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M A G A Z I N E 70

Plus: Adobe Muse Blurb Book Creator Using RGB Images

February 2015

Inspired Designs


Adobe® Creative Cloud™ Creative freedom is having access to all the latest creative apps and services right on your desktop. Creative freedom is easily publishing your apps and websites and having access to tools that will allow you to make anything you can imagine. New tools for the new creative.

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MAGAZINE

From the Editor in Chief PUBLISHERS David Blatner, Anne-Marie Concepción EDITORIAL Editor in Chief Mike Rankin, mike@indesignmag.com Managing Editor Wendy Katz, wendy@indesignmag.com Senior Editor Sandee Cohen, sandee@indesignmag.com Contributing Writers Rebecca Bedrossian, Conrad Chavez, Justin Seeley, Bart Van de Wiele, Steve Werner, Claudia McCue, Alan Gilbertson DESIGN W+W Design, www.wplusw.com Rufus Deuchler rufus.deuchler.net BUSINESS Contact Information http://indesignsecrets.com/contact Subscription Information indesignsecrets.com/issues Published by InDesignSecrets.com, a division of The Creative Publishing Network, Inc. Copyright 2015 InDesignSecrets.com. All rights reserved. Reproduction and redistribution prohibited without approval. For more information, contact permissions@indesignmag.com. InDesign Magazine is not endorsed or sponsored by Adobe Systems Incorporated, publisher of InDesign. InDesign is a registered trademark of Adobe Systems Incorporated. All other products and services are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners and are hereby acknowledged.

With apologies to our friends in the southern hemisphere, midwinter can be a tough time of year to be at your most productive and creative. New Year’s resolutions are but a faint memory, and the rejuvenating warmth of spring is a long way off. That’s why this issue is designed to deliver a refreshing jolt of information to help you recharge and reinvigorate your skills and passion for your work. First, Rebecca Bedrossian sets out a smorgasbord of delightful design work from around the world to inspire you and get you itching to fire up InDesign and make something cool with it. Next, Justin Seeley is here to get you acquainted with Adobe Muse, so you can see just how easy Adobe has made it for you to transfer your InDesign skills into the job of making beautiful websites. Then David Blatner will bring you (kicking and screaming if necessary) into the 21st

century of print production, with an InStep article on the benefits of sticking with RGB images in InDesign throughout your workflow. Seriously, the sooner you get on the RGB bandwagon, the better. I’ll save you a seat. Speaking of great images, Conrad Chavez knows a thing or two (or two hundred) about print production, so he was the perfect person to review the Book Creator plug-in from Blurb. Not to be outdone, Sandee Cohen checks in with an InDesign 101 devoted to everything you need to know about placing images. I love Sandee’s 101 series, because we all have gaps in our knowledge, and the 101s go a long way towards filling them in. In the GREP of the Month, Bart Van de Wiele shares an expression for the tricky task of targeting email addresses. And as always, we have several great InDesignSecrets articles you don’t want to miss in the Best of the Blog. Enjoy!

Photos on pages 1, 7, 29, 39, 49, and 77 courtesy of Fotolia.com

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InSide: Table of Contents 7

20

29

39

49

50

weekend

Inspired Designs Rebecca Bedrossian highlights a variety of innovative design work to inspire you.

Best of the Blog  A collection of the most important and informative articles from InDesignSecrets. 57

InDesign New Features Guide Updated Back to Version 1

58

Why You Should Import RGB Images Into InDesign and Convert to CMYK On Export ALMANAC

Using RGB Images in InDesign, from Photoshop to Final PDF David Blatner offers up a step by step guide to getting the best color images in your work.

63

Tables to the Rescue: Centering a Bullet Character on a Paragraph

68

Force Color Images to CMYK with a 240% Ink Limit

InDesign 101: Placing Images Every InDesign user should know the fine details of placing images, and Sandee Cohen's got 'em.

70

Using Animated GIFs in InDesign

73

Yet More Reasons to Create Tagged PDF

GREP of the Month: Email Addresses Bart Van de Wiele shares a simple expression to help you instantly format email addresses.

75

Updated Visual Guide to InDesign Preferences

Working with Adobe Muse CC 2014 Justin Seeley shows just how easy it can be to transfer your InDesign skills to the job of building websites.

76

InDex to All Past Issues

InReview: Blurb Book Creator Conrad Chavez examines a plug-in to help you self-publish books.

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WORLDWIDE INDESIGN USER GROUP COMMUNITY

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InDesign User Group

Attend an InDesign User Group meeting to learn more about Adobe InDesign CC, Muse CC, InCopy CC and other Creative Cloud products and services, connect with peers, and stay up to date on publishing trends.

Visit our website for meeting information, training resources, member discounts, and more.

Join a chapter near you!

www.indesignusergroup.com/idmag

InDesign User Groups are free to join and offer many great benefits!

© 2014 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All rights reserved. Adobe, the Adobe logo, InDesign and InCopy are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Adobe Systems Incorporated in the United States and/or other countries. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

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Inspired Designs Your favorite layout program, center stage in some high-profile places.

By Rebecca Bedrossian INDESIGN MAGAZINE  70

February 2015

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Inspired Designs

N

ow that the glow of holiday cheer has faded and 2015 is a reality, it’s time to get back in the saddle and do what creatives do best: make great work in InDesign. To get your design juices flowing for the year ahead, we’ve put together a selection of innovative work that is sure to inspire. The following projects hail from California to New York to Mexico and across the pond to Europe. And while there are touches of vectors, frames, styles, margins, and layers

throughout, our goal is to focus on the creative process more than the technical how-to. For now, let inspiration take center stage as you peruse these designs that demonstrate the delightful complexity of InDesign.

Weekend Almanac “Whether it’s a cocktail party, a trip to the nearest beach, or an entire afternoon spent making your grandma’s Sunday gravy, your weekends are worth working for,”

saturday screen savers

Pull into any of the 366 drive-in theaters le standing in the U.S., and it’s like going back in time. The buery smell coming from the concession stand, the rows of parked sedans and trucks, the surround-less sound piping in from your car radio or speaker stand—it all makes for the perfect date night, no maer what’s playing. The earliest drive-ins opened in the 1930s, peaking at more than 4,000 screens in the middle of the last century. Up until now, they’ve projected 35-millimeter film, which adds richness to the cinematic nostalgia. But by the end of 2014, Hollywood will stop distributing film in favor of digital. The conversion to digital can cost $50,000 to $80,000, puing most of the remaining outdoor theaters at risk for closure this year. Is this a sign of the last picture show? Hardly. Many, including the Henagar Drive-In in Alabama and the Randall Drive-In in New Hampshire, are raising funds on Kickstarter to help them make the transition. Other fans are organizing guerilla drive-ins through groups such as MobMov to project movies against abandoned warehouses in parking lots across the country—oen planned without much notice and announced on social media—so that this classic date night never goes out of style. Δ

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ERIN KUNKEL

WEEKEND ALMANAC 9

Weekend Almanac is divided into three chapters, Friday, Saturday, and Sunday. Because who doesn’t want to start their weekend on Friday?

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February 2015

work

connect

watch

friday

says creative director Ali Zeigler. That idea is the foundation of Weekend Almanac, a collectible, lifestyle biannual publication that Zeigler started with editor Lauren Ladoceour in 2013. “The magazine is divided into three chapters,” Zeigler explains, “Friday, Saturday, and Sunday—and celebrates all the good stuff that happens during your time off.” The seeds for what would become Weekend Almanac were planted years before, when Zeigler and Ladoceour both

sunday flock together

My folks and I live more than 3,000 miles apart, but we catch up on the weekend over the phone like a lot of grown children and their parents do. During one visit home to Vermont a while back, I was rooting around the barn when my pops shared some stained glass he’d been working on. I was so impressed, I thought, “Let’s make something together!” Aer I returned to California, we decided that that something should be stained-glass feathers, a nod to the birds that flit along the banks of the Clyde River my pops and I like to canoe. Soon our weekly phone conversations turned to colors, materials, and the meaning behind certain birds—with me in my photo studio or hammock in the waning West Coast sun and

beach bowls

Aer school, most 18-year-olds in Australia are thinking about the beach or university, but good mates Babs Robertson and Stella Maynard are talking oats. When classes break and all the tests for the week have been taken, the friends get to work at one of their houses in Sydney to create a makeshi cafe stall called Pop-Up Porridge. They begin by cleaning, painting signs, and shopping for kilos of milk, oats, and bananas. Throughout the weekend, they bake banana bread, along with white chocolate and raspberry muffins, and then finish their prep by covering organic oats with water to soak overnight. Finally, on Sunday morning, crowds of school friends, family, administrators, and strangers gather

my pops up in the barn on the East Coast. Eventually, we turned our project into a small

between colorful tapestries and garlands of flags at Pop-Up Porridge to buy steaming cups

business called The Wilderness Workshop. I do the art direction, website, and finances. He

of chai, baked goods, and the duo’s famous porridge, loaded with any combination of sliced

handcras each piece. Now my mom has jumped on board, handling inventory, glass orders,

fruit, organic yogurt, toasted coconut, berry coulis, and biodynamic honey from Robertson’s

shipping, and bird research for upcoming collections. This wild lile idea has blossomed into a beautiful, creative way to connect with my family beyond talking about the weather. And as we all get older and busier, I can’t think of a beer way to spend our weekends. Δ

STORY AND PHOTOGRAPHY BY THAYER ALLYSON GOWDY

WEEKEND ALMANAC 27

Almost all of the design elements throughout Weekend Almanac are hand drawn, scanned in, and layered. Creative Director Zeigler carved and hand-stamped the circles seen here behind the Saturday type.

family farm. Everything’s less than $6, and all the profits go toward the girls’ gap year travels to Kenya and Lord Howe Island. It’s an aer-school job, they say, that lets them watch people enjoy their food and feel warm all over. Δ

BY SERENA RENNER PHOTOGRAPHY BY SASKIA WILSON

WEEKEND ALMANAC 41

Zeigler says, “I use the colors in the images to select a complementary palette for the artwork on the opposite page. I would have loved to have run this as a feature spread, but the image wasn't high-res enough—one of the problems you often run into in print media.”

8


Inspired Designs worked at Yoga Journal. They discovered that they both wanted to create a place where they could work freely and give other artists, photographers, and illustrators that same opportunity. As they moved on to other publishing jobs, they kept in touch until the time was right to launch the lovely modern almanac—literally from Zeigler’s kitchen table. Zeigler studied design at RIT and began her career at a small New York City ad agency. It wasn’t long before she made the switch to publishing to work on Ride BMX, Guitar Player, Yoga Journal, and, most recently, in the Food and Drink division at Weldon Owen Publishing in San Francisco, creating books for Williams-Sonoma and others. Needless to say, with 15 years of publishing and editorial design experience, Zeigler was well versed in InDesign before starting Weekend Almanac. “We have a small print run, and I wanted our first issue to feel as if it was created just for you,” explains Zeigler. “Almost all of

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February 2015

the main headline type was hand drawn. I then scanned the artwork and layered it into my InDesign file.” Other than those headlines, she designed the entire first issue herself with InDesign. “When I’m working

on multi-page editorial design spreads, the photography selection, order, and flow is so important to tell the story. I always use InDesign to block this out first. It may not look like much, but it’s the heart of the

Alice Gao is a food and lifestyle photographer in New York City. Her collection of Instagrams, shot with an iPhone 5S during 70-plus laid-back weekends and then edited in Snapseed or VSCO, begin and end this edition of Weekend Almanac. The majority were taken in her apartment and the shops, cafes, and restaurants she frequents in her neighborhood. But she also travels a lot, and so she included a few from her trips to Colorado and California too. (The one thing you won’t see in the collection, she says, is how messy her apartment can get by the end of Sunday.) Look out for new photos on Instagram @alice_gao and in an upcoming cookbook about female chefs in New York.

The Almanac’s end papers feature images taken on the weekend from favorite Instagram accounts. For this edition, says Zeigler, “we chose Alice Gao; her feed is always full of delicious-looking food and striking architecture.”

9


Inspired Designs overall design.” Zeigler and her partner then shared files, editing back and forth, until the design and copy were final. The big takeaway from that first issue? “Art directing and designing an entire magazine by myself, in a short amount of time, was a challenge,” Zeigler admits. So for the second and the third issue, now in production, she’s enlisted the help of two designers. They work together in the spirit of the digital age—remotely—and are never in the same room. “From start to finish, we share our designs and feedback on filesharing servers like Dropbox. “When creating a book or magazine with 100+ pages, it’s important to stay organized. One of my favorite ways to do that is to use layers in InDesign. I’ll have a background layer, a folio layer, a graphics layer, a type layer, etc. If you’re sharing these files with someone, you can lock all the layers they don’t need access to, which keeps things tidy and eliminates mistakes.”

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February 2015

Zeigler says, “This is one of my favorite stories in the issue. The majority of our content is submitted by readers, and this one was by hair and makeup artist Tricia Turner. She not only wrote the story, but made [chef ] Preeti [Mistry] look beautiful for the photo shoot.”

This process is not without its share of irritations, Zeigler acknowledges. “I’m constantly frustrated with moving a photo

box only to have the image inside the box move instead (even though I’m using the correct tool). It drives me crazy.”

10


Inspired Designs For those just diving into InDesign, Zeigler recommends lynda.com, though nothing beats working on real projects. “If it’s too intimidating to dive in on a real job, then make some up,” she suggests. “Use InDesign to make your business cards, invitations, or holiday cards. Do something fun so you enjoy working on it while you’re learning. If you have specific questions along the way, YouTube has tutorials for everything.”

Zeigler says, “It’s difficult to choose images for the table of contents because you want be sure it reflects the perfect balance of what readers will find inside. It’s always the last pages I design.”

contents 10

we are Lauren Ladoceour editor Ali Zeigler creative director

4 HEY THERE

contributors

Dear busy readers: Join us in finding some hammock time. 6 FORECAST

Stargazing 101 and when to spot the best light shows this year.

writers Kathryn Arnold, Lisa Chatham,

friday

Charity Ferreira, Gabe McNeil, Serena Renner, Olivia Terenzio,

9 SCREEN SAVERS

Tricia Turner

A revival of drive-in theaters, coming soon to a town near you. 10 AGE APPROPRIATE

illustrators

The bartender behind NYC’s Fedora on homemade Negronis.

Anna G. Adamczyk ,

14 COME ON BACK

Sarah Clement, Claire Heffer,

Sunset in LA is the perfect time for a last-minute barbecue.

Madison Lytle

18 SCORE KEEPERS

DIY washers pits for a unique backyard party game.

photographers

20 SPIN CYCLE

Ashley Batz, Chloe Berk,

Why one man leaves the office early to sit at his poery wheel.

Alice Gao, Thayer Allyson Gowdy,

24 PRINT QUOTE

Shay Harrington, Elsa Kawai,

Graphic designer Stephen Wildish’s Friday Project posters go viral.

Eva Kolenko, Erin Kunkel,

saturday

46

27 FLOCK TOGETHER

A weekly phone call to mom and dad about the weather turns into a shared art project. 28 TAKE IT OUTSIDE

Two friends prove you don’t need a lot of money or time to travel. 32 THE SHAPE OF THINGS

Home-improvement projects turn a house into a woodsy haven. 38 THE FIELD GUIDE

Linger in bed a lile longer with a connect-the-dots puzzle that might just inspire you to get outside later.

sunday

58

Robyn Lehr, Brook Pifer, Katherine Sheehan, Saskia Wilson stylists Rebecca Bartoshesky, Christine Wolheim production liaison Chris Hemesath

28

41 BEACH BOWLS

Sydney residents line up for porridge before hiing the surf. 42 POOLS OF INTEREST

A field trip to NorCal’s tide pools reveals an underwater world.

consultants John Abbo, Kathryn Arnold, George Clark, Phillip Moffi

© 2014 Weekend Almanac All rights reserved. Produced in the USA; printed in Hong Kong. No part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed, or transmied in any form or by any means (yikes!), including photocopying or other electronic or mechanical methods, without the prior wrien permission of the editor, except in the case of brief quotations in critical reviews and other noncommercial uses permied by copyright law.

46 GARDEN TO TABLE

Chef Preeti Mistry spends her one day off in the garden and explains why it doesn’t get much beer than Sweet 100 tomatoes. 54 HANGING AROUND

Create a gallery of pictures and found objects over an aernoon. 58 CLOSING CEREMONY

For permission requests, write to the editor, addressed “Aention: Weekend Almanac Permissions,” at weekendedit@gmail.com.

Casual cake recipes for tonight’s dessert (or Monday’s breakfast!).

WEEKEND ALMANAC 3

2 WEEKEND ALMANAC

bake Plum Upside-Down Cake

t p lu M

U

7

Upside-Down

Ø

U Closing

This incredibly versatile cake was taught to me by my friend Debbie Hughes, the pastry chef at San Francisco’s Firefly restaurant. You can make it with many different seasonal fruits, from pear to pineapple.

going, a Bay Area cookbook

Pour 1 tablespoon brandy and 2 teaspoons vanilla

In a small bowl, stir together 1 ½ cups flour, 2 ½ teaspoons baking

powder, and ¼ teaspoon salt. Stir half the dry ingredients into the wet ingredients. Stir in ½ cup milk until incorporated, followed by

Buer an 8-inch square cake pan, and line the boom with a square

of baking parchment. To make a caramel, melt 3 tablespoons buer

the remaining dry ingredients and ¼ cup crème fraîche or sour cream.

and ½ cup brown sugar together in a heavy-boomed saucepan over

Scrape the baer into the pan.

medium heat, whisking until melted, bubbly, and well-blended. Remove

5

from heat, and carefully add 2 tablespoons brandy, rum, or bourbon

when pressed with your finger, 35 to 40 minutes—enough time to make

(it will bubble up and may splaer). Return to heat; continue to cook for

some tea, put on some music, feed your fish, water your herbs, and set

1 to 2 minutes, whisking until the mixture looks slightly thicker, pale,

To keep that sweet weekend feeling

Beat 6 tablespoons soened buer and 1 cup

extract into the wet ingredients, and beat until blended.

4

Feeds 6-8 family & friends

1

3

sugar with a mixer until well-blended and fluffy. Add 2 eggs one at a time, beating well aer each.

Place the pan into your hot oven, and bake until the top springs back

the table for dinner.

and foamy. Pour caramel into the prepared pan, and set aside to cool.

6

2

along the sides of the cake to free it from the pan. Invert the cake

Preheat the oven to 350°. Slice 5 or 6 red plums, and arrange them

Let the cake cool 10 minutes in the pan. Then run a paring knife

(((((((((((((((( (((((((((((((((( onto a cooling rack. Serve warm or let cool completely.

close together over the caramel in the boom of the pan (see page 58).

author spends every Sunday afternoon baking

7 cake.

Follow her recipes for

slices to be enjoyed as

bu

dessert—or breakfast

A thin slice of this loaf for breakfast might just make Monday morning a little more bareable. You can use chocolate chips if you like, but extra-dark bittersweet chocolate gives the cake a nice edge.

I might not have as much time as I'd like for baking during the week, but I always devote a few hours on Sunday aernoon to making a cake

º

t

Chocolate

t c h iP

Feeds 8-10 family & friends

for whatever family, friends, and neighbors happen to be around. Aer all, Sunday cakes are family dinner cakes—low-key and not fussy or ambitious. They're just basic recipes I make so oen I practically have them memorized and always have the ingredients on hand. But even the simplest cake adds a lile ritual and ceremony to the end of the weekend. The quiet, methodical measuring and mixing imposes a lile bit of happy order on my family’s schedule as we sele back in for

1

Preheat oven to 350°. Buer and flour a 9-inch loaf pan.

2

Beat 1 ½ sticks of soened buer and 1 ¾ cups light brown sugar with

in 1 cup buermilk until incorporated, followed by the remaining flour mixture. Stir in 1 cup chopped extra dark biersweet chocolate (about 5 ounces) or chocolate chips.

4

Scrape the baer into the pan and bake for about an hour

while you pour yourself a glass of wine, clear the crumbs and homework off the coffee table, and call a friend. The cake is done when the top springs back when pressed with your finger and a wooden skewer inserted in the center comes out with moist

a mixer on medium-high speed until well-blended and fluffy. Add 4 large

crumbs aached.

eggs, one at a time, beating well aer each. Add 1 tablespoon vanilla.

5

3

loosen the cake in the pan and invert it onto a cooling rack. It'll be

In a separate small bowl, stir together 1 ½ cups all-purpose flour and

Let the cake cool 10 minutes in the pan, and then use a knife to

¾ cup buckwheat flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder, and ¼ teaspoon

tempting to dig right in, but resist! Let the loaf cool completely,

salt. Stir half the flour mixture into the buer mixture. Then stir

and si powdered sugar lightly over the top before serving.

(((((((((((((((( ((((((((((((((((

the week. This Sunday, set aside the hours from 4 to 6 p.m. to make a cake (and finish your to-do list while your masterpiece is in the oven).

BY CHARITY FERREIRA PHOTOGRAPHY BY ROBYN LEHR

58 WEEKEND ALMANAC

ckwhea

Ï

Monday morning.

WEEKEND ALMANAC 59

60 WEEKEND ALMANAC

WEEKEND ALMANAC 61

The staff baked and photographed the “subjects” at the home of the writer. The headline typography is set using CraftType from Creative Market.

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Inspired Designs A Part User Four years ago, frustrated by the current state of design and creative work in the United Kingdom, designer Neville Brody held the Anti-Design Festival in London. The nineday event—which included performances, lectures, workshops, and installations— exhibited work that challenged the status quo and contemporary stereotypes. There was a call for submissions. And the idea of this “anti” festival resonated with Craig Hansen and Chris May, two Chicago designers who decided to create a project to submit. Even though no client was involved, they kept the Anti-Design Festival audience top of mind while creating their booklet titled A Part User. “We began the process at Harold Washington Library in Chicago. It has a wonderful, massive public domain image bank stored in file cabinets,” says Hansen. “We photocopied selected images, and then made hi-res scans. From there, we made half

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February 2015

Digitally printed posters to accompany the A Part User booklets, built in the same collaborative collage method.

of the images monotone cyan, leaving the others black-and-white.” “We created an InDesign file with a very tight grid,” continues May. “This allowed

us to work independently with the same source imagery and maintain a tight system. Near the end, we came back together, combining our work and layering the type.”

12


Inspired Designs The collaboration was a success, not simply in the creation of A Part User, but in the organic creative process itself. Hansen explains: “We began exploring ideas without rules or preconceived notions and were pleasantly surprised at different stages. During the course of development, we found that it became more about the process than the final product. We established guidelines for the layout of the spreads for both aesthetic and functional purposes. In addition to the layout, we had a very structured process for the text selection.” “In the end,” says May, “the process of developing these guidelines proved to be the main driver for the design executions.” The spreads for A Part User were printed and deliberately left unbound. While some might argue it was unfinished, Hansen and May instead created an interactive analog piece; in a nod to the Exquisite Corpse style, users were able to assemble the booklet in any number of ways.

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When asked about working with InDesign features, the long-time designers quickly light up with their likes and dislikes. Interactive capabilities top Hansen’s list of best features, while paragraph and character styles reign supreme for May. As with all things, there is good and there is not-so-good. And for that Hansen and May are in agreement: “We wish there were ways to better experiment with type outside of a box and to develop typographic ‘sketches’ quicker.” (Adobe, please take note!) In the meantime, both advise to play with a new InDesign tool every day.

Anagrama was tasked with creating its brand identity. Because the apartment tower boasts automated appliances and LEED certification, Daniela Garza, Anagrama project manager, says, “[We needed] to communicate such sophistication and exclusiveness to potential buyers.” What Anagrama produced was unexpected for this category, and absolutely stunning. The trifecta of Sofia’s identity is logotype, typography, and layout, according to Garza.

Sofia Just south of the Texas border in Monterrey, Mexico, the climate is hot and so is Anagrama, a firm that’s been taking the design world by storm since 2009. So it should come as no surprise that when renowned architect Cesar Pelli designed Sofia, a building in San Pedro, Mexico,

Advertising art for Sofia. The identity is formed by three very important axes: logotype, typography, and layout. Both the attention to detail and the brand’s elements convey the distinction of Sofia’s architectural project.

13


Inspired Designs “The logotype—the keys and the coat of arms—is inspired by San Pedro’s coat of arms. We developed a custom typeface designed especially for Sofia, which takes inspiration from British san serifs. And lastly, the arrangement of text and information is influenced by the typographical treatment used before grids were popularized by the Swiss grid system.” Garza is direct with her InDesign feedback: “We love the ability to create

precise layouts in a short time, though working with vectors is tricky when moving from Illustrator to InDesign. You don’t have as much control.” It’s clear that Anagrama takes attention to detail seriously. Sofia’s branding program boasts lush still-life photography, crisp layouts, and stellar typography. It exudes elegance. Anagrama will be a firm to watch for years to come.

Foldout spread from the Sofia building’s brochure, showcasing its amenities.

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Custom typeface designed especially for Sofia, inspired by British san serifs.

From custom stationery to scent to bags to books, the Sofia brand exudes elegance.

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Inspired Designs The New School for Jazz 25th Anniversary Poster Before designer Jay Kapur moved to Oakland, California, he called Brooklyn home and was employed at The New School in New York City. There he worked on a variety of design solutions for Parsons The New School for Design, The New School for Jazz, and The New School for Drama. When an influential institution such as The New School for Jazz celebrates its 25th anniversary, the stakes are high, creatively speaking. Add a concert featuring one of its most prestigious alumni, jazz pianist Brad Mehldau, into the mix, and it intensifies. Kapur was asked to design the poster for the event. He worked on the project with senior designer Alex Ku and art director Ed Pusz. “I began this project as I begin all projects, with extensive research. I dug in and found out as much as I could about The New School for Jazz, and explored the historical visual language of American

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Jazz,” Kapur explains. “From this informed position, I began hand-sketching possible visual solutions to the problem at hand. Only after thorough research and sketching did I begin to use InDesign.” Kapur then experimented with several different grids before the right one for the poster revealed itself. “I arrived upon a flexible grid,” he says, “based on the Fibonacci sequence paired with a set of angled columns and gutters.” The solution worked in creating a dynamic layout that communicated all the information about the event in an elevated manner. These days, Kapur, a senior designer at Duarte Design, says his favorite InDesign feature is still the paragraph style settings. “Once you master the use of paragraph styles,” he explains, “as a designer, you can take maximum control of your layout’s typography and make fine adjustments throughout your design process to strive for perfection.”

Layout sketches from The New School for Jazz 25th Anniversary Celebration poster.

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Inspired Designs Harrods City Guides

Detailed screenshot of The New School for Jazz 25th Anniversary Celebration poster.

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If you’ve traveled to London, you’ve probably visited, or at the very least seen, Harrods. Rich in history, the landmark department store is known not only for being one of the world’s largest (at 9,000 square feet) but for its connection to the Royal Family—royal warrants, Princess Diana, and more. The luxury store takes fashion seriously, so much so that it produces New York and London Fashion Week City Guides. In 2013, designer Lorena Massacane was hired to create the Harrods City Guides. Massacane, who splits her time between London and Berlin, says, “[The Guides] highlight the must-visit and must-see places loved and chosen by favorite designers.” The guides are then sent to editors and bloggers in both New York and London. So they needed to grab attention to ensure a farand-wide reach. “It was an amazing experience to work with the Harrods creative team,” says

16


Inspired Designs Harrods City Guides for London Fashion Week (2013).

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Massacane. “They gave me the freedom to think out of the box and do something different.” Massacane has worked with a range of clients, from international brands to small boutique companies, and brought ten years’ experience to the Harrods project. And it shows. Her use of sophisticated type, a bold color palette, and striking graphics resulted in a contemporary design for this old-world institution. Why InDesign? Massacane says it’s the ability to work with styles—an important feature missing from other design programs. She advises designers to do as she does: “Keep exploring the tools, there’s always a new feature, and another way to get to the same result. Learn the shortcuts and have fun!”

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Inspired Designs Design New Worlds at Parsons Paris When Parsons opened its European branch, recruiting students for the new Paris campus became a top priority. Traveling admissions counselors and the Parsons Paris staff requested an innovative booklet that would introduce prospective undergraduate and

graduate students to the new academic center, entice them to explore more deeply, and eventually apply online. It’s a tall order for a “first-touch” booklet, but New York designer Paula Giraldo was up for the challenge. At the time, Giraldo was working as a designer and associate art director in the central strategic

communications team of The New School. (She now heads her own firm, Paula Giraldo Design.) This ambitious project had Giraldo working with teams in both New York and Paris. “A creative concept, based on the message that Parsons Paris offers students the ‘best of both worlds’ (that is, Parsons’

The die-cut in the 32-page Design New Worlds booklet cuts only partway through, giving the piece its 3D quality. The middle section can be completely detached, affording the viewer a different experience with the brochure.

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Inspired Designs renowned curriculum along with Paris’s unique resources), was developed,” explains Giraldo. Next she began collecting and analyzing information, sketching, gathering assets, making paper dummies, and requesting printer quotes—all the while keeping the project’s time constraints and budget in mind. “Then I jumped onto the computer, using InDesign to assemble all information; I used Illustrator to create any necessary graphics and Adobe Photoshop to manipulate photographs,” Giraldo says. “Once the designs begin to take shape, I start printing mockups to better understand proportions, sizes, colors, and the pacing of the information. I carefully built my InDesign file from the beginning; doing so helps me stay focused and organized. During each step of the process, grid and styles were essential. And I kept all my links in the same place to further organize a given file, which is something that will serve you to move things faster.”

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To give the Design New Worlds booklet some dimension, Giraldo envisioned a three-dimensional center section formed by a die-cut semicircle. Thus, when laid open on a table at a recruitment event, it would draw attention. “In an open position, the booklet’s semicircle pages stand up, evoking a sphere of the two worlds described [in the booklet] as coming together in Paris,” explains Giraldo. The small, brightly colored, unusually-shaped pages add a surprising and interactive element to the booklet. It’s a smart solution with high impact in a category that typically leaves innovative design and printing techniques on the back burner. Giraldo leans heavily on InDesign in her work. “It’s such a big and flexible program that it often seems to me that the only limitations come from yourself. Once you know how to use it well, it becomes a tool that makes your creative process much

easier.” Her “it list” of InDesign features includes styles, margins, rules, layers, and master pages. “A grid and styles should always be present in an InDesign file; together, they form a good foundation for a well-designed project.”

Adaptive Learning One thing all the designers in this article have in common is playful experimentation. That love of learning is vital to the creative process. InDesign is a powerful tool and the possibilities are endless. Now it’s your turn to explore.

n  ebecca Bedrossian is an independent R writer and editor with a master’s in art history and over 15 years of experience in design. The former managing editor of Communication Arts magazine serves on the board of AIGA San Francisco. See her work at rebeccabedrossian.contently.com.

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By Justin Seeley

Working with Adobe Muse CC 2014

How to Build Websites Without Learning How to Code. You know you want to build web pages— heck, a whole website!—but you don’t want to think about code, and the last time you tried to learn Dreamweaver you gave up in frustration. You’re not alone! There’s a name for people like you: Normal and Healthy. Fortunately, Adobe has an app specifically designed for InDesign users who want to build web pages: Adobe Muse. Muse is quickly becoming the go-to solution for many InDesign users for creating fast and effective websites for themselves and their clients. In this article I’ll explore Adobe Muse and show you some of the similarities between it and InDesign CC. By the time you’re finished reading, I think you’ll be just as excited as I am to start building websites using this awesome tool.

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What is Adobe Muse? Adobe Muse is a WYSIWYG (what you see is what you get) website creation tool. Basically, Muse allows you to lay out a web page and build a website much like you would create a document inside of InDesign. When you’re ready to go live, Muse gathers up all of your assets—just like packaging an InDesign file—and creates standardscompliant HTML, CSS, and JavaScript for you to publish to a web server of your choosing. Just like you don’t need to know how to code in PostScript or the PDF “language” to use InDesign, Muse shields you from having to know HTML or CSS. (By the way, one reason Muse is so comfortable for InDesign users is that many of the software engineers who built it used

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Feature: Working with Adobe Muse

to be on the InDesign team! It really is like a brother or sister to InDesign.)

Getting Started At first glance, when you launch Muse, it might not seem very InDesign-like in appearance, but that’s only because your first view in Muse is something called Plan View, which allows you to quickly build your sitemap in a visual manner. Think of this as being like adding pages to the Pages panel in InDesign. In addition to top-level pages, you can also add several layers of subpages to your site, making it easy to see all points of navigation that you’ll have throughout your website (Figure 1). Figure 1: The Plan View in Adobe Muse CC.

Adding master pages Once you’ve planned out all the pages you’ll need in your site, you can start working on your master pages. Again, this process works much the same as it does in InDesign. You have one master page by default, but you can easily create multiple masters within

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the Master Pages section of the Plan View module (Figure 2, next page). Most of the time, I will start off with just one master page. This serves as my template for many common objects that need to be displayed throughout my site, including

navigation, background components (color, images, etc.), and header and footer content. Throughout the course of building my site, if I need any extra master pages, I can always jump back over into Plan View and add them with a simple click.

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Feature: Working with Adobe Muse

Building your Website Once you’ve got the structure of your website all planned out, it’s time to start adding aesthetic elements to it. That means building things like a navigation bar, adding

photos and text, and adding interactive content like slideshows. If you were coding all of this yourself, it might take you months to build it all, but with Muse you can do it all in a fraction of the time, using tools and

techniques you’re already familiar with from InDesign, plus an amazing feature you’ll wish InDesign had, called Widgets. Working in Design View When you double-click any page or master page in Muse, you’ll be taken into a new view called Design View. This is where Muse most closely resembles InDesign. You’ll see the familiar menu structure across the top of the window, tools along the left side, and panels tucked away on the right. Everything works just the way you would expect from an Adobe application, right down to the keyboard shortcuts for the Tools panel (Figure 3, next page).

Keyboard Shortcuts PDF I’ve included a PDF with all of the Tools panel shortcuts in Adobe Muse CC 2014. You can download it here. Figure 2: Adding master pages in the Plan View of Adobe Muse.

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Feature: Working with Adobe Muse

The interface in Adobe Muse is very simple, but that doesn’t mean that the application is lacking anything. In order to understand why the interface is so sparsely populated, you must have some understanding of the inner workings of a

Figure 3: The Design View of Adobe Muse CC 2014.

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website. Most websites are composed of shapes and colors that are generated by code, not by image editing applications. And in Muse, you use familiar tools to create those basic shapes and colors, while the application creates the underlying code.

Muse is just as powerful, if not more so, than any other design-oriented website creator on the market. Adding navigation When I began learning web design nearly twelve years ago, one of the hardest things for me to grasp was the concept of navigation. There are a lot of moving parts to a navigational system on a website, especially if you intend to have multiple levels of navigation that require things like a fancy dropdown effect. Luckily, you’ll find that Adobe Muse makes creating this type of navigation a breeze with its built-in Widgets Library (Figure 4, next page). All you have to do is drag and drop the widget that you want onto your page, and Muse will build the necessary code to make it work on your website. The Widgets library includes both vertically and horizontally oriented items, so you can easily choose what fits best with your overall design aesthetic. (Figure 5, next page).

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Feature: Working with Adobe Muse

Figure 4: The Widgets Library panel.

The menu-creation tools in Muse are unlike anything I’ve ever seen before, and I really love the way they allow you to quickly and easily deploy a menu for a website. And my favorite feature in all of Muse is the fact that any time I add or delete a page from my website, the menus I’ve made automatically update to reflect the change. That means that once I set up a menu and get it styled just the way I want it, I never have to worry about editing it again, because Muse takes

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Figure 5: A drag-and-drop menu created with the Widgets Library panel.

care of that for me in the background, which is really helpful. Adding content Getting images and other content into your Muse website is really simple. Just like

in InDesign, you have the ability to place items, either one at a time or in bulk, using the File > Place command (Figure 6, next page). Once you’ve chosen that menu item, selected your files, and clicked Open, you’ll notice a very familiar cursor appear on

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Feature: Working with Adobe Muse

your screen. That’s right, it’s the same Place gun that you’re used to seeing in InDesign (Figure 7). Just click anywhere on the page where you’d like to place the file, or click and drag out a frame to size it just the way you want it. As you begin to place files into your document, you’ll want to make sure that you open the Assets panel so that you can manage all of the images you’re using in your project. Think of this panel as the Links panel from InDesign. Many of the features, such as Relink, Go To, and Edit Original, can be found by right-clicking on any asset in the panel. This allows for easier asset management and round-trip editing with other apps like Adobe Photoshop (Figure 8). In fact, you can place PSD files directly into Muse just like you can inside of InDesign,

and Muse will automatically convert and optimize those images to a web-friendly format upon export. Adding interactive content The Widgets Library panel isn’t just for building menus. There are a lot more exciting things it can produce, like slideshows, tabbed panels, lightboxes, and Figure 6: Use File > Place to insert graphics into Adobe Muse.

Figure 7: The loaded Place gun used to place files into Muse. Figure 8: Right-click assets to reveal asset-management commands.

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Additional Uses for Photoshop Files One of my favorite ways to use Photoshop files in Muse is to create buttons. By creating a multi-state button in Photoshop (one layer for each state), you can easily create rollover buttons in Muse by choosing File > Place Photoshop Button. This is a great way to add more visually appealing navigation points and calls to action on your website.

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Feature: Working with Adobe Muse

customizable buttons (Figure 9). These widgets are also drag and drop, meaning all you have to do is position them where you want them, customize the appearance, and that’s it. My favorite widgets are the slideshows. These are perfect for showcasing portfolio pieces, products, or any other type of visual sequence you’d like to display (Figure 10).

Figure 10: Sample Slideshow widget in action. Figure 9: Featured News widget from the Widgets Library panel in Muse.

Previewing your site While you’re building your site, you’ll probably want to spot-check how it’s going to look and act once it’s on the web. You

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can do this quickly by clicking the Preview Mode button at the top of the Muse user interface to preview the site directly inside of Muse. However, Preview Mode may not be the best choice, because it limits you

to the built-in Adobe Muse Browser. So, instead, press Shift+Cmd/Ctrl+E (page) or Opt/Alt+Cmd/Ctrl+E (site) to test your site in your default web browser.

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Feature: Working with Adobe Muse

Publishing your Website After you’ve completed your website, you’re ready to press the publish button (literally). Adobe Muse makes it easy for you to export all of your HTML and CSS files in a variety of different ways. If you’re a Business Catalyst user, Muse integrates directly with your existing account and allows you to publish directly to BC from within Muse using your credentials (Figure 11). If you prefer to manage your website using your own hosting provider (InMotion, GoDaddy, or whatever), then you’ll enjoy the

Figure 12: Publish directly to your FTP or SFTP web-hosting platform.

Figure 11: Quickly publish your site to Business Catalyst using your existing account.

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fact that Muse can actually publish directly to your server using FTP or SFTP protocols (Figure 12). The final way to export your website from Adobe Muse is probably the most common way—and also the one that most

closely mimics that of exporting a PDF in Adobe InDesign. By choosing File > Export to HTML, you are telling Muse to bundle everything together and export it out to a folder. This folder will then include your HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and assets that will

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Feature: Working with Adobe Muse

be used to display your website on the web (Figure 13).

Mobile and Tablet Design Tools As the proliferation of mobile devices continues, it becomes increasingly important for web designers to be able to deliver a tailored experience for their clients across all of these different devices and screen sizes. While Adobe Muse doesn’t produce true responsive websites, it does allow you to create desktop, mobile, and tablet-based layouts for your website. I generally begin with my mobile website and then progress to tablet and desktopbased layouts. This is known as progressive enhancement, and it allows me to focus on the most important pieces of content and to present that information in a more meaningful way. Graceful degradation is another widely accepted form of website creation. This method would have you create your desktop experience first

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Figure 13: Export all of your assets to an organized folder.

and then slowly remove bits of content and information until you get to a fully optimized mobile experience. Either way is perfectly fine, and Adobe Muse allows you to work in any order you like. When you create a document, you have the ability to choose which layout you want to work on, and then you can simply add new layouts as you go along (Figure 14).

A Mighty Muse I’ve been using and teaching Adobe Muse for a little over two years now, and it is quickly becoming one of my favorite website design tools. If you’ve been debating whether or not you should take a dip in the web-design pool, Adobe Muse is a safe environment for you to do just that.

Figure 14: The Adobe Muse New Site dialog box allows you to choose your website layout.

Muse is one of the Adobe Creative Cloud apps that sees significant updates (almost) quarterly, so there are always new features being designed and deployed for the application. It’s already awesome, but I fully expect this app to get even better over time. If you’re already familiar with InDesign, there’s absolutely no reason why you can’t be equally proficient with Adobe Muse.

n Justin Seeley is currently a staff author for the design, business, and web segments at lynda.com. He has over 12 years’ experience in the graphic and web design industry, and is a regular speaker at events like Adobe MAX and PePcon. He blogs regularly at justinseeley.com.

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By David Blatner

Using RGB Images in InDesign, from Photoshop to Final PDF

A step by step guide to entering the twenty-first century Do you remember what your mom used to say when you’d insist, “all my other friends are doing it”? She’d reply, “if they all jumped off a bridge, would you follow them?” And it's the same when we consider the question of RGB and CMYK in the printing process. For whenever someone insists that they should convert their color images to CMYK in Photoshop before importing into InDesign—“after all, that’s what we’ve always done; that’s what all my colleagues do”—I wonder why these people are so quick to jump off that bridge without first thinking it through. I want to be clear: There are times when you do want to convert to CMYK first! But

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the proper response (both to your mom and to the idea of converting to CMYK in Photoshop) should be: “I would stop, consider the pros and cons, ask advice, and then make my own decision.” Claudia McCue and I wrote an article at InDesignSecrets about the pros and cons of importing RGB images into InDesign (spoiler alert: you should use RGB for most images). But there continues to be confusion about exactly what steps you should take when using RGB images. This brief step-by-step RGB workflow will take you from Photoshop to final PDF—even a CMYK PDF if your printer demands it—by way of your InDesign layout.

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InStep: Using RGB Images

1. Start in Photoshop

Remember that every digital image starts in the RGB format. If someone sends you an image in CMYK format, you should probably leave it in CMYK (there’s rarely a good reason to convert back to RGB). But assuming you have an RGB image, open it in Photoshop first.

If you know approximately what size the image will be on your InDesign page, it’s best to crop the image (using the Crop tool) and use Image > Image Size to adjust the image resolution. If your document will be printed, choose an image resolution of about 1.5 times your printer halftone screen. For example, if you’re printing at 150 lpi, you probably don’t need your image resolution to be more than 225 ppi. Note, however, that if you enlarge

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the image after placing it in InDesign, the image resolution will drop. To give myself some flexibility, I usually round up to 250 ppi for images that are destined for print. (The old 300-ppi guideline is fine, but usually results in images far larger than necessary.)

After you adjust your image resolution, you may need to apply a little sharpening to bring the image quality back up.

2. Soft Proof your Images

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While you’re still in Photoshop, you can adjust tone and color. (Do yourself a big favor and learn to use Adjustment Layers or the Smart Filters and the Camera Raw filter for this, so you can safely make additional changes later.) Remember that your image will end up as CMYK sooner or later. Fortunately, Photoshop can preview how your image will appear in CMYK without your having to actually convert it. This is called “soft proofing.”

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InStep: Using RGB Images

Low-tech tip: close your eyes Before you make any settings in the Customize Proof Condition dialog box (View > Proof Setup > Custom), turn off the Preview option. Choose your settings, then hover your cursor over the OK button and close your eyes when you click OK. Wait for five seconds, and then open your eyes. Yes, it sounds crazy, but here’s the reasoning: When you click OK, you’ll see the change from RGB to CMYK, and it will be ugly and you’ll be sad. But if you follow my advice, you’ll notice the difference, but it won’t be so dramatic. Avoid the temptation to do quick before-and-after comparisons, as they’re unrealistic and—if you think about it—not really helpful. The important thing is, how does it look in CMYK (not how it compares to the RGB version).

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To soft proof your document, first choose View > Proof Setup > Custom. Choose the output target profile from the Device to Simulate pop-up menu. For example, if your printer has sent you an ICC profile that describes their printing press and the paper stock you’ll be printing on, you can choose it here. (You would need to install it first, outside of Photoshop.) Alternatively, if your printer has told you to target a standard such as Coated GRACoL, then choose that. Also, you probably want to turn on the Simulate Paper Color option; colors will appear even more “dull,” but they’ll be more realistic.

You can still edit your image while previewing CMYK if you want, or disable the softproofing mode by choosing View > Proof Colors. Note that you can also always inspect the CMYK values by opening Photoshop’s Info panel and hovering your cursor over the image. However, those CMYK values are based on the CMYK setting in the Working Spaces section of the Edit > Color Settings dialog box. If you change the CMYK working space in that dialog box (in order to get more accurate CMYK values in the Info panel), be sure to remember to change it back after you’re done, or you may inadvertently mess up future images!

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3. Save Your Images

Once you’re done editing and previewing your image in Photoshop, it’s time to save it— leaving it in RGB mode. In the Save As dialog box, make sure the Embed Color Profile option is turned on (it is by default).

One question I’m often asked is which file format to save Photoshop images in. The quickn-dirty answer is: native Photoshop (PSD) for most images, or a high-quality JPEG when file size is an important issue. Or, if the image has vector artwork (like text layers) in it, then I recommend Photoshop PDF. (See InDesign Magazine issue 57 for a more detailed answer.)

4. Import into InDesign

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When you place your image into your InDesign layout (see “InDesign 101: Placing Images” on page 39), your RGB image appears on your page looking much like it did in Photoshop. InDesign automatically reads the RGB color profile that Photoshop embedded, which tells it what the RGB colors are supposed to look like—and how to display them properly on your page.

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For the advanced color user (most people will never need this): By default, InDesign uses the Relative Colorimetric rendering intent. If your images are brightly colored business charts, you may want to use the Saturation intent instead. Or, if you’re dealing with a photographic image that has a wide spectrum of colors, you might find that the Perceptual rendering results in a better conversion to CMYK. In either case, you can control the rendering intent by selecting the image and choosing Object > Image Color Settings.

5. Soft Proof your Layout

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One of the most common complaints I hear about using RGB images in InDesign is, “I need to show my client/boss how it will appear in CMYK.” Fortunately, InDesign has exactly the same kind of “soft proofing” feature we saw in Photoshop. To preview your document in CMYK, choose View > Proof Setup > Custom, and choose a target CMYK profile from the Device to Simulate pop-up menu.

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InStep: Using RGB Images

As I mentioned earlier, I strongly suggest closing your eyes (or at least looking away from the screen) for a few seconds while you click OK and let your eyes adjust before looking back at your page. That said, I will admit that it’s kind of fun and educational to see both the RGB and CMYK versions of your document at the same time. You can do that by splitting your window, or using Window > Arrange > New Window to display a second window on your document. Then select either one of the windows, and turn on View > Proof Colors to see the CMYK version.

Remember that you can always see an accurate reading of CMYK values anywhere in your document in the Separations Preview panel (see InDesign Magazine issue 67). When you are

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InStep: Using RGB Images

soft proofing (when Proof Colors is enabled), the CMYK values that appear in the panel show the true CMYK values for objects and images.

6. Export PDF

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The most important thing to remember in this process is that just because you place RGB images in InDesign doesn’t mean you’re going to send RGB images to your printer! InDesign can convert all the RGB images to CMYK for you, on the fly, when you export your print-ready PDF file. But before you do this, ask your printer what they want to receive. Many InDesign users who are disappointed with the color they’re getting when they send CMYK images discover that their printers are actually happy to receive PDF files with RGB images in them, and that this results in far better-quality color. So, ask your printer if they’ll accept a PDF/X-3 or PDF/X-4 file. If so, that means they’ll handle the conversion to CMYK for you. InDesign can easily export a print PDF in those

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InStep: Using RGB Images

formats (just choose them from the Adobe PDF Preset pop-up menu in the Export Adobe PDF dialog box).

If they want a PDF/X-1a file, or they insist they want only CMYK in the PDF, that’s no problem. But don’t just leap to the Export button after choosing PDF/X-1a from the Adobe PDF Preset pop-up menu! Instead, take a moment to click the Output pane and choose which CMYK you’re targeting. This is critical. First, make sure the Color Conversion pop-up menu is set to “Convert to Destination (Preserve Numbers).” Then choose the target CMYK from the Destination pop-up menu. Again, if your printer gave you a profile to use, you should choose it here. If your printer tells you to use a generic target, such as Coated GRACoL or Uncoated FOGRA29, then choose that. If your printer or output provider simply gives you an ink limit and no other

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InStep: Using RGB Images

instructions, you can build your own profile with a technique I wrote up at InDesignSecrets (reprinted in this issue's Best of the Blog). In the worst-case scenario, where you truly have no idea how or where the document will be printed, or even on what paper stock, then leave it set to the defaults. (In North America, that means U.S. Web Coated SWOP, otherwise known as “middle of the road, mediocre color.”) If you need to package and send your source files to the printer along with the PDF, those images will, of course, still be in RGB. If that scares your printer, you could convert these copies of your images to CMYK before sending them, but personally I’d rather find a different printer (one who lives in the 21st century). RGB will always be the most flexible, robust, and high-quality format in which to store your images. While there are reasons to convert some images to CMYK before importing them into InDesign, these should be considered the exception, not the rule. Remember that converting to CMYK too soon is like jumping off a bridge: Don’t do it out of peer pressure, do it only after you understand your options and have made the decision for good reason. In the meantime, use a modern workflow and place RGB images in your documents. Your mom will be proud.

n David Blatner is the co-founder of InDesign Magazine and can be found on Twitter at @dblatner, or in real life at PePcon: The Print + ePublishing Conference.

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By Sandee Cohen

InDesign 101: Placing Images

Click? Drag? Move? Crop? There’s a wealth of options for what to do when an image hits the page.

It’s hard to find any InDesign user who has never placed an image in a document. But that doesn’t mean that you know all the tips and techniques for working with images. Here’s a rundown of everything you need to know to work smarter with those images.

Click the Open button. This takes you back to your InDesign page. Your arrow cursor has been replaced by what is called a “loaded cursor” that displays a small preview of the image you chose (Figure 1).

File > Place 101

The first step in importing images is to choose File > Place (Cmd/Ctrl+D). Find the image you want to place. The Place dialog box appears. Use the navigational controls in your operating system to find the image you want to place. (You can choose more than one image, but we’ll cover that later.)

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Figure 1: The loaded cursor preview.

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101

You'll move the cursor over the area where you want to place the image. You have two options for placing the image. Click to place an image If you click the mouse, you’ll place the image at its full size on the page. This means an image that is 1024 pixels by 768 pixels at 72 pixels per inch (ppi) will appear on the page at 1024 pixels by 768 pixels (approximately 14.22" by 10.66"). This is why images from most smartphones are huge when placed on an 8 1/2" by 11" page—they are stored at 72 ppi. However, if you choose an image that is 1024 pixels by 768 pixels at 300 ppi, it will come in at approximately 3.41" by 2.56" when you click on the page. The number of pixels is the same, but the size of the pixels is about four times smaller than the first image (Figure 2). Think of the pixels in the higher resolution image as having been squeezed smaller to be more compact than the lower resolution image. Handy rule: as

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the resolution goes up, the file dimensions go down. Drag to place an image If you want, you can drag with the loaded cursor to create a frame that is larger or smaller than the full size of the image. Unlike drawing a regular frame, this frame is constrained to the same proportions of the original image (Figure 3). If the image is landscape, you can only drag to make a landscape frame. The same goes for portrait images. When you release the mouse, the image fills the frame exactly. (This was a

Figure 2: An image at 72 ppi (left) and an image with the same pixel dimensions set for 300 ppi (right).

revolutionary idea when it was introduced into InDesign CS4.) Of course there may be times when you don’t want your images to fit neatly into a frame. If so, hold the Shift key as you drag. You can then make the frame any size you wish. The image won’t fit exactly into the frame, so you’ll have empty space either on the top/bottom or left/right sides of the frame. There’s one more modifier key you can use when dragging to place an image. If you hold the spacebar, the frame will

Figure 3: Dragging the loaded cursor constrains the frame to the proportions of the image. Also, notice the transformation value for the image.

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101

stop resizing as you drag. You can then reposition the image without changing the size. I do this a lot when I realize I’m running out of space on the page and need to shift the image.

Loading the cursor with many images You don’t have to stop at choosing just one image to place. Select as many images as you want in the Place dialog box. You can even mix images, text, movies, sounds, snippets, or anything else that InDesign lets you put onto a page. You’re not even limited to choosing from just one directory. After you click the Open button, and go back to the InDesign page, choose File > Place again. Navigate to somewhere else, and choose more items to place. You can go on and on this way for as long as you want. Once you’ve loaded up the cursor, there’s a little blue number in the cursor preview. This tells you how many items are loaded (Figure 4).

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Controlling the loaded images There are several keystroke controls for how images are handled in the loaded cursor. Use the up/down or left/right arrow keys on your keyboard to cycle through the different images. The cursor preview changes as each one comes “up to bat.” This makes it easy to choose just the image you want in a specific location in the document. If you can’t tell exactly what the image is based on the preview, take a look at the Links panel. The first image in the stack has a blue LP in the pages column. This way, if you

Figure 4: A number displays how many images are in the loaded cursor.

Figure 5: The LP in the Links panel indicates which image is at the top of the loaded cursor stack.

can’t visually identify what the image is, you can tell by its filename (Figure 5). Click the Escape (esc) key to delete an image from the stack. The number goes down. This helps when you realize you loaded an image you didn’t want. Click any tool or keyboard key to empty all the images from the cursor. I always press the V key, as the next thing I usually want to do is select objects. What can you do with a loaded cursor? My students are always afraid that they’re going to do something to lose the stack of images in their loaded cursor. It’s actually pretty hard to lose the images in the cursor.

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The basic rule is you can do almost everything in the program except choose a tool without losing the loaded cursor. As soon as you choose a tool, either by clicking in the Tools panel or pressing a tool shortcut, you’ll lose the stack of images in the cursor. But even if you do lose the stack of images, that action is undoable. Press Cmd/Ctrl+Z to get the loaded cursor back. Otherwise, that loaded cursor insists on staying loaded. You can even switch to a different document—InDesign or another program—and when you come back to the file, the loaded cursor will still be ready for action. Creating a contact sheet with Gridify At some time you may want to fill your pages with a grid of images to review or save as a PDF to send to a client. That’s when you can use the contact sheet keyboard modifiers as you place images. (See the sidebar on the next page as to why this is called a contact sheet.)

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Start by loading your cursor with as many images as you want. Then position the cursor on the page and start to drag. This creates a frame for a single image. Don’t release the mouse yet! You need to make columns and rows to hold the images. Now tap the arrow keys on the keyboard as shown in the table below. As you tap the keys, you’ll see dotted lines that indicate the rows and columns for the grid (Figure 6). Key Right arrow Left arrow Up arrow Down arrow Cmd/Ctrl key + right arrow Cmd/Ctrl key + left arrow Cmd/Ctrl key + up arrow Cmd/Ctrl key + down arrow

Result Adds columns Deletes columns Adds rows Deletes rows Increases the space between columns Decreases the space between columns Increases the space between rows Decreases the space between rows

Continue dragging to increase the size of the rows and columns to however you want them to fill the page. The downside to using this Gridify feature is that you are limited to placing images on only one page at a time. If you have more than one page of images, you have to create a new page, and then drag and tap to create the new columns and rows. This can get tiresome if you have hundreds of images.

Figure 6: Drag while pressing the up/down and left/right keyboard arrows to create a grid of frames for multiple placed images.

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Creating an image catalog If you want to fill a document with all the images in a specific folder, you can use the ImageCatalog script, which is already installed in your Scripts panel! Open the Scripts panel, navigate to Application > Samples > JavaScript, and double-click the ImageCatalog.jsx

document. An operating system dialog box opens, where you can choose a folder that contains the images you want to place. (Choose the folder, not the images.) Once you choose the folder and click Open, the ImageCatalog dialog box appears (Figure 7). This is where you can choose the number of rows and columns, the space between them,

Why is it called a contact sheet? Here’s a bit of trivia. Before there were digital cameras, photographers took pictures on rolls of film. The photographer would lay the negatives on black and white photographic paper and expose the sheets. This created thumbnails of the images on the paper. You could also see sprockets and film information on the negatives. These pages were called contact sheets because the negatives were in direct contact with the photographic paper. Clients would look at the images through a magnifying glass called a loupe. They would then use a wax marker to indicate which images they liked and how to crop them.

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Figure 7: The options for the ImageCatalog script.

the fitting options, and more. You can even choose to add labels to the catalog and style them with a paragraph style. The ImageCatalog script is pretty powerful. Don’t let it overwhelm you. Fortunately, Bart Van de Wiele wrote up

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a terrific tutorial on ImageCatalog for InDesignSecrets.com.

Placing images into existing frames Not everyone has the freedom to place images anywhere they want on a page. Many people are limited to using templates, created by others, where empty graphic frames are waiting to be filled with images. Here’s how to work with frames that are already on your document pages. Graphic frame or unassigned frame? This is something that mystifies most beginners. Why are there two different tools to draw rectangles? There’s the Rectangle Frame tool and the Rectangle tool. (There are also two tools for ellipses and polygons.) So why the duplicate tools? On first glance you might not see much of a difference, but look carefully. First, when the two types of frames are on the page, notice that the frame created by

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the Rectangle Frame tool has two diagonal lines crossing from corner to corner (Figure 8). Frames created by the Rectangle Frame, Ellipse Frame, and Polygon Frame tools are called graphic frames. The frame created by the Rectangle, Ellipse, and Polygon tools don’t have diagonal lines. These frames are called unassigned frames. The diagonal lines in the graphic frames are supposed to mimic the lines drawn in non-reproducing blue pencils on layout boards that indicated that an image was supposed to go in that space. It was a way of reserving the space so that it didn’t get filled up with copy or ads. The convention was carried over from layout boards to digital

Figure 8: The two types of rectangle frames: a graphic frame (left) and an unassigned frame (right).

page layout programs. So when you draw a graphic frame using the Rectangle Frame tool, you are indicating “an image goes here.” The other big difference is that unassigned frames can be set with a default stroke or fill. The default when the program ships is a frame with a 1-point black stroke and no fill. Change the fill or stroke when no object is selected, and you’ve changed the defaults for any new unassigned frames. The frame created by the Rectangle Frame tool will always have no stroke and no fill. Since unassigned frames don’t have the diagonal lines criss-crossing the rectangle, they are a better choice for setting background colors and gradients. I know so many designers who complain about the clutter of the diagonal lines, but don’t know they can use unassigned frames. So if you want to place frames on your pages to show where graphic should go, your best choice is a graphic frame. But that’s not your only choice, as you’ll discover shortly.

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Clicking into an existing frame Once you’ve got a loaded cursor, place it over a frame that is already on the page. One thing that throws beginners is they think the frame needs to be selected. Nope! It doesn’t have to be selected. It doesn’t have to be released from the master page. You just have to place the cursor inside the area of the frame. Now look carefully at the cursor. Notice that when the cursor is outside the area of the frame, it has a squared corner at the top left of the preview (Figure 9). That squared corner indicates that if you click or drag,

you will be creating a new frame for the image. Now put the loaded cursor inside the area of the frame. Notice how the cursor now has curved lines at the top left. These indicate that the image is going to go into an existing frame (Figure 10).

Figure 9: The squared edge of the cursor preview indicates that the image will be placed into a new frame.

Figure 10: The curves around the cursor preview indicate that the image will be inserted into the frame that it is over.

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Replacing an existing image What if you’ve already got an image in a frame, but have a loaded cursor and want to replace the image? Position the cursor over the frame, and hold the Option/Alt key. The cursor displays

the curved preview. Click. This replaces the existing image with the new one. Converting frames But wait, there’s more! Remember I said there is another choice for the kind of frames you can place images into? Well, you can put your cursor inside the area of an unassigned frame, and you’ll still get the curved lines to insert the image into that frame. Of course as soon as you put the image into the frame, it’s converted from unassigned to graphic, but that’s no bother, because you wanted a graphic in that frame. (Sorry, but you can’t click to convert a text frame into a graphic frame.) A similar feature exists if you want to insert text into the area where there is an empty graphic frame or an unassigned frame. Just place your Text tool cursor inside the area of the empty frame. You’ll see a circle around the cursor icon. This indicates that if you click, you will be converting the frame into a text frame that contains text.

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Container? Content? Once you’ve got an image on the page, there are several different ways you can transform it. But first you have to understand the different parts of the image. There are two parts to the item you placed on the page using the Place command: the image itself and the frame that holds the image. The frame is sometimes called the container. The image is sometimes called the content. All images are held in a frame. When you dragged to place the image, you created the frame and put the image inside it. Selecting and moving both the container and the content Drag with the Selection tool over a frame that contains an image. While it’s not obvious, you’ve actually selected the frame (container) and the image (content). If you’re working on the default Layer 1 of a document, you see a blue bounding box

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and blue transformation handles. These blue items are for the container, but the content is still selected. The blue comes from the color for the layer. Now move the Selection tool slightly inside the container. Don’t go too close to the center of the frame. If the cursor turns into a hand, move away from the center. Wait till you see the arrow (Figure 11). Now press and drag the frame to a new position. Notice both the container and the content move together.

Figure 11: The arrow inside the image indicates that both the container and content are moving.

Selecting and moving just the content Now, move the Selection tool more to the center of the frame where the donut (content grabber) is located. Notice that the hand cursor appears (Figure 12, next page). Press and move the hand around. The image moves inside the frame. Also, notice that instead of the blue color, the bounding box and handles are light brown. (This is assuming you’re working on the default Layer 1.) The light brown is applied to the elements because it is the RGB inverse of the light blue color of the layer. All the images inside a frame show the inverse of the color of the layer. If you find it difficult to grab the content with the content grabber, use the Object > Select > Content command. Selecting and moving just the container This one’s a little tricky. Whenever you use the Selection tool to select a frame, you will always select the container as well as the

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Figure 12: The hand cursor indicates that the content is being moved within the container.

content. But what if you want to select just the container? You would think that the command Object > Select > Container would help, but it doesn’t. It selects both the container and the content. Instead of the Selection tool, choose the Direct Selection tool. This tool is usually used to select individual points on a path or manipulate text wraps. This time, however, we’re going to use it to select just the container, without the content.

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Place the Direct Selection arrow next to one of the sides. If you click, you will select either a point or segment along the path. Now hold the Option/Alt key. A plus sign appears next to the arrow (Figure 13). This indicates that instead of manipulating an individual point, you’re going to select the entire frame. Click. The container alone is selected. Drag any point, segment, or the center point of the frame to move the container, not the content.

and click to place it on a page. As I said at the beginning of this article, the image is displayed at its actual size—100%. Now place the same image, and drag to make a frame that is smaller or larger than the first. Now click to select the first frame. The X and Y Scale Percentage fields display 100% (Figure 14). That’s as expected—we clicked to place the image. Now click to select the second frame. The X and Y Scale Percentage fields display 100%.

When 100% isn’t 100% Here’s something that puzzles many of my students. Take a raster (pixel-based) image,

Figure 13: The Direct Selection cursor with a plus sign indicates you will select the frame.

Figure 14: The X and Y Scale Percentage fields display 100% for the scale amount of the container at InDesign’s default settings.

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Huh? How can that be? Didn’t we drag to place the image not at its actual size? The answer is, take your Selection tool and click the content grabber, or doubleclick the image inside the frame to select the image inside the frame. Now look at the X and Y Scale Percentage fields (Figure 15). They show the true size of the image, either smaller or larger than the original. The Selection tool displays the percentage of the container, which always snaps back to 100% at InDesign’s default

Figure 15: The X and Y Scale Percentage fields display the actual scale amount when the content is selected.

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settings. When you select the content, you see the amount that the image was scaled.

Placement Proficiency With these basics under your belt, and a few nagging mysteries explained, you should have a much easier time working with placed images.

n Sandee Cohen is the author of the InDesign CC 2014 release Visual QuickStart Guide, and co-author of Digital Publishing with InDesign CC.

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GREP of the Month

\w\S+@\S+\w Email addresses

Automatically format email addresses when applying a paragraph style. InDesign helps you format email addresses when you use the Convert URLs to Hyperlinks command (in the Hyperlinks panel menu). But you have to run this command manually and repeat the process every time you’re handed new text. Instead, why not automate this process using GREP styles? Knowing what you’re looking for When you look at the structure of an email address, you’ll see that there are a lot of formations. Here are just a few examples: bart.van.de.wiele@indesign.com bart_vdw1982@adobe.com.au

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You might think you need to look for any upper- or lowercase character, digit…or another special character…followed by the “@” symbol…followed by another series of characters…followed by a period…followed by “a few” other characters…Notice how hard this is getting? Let’s change strategies. Knowing what you’re NOT looking for One character you know cannot be part of an email address is the regular space character: \s, in GREP-speak. But instead of looking for \s, look for \S, because using uppercase tells InDesign to look for everything EXCEPT that character.

Creating your GREP style Start by editing your paragraph style. Add a new GREP style, and then, for the expression, type \w\S+@\S+\w \w looks for a “word character,” which is either an uppercase character, a lowercase character, or a digit. This helps avoid issues where an email address is next to a comma, parenthesis, or other characters that can’t be part of the address. \S+ looks for a series of characters that does not include a space character. @ looks for the actual @ character. —Bart Van de Wiele

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By Conrad Chavez

Blurb Book Creator plug-in for Adobe InDesign

A thoughtfully designed plug-in that saves time and streamlines production when you create a book for the Blurb self-publishing service. Blurb Book Creator plug-in for Adobe InDesign http://www.blurb.com Free Mac and Windows, InDesign CS3–CC 2014 Rating:

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Blurb is one of several companies that can print books you upload from electronic files. They helped drive the rise of affordable self-published books made possible by the digital press. Before the digital press, selfpublishing a book meant a considerable up-front investment in a print run large enough to justify the prep work for a traditional printing press. But because a digital press is like a bigger, faster version of a color printer you might have on your desk, producing even just a single copy of a book is now affordable.

When you design a book for a selfpublishing service, first you need some answers: What page sizes, papers, and cover styles are possible? What production specifications will ensure that it will print properly? Where can you download the right template and InDesign presets? How much will a book cost, and why? Typically, getting these answers can take a lot of time as you navigate the book service’s website in search of the options, pricing, template and preset downloads, and support pages you need.

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InReview: Blurb Book Creator Figure 1: Blurb Book Creator uses one simple window for everything it does.

Blurb Book Creator is an Adobe InDesign plug-in that handles all of those steps in a single window. It integrates book specifications, pricing, preflighting, and uploading to Blurb. It creates relatively unstructured templates you can use, so you can freely design your book using the full power of InDesign. (Note that those unfamiliar with InDesign or who require more help with design and production may be better served with the guided BookSmart or BookWright applications or the Bookify online bookbuilding tool, all available at the Blurb website.)

Installation and updating Installation of the Blurb Book Creator plug-in is easy: just download and run the installer for your version of InDesign, and it’s ready to go. In InDesign you’ll find a new Blurb Book Creator command at the bottom of the File menu; choosing that command launches the plug-in.

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Conveniently, whenever there’s a new version of Blurb Book Creator, you can update it with one click. This is much easier than other services I tried, where you manually download updated plug-in files or scripts and have to move them into the correct (sometimes hidden) folders yourself.

Starting a book The plug-in has a single window organized into numbered steps (Figure 1). Step 1 is a single Create New Book button that adds a new book project to the Your Recent Projects list managed by the plug-in.

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InReview: Blurb Book Creator

In Step 2, Book Details, you specify required options of your book, such as the title, page size, and number of pages. The options you choose change the percopy Price value near the bottom of the plug-in window, so you immediately know how different options affect the cost. You can even have the plug-in create an ISBN number for you, which you’ll need if you want to sell the book through a retailer or book distributor. What happens in Step 3, Document Files, is a little less obvious, because it ties into how the plug-in manages your InDesign documents. A Blurb book project requires two InDesign files: one for the pages and one for the cover. When you click the Create Pages Template or Create Cover Template button, it builds a new InDesign document on the fly based on the settings you chose in Step 2, so you don’t have to worry about finding the right template file to open. When you create the cover document, the plug-in is smart enough to create a spine

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width that can accommodate the number of pages you specified. It’s a little confusing that Blurb Book Creator calls these documents “templates,” because they’re actually saved using the InDesign document format, not the InDesign template format.

Managing Your Documents Once the Book Creator makes your documents, there’s nothing wrong with opening these files from the desktop or by choosing File > Open; however, it’s convenient to manage them from the plug-in window because it keeps track of your book projects and the InDesign documents linked to them. Step 3 contains three buttons to manage the pages and cover documents (Figure 2). If you want to start over, the first button creates a new InDesign document for the pages or the cover. If you moved or renamed the pages or cover document, or just want to Figure 2: Three buttons manage pages in Step 3.

relink to a different one, use the second button. When you want to edit, the third button opens the linked InDesign pages or cover document, so that you don’t have to remember where you saved them. Each document generated by the plug-in uses Blurb standard trim, bleed, margin, and gutter settings, and contains helpful annotations on a non-printing Instructions layer which is easy to hide (Figure 3, next page). Within all of that, you’re free to design and lay out your book however you would

For more detailed Blurb info »» Guide: Blurb InDesign Plug-In »» A Few Things to Know about PDF to Book »» InDesign to Blurb PDF Best Practices

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InReview: Blurb Book Creator

that possible, and has no soft-proofing feature of its own. (You can download an ICC profile from the Blurb website, but some users have reported that its value is limited because it doesn’t precisely represent the paper type you choose.)

Preflighting, reviewing, and uploading

Figure 3: Blurb Book Creator built this document from the settings in Step 2.

like (Figure 4, next page), keeping in mind the guidelines and best practices that Blurb recommends on their website. The plug-in has helpful tool tips, but if you need more information, there’s a guide to Blurb Book Creator on the Blurb website and additional information in their support section.

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If color management is important to you, note that Blurb Book Creator does not help you simulate printed colors on screen (softproof ). While InDesign can soft-proof using the View > Proof Setup and View > Proof Colors commands, Blurb Book Creator does not install an ICC profile that would make

When your InDesign pages and cover documents are ready for final output, you can open the plug-in again and move on to Step 4, Order Book. There you can choose options such as quantity, currency, and whether you want to pay a little more to remove the Blurb logo from the last page of the book. There’s also an option to order an ebook instead of a printed book, but Blurb ebooks have limitations, as described in their guidelines. For example, video, audio, and inline graphics are among the features you should not use in a Blurb ebook. What you might not expect is that the Order Book section is not just about

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placing an order, and the Upload Book button doesn’t immediately upload a book. When you click Upload Book, Blurb Book Creator starts its own preflight process (Figure 5, next page). The Blurb preflight feature works independently of the Preflight feature in InDesign and doesn’t tell you exactly what it’s looking for, but when I included a spot color and an image with an effective resolution of 149 ppi, it flagged both (Blurb guidelines suggest at least 150 ppi). It also noticed that a font was missing; it was a Typekit font that was unavailable because I had quit the Creative Cloud desktop app. Blurb Book Creator preflight helpfully categorizes preflight errors as Serious Problems or Warning Conditions. If Blurb preflight lists any Serious Problems, it won’t let you upload. My missing font was classified as a Serious Problem, but the other issues weren’t. If you want to run the document through your own InDesign preflight profile, check your Preflight results

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Figure 4: I customized the margins, guides, styles, and layout of my book.

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and resolve any resulting issues before you click Upload Book. Then, even if the plug-in tells you that your pages and cover documents passed preflight, you’re still not uploading— even though you clicked an Upload Book button some time ago. The next thing the plug-in does is generate PDF files of the two documents and opens both in Acrobat so that you can review them one last time. These PDF proofs output the bleed area but without crop marks, which may be confusing for users expecting a preview of trimmed pages. As you work in InDesign, it’s a good idea to check your bleeds by using the Preview screen mode from time to time (press the W key). I also chose to do my own test print of an actual-size spread with bleeds and crop marks. After reviewing the PDFs in Acrobat, you should switch back to InDesign, where a Blurb dialog box asks you if you’re satisfied with the PDF files. If you are, you click another Upload Book button. Or,

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Figure 5: Blurb Book Creator lists the results of its preflight process.

if you’re not happy, click Keep Working (Figure 6, next page). If you haven’t already signed in to your Blurb account through the plug-in, at this point you can sign in or create an account. And then, finally, once all

that is behind you, the plug-in will upload your book to the Blurb server. Because the plug-in handles PDF generation itself, you don’t have to set up or import any InDesign export presets. Uploading takes you to the

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InReview: Blurb Book Creator

Blurb website, where you can fill in final order details. When I received my final printed book in the mail, I found no major surprises. The page edges didn’t always match up exactly with the trim lines in the InDesign document, but that’s normal; it’s why there are bleed areas and safe areas. The colors in my images were warmer and more saturated than I expected, but, again, there is no way to proof the colors accurately without buying a book. Still, I’m satisfied with my book (Figure 7). Figure 7: The finished book.

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Figure 6: When you get this far, your book is technically ready to upload to Blurb for printing.

Self-Publishing with Blurb It’s certainly possible to create a Blurb book with InDesign without using Blurb Book Creator. But using the plug-in is far easier and less error-prone than having to step through the process manually. The built-in

annotated templates and preflighting can help resolve problems before they turn into costly printing mistakes. The few rough edges I encountered are minor; the plug-in feels polished and tested. The way that Blurb Book Creator simplifies the book production workflow may help sway users who might be considering a different book service, and it’s kind of fun to use, too.

n Conrad Chavez writes books, articles, and training materials with a focus on digital imaging using Adobe Creative Cloud tools. He is the author of books such as Real World Adobe Photoshop CS5 for Photographers, and is also a fine art photographer. You can find out more about Conrad at his website, conradchavez.com.

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Best of the Blog

Best of the Blog

A collection of the most important and informative articles from InDesignSecrets. If you want to add comments or ask questions, just click the title of the article, or click the Feedback button to view the original post in your web browser. InDesign New Features Guide Updated Back to Version 1 Steve Werner | December 9, 2014

Would you like to do some time travel? Download the updated version of James Wamser’s great InDesign New Features Guide. You can travel into the not-so-long-ago time when QuarkXPress reigned as the king of desktop publishing. A young upstart called InDesign 1.0 was the young David that challenged the king with its exciting new features like High Resolution EPS and PDF Display, Multiple Redo & Undo, or a Native Multi-line Text Composer—none of which QuarkXPress could do.

InDesign New Versions Updated

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Best of the Blog

Mike Rankin wrote about the first version of the InDesign New Features Guide in July 2014. Since then, it has been updated back to the first version of InDesign, which arrived August 31, 1999. James has also updated the index, added features, and added a link to page 1 that enables direct download from his public Dropbox folder so you always have access to the latest version.

James told me why he originally created the document: I originally developed this New Features Guide to view on my iPad while teaching. One day I might be teaching or providing support for CS4 and the next day, a completely different version. I need to know when features were introduced. For example, if a customer is creating a perfect bound cover, I would recommend they use Multiple Page Sizes, but only if the version they are using has that feature. I asked him why he had updated the New Features Guide: I thought in order to have a really comprehensive guide, I needed to go back all the way to version 1.0. After I completed the first version, I decided to share it, since I thought someone might find it useful. The comments made it all worth the time I spent putting it together. Feedback It’s a free download, so enjoy a trip into the past! 

Why You Should Import RGB Images Into InDesign and Convert to CMYK On Export David Blatner and Claudie McCue | December 11, 2014

Yes, we know you probably learned to convert images to CMYK in Photoshop before placing them in InDesign. And yes, we know that you’ve been doing this since 1989 with PageMaker 2. But you know what? It’s the 21st century now and it’s time to wake up, smell the coffee, and change your ways for the better.

InDesign 1.0 features

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Best of the Blog

So, even though we’ve been saying this for 15 years, maybe you haven’t heard it… so we’re going to say it one more time, with emotion: You can leave your images in RGB. You don’t need to convert them to CMYK. And in fact, you probably should not convert them to CMYK (at least not in Photoshop). As we have traveled around the world giving presentations about InDesign, Photoshop, and publishing, we’ve been constantly amazed at the number of people who are still using the old, 20th-century “convert to CMYK” workflow. And we feel a bit like someone walking into a jail announcing, “Hey, the doors aren’t locked! You don’t have to stay in here!” Some people immediately jump up and taste freedom; some wake up to the new realization slowly; and others refuse to believe it, knowing that staying behind bars is more comfortable than facing the unknown. True, in Ye Olden Days, the RIPs (raster image processors) used by commercial printers to translate PostScript from graphics programs did a lousy job of converting RGB to CMYK, resulting in muddy, inaccurate color rendering. Thus it was that, in all the land, a decree went out, ordering that Thou Shalt Convert Thy RGB Images To CMYK Before Sending Thy Job To Thine Printer. Fast forward to Ye Moderne Times: Current print workflows perform excellent conversions of RGB to CMYK, and some printing processes—such as digital presses and large-format inkjet output

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devices—actually provide better and more vibrant output when fed with RGB content. You’ll still encounter print providers who insist on the submission of CMYK content, partly because “that’s how we’ve always done it” (and partly because some very small shops might still be using antiquated equipment). Of course, you should always consult the printer to determine how your job should be submitted—never assume! But here’s the truth: InDesign can convert your images to CMYK as well as Photoshop can. It uses the same color engine, so you can get exactly the same results. (There are a few, relatively rare exceptions to this rule, which we’ll cover below.) So now, in the 21st century, here’s the new rule: Keep your images in RGB as long as you can, place them, as RGB, into InDesign… and then, only if you have to, convert to CMYK inside InDesign when you make your PDF files. We’re Talking Pixels Here We want to be clear that we’re talking about pixel-based images here—bitmapped images, such as those from Photoshop. We’re not talking about vector artwork. InDesign can convert RGB vector artwork, too, but it won’t necessarily end up the way you’d expect. If you’re using Illustrator or a similar vector-drawing tool to

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Best of the Blog

make logos or illustrations that will likely be printed, we generally recommend using CMYK or spot colors, not RGB. Similarly, when you’re applying solid colors to objects in InDesign—and those documents are headed for print—you should use CMYK or spot color swatches, not RGB, in the interest of predictable conversion. For example, if you apply a solid RGB color 0/255/255 (which is bright cyan) to a frame and then print it, you’re not going to see a perfect 100% cyan in print. Instead, you’ll get something like 52% cyan and 13% yellow. That’s just par for the course when it comes to converting solid RGB colors to CMYK. So if you want 100% cyan, you should spec it in InDesign as 100% cyan. Tip: In the Swatch Options dialog box, InDesign and Illustrator both warn you if an RGB color falls outside what CMYK printing inks can reproduce (called the CMYK “gamut”). Click the yellow alert triangle to convert to the closest in-gamut RGB value, so you won’t be shocked when the color is converted to CMYK.

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Note that we’re emphasizing “for print.” If you’re creating documents that are primarily for on-screen viewing, then solid RGB colors are great, even in vector artwork! Why Placing RGB Images is (better than) OK What’s so wonderful about Red-Green-Blue? RGB is the native language of digital cameras and scanners, and it can faithfully portray a wide range (gamut) of colors, from vibrant oranges to brilliant greens, from bright white to dramatic black. Cyan, magenta, yellow, and black (CMYK) printing inks can render a smaller range of colors, resulting in disappointing approximations of those oranges and greens, as well as other commonly desired colors, such as navy blue. When you convert RGB images to CMYK, you lose those out-ofgamut colors, and they won’t return if you convert back to RGB. But here’s the important part: Just because you place RGB images into InDesign doesn’t mean you’re sending RGB images to your printer! InDesign can convert those RGB images to CMYK when you export your PDF file. (It changes them in the PDF file without modifying your originals on disk.) So by placing RGB images, you have a choice: send RGB or CMYK—and if you choose CMYK, then you have to decide which CMYK. The “which CMYK” is a new question for a lot of people, because they think there’s just one CMYK. But there are thousands of

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different CMYKs! So when you convert an RGB image to CMYK in Photoshop you’re targeting (optimizing for) just one of those. And unless you use the correct target printing profile to perform the conversion, you may have stripped out RGB colors that could have printed successfully. For example, if you used a profile for uncoated paper when preparing images that will print on coated stock, your conversion is way off. Plus, printers who have implemented a full color-managed workflow want your images as RGB because they can convert to CMYK at the last stage before printing, optimizing output for the final printing platform. Even better, sticking with RGB means you can use the same images for different jobs: the same document could be printed on Web press coated paper one day and then sheetfed uncoated paper the next. Or you can use the same image assets in multiple ways—for example, a brochure printed on a sheetfed offset press, and a companion banner printed on a grand format inkjet device. The results might be very slightly different, but you will be able to get the best quality from each, rather than target just one printing condition and then leave the other one to chance. Keep in mind that most modern printers can handle RGB content. Converting to CMYK early won’t necessarily ruin the outcome, but might result in the loss of some color gamut, especially if the job is going on a digital press such as the HP Indigo or a wide-gamut device such as a large format inkjet printer.

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So talk with your printer: If they say they can accept a PDF/X3 or PDF/X4 file, that means they can handle the conversion from RGB to CMYK themselves (and, again, they’ll probably do a better job of it than you can). If they say they need all your images converted to CMYK, then use InDesign to do the conversion when you make your PDF. (Some of you are saying, “But I don’t make a PDF, I send my native InDesign files to the printer.” Well, um, that’s nice. We find sending PDF files to be far more reliable, assuming the file is created correctly. If you aren’t sure how to make a great PDF file, see the links to our video courses and books at the end of this article.) Of course, your printer may request that you send an InDesign package with the PDF so that any necessary changes can be made more easily. Printers often have to modify otherwise perfect files to accommodate the final printing process. But if the file and the PDF are made correctly, they shouldn’t need to touch your original files. How to Convert to CMYK When Exporting a PDF When your printer tells you they do prefer CMYK images, here’s how to export your PDF files from InDesign: 1. Choose File > Export. 2. Choose PDF (Print) from the Format pop-up menu.

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3. Choose a PDF Preset (such as PDF/X-1a if you want to flatten all your transparency, or PDF/X-4 if you want to maintain your transparency). 4. Set up all the other options in the Export PDF dialog box (compression, marks and bleeds, etc.). 5. Here’s the important part: In the Output pane of the Export PDF dialog box, choose Convert to Destination (Preserve Numbers) from the Color Conversion pop-up menu. Do not choose Convert to Destination (without the “preserve numbers” part) unless you really seriously know what you’re doing. Preserve Numbers means “if I have a CMYK image or CMYK colors in my file, then leave those alone.” You want that. 6. In the Destination pop-up menu, choose which CMYK you are targeting. Again, in the best case scenario, your printer will give you a color “profile” you should choose. But if they insist on CMYK, and for some reason can’t provide a custom profile, ask if they’re running the job on a web press or on a sheetfed press; then you can at least use canned profiles. For example, for uncoated stock on a sheetfed press, you might want to use Uncoated FOGRA29. 7. Click Export. The PDF you get will be all CMYK and your printer will be happy.

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When It Makes Sense To Convert to CMYK Before Placing an Image There are a few times when we convert images to CMYK in Photoshop before saving and placing into InDesign: »» First, if an image includes a color that must show up with a specific CMYK value. For example, let’s say you have an image of a banner with a giant corporate logo on it, and that logo has to be a particular CMYK value. Or if you have an image that contains an area of solid magenta that really is supposed to be solid, 100% magenta. »» Second, there are some image-retouching situations where you really need to adjust just one plate. A classic example is when you have an image of a model’s face and you want to adjust only the black plate. In those cases, we would convert to CMYK in Photoshop and then adjust the color on individual channels/plates to match the required color. But those are the exceptions, not the rule. And, for goodness sake, if you are going to use Photoshop to convert from RGB to CMYK, choose Edit > Convert to Profile (instead of just choosing Image > Mode > CMYK). If you just change the image mode, Photoshop uses the values dictated by your current color setup (Edit > Color Settings). That’s fine if your current color settings match your ultimate printing process.

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But choosing Edit > Convert to Profile helps ensure that you’re choosing the correct target (“which CMYK”) each time.

Tables to the Rescue: Centering a Bullet Character on a Paragraph Alan Gilbertson | December 15, 2014

For More Information Want to learn more about preparing images for print, exporting documents to PDF, and managing your color? Check out: InDesign Insider Training: Print PDFs Print Production Fundamentals Real World Print Production Real World InDesign Feedback Real World Color Management (an oldie, but a goodie) 

In most cases, bulleted lists have the bullet character beside the first line of the paragraph. This is how we’d normally set things up:

But what if, as one person asked recently, you wanted to center the bullet on the whole paragraph, in such a way that no matter the

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length of the paragraph—one line, two lines, five lines—the bullet would automatically be centered, like this?

You could get there, painfully, by setting up different character styles for the bullets, each with enough baseline offset so that the bullet would be correctly positioned for a particular paragraph length. The problem is you’d then have to have a set of paragraph styles called 1-line Bullet, 2-line Bullet, 3-line Bullet, and so on. And if the copy were to be edited, many of these bulleted paragraphs would suddenly have the wrong style applied. Worse, if the client were to ask for a different font, all those baseline offsets would have to be adjusted, and all the bulleted paragraphs would have to be checked to see if they needed a style change. Ouch!

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Tables and table styles are the way out of this situation, but they need some careful setup. We have paragraph spacing in the normal flow of text, and a table also has space before, space after, and cell offsets that will make things look very odd if we don’t account for them. We want the bullet paragraphs to mesh perfectly with the rest of the page layout. For this example, the Body Copy style is Myriad Pro at default 12 pt size and leading, with Space Before set to 8 pt. Remember that number, because we’re going to need it.

The bulleted paragraphs will sit in a two-column table. The narrow left column will have the bullets, with their own paragraph style. The wider right column will contain the text in the same Body Copy style we’re using for regular text.

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First we set the table style. Zero out everything in the Table Setup section. We don’t want the table itself adding any spacing, and we definitely don’t want a table border!

Now we have to set up two cell styles, one for the text and one for the bullets. The table text cell style looks like this:

Vertical Justification should already be Align Top, but change the First Baseline Offset to Leading, as shown. This is essential to make the rest work.

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The first paragraph of text in a table cell behaves like the first paragraph in a text frame: any Space Before setting in the paragraph style is ignored. We’ve substituted for this by setting the “Top” Cell Inset to 8 points and the other three to zero.

paragraph style. Note the same 8-pt top inset and zero bottom inset as the text.

Setting up the Cell Style for Bullets For this example, I’ve used an ornament from the Minion Pro Regular font at 20 pt, with 20 pt leading. In the same way we used Cell Inset settings to adjust the placement of the text in the paragraph cells, we’ll use the them to finesse the placement of our bullet. Just be aware that the exact settings depend on the size and style of the bullet glyph, so they’re not as precise as for the text. Here is how this particular one is set up. The 2-pt left offset is the equivalent of changing the hanging indent setting in a bulleted

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Placing the original bulleted paragraphs (cyan) under the new ones that we set using our table, you can see the difference:

Numbered Lists The same technique works for centering the numerals in numbered lists. The cell has to contain at least a single space (it can be a hair space) so InDesign will insert the number, but otherwise the principle is exactly the same. In this example, I used 16-pt Myriad Black at 60% grey for the number style, and added a top offset to the cell to make the numeral sit on the baseline of a single-line paragraph.

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Variations Instead of using the full Space Before as a top inset in the text cell style, you can split it 50/50 top and bottom to give more flexibility in placing the bullet, or to make room for a larger graphic. In that case, you would add Space Before to the table itself and a negative Space After to keep paragraph spacing in sync with the regular text. Feedback

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Force Color Images to CMYK with a 240% Ink Limit

then set View to Separations, and then hover your cursor over a color on the page, you can see the total ink coverage really easily:

David Blatner | December 17, 2014

So your printer or output provider (such as Lightning Source) says you have a 240% ink limit, eh? First of all, what does that mean? How can you have more than 100% ink? Well, if you place 100% cyan and 100% yellow in the same place, that green color is called 200% total ink. (It is also often called “total area coverage” or TAC.) So a 240% TAC means there shouldn’t be any place on your page that has more than 240% total ink—which can happen pretty quickly in dark shadows where there is a lot of black ink. Fortunately, it’s easy to test for this in InDesign, and it’s even pretty easy to avoid if you use the correct CMYK conversion methods. Separations Preview and Ink Limits Claudia McCue wrote a terrific piece about InDesign’s Separations Preview panel in Issue 67 of InDesign Magazine, where she showed how you can use this panel both to view your color separations on screen and also find your total ink limit anywhere on the page. In a nutshell, if you open the panel (from the Window > Output menu),

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In this case, the cursor is over a black section of an image, and the total ink (look next to “CMYK”) is 238%. This is great because it gives you real-time, accurate feedback about what CMYK colors are going to come out of InDesign, even if you place RGB images into InDesign. That is, if you have placed CMYK images, it’ll show you the real CMYK values; or, if you place RGB images, the panel will show you what values you’ll get if you convert to CMYK as part of the printing or PDF-exporting process. (More on that in a moment.)

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Alternatively, you can set the View pop-up menu in the panel to Ink Limit, and then set the total ink limit in the field in the upperright corner of the panel. Here, I’ve set it to 240%, and all the areas that are under 240% show up in gray, and all the areas that are more than 240% total ink show up in red:

Now, if you’re paying attention, you’ll wonder why there is so much red in the second image, when the dark black I measured in the image above was clearly under 240%! In both cases, the image is an RGB image that I’ve placed into InDesign. But in the first screen shot, I told InDesign how I was planning on converting it to CMYK, and in the second screen shot I left it set to the default conversion.

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That is, in the second image, InDesign assumed I was just going to use the default U.S. Web Coated SWOP v2 profile, which has a built-in max ink limit of 300%. Making the Panel Use the Right CMYK When you’re converting colors from RGB to CMYK with InDesign (or Photoshop, or anything else), you need to pick the right CMYK. If you just go with the defaults, you’ll get middle-of-theroad mediocre color most of the time. Or, your printer will yell at you because you didn’t convert correctly. So, back to the original question: How can you tell InDesign to use a 240% max ink limit in the conversion? First, you need a profile with that limit. Here’s a simple one I created quickly with Photoshop. You can likely get better results by downloading one from color.org or VIGC or colormanagement.org. The best option would be you getting one from your printer! (Ask them for “an ICC color profile for your press.”) After you get the profile, you need to install it in the right place: »» Mac: Drag into [HD]/Library/ColorSync/Profiles/ »» Windows: Right-click on the profile and choose “Install Profile” Okay, so now you have a profile that will limit all RGB-to-CMYK conversions to less than 240% ink. To tell InDesign’s Separations

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Preview panel to use that profile, choose View > Proof Setup > Custom, and then choose your new profile from the CMYK pop-up menu:

you’ll get when you use that profile to convert your RGB images to CMYK. (See “How to Convert to CMYK When Exporting a PDF” in this article.) Next time someone says to you, “I have to use Photoshop so that I can see my CMYK values,” you can explain that InDesign does it Feedback just as well. You just need to know where to look. 

Using Animated GIFs in InDesign Mike Rankin | December 22, 2014

When you click OK, InDesign automatically turns on the View > Proof Colors feature. (But you can toggle that on and off manually, too.) When Proof Colors is on, InDesign is displaying your whole document as though you were in CMYK. You’ll often see bright RGB colors get muted or shift slightly (which should be expected in CMYK). Also, View > Overprint Preview will turn on automatically, and the current color view will be listed in the document title bar:

So now, when Proof Colors is turned on, the Separations Preview panel shows you real CMYK values—that is, the CMYK values

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At this year’s InDesign Conference, I was asked an interesting question about using animated GIFs in interactive documents exported from InDesign. It’s not a topic that comes up very often, but on the chance that you may have a GIF or two that you want to use in a project, here’s the scoop. Placing Animated GIFs in InDesign You can, of course, place animated GIFs into your documents, but InDesign has (almost) no idea that the images are supposed to be animated. When you place the file, all you get is a static image of the first frame (Image Import Options only gives you controls for color and transparency). Since the file is not recognized as a video, the Media panel is empty, and you can’t assign a button action to play the GIF.

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So at first, it looks like GIFs are DOA. However, if you look in the EPUB Interactivity Preview panel, you get the first sign of where animated GIFs might work. Preview a spread with a placed GIF, and it plays just fine in the panel. Note that you will not see a GIF play in the SWF Preview panel. Animated GIFs in iBooks and Elsewhere Sure enough, if you export to EPUB and view in iBooks, you’ll see the GIF play. This shouldn’t be too surprising, since underneath, EPUBs are mostly HTML, and HTML web pages are a GIF’s natural habitat. But the story is different outside of iBooks, like in Adobe Digital Editions, where I’ve seen GIFs play in fixed-layout EPUBs, but not in reflowable EPUBs. So if you’re going to try using GIFs in EPUB outside of iBooks, definitely do your own testing.

apps like Photoshop, Adobe Media Encoder, or a service like online-convert.com. In Photoshop, open the GIF, and then click the button in the Timeline panel to convert to video timeline.

Then, click the button to Render Video.

Converting Animated GIFs for PDF and DPS When it comes to other kinds of interactive documents you can make with InDesign, like PDFs and DPS folios, you’re out of luck (at least temporarily). Neither format supports animated GIFs. But both formats support video, so all you need to do to use the animated content is convert the GIF to an MP4 video file using

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In the Render Video dialog box, choose the options you want for your MP4.

Then press return or Enter (or click the Start Queue button) to perform the conversion.

Or, as a last resort, you could use some screen-recording software to record the GIF playing and save it as MP4, which you could use in any interactive output—DPS, PDF, or EPUB. For some inspirational examples of using animated GIFs in iBooks, check out NYC Basic Tips and Etiquette and Appley Dapply. And for general GIF inspiration and hours of time-wasting, check Feedback out giphy.com.  In Media Encoder, open the GIF, and use the controls in the Queue panel to select the desired format, preset, and location for the video file.

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Yet More Reasons to Create Tagged PDF David Blatner | January 7, 2015

Even if you don’t care about making your PDF files accessible (though you should! it’s important), you should still turn on the Create Tagged PDF checkbox in the Export PDF dialog box. Frustratingly, this checkbox is not selected by default in most of the PDF Export Presets (such as PDF/X or Smallest Size). So you need to do it manually.

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To understand why you should enable this feature, you have to understand how PDFs are made. In a PDF, every line of text—and sometimes every word, or even individual characters in a word—is positioned on the page with a coordinate. The result is that Acrobat (or Reader, or whatever PDF viewer you use) is simply placing letters or words or lines on a page, without any understanding of how they fit together. That means if you select some text from a PDF and try to paste it someplace else (such as into Word or an email program), each line of text often ends up in its own paragraph! Also, sometimes hyphenated words at the end of a line can appear with a hyphen in them when you copy and paste. Similarly, Acrobat’s hyperlink-recognition feature (where it looks for text that appears to be a hyperlink) generally breaks if the URL is hyphenated or broken across two lines. However, if you turn on Create Tagged PDF when you export your PDF file, then you won’t generally have these problems. When PDFs are “tagged,” then InDesign includes some XML-like structure tags in the background that you don’t see, but Acrobat (and some other PDF readers) can see. Those tags tell the PDF viewer that “this is a paragraph,” “this is a whole word,” and so on.

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Here’s one other reason you want to enable the tagging feature: If you ever lose your original InDesign document and you need to re-create it from the PDF (using a tool such as Recosoft PDF2ID), having your text tagged can help a lot! Note that I said “some other PDF readers” earlier… some PDF readers don’t seem to pay attention to these tags, so your mileage may vary. But Adobe Acrobat and Reader handle them great, so I Feedback almost always turn this checkbox on. 

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Updated Visual Guide to InDesign Preferences Mike Rankin | January 12, 2015

A few years ago, I posted a visual guide to InDesign preferences, to help folks understand which preferences affect only the current document, and which ones affect all your documents. Now I’ve updated the guide to include all 19 tabs in the InDesign CC 2014 preferences dialog box. Enjoy! Visual Guide to InDesign CC 2014 Preferences (19 pages, PDF)

Feedback

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The InDex: InDex Your Key to Our Content Can’t find that article you saw in an earlier issue? Wondering whether we covered that obscure plug-in? Never fear, the InDex is here.

Index for issues 1 through 70 July 2004 — February 2015

MAGAZINE

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The first issue of InDesign Magazine was published in July 2004. Since then, we’ve cranked out thousands of pages on hundreds of related topics. While it’s possible to use Acrobat to simultaneously search all past issues of the magazine for one word or phrase, many readers have clamored for a formal index at the back of each issue. However, with 70 issues to account for, that’s not feasible. Instead, the InDex will live as a PDF you can download for free. If you come across a topic you want to know more about, but it’s in an issue you don’t have, you’re not out of luck. We sell back issues at indesignsecrets.com.

If the topic you’re looking for isn’t in the InDex, you have one more way to search: that PDF trick we mentioned. To make it work, all of your magazine issue PDFs must be in one folder. Open any issue in Acrobat, and then press Shift+Command+F (Shift+Ctrl+F on Windows). In the Search window that appears, be sure that you click the radio button that says “All PDF Documents in,” and in the dropdown menu below that, choose the folder in which you placed your magazine issues. You’re on your way to finding anything in any PDF!

Click here to download the InDex.

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While this PDF is just for you, you can tell your friends about this great discount:

$10 off a 1-year membership (use coupon code friend) Send them to: indesignsecrets.com/issues

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