip of the Week while you’re at it). But I know that some folks are not so enamored with the Color Theme tool—especially folks who are accustomed to using the Eyedropper tool on a daily basis. This is partly because those two tools share the same spot in the Tools panel, and the same keyboard shortcut (I). And in an effort to make the Color Theme tool more “discoverable,” Adobe chose to make it the default, so out of the box when you press I, you get the new tool, not the Eyedropper. However, it’s easy (if not entirely obvious) how to get the old tool back: just immediately press I again. This will switch you from the Color Theme tool to the Eyedropper tool. And if you choose

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another tool (like the Selection tool), the Eyedropper will stay visible in the Tools panel, so the next time you press I, you’ll get the Eyedropper, and not the Color Theme tool. Even if you quit and restart, InDesign remembers which tool you used last and leaves that foremost in the Tools panel. In other words, if you don’t like the Color Theme tool, you need never see it again. Just leave the Eyedropper foremost in the Tools panel. And if you press I and you don’t get the tool you want, immediately press I again. As for using the Eyedropper to copy and paste attributes, remember to double-click it in the Tools panel to choose which attributes to copy and which to ignore.

Controlling Line Breaks with Nested Styles Keith Gilbert | April 20, 2015

A customer came to me recently with an interesting InDesign problem. I only had a few minutes to help them. I thought I’d share my “hack” solution to their problem here in hopes that someone else can make use of it or learn something from it. Or, perhaps, someone can suggest a simpler, more elegant solution? The Problem The client had hundreds of pages of text that contained entries like this:

And when copying and pasting attributes from anything (text or objects), you don’t need to make a selection first. Just get the Eyedropper tool, click once on the object you want to sample, and then click on the object you want to change. To copy/paste a different look on the fly, just hold Option/Alt (you’ll see the Eyedropper cursor change) and click on a different object or text.  Feedback

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If a bold heading was long enough to wrap to a second line, they always wanted the break to occur after the first comma, as indicated by the magenta lines in the screenshot above. They didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to fix each of these manually. The solution I came up with uses the No break attribute.

2. Create a paragraph style for the headings with three nested styles as shown below:

The Solution 1. Create a character style named No break that has the No Break attribute enabled:

The first style applies the No break character style from the start of the paragraph through the first comma. Then, no character style is applied through one space (allowing the line to break after that space), and then the No break character style is applied to the rest of the sentence. So the No Break attribute ends up getting applied to the entire sentence except for the space character that occurs after the first comma.

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3. When the paragraph style is applied to the headings, this is the result:

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If I add some additional text to the last heading, it also wraps after the comma-space, automatically:

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This could have also been accomplished with a GREP style. But I thought a nested paragraph style was easier to explain quickly to the customer. I also created a second paragraph style for the headings that did not contain the nested styles, and instructed them to use this second style for “exceptions” when they wanted to control the line break manually.

Feedback

The Mystery of the Upside Down Master Page Contest Mike Rankin | April 23, 2015

Hey folks, it’s contest time again! Last month, many of you unraveled the Mystery of the Unwelcome Text Wrap. This month, you’ll have to put on your thinking cap (or maybe just stand on your head) to explain what’s going on in this screenshot. You can click on it for a closer view.

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Notice in the Pages panel that the A-Master spread is highlighted, so that’s what we’re viewing in the document window. The A-Master has also been applied to the one document spread. The thumbnails in the Pages panel show that there should be three colored frames on the left page: red on the top, yellow in the middle, and blue on the bottom. But that’s not what we’re seeing in the window. There, the frames are upside down and on the wrong page. But no items have been moved or altered in any way. How can this be? The Answer And as many of you pointed out, the answer is that the master spread has been rotated 180°.

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There are several ways you can do this. You can choose View > Rotate Spread > 180°.

So spread rotation explains most—but not all—of the screenshot. The other interesting twist (pardon the pun) is that usually when you apply rotation to a spread, you’ll see a little icon next to the spread in the Pages panel.

You can go to the Pages panel menu and choose Page Attributes > Rotate Spread View > 180°. You can right-click on a spread and use the contextual menu. Or if you’re really fancy (and you have multi-touch gestures enabled in Interface preferences), you can rotate a spread just by twisting two fingers on a trackpad when you have nothing selected.

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This lets you know why you might be seeing a spread upside down or sideways. But that icon is not present in the original screenshot. The reason it’s not present is that the master spreads are shown at Small size in the Pages panel, and icons for rotation,

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(along with those for transparency and transitions) are not displayed at small and extra small sizes.

If you use the Panel Options in the Pages panel to display masters at a larger size, the rotation icon appears (and the mystery is fully revealed).

Thanks again to everyone who entered for taking the time to participate. Keep those emails coming! Next month, we’ll have Feedback another fun contest with a brand new prize. 

An Unexpected Use for the Hyperlinks Panel Jamie McKee | April 27, 2015

The other day I was working on some chapters for a book I was typesetting, when I discovered a helpful trick in the Hyperlinks panel. The chapter was 27 pages of all text that had been prestyled (properly, with paragraph and character styles), except that I noticed a lot of missing spaces between sentences—one sentence would be followed immediately by the beginning of the next. Crud!

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As I was thinking about the trip I would need to make to the Find/Change dialog box (searching for a period followed by “Any Letter”), I remembered that there were a few hyperlinks that I had to make active in the References section, so I opened the Hyperlinks panel and ran the Convert URLs to Hyperlinks command. Imagine my surprise when InDesign found not the three hyperlinks I knew were in the References, but 25! Upon closer inspection, I saw that InDesign had found all the instances of two sentences that were not separated by a space. Well, at least those where the first sentence ended with a period. To fix any that might have ended with a question mark, I was going to have to use Find/Change. But for the others, I could click on the page number listed in the Hyperlinks panel, quickly jump to the offending sentences, and insert a space. Then it was just a matter of selecting all these non-hyperlinks in the panel and dragging them to the trash. This also demonstrates one of the ways the Convert URLs to Hyperlinks command works: by looking for text separated only by a period (as in a URL). Should you find yourself in a similar predicament, using the Convert URLs to Hyperlinks command in the Hyperlinks panel will quickly show you where you need to add some space! Feedback

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When InDesign’s Find/ Change Gets Really Slow David Blatner | April 30, 2015

I’ve been sitting here, editing a document that someone sent me, and wondering why every time I do a Find/Change it takes much longer than usual. Find/Change usually goes pretty fast, and I can make a change that replaces hundreds or even thousands of pieces of text in a few seconds. But in this document it is taking fffffffooooorrrrrreeeevvvvvveeeeeerrrrrrr… And then it hit me: with each change, InDesign must be trying to reflow something in the background. And the feature that most often is culpable of trying to reflow stuff is Smart Text Reflow. The Smart Text Reflow feature is pretty neat because it can automatically add or remove pages (and threaded text frames) from your document as your story grows or shrinks. That way you don’t have to worry about adding pages and frames, manually threading them, and so on. I wrote about it back here in this post. You can turn it on and off in the Preferences dialog box:

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So when I opened Prefs for this particular document I was working on: Yup! It was enabled. And the main story was flowing through 100 pages of primary text frames. To test my hypothesis, I turned off Smart Text Reflow and tried a find/change query again. It was as fast as ever. Hooray! So make a mental note: disable Smart Text Reflow when you Feedback don’t need it. 

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The InDex: InDex Your Key to Our Content Can’t find that article you saw in an earlier issue? Wondering whether we covered that obscure plug-in? Never fear, the InDex is here. The first issue of InDesign Magazine was published in July 2004. Since then, we’ve cranked out thousands of pages on hundreds of related topics. While it’s possible to use Acrobat to simultaneously search all past issues of the magazine for one word or phrase, many readers have clamored for a formal index at the back of each issue. However, with 74 issues to account for, that’s not feasible. Instead, the InDex will live as a PDF you can download for free. If you come across a topic you want to know more about, but it’s in an issue you don’t have, you’re not out of luck. We sell back issues at indesignsecrets.com.

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If the topic you’re looking for isn’t in the InDex, you have one more way to search: that PDF trick we mentioned. To make it work, all of your magazine issue PDFs must be in one folder. Open any issue in Acrobat, and then press Shift+Command+F (Shift+Ctrl+F on Windows). In the Search window that appears, be sure that you click the radio button that says “All PDF Documents in,” and in the dropdown menu below that, choose the folder in which you placed your magazine issues. You’re on your way to finding anything in any PDF!

Click here to download the InDex.

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While this PDF is just for you, you can tell your friends about this great discount: $10 off a 1-year membership (use coupon code friend) Send them to: indesignsecrets.com/issues

Coming Soon!

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