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M A G A Z I N E 69

Creating Timelines

• Script Typefaces

January 2015

• Preflighting Ads

Wireframing & Prototyping in InDesign

•F  ind Duplicate List Entries •W  hat’s the Difference Between EPUB, DPS, and PDF?


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MAGAZINE

From the Editor in Chief PUBLISHERS David Blatner, Anne-Marie Concepción EDITORIAL Editor in Chief Mike Rankin, mike@indesignmag.com Managing Editor Wendy Katz, wendy@indesignmag.com Senior Editor Sandee Cohen, sandee@indesignmag.com Contributing Writers Justin Putney, Nigel French, Jeff Gamet, Bart Van de Wiele, Matt Mayerchak, Sandee Cohen, Bob Levine, Colin Flashman DESIGN W+W Design, www.wplusw.com Rufus Deuchler rufus.deuchler.net BUSINESS Contact Information http://indesignsecrets.com/contact Subscription Information indesignsecrets.com/issues Published by InDesignSecrets.com, a division of Publishing Secrets, Inc. Copyright 2014 InDesignSecrets.com. All rights reserved. Reproduction and redistribution prohibited without approval. For more information, contact permissions@indesignmag.com. InDesign Magazine is not endorsed or sponsored by Adobe Systems Incorporated, publisher of InDesign. InDesign is a registered trademark of Adobe Systems Incorporated. All other products and services are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners and are hereby acknowledged.

Happy New Year! All of us at InDesign Magazine are excited to kick off another year of bringing you the best InDesign content, bar none. And to get things started, we have an eye-opening feature article by Justin Putney on a surprising use for InDesign: as a tool for designing and prototyping interactive content for websites and apps. The demand for interactive content is high, and it’s only going to grow in the future. You might think this means you’d have to learn all new techniques and applications. But as Justin explains, you already possess a powerful set of tools for these tasks: Adobe InDesign! Continuing with the theme of unexpected uses for InDesign features, in this month’s InStep, I show how to use tables to quickly create graphical timelines. One time when you definitely don’t want surprises is when you receive a job back from a printer. That’s why preflighting is a key step in any print project, but it can be especially

important (and especially tricky) when you’re dealing with advertisements. In his article on preflighting ads, Matt Mayerchak describes the typical challenges and offers some sound advice for dealing with them. Script typefaces can add flair to your designs, but the sheer number and variety of them may make it hard to find the right one for a particular job. That’s why we asked Nigel French to devote this month’s InType to the topic of script faces, so you can choose and use them with confidence. In the GREP of the Month, Bart Van de Wiele has a nifty expression for cleaning up duplicate items in a list. Jeff Gamet is back with another InBrief full of cool add-ons and fonts. And the Best of the Blog features important articles on the future of Adobe DPS, choosing the right digital publishing format, color management fundamentals, and a lot more. Enjoy!

Photos on pages 1, 20, 21, 26, and 38 courtesy of Fotolia.com

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INDESIGN MAGAZINE  69

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InSide: Table of Contents 7

20

26

32

38

39

Wireframing and Prototyping in InDesign Justin Putney explains how you can use InDesign to assist in the task of creating interactive content for websites and apps. InStep: Creating Timelines with Tables Mike Rankin shows how to take advantage of table features for making accurate and attractive timeline graphics. How to Prepare and Preflight Ads When it comes to workflow and creating highquality output, ads present a unique set of challenges. But Matt Mayerchak is here to help! InType: Script Typefaces Nigel French offers a guide to some of the most beautiful and expressive typefaces of all. GREP of the Month: Find Duplicate List Entries Bart Van de Wiele helps you find repeated items in a list.

Best of the Blog  A collection of the most important and informative articles from InDesignSecrets. 43

Converting Cross References to Text and Retaining the Information

45

Adobe Drops DPS Single Edition Support from Creative Cloud

48

What’s the Difference Between EPUB, DPS, and PDF?

51

Traps When Packaging Data Merge Files

52

Arranging Numbered Lists in Separate Frames

54

Leading as a Character Attribute? I’m a Believer!

57

Did You Know InDesign Ignores CMYK Profiles?

61

InDex to All Past Issues

InBrief: New & Improved Products Jeff Gamet keeps you up to date on products that are new, improved, and interesting to InDesign users.

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Join a chapter near you!

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InDesign User Groups are free to join and offer many great benefits!

© 2014 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All rights reserved. Adobe, the Adobe logo, InDesign and InCopy are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Adobe Systems Incorporated in the United States and/or other countries. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

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Wireframing & Prototyping in InDesign How InDesign can help communicate ideas quickly when designing apps and interactive web content Sidebar Image/Link

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by Justin Putney INDESIGN MAGAZINE  69

January 2015

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Wireframing & Prototyping in InDesign

W

hy in the world would you want to use InDesign for tasks like wireframing and prototyping? As it turns out,

InDesign has a great collection of easy-to-use features for creating quick interactivity. And of course, when it comes to wireframing and prototyping, quick is the name of the game. In this article, I’ll show you why (and how) many web and interactive designers are starting to use InDesign.

Defining Our Terms Before we dive into the deep end of this topic, let’s cover a few basic definitions.

UX The acronym UX is short for User eXperience. This is a broad category of design that focuses on the experience of the person interacting with the design. It’s most commonly used when referring to websites or applications, but can be applied to any design process. UI is a related term that stands for User Interface (or User Interaction), which is the visual manifestation of UX. Both

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wireframes and prototypes (defined below) are created as part of a UX design process.

Career Tip UX is a hot buzzword at the moment. If you can find a job with UX requirements, it’s likely to pay more than a job without that requirement. This may only be true until the next hot fad comes along, but this is an important topic to understand and apply for your overall design literacy.

Wireframe A wireframe is an early stage, bare-bones representation of an interactive design. It usually blocks out the major elements with simple lines and rectangles. The terms mockup and comp can be used interchangeably with wireframe, but these two terms can also be used to refer to later stages in the design process, whereas wireframes are typically used only at the very beginning of a project. Figure 1 shows a sample wireframe.

Figure 1: This sample wireframe blocks out the initial design using simple shapes.

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Wireframing & Prototyping in InDesign Prototype A prototype can contain varying levels of detail, but its real purpose is to test functionality (or animation)—in other words, where a wireframe is typically static, a prototype provides some interactivity. A prototype lets you, your developer, or your client see how the ideas in your head work in a real setting. By building a prototype, you can review and make changes before committing to the final design. A prototype is also sometimes referred to as a proof-of-concept.

Why Wireframing and Prototyping are Important Have you ever worked your buns off on a rush job where you knew exactly what the client wanted, and you somehow managed to post the final project just before the (outrageous) deadline, and you’re getting ready to leave work for some well-deserved rest,

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when the client emails you at 4pm on Friday to tell you that something is completely wrong? (Sadly, this has happened to me more times than I would like to admit.) The trick to avoiding the horrible scenario just described is to get the “no” responses from the client out of the way in the early stages of a project, using—you guessed it— wireframes and prototypes. Fundamentally, creating wireframes and prototypes is about saving time and energy. Wireframes let your client review the basic elements of a design when the stakes are low. A comment like “the logo needs to be on the left” costs you much less to change in a wireframe than it does in a final design. Similarly, when your developer says “that can’t be done” based on a wireframe or prototype you’ve designed, it’s not the crisis that it would be with your “final” design that has already been approved by the client. So wireframes and prototypes are all about getting your team (you, your developer, and your client) on the same page.

What InDesign Offers in the UX Process Years ago, when it was becoming clear that digital screens might someday eclipse the printed page as the preferred viewing surface, the InDesign team at Adobe wisely added a lot of helpful, productive interactive features to InDesign. At the time, these interactive features were heavily tied to Flash and SWF. So, as Flash has lost its luster these past few years, these wonderful interactive features have been somewhat underappreciated and even forgotten. However, not only are these features still relevant and finding new homes in DPS, EPUB, and HTML, but when you combine them with other great InDesign features, you find that our favorite page-layout application happens to be a wonderful tool for building wireframes and prototypes. In fact, the interactive features are particularly good for whipping up rapid prototypes with absolutely no coding or scripting.

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Wireframing & Prototyping in InDesign Through the rest of this article, I’ll walk you through ten features that make InDesign a uniquely powerful UX tool.

1 Document presets and workspaces

A wireframe should not take a long time to create. So, creating a document for that wireframe should be fast, too. It’s likely that you’ll be mocking up content for certain sizes over and over. By saving a document preset, you can quickly create new documents with the same settings using a single step. Figure 2 shows the New Document dialog box, preconfigured with some example settings from a document preset. As you know, InDesign has multiple uses, and many, many panels to serve all of those uses. Those features can be distracting when working on wireframes and prototypes, so it would be nice to be able to strip away all of the unnecessary parts of InDesign when we don’t need them. A custom workspace will let you do just that. To create a new

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Figure 3: A custom workspace lets you save panel locations and menu customizations so that you can quickly adapt InDesign for different design tasks.

Once you’ve created a new workspace, you can quickly shift InDesign into (or away from) UX “mode” via Window > Workspace, as shown in Figure 4. Figure 2: Enter custom settings in the New Document dialog box, and then you can save them as a document preset (just click the “save to disk” icon next to the Document Preset field) that you can call up instantly.

workspace, arrange your panels (open the ones you want to use and close the ones you don’t), and then choose Window > Workspace > New Workspace. This will bring up the New Workspace dialog box, as shown in Figure 3.

Figure 4: Easily change the display of InDesign panels by changing your current workspace.

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Wireframing & Prototyping in InDesign

2 Grids, guides, and smart guides

The alignment and distribution of page objects is an essential component to a UX design tool. The content of the design at this early stage is largely made up of placeholders. Our task, starting with the wireframe, is to figure out what elements need to be present in our design, and how they will fit together. InDesign has as good a system as any application available for guides and grids; but one feature I really love is smart guides. Unlike standard guides and grids, smart guides require no setup. You can simply start drawing and positioning elements, and smart guides will do their work, as shown in Figure 5. Zero setup is a great thing, since we’re trying to save time and energy in the process of creating wireframes.

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Figure 5: When dragging the rectangle at the bottom right, InDesign automatically shows bright green smart guides when the selected rectangle comes into alignment with the rectangle at the top left. (Note: This screenshot was augmented in Photoshop to increase the visibility of the guides in a small image.)

3 Styling: Characters,

Paragraphs, Objects, Tables, and Cells The one thing you can know for sure when you start creating your wireframes is that they will change—perhaps dramatically so. How do you make massive changes to a design with relatively little fuss? Well, one way is to use styles. Styles are rules that govern the appearances of different elements on our pages (both text and objects).

Fortunately for us, InDesign has the best styling functionality of any application. The exponential power of styling comes into effect when you start basing styles on other styles. This technique allows you to make changes to a “parent” style that will ripple through to all of that style’s children and grandchildren. Not only can styles be based on other styles, but one type of style can also be nested inside another type of style. For example, an object style can also contain a paragraph style. In Figure 6a, the button has several attributes applied, including rounded corners, a stroke, a paragraph style, vertical centering, and a gradient fill. From this button, I created a style called Button Style.

Figure 6a: An object style was created from the button at the top right, but that style has not yet been applied to the text frame below.

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Wireframing & Prototyping in InDesign After creating the object style, I simply drew a text frame and added text. Now, in a single step, I click Button Style in the Object Styles panel, and all of the attributes that I listed have been applied to the new text frame (as shown in Figure 6b).

Figure 6b: The object style applies all of the attributes from the top button, including the paragraph style used inside of the frame.

Best of all, once you’ve created styles, you can import them into new documents, or save them as part of the default set. To add default styles in InDesign, simply close all documents before creating (or importing) the desired styles. You’ve just saved more time!

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Multi-State Objects 4 Multi-State Objects (MSOs) are another brilliant piece of engineering that makes InDesign particularly effective as a prototyping tool. The ability to add different “states” to an object opens up all kinds of possibilities for creating variable and interactive content. There are many different uses for MSOs (slide shows, pop-up windows…), but I’ll just focus on one that is frequently required in prototyping. Any kind of interactive experience has a set of “application states.” When a user interacts with an application (or website, or publication, etc.), and a visual change is required, this change is considered a new application state. For example, when you log into Gmail and your inbox appears, you’re in a “list” state. If you then click on a message, you’re in a “read” state. If you click Reply, you’re then in a “compose” state. Figure 7 shows a prototype for the default state on a website landing page.

Figure 7: A simple wireframe/prototype showing the landing page of a website.

When the Play button for the video is pressed, the application state changes to reveal a video overlaid on the page, as shown in Figure 8.

Figure 8: A second object state is used to create a video overlay.

Not only can you create object states in InDesign, but you can also control the display of those states with buttons.

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Wireframing & Prototyping in InDesign Buttons (with No Coding) 5 Buttons are great, right? But don’t they usually require some coding? Not with InDesign. And, if that alone doesn’t impress you, how about creating a button and adding an action to that button in a single step? Figure 9 shows this one-step process.

In case I haven’t harped on it enough, prototyping is about speed and saving time. It’s hard to beat the ability to create interactivity in a single step.

6 Animation and

Timing (Motion Presets)

Animation is a design element, right? So why, when we create static mockups, is it then left up to the developer to decide how the animations will look? Instead, I argue that it’s a good idea for the designer to prototype the animation. Luckily, since InDesign was built with designers in mind, applying animation is a very easy process, as shown in Figure 10. And before you start wondering if the simplicity of the Animation panel limits you to creating very simple, pre-baked animations, let me introduce you to the Timing panel (shown in Figure 11).

Figure 10: Animation, like interactivity, can be added in a single step, thanks to InDesign’s Animation panel.

Figure 11: The Timing panel lets you create sequences and synchronized animations.

Figure 9: Select any text or graphic frame on your page, click the plus sign (+) in the Buttons and Forms panel, and you’ve got instant button actions at your fingertips.

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Wireframing & Prototyping in InDesign You can change the order of your animations by rearranging them in the Timing panel. You can string complex sequences together, trigger animations with different events, create loops, and synchronize items, all thanks to the Timing panel. So, your animations can be simple or complex, and in both cases, they can be created quickly. To be frank, it’s not like InDesign is AfterEffects or Edge Animate; you can’t easily build tricky or complicated animations. But for many (and perhaps most) animations that you would need in a prototype, InDesign’s tools are perfect.

7 Liquid Layouts and Alternate Layouts

If you’re mocking up something digital these days, chances are good that you’ll want to consider a “responsive” design that can handle multiple screen sizes. InDesign’s Liquid Layout panel lets you control how objects are moved, resized, or scaled when the page size changes. By using the

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Figure 12: Left: The layout at its default size. Right: The layout being scaled with the Page tool, based on the layout rules shown in the Liquid Layout panel.

Object-based option, you can control the individual properties of each item in your layout. You can then test the scaling by using the Page tool to temporarily change the size of the page. Figure 12 shows how the header is being scaled based on the Liquid Layout rules applied. While the Liquid Layout feature can be handy in prototyping some rather simple responsive designs, it’s nowhere near as robust as the CSS Media Queries used

by web developers to create responsive designs. (For example, there’s no way to indicate in InDesign that a particular block should disappear on a narrow screen.) But have no fear, because your work setting up layout rules has not been in vain! If you have to break down and mock up multiple screens separately (instead of in one liquid layout), the Alternate Layouts feature will let you create multiple layouts in one document. Best of all, if you’ve applied Liquid Layout rules, you can base the new layout on an existing layout, and InDesign will use the Liquid Layout rules to pre-scale

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Wireframing & Prototyping in InDesign

Figure 13: The Liquid Layout rules did most of the heavy lifting when creating these alternative layouts for different screen sizes. Other than removing the sidebar at the right after creating the second layout, InDesign did all the work.

and pre-position items for you. The two alternate layouts shown in the center and on the right in Figure 13 were created in about 30 seconds, thanks to the Liquid Layout rules already created for the original layout on the left.

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8 Master Pages (and

Masters Based on Masters)

Master pages are another feature that InDesign does masterfully (pun intended). Master pages let you create content on one page, which then appears on many pages. Moreover, you can create master pages based on other master pages. When you edit the original item on the master page, all of the “child” items receive the update.

Here are a few places where you might need to repeat items in a UX environment (e.g., a digital publication, website, or mobile app): »» Logos »» Headers »» Navigation menus »» Social sharing buttons »» Newsfeeds »» Toolbars »» Footers »» Copyright notices You can probably think of even a few more. If you set up your repeated content on master pages, when the client hands you those massive changes, you can look (and feel) like a superhero by making a single change to a single master page and watch it ripple through your entire design.

Libraries 9 The Library panel lets you store and reuse visual assets across documents. Once again, since speed is one of our main focus areas at this point in the UX process, being

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Wireframing & Prototyping in InDesign able to easily grab reusable components instead of creating them from scratch is a big win. Figure 14 shows a library with a couple of common navigational elements.

created. There are many websites that make it easy for you to embed their content. Here are a few examples: »» Social sharing buttons »» Twitter feeds »» YouTube videos »» Google Maps (shown in Figure 15) »» Calendars Figure 16: The same Google Map from Figure 15 has been pasted into InDesign.

Figure 14: InDesign libraries are independent of documents and are a great way to store reusable assets.

You create a library by choosing New > Library, and applying and saving library items is as easy as dragging and dropping between the panel and the document.

10

Embed HTML

Question: What’s faster than creating something you can reuse? Answer: Using something that someone has already

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Figure 15: With Google Maps you can click a gear icon at the bottom of the map window to bring up options to link to the map or embed it (by copying the HTML iframe code).

After you copy the HTML, switch over to InDesign, and simply choose Edit > Paste (or Cmd+V/Ctrl+V). InDesign will recognize the clipboard content as HTML, and will generate a container to house the HTML as well as display a preview (Figure 16). If you export your document to FixedLayout EPUBS, or to Adobe DPS, or to HTML5 using in5, the map will retain its interactivity as well.

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Wireframing & Prototyping in InDesign

11

How to Share Your Wireframes and Prototypes

Bonus: Preview

I’ve added one extra item to tie several of the other features together—the Preview panel. (Technically, this is called the SWF Preview panel or, in CC 2014, the EPUB Interactivity Preview panel, but I just call both of these “the Preview panel.”) The Preview panel lets you test out animation and interactivity while you’re still working in InDesign. My favorite thing about the Preview panel is that you don’t have to look far to find it. Every interactive panel includes a preview button (Figure 17). Regular tests using the Preview panel let you know that your layout is functioning as it should, before you go to the trouble of exporting everything.

Figure 17: The Preview panel can be accessed from any interactive panel, such as the Buttons and Forms panel (click the button in the lower-left corner of the panel).

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While building your wireframe or prototype is relatively easy, the tricky part is how to share them—how do you get all of these fantastic things out of InDesign so that they can be shared with clients and/or developers? Table 1 (next page) covers a lot of the functionality that I’ve mentioned in this article, and explains which output methods support which types. If you know your clients are using desktop machines with the Flash Player installed, you may be able to export a SWF or a PDF from InDesign. To share these files with the client, you can either send the PDF via email, or post the SWF and its accompanying HTML file to a web server, and send the URL of the HTML file to your client. The PDF provides the added functionality of built-in commenting (if using Adobe Acrobat or

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Wireframing & Prototyping in InDesign Feature

SWF

PDF

in5

FXL ePub

Audio/Video

*

MSOs

*

Hyperlinks

Buttons

Form Elements Animation

Embedded HTML

Folio Overlays

Mobile Friendly

Commenting

Table 1: Different output methods support different interactive features. The in5 export method is HTML5 and requires the commercial in5 product, which I developed (you can find more information at ajarproductions.com).

*Audio, video, and multi-state objects are Flash Player-based, and thus only work on desktop versions of Adobe Acrobat and Reader when Flash is installed.

Reader, see “PDF Markup Demystified” in Issue 68). There’s also a wonderful tool called SWFPresenter that can export your InDesign pages as SWFs and place them in a PDF, thus allowing you to include animation within a PDF. One note of caution, though: Adobe no longer bundles the Flash Player with Adobe Reader, so you may have to provide

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Flash Player installation instructions to your reviewers. The reliance on the Flash Player also means that SWFs and interactive PDFs will not function properly on mobile devices. If your wireframe is simple and doesn’t include interactivity, it might be sufficient to export your pages as PNG images (or

as a non-interactive PDF) and email them. However, if you need to include any kind of interactivity and mobile support, you’ll want to export your layout as HTML, which will display on all devices. The most straightforward option is to use a third-party plug-in like in5, which will export all of the layout and interactivity in a format that any modern browser can display. The files can then be posted to a web server for review. Full disclosure: I am the creator of in5. There’s one other option for getting HTML out of InDesign, but it might involve getting your hands dirty. As of InDesign CC 2014.1, the built-in Fixed Layout (FXL) ePub export supports animation and MSOs. So you could attempt to send around an FXL ePub for review. It’s not widely supported, but if you know that your reviewers have a proper reader (such as iBooks on the Mac or the free Adobe Digital Editions on Mac or Windows), this might be a viable format for your review process. Under the hood, ePub is simply HTML files. So if you’re comfortable

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Wireframing & Prototyping in InDesign cracking open the ePub package, you could also consider repurposing the HTML found inside. Be aware, though, that the HTML inside is narrowly targeted to ePub readers, so you may want to do some cross-browser testing of the ePub HTML before sending it out to clients.

Some Closing Thoughts and Where to Go From Here There are a couple of things that I hope stick with you after reading this article. First, that creating wireframes and prototypes can speed up your workflow, save you some headaches, and make you look better in your client’s eyes. And second, that InDesign has a wonderful collection of tools for a UX workflow, especially for prototypes that involve animation or interactivity. If you don’t yet create wireframes or prototypes, I hope this article has got you thinking about doing so in the future.

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Combining Photoshop and InDesign for Wireframing What if you really enjoy wireframing in Photoshop? By all means, please continue wireframing in Photoshop. You may find it helpful to import your Photoshop file into InDesign when you need to add interactivity to your wireframe or mockup. InDesign can toggle the visibility of layers as well as layer comps with placed Photoshop files. One technique that I’ve used involves importing a layered Photoshop file into InDesign. I then use the Object States panel to duplicate the If you’d like to continue learning about this topic, I’ve put together a resources page with the original articles that inspired this one, as well as software links and video tutorials. You can find the resources page at http://ajar.pro/go/IDUX. Plus, check out InDesignSecrets to learn about other valuable resources like EightShapes Unify, UXmatters, and more.

Photoshop content into new object states. In each state, I right-click the image and choose Object Layer Options, and then I toggle the visibility of certain layers in the Object Layer Options dialog box. I now have an MSO with multiple application states that I can control by placing buttons on top (or inside) of the MSO. So, if you’re happy with your UX workflow, there’s no reason to ditch it, but knowing InDesign’s capabilities may help you in the future.

n Justin Putney is a designer, animator, developer, speaker, author (Adobe Press & lynda.com), Adobe Community Professional, entrepreneur, minimalist runner, and co-founder of ajarproductions.com.

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By Mike Rankin

InStep: Creating Timelines with Tables When you want to make a graphical timeline, there’s one tool in InDesign you should reach for immediately: tables. Earlier in my career, I spent many years making textbooks. Often these textbooks would include graphical timelines with important dates, images, and other content arranged in a precise linear fashion to give students a sense of the timing and context of important events. But timelines aren’t just for textbooks. You might use timelines in posters, brochures, web graphics, magazine articles, even evidence exhibits for a court case. They’re the perfect kind of infographic for any time you need to portray a sequence of events. You can make them horizontal,

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vertical, or even in a grid format. Plus you can save a lot of time (and have a lot more fun crafting the look) when you let InDesign handle the chore of making an accurate and flexible structure for the timeline. On the next page is an example of a simple horizontal linear timeline, featuring milestones in the history of audio storage technology from 1935 to 2001. Building and editing this kind of graphic with any kind of precision would be a time-consuming pain in the neck if you tried to use separate frames and lines for everything. So instead, let’s start with a table.

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InStep: Creating Timelines with Tables

A basic linear timeline

1935

1948

reel-to-reel tapes

1940

1962

LP records

cassette tapes

1950

1960

1964

1982

8-track tapes

1995

compact discs

1970

1980

MP3 files

1990

2000

Popular Music Storage Formats: 1935–2001

1. Create the basic table

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Start by creating a text frame large enough to contain the entire area of the timeline. Then add a table (Table > Insert Table) with one column for each year, minus one. In this case we want to show 67 years, so we’ll use 66 columns (66 columns make a total of 67 vertical strokes, for the year tick marks in the table). The number of rows depends on the design of the table and how much information you need to put into it. This design is very simple, so we need only three rows: one to contain the events, one for the vertical lines to connect the events to the timeline, and one for the labels and tick marks.

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InStep: Creating Timelines with Tables

2. Create the tick marks

3. Format the tick marks

4. Merge cells for labels

Select the top two rows, and remove all strokes to create tick marks at the bottom.

Select the bottom row, target the internal vertical strokes, and change the stroke style to dotted.

Create the label cells by counting tick marks to find the vertical line which corresponds the year you wish to label. In this design, each decade is labeled, and the labels are centered on the year-line, so we need to merge the two adjacent cells by selecting them and clicking the Merge Cells button in the Control panel.

Tip: If you would rather put the labels below the timeline and show every year with a tick mark, you can add a row to the bottom of the table, put the labels there, and leave the third row’s cells unmerged.

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InStep: Creating Timelines with Tables

5. Add the labels 1940

1950

6. Create the connector lines

1940

1950

7. Merge cells for events

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Enter the text for the labels, and format it. Be sure to create and use a paragraph style to make your life easier both when applying and tweaking the text formatting.

1960

1970

1980

1990

2000

For each year where you want to add an event, select the column to the right, and change the stroke style to solid 1-pt black.

1960

1970

1980

1990

2000

For each event, select a range of cells in the top row adjacent to the solid vertical lines, and merge the cells. The number of cells you’ll need to merge will depend on the amount of information in each event and the text formatting you want to use. In this case, I merged four cells. Occasionally you may need to merge cells to the left of a vertical line when two events are close together, like in this timeline where there are events in both 1962 and 1964.

23


InStep: Creating Timelines with Tables

8. Add the event content

Add the information and graphics for each event. Select the top row, and adjust the height to accommodate the text. In this case, I made the height of the top row exactly 40 px.

To format the text and cells, I used the Color Theme tool in InDesign CC 2014.1 to sample colors from each photo and apply them to the event cells and text. The photos are placed independently on the page, outside the table. Group them with the text frame if you’re worried they might accidentally get moved out of alignment.

1935

1948

reel-to-reel tapes

1940

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1962

LP records

cassette tapes

1950

1960

1964

1982

8-track tapes

1995

compact discs

1970

1980

MP3 files

1990

2000

24


InStep: Creating Timelines with Tables

If you want to add a title to your timeline, select the bottom row, and choose Table > Insert > Row. Insert one row below. Select the whole row, and merge all the cells. Then enter and format your table title. Voilà! You have a nifty horizontal timeline.

9. Add a title

1935

1948

reel-to-reel tapes

1940

1962

LP records

cassette tapes

1950

1960

1964

1982

8-track tapes

1995

compact discs

1970

1980

MP3 files

1990

2000

Popular Music Storage Formats: 1935–2001 From here, you can experiment with different looks by changing the formatting of the tick marks, connector lines, and event cells. Or try creating a vertical version of the timeline table with 3 columns and 66 rows. Now that you know this cool use for tables, I hope you have fun creating great graphics in a most “timely” manner.

n Mike Rankin is the Editor in Chief of InDesign Magazine, InDesignSecrets.com, CreativePro.com, and the author of several lynda.com video series, including InDesign FX.

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By Matt Mayerchak

How to Prepare and Preflight Ads

Want your ad to soar? Preflight is the key! If you work on publications, you know it can be maddening to receive that back cover ad right before your deadline, only to find out that it’s the wrong size, has no bleeds, and the photos are low resolution. Here are a few tips for how to improve your chances of receiving ads that will be usable, and how to create ads that will pass preflight.

Garbage Out, Garbage In As obvious as it sounds, the most effective thing you can do to ensure that the ads you

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receive will work in your publication is to give your advertisers the right specifications in the first place. Every publication, no matter how small, should have a media kit, even if it’s a one-page ad-rate PDF, that clearly identifies all of your requirements for the following categories: »» Trim Size  It’s unlikely that an ad was designed specifically for your publication. Advertisers frequently repurpose ads, so it’s common to receive ads that are built with the wrong trim size. Your spec

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How to Prepare/Preflight an Ad

sheet should clearly identify the size (and »» Color space  Typically RGB or hexadecimal orientation!) for every size ad you offer. If for digital use, and CMYK for print (but ads that bleed are an option, you should not always; see Why You Should Import list sizes both with and without the bleeds. RGB Images Into InDesign and Convert to The same goes for covers vs. interior page CMYK On Export at InDesignSecrets). One ads; some magazines require a clear space of the most common errors I see is the use for the glue strip on the side nearest the of PMS colors in art and logos. Converting spine, so an ad on the inside cover may from RGB to CMYK for print usually be a slightly different size than one for the doesn’t require going back to the client for back cover. approval, but converting a Pantone color If you’re the one creating the ads, a to CMYK or RGB can yield very different best practice is to set the page size to results. The same holds for converting match the trim size of the ad, rather than anything to grayscale. Rather than run the building an ad on a larger page and risk of an unhappy customer, I always ask drawing crop marks. InDesign CS5 and them to resubmit the ad using process later allow multiple page sizes in one file, colors, unless they specifically give the OK so there’s no reason to use a larger page. for me to convert them. If you type the dimensions in the Page »» Resolution  People seem to have a really Size field, and let InDesign create the crop hard time understanding the concept that marks when exporting the PDF, both the for print, you need 300 dpi at the final size, ad size and the crop marks will always be and that if you take a 300 dpi image and accurate, and the production artist has the scale it up 200%, it is now only 150 dpi. I option to include the crops or not when see ads all the time with 72-dpi logos or placing your PDF. photos copied from the web. Just because

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Ad Portals Ad portals take the burden of preflighting off the production artist and give it back to the designer. The advertiser uploads their ad file to the portal, and receives instant feedback about whether the ad passes preflight. If the ad contains the wrong color space, trim size, resolution, etc., it is rejected, and the advertiser knows right away that they need to fix it. Best of all, the production department never even sees the failed ads; they only receive files that have made it through the portal. Due to the cost of setting them up and maintaining them, ad portals are typically used by larger publishers who have several magazines in production on an ongoing basis. Now, if only parents could set up “dating portals” for their kids . . .

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How to Prepare/Preflight an Ad

it looks OK on screen doesn’t mean it will look good in print. It’s the unenviable task of the desiger/production artist to explain to the advertiser that if they don’t redo the ad with a high-resolution image, it will look blurry and jaggy. »» File formats  PDF is hands-down my preferred file format for print ads. Type comes out sharp, and you don’t need to

supply fonts or linked images. And, when placing a PDF in InDesign, you can choose to include the trim only for a half-page ad, or the crop marks and bleed if it’s a full-page one (Figure 1). Accepting native application files (such as .indd, .psd, .ai, or even .qxp, .docx, or .ppt) is asking for trouble with all the different versions of applications and fonts in use today. For

web ads, image formats (.png, .jpg) are usually preferred, but always check with your web production person. »» Ink coverage  For print documents, you’ll want to ask your printer what the maximum ink coverage is for their press, and add this to your spec sheet. But don’t be surprised if the ad designer has never heard of this one!

How to see what’s wrong and fix it Sadly, no matter how detailed your spec sheet is, a lot of advertisers will totally ignore it, so you will still have a lot of ads that are not up to print quality.

Figure 1: When placing a PDF, you can choose whether to include bleeds, crops, or just the trim size.

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Use a dummy There are several ways to preflight files with InDesign, but for ads, I find it best to use a multi-step approach. The first step is to use either InDesign’s built-in Preflight panel or a third-party app such as FlightCheck from Markzware, just to see if there are

28


How to Prepare/Preflight an Ad

and insert a new blank page, so that the master page margins and guides match the live document. I use this dummy doc to place ads into while checking them out. If the ad is an image file, you can customize the Links panel to show you what you need to know (Figure 2). However, the Links panel cannot parse the resolution or color space of images within a PDF. But if you set up a custom preflight profile, the InDesign Preflight panel can tell you whether there are errors in the PDF (Figure 3). If your dummy doc is based on the live file, Figure 2: For image files, you can customize your Links you can easily see if the ad is the correct size panel to show the color space, original resolution, scaling by just placing it at 100% size into the type of percentage, and effective resolution. page where it is supposed to appear. This is any problems. InDesign’s Preflight panel easier than opening it in Acrobat or its native Figure 3: If you create a custom preflight profile (this one will show you everything about the entire app and looking up the size. If it is supposed is for CMYK print), InDesign’s Preflight panel will show you what kinds of errors there are in a placed PDF. publication, but that’s a lot of information to bleed, be sure to include the bleeds when to wade through if you just want to see the placing the PDF. the ad fails the preliminary test, all you may info about one ad. It’s easier to place the ad know is that your ad has something in it that by itself into a new document, so you see the The ad failed; now what? is low-res or uses a spot color. This could be errors only in the ad. Typically, I make a copy If everything is OK and there are no errors enough to ask the advertiser to resubmit it, of the publication file, delete all of the pages, flagged, chances are the ad will be fine. But if but I find that I get better results if I can tell

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How to Prepare/Preflight an Ad

them exactly what the problem is and how to In Acrobat Pro, if you select Preflight under fix it. Fortunately, the Preflight panel will tell Tools > Print Production, you’ll see a long list you exactly where each low-res image is, and of presets to choose from (Figure 5), and if allow you to navigate right to the problem (Figure 4). Also, Acrobat Pro has sophisticated tools for identifying where the problems lie. So why not just start there? I probably should, but I keep foolishly thinking that maybe this time, this ad is going to be perfect, and if it works, it’s a lot faster to just place it in InDesign or drop it on the Flightcheck icon and verify that it’s OK.

Figure 4: In the Preflight panel, click the disclosure triangles to reveal specific problem images, and then navigate to them by clicking the page number or double-clicking the image name.

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Figure 5: Acrobat Pro has sophisticated preflight tools with presets for many common types of presses.

that’s not enough, you can customize any of them or make your own. I usually select the Prepress > Magazine Ads preset and click the Analyze button. The other one, “Analyze and fix,” will convert spot colors, etc., and I’m not ready to do that yet. When you click Analyze, Acrobat gives you more info than you would ever want to know about the PDF (Figure 6). When you click an error flag, you can select either the Show button to the right of it, or the Show in Snap

Figure 6: Acrobat Pro lists each item that contains an error.

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How to Prepare/Preflight an Ad

button below, and Acrobat will show you the object that caused that flag (Figure 7). There are other useful tools in Acrobat Pro for identifying specific problems. If you are going to use Acrobat Pro at all regularly, it’s really worth taking a few minutes to customize your toolbar with the tools you use most often (Figure 8). For instance, if I know that a PDF contains spot colors and it doesn’t have any image resolution issues, I often prefer to just click the Color Separations Preview icon , which brings up a window showing all colors in the document (Figure 9). Turning off the Process colors will show me just those elements that use the spot color.

Figure 8: Customize your Acrobat Pro toolbar with the tools you use most often. Choose View > Show/Hide > Toolbar Items > Edit Current Tool Set. (In Acrobat X, choose View > Show/Hide > Toolbar Items > Quick Tools.)

Figure 9: Previewing color separations in Acrobat Pro.

Figure 7: The Snap view identifies the problem image.

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The Output Preview window also contains the Total Area Coverage field; if you set the number to your printer’s maximum (320 in my example), any areas of the PDF that exceed that value will be highlighted.

The Convert Colors icon (just to the right in my customized toolbar) opens the Convert Colors dialog box, which is used to manually convert colors. Again, this is an option of last resort; I always offer the customer the option of resubmitting an ad before converting spot colors, because the converted colors can be very different. Surprisingly, it’s been my experience that ads coming from professional ad agencies have as many, if not more, problems than those from in-house designers. But if you follow these guidelines, the ads in your publication, or those you send out, will look good in print, and also keep your production department happy.

n Matt Mayerchak is an Adobe Certified Expert in InDesign. As the principal of Mayerchak & Company, he has over 25 years’ experience providing production support to graphic designers, publishers, and organizations.

31


InType: Script Typefaces

By Nigel French

There’s a Script (Typeface) For That Getting the most from these fancy and flowing fonts There are certain typefaces that belong in every designer’s toolkit: along with the workhorse serifs and sans serifs, and a handful of display faces, we all need some scripts for those times when we want an elegance—or an informality—that “normal” typefaces can’t deliver. Though they come in many varieties, script typefaces all convey a handwritten feel. There are the formal script faces, of course—the kind of thing you’ll find on certificates, diplomas, and wedding invitations. Derived from 17th-century writing styles, these refined letterforms are intended to lend an air of sophistication, history, and authority. They are cursive, and many of the characters have strokes that join them to other letters.

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Then there are the informal scripts for when you want a casual or quirky feel. These are usually friendly and approachable and give the impression of having been created quickly and spontaneously (Figure 1).

R

The Senate of the University of

The Senate of the University of

Bring your own Bottle

Bring your own Bottle

Figure

Figure Figure 1 1: The formal (Snell Roundhand) and the informal (Dom Casual). Switch their roles, and the message becomes confused and even humorous.

Many scripts can also be classified according to the writing device they

32


InType: Script Typefaces

suggest:of calligraphic pen or quill, broadhe Senate the University of

tipped marker, or even paintbrush. The tool they evoke usually hints strongly at their preferred usage (Figure 2).

he Senate of the University of

BringA Few yourBasic ownRules Bottle for “Grooming”   Script Fonts

BringLikeyour ownscript Bottle all type classes, faces come with

e1

Répondez s’il vous plaît Apples & Pears

Bowling Alley

FigureFigure 2 2: Scripts that evoke a quill (Bickham), a marker pen

Upper Crust

(FF Market), and a signpainter’s brush (HouseMovements Sign).

their own set of dos and don’ts. These are mainly common sense, yet it’s surprising how often you see them flouted—and seldom with good results. To start with, never put a formal script in all uppercase. Just as you wouldn’t write with a freeflowing hand in uppercase, you don’t want to set Figure 3 Figure 3: Setting script (in this case, Bickham) in upperscript that way (Figure 3). case looks daft. Then there is the issue of kerning. For the type designer, script faces present has been well made, that is, with good Figure 3kerning metrics, the Metrics method of auto a labor-intensive challenge: the letters must connect—just like the strokes of kerning in InDesign will almost certainly be handwriting. With thousands of possible preferable to Optical. By choosing Metrics, letter combinations, this means many late you are opting for the pair kerning that the nights of painstaking kerning to adjust type designer labored long and hard over. the fit of letter pairs. If the script typeface Optical kerning, on the other hand, often

Upper UPPERCrust CRUST

preferable for display faces, will ignore the kerning metrics and use InDesign’s best guess for letterspacing based upon the character shapes. The result is that connecting strokes will often miss each other like star-crossed lovers. Using Metrics kerning is a good starting point. In addition, be prepared to apply additional manual kerning as necessary. In Figure 4, you’ll see that optical kerning fails to connect the letters, and while metrics

Go with the flow

Go with the flow Go with the flow Metrics Kerning

Metrics Kerning

Optical Kerning

Gowith withthethe flowflow UPPER CRUST Go

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Optical Kerning Metrics Kerning plus manual kerning

Go with the flow

Figure 4

Metrics Kerning plus manual kerning

Figure 44: Often you can get the best results by using a Figure font’s built-in kerning plus a few manual tweaks.

33


InType: Script Typefaces

fares better, additional manual kerning is required to adjust the Go and wi letter pairs. With no alternate characters in this particular font (Mistral) and no dotless i, the wi combination is awkward at best. Another important consideration when working with scripts is size. For their exuberant descenders and ascenders to be contained in an em square, scripts may Figure 7 look disproportionately small at text sizes compared to “normal” typefaces. If you’re combining a script with a serif or sans serif face, it may require some resizing to look proportionate.

Make a Splash with Alternate Characters Many script faces that are available in OpenType Pro format offer a range of alternate characters that you can take advantage of via the Contextual Alternates feature from the OpenType menu in the Control panel or Character panel (or through styles, of course, which would

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be even better). Because each letter pair connects differently, the ability to apply Contextual Alternates can make a substantial difference to the overall effect of your type. For example, an O may be drawn differently according to the letter that precedes it. This is the “context” part of Contextual Alternates. With this feature activated, the shape of certain characters changes on the fly according to what character you type next. If you’re

What’s a swash? Swash: An elegant extension on a letterform, either a modification of an existing part or an addedon part. Finial: The curved or tapered end of a stroke that has no serif. Source: fontshop.com

easy does it Contextual Alternates off

easy does it Contextual Alternates on

easy does it Contextual Alternates plus custom Alternates Figure 5: Top: With Contextual Alternates off, the o and e do not connect, and the e and s connect awkwardly. Bottom: I’ve used the Glyphs panel to manually apply alternates to the y, the o, and the i in Caflisch Script.

in the market for a script typeface, the availability of these alternate characters might be a major factor in your choice (Figure 5). Irrespective of Contextual Alternates, alternate characters allow a degree of personalization not possible with a standard font. FigureYou 8 can add swashes at the beginning of the word and finials at the end, but be

34


Salted Seasons Caramel Seasons Chip InType: Script Typefaces

The Four

Figure 6: Swashes and finials applied to the starting and ending letter in Bickham Script, respectively for each word, using the Glyphs panel set to Show Alternates for Selection.

The Four

Figure 9

The Conundrum of Perfection

Figure 10

Typeface Designer Laura Worthington

Salted Seasons Caramel Chip Season

For original scripts strongly evocative of historic eras, from 19th-century French advertising to mid-century Americana and beyond, check out the site of Laura Worthington. Her script and display typefaces are beautifully crafted and come with an extensive selection of OpenType options. You can even download a free version of the luscious Milkshake at fairgoods.com.

The Four

The Four

Figure 9

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careful not to overdo it: too many swirls, and you might induce an attack of vertigo in your reading audience (Figure 6).

There is something inherently oxymoronic about script typefaces: they are intended to emulate the human hand, yet they carry the traits of digital perfection. Every a is the same as every other a, every s the same as every other s. The uniqueness that they are touting is undermined by the knowledge that someone with the same font can, with a few keystrokes, be just as unique. So if you’re choosing a script for a logo or headline treatment, consider hand-lettering the text. I mean it, this needn’t be an onerous task: you can base the letterforms on an existing script face, and in their re-creation, you can introduce—intentionally and otherwise— your own flourishes and idiosyncrasies. These personal touches will humanize the result and make it truly your own. Using

35


InType: Script Typefaces

the Pen tool in Illustrator has never been, nor probably ever will be, easy or intuitive, but it is easier now—and once you get the hang of keeping your anchor points perpendicular, redrawing your letterforms with the Pen tool is a meditative process that can yield pleasing results (Figure 7).

If you have good handwriting and a graphics tablet and stylus, why not create the letters from scratch? After all, what could be more unique, more infused with personality than your own handwriting (Figure 8)? If you find you have an aptitude for drawing letters, you might want to take it further and, using a font creation program like FontLab Studio or Fontographer,

make a fully functioning font. This can be immensely satisfying and informative— but be prepared to kiss goodbye any free time you may have had. If you just want to dip your typographic toe in the healing waters of font creation, there are several options: fontstruct from the good people who bring us fontshop.com, BitFontMaker2, yourfonts.com (where you can make a font from your handwriting for a mere $10), and paintfont.com (similar to yourfonts, but free!). For an overview of these cheap or free web-based font creation tools, see Mike Rankin’s lynda.com course, Font Management (Figure 9, next page).

Final Advice Figure 6

Figure 6

Figure 5

Figure 7: Grafolita Script Medium (available on Typekit), above, and my customized version, below.

Figure 8: Handwritten in Illustrator, starting with a sketch, manually tracing with the Pen tool, and then applying a calligraphic brush stroke.

Using script faces is a lot about common sense. Don’t lose sight of their origins: they come from handwriting, and many are intended to evoke a particular writing implement. If you have the time and the inclination to hand-letter your text, you can really humanize your work. When it comes

Figure 5

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36


InType: Script Typefaces

to script faces, they are not all created equal. The adage that a well-designed typeface is as much about the space between the letters as the letter shapes themselves is especially true with scripts. How good are the metrics, and how well do the letters connect? And consider the availability of OpenType features for any script face you may be auditioning. It’s these flourishes— combined using your own highly refined designer’s sensibilities, of course—that will bring a degree of interpretation and individuality to type.

n

Figure 9: My brief foray into font design using Fontographer.

Nigel French is a graphic designer, photographer, author, and teacher living in Lewes, UK. He is the author of InDesign Type and Photoshop Unmasked, both from Adobe Press, as well as several titles in the lynda.com online training library, including InDesign Typography.

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37


eggs

GREP of the Month

milk

(.+)\r\1

juice

apples

Find Duplicate List Entries How to find the same name, product, or numbers repeated twice in a row.

When you use the Find/Change dialog box, you can specify certain criteria in the Find field and then reference your found text using the “Found Text” expression in the Change To field, visualized as a $ symbol followed by a number. For example, if you search for ^\s(.) and replace with $1, you will find any character preceded by a space located at the beginning of a paragraph; and you’ll change it to just the “any character” you found—the $1 refers to the GREP expression inside the parentheses. Understanding this principle will help you when you use the next expression.

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January 2015

apples

bread

Using found text again Curiously (and this is not even documented in InDesign), you can use the same “found text” expression in the Find field to find double entries in a list. But using the $ symbol won’t work, because the $ symbol in the Find field means “end of paragraph.” For this reason, you should use \1. For example, let’s say you type (.+)\r\1 in the Find field, and set the Change To field to $1. The expression (.+) finds a series of characters in a paragraph, and \r will find the hard return at the end of the paragraph, allowing the GREP search to continue looking based

on whatever expression comes next. Finally, \1 reuses the same expression as the GREP in the first pair of parentheses (hence the number 1). So in this case you’re looking for text, followed by a return, followed by the exact same text: a double entry! If the Change To field were blank, the pair would be deleted. But when you set it to $1, InDesign replaces the pair with just the first instance—it “de-dupes” the list. You can even take this one step further and work with different sets of parentheses, and then use multiple “found” criteria like \2, \3, \4, etc. —Bart Van de Wiele

38


By Jeff Gamet

InBrief: New & Improved Products

This month we highlight add-ons that let you export your layouts, open files made in CC and CC 2014 with older versions of InDesign, and edit layouts without using InDesign at all. Plus we found some beautiful fonts to add to your type library, the perfect book for getting up to speed on InDesign CC 2014.1, and a cool designer’s journal for your notes and sketches. ID2Office 2 Recosoft, $119.95, $59.95 upgrade www.recosoft.com Need to convert your InDesign layouts to Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, or Apple’s Keynote? Check out ID2Office 2 from Recosoft. This plug-in supports InDesign CS5 and later, and exports layouts to Word and PowerPoint versions 2007 up through 2013 along with Keynote, complete with

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January 2015

linked frames, formatting, tables, graphics, and fonts while maintaining the look of your original layout. It also converts InDesign page transitions into PowerPoint and Keynote transitions. Unfortunately, your style sheets don’t convert, but ID2Office still does a surprisingly good job of maintaining the look of your original document, and it includes controls for fine-tuning your layout during export.

39


InBrief: New & Improved Products

Adobe Shape CC Adobe, free www.adobe.com I hadn’t thought about using my iPhone to turn real-world objects into vector art until Adobe released Shape CC. The app lets you snap photos with your iPhone or iPad camera that become vector art you can access through the Libraries panel in Illustrator and Photoshop, and then place

into InDesign. Shape includes easy-to-use controls for refining your photos before sending them on their way through your Creative Cloud account for further editing. Even though your iPhone is doing the heavy lifting of converting real-world objects into vectors, Shape is surprisingly responsive, and it’s a cool way to make new art for your designs.

MarkzTools for InDesign Markzware, $99 a year www.markzware.com Mac only Sometimes our workflow requirements can keep us stuck in the past even though time, and InDesign, march on. If you’re using an earlier InDesign version, but need to open and edit files created with a later version, it’s time to check out MarkzTools. This plug-in for InDesign CS5, CS5.5, and CS6 running on OS X 10.6.8 or later lets you open layout files from more recent InDesign versions, including InDesign CC and InDesign CC 2014.

MarkzTools recognizes and opens InDesign documents without any extra steps, so you won’t even need to ask your CC-using friends to save their files in IDML format.

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40


InBrief: New & Improved Products

Amorie

Suitcase Fusion 6

Kimmy Design, $12 / $95 (complete family) www.fonts.com Amorie is a whimsical handwrittenstyle font with a versatility that goes far beyond its surprisingly affordable price. Kimmy Kirkwood designed Amorie to give designers a different look depending on how they use the typeface groups—classic and chic Modella, fun and fancy Nova, or small caps and all-business SC.

Extensis, $120 www.extensis.com Managing fonts is an important part of most designers’ workflows, so it’s critical that the tools we use for that task are up to date and compatible with the latest version of InDesign. Extensis is on top of that with its new Suitcase Fusion 6, which offers support for Adobe Creative Cloud 2014, OS X Yosemite, and Retina displays. It also lets you store your font collection on cloudbased services such as Dropbox and Google Drive so they’re accessible from all your computers. All that, and Suitcase 6 displays interesting type samples to help feed your creativity, too.

It includes plenty of contextual alternatives so you won’t see two identical letters side by side, adding to the illusion that your design really was hand-lettered. The Extras set includes a nice mix of flourishes, plus Kimmy designed Extras sets with frames, lines, and borders, too.

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January 2015

intimidating, so it’s great that Sandee Cohen’s InDesign CC: Visual QuickStart Guide is out. Sandee’s book covers the basics for getting up and running, plus new features from the 2014 Creative Cloud release, such as EPUB fixed layout, enhanced ebook export support, table reformatting, improved Behance integration, and more— and it’s the quality of Sandee’s book that earned her an InBrief shout out. If digital books are more your style, you can pick up the QuickStart Guide in PDF, MOBI, and EPUB formats instead.

InDesign CC: Visual QuickStart Guide Peachpit, $35.99 www.peachpit.com Staying on top of the latest features when Adobe updates InDesign can be pretty

41


InBrief: New & Improved Products

Mengelt Basel Antiqua

Pantone Chips Journal

Adorn

Christian Mengelt, $65 /$234 (complete family) www.linotype.com

Pantone, $9.95 www.pantone.com

Laura Worthington, $45 www.fonts.com

Mengelt Basel Antiqua is based on the Renaissance Antiqua style, but with a fresh look and inspiration from 16th-century serif fonts used by Basel printers. Designer Christian Mengelt did a great job of blending the old type style with modern typographic elements into an easy-to-read typeface. The family includes Regular, Italic, Bold, and Bold Italic with Latin and Greek letters as well as Cyrillic symbols. That gives Mengelt Basel Antiqua the flexibility to work with nearly 90 languages. It’s a beautiful typeface for long-form body copy as well as headlines, and I’d be happy to read it all day.

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Not everything in our design world is digital, and sometimes a paper journal is just the thing for keeping track of notes, jotting down ideas, and sketching out your thoughts. Pantone found a fun way to mix our need for paper journals with our love for design with its Pantone Chips Journal. The bound notebook sports a Pantone chip soft cover with 192 blank white pages measuring 5 inches by 71/8 inches. Pantone says it’s “chic,” but I say it’s just cool.

Creating a typeface family with very different looks that all play well together isn’t easy, but Laura Worthington has managed to do just that with Adorn. The family includes seven display fonts and four scripts, along with ornaments, monograms, illustrations, frames, catchwords, and banners that look great in promotional designs, invitations, product packaging, and most anywhere else you need a distinct yet readable look.

n Jeff Gamet is The Mac Observer’s Managing Editor and the author of “The Designer’s Guide to Mac OS X.” You can find him on several podcasts including Apple Context Machine and The iOS Show, and speaking at events such as Macworld/iWorld.

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A collection of the most important and informative articles from InDesignSecrets. If you want to add comments or ask questions, just click the title of the article, or click the Feedback button to view the original post in your web browser. Converting Cross References to Text and Retaining the Information

Cross-Reference.” When you choose that command, an alert lets you know that the selected x-ref will be converted to text.

Sandee Cohen | November 20, 2014

Cross references were introduced to InDesign in 2008 in version CS4. A cross reference allows you to insert text within one paragraph that references the text in another position across the document (hence the term cross references, sometimes shortened to x-refs). A typical x-ref might be: For more information, see “Working with text” on page 16. In that case, the x-ref picks up the text inside the referenced paragraph as well as the page number. For a quick tutorial on how to apply x-refs, see David’s article here. However, I don’t trust x-refs once the InDesign files have been sent to my publisher. I have no idea what those folks are going to do to the files, and I don’t want the x-refs getting screwed up. Fortunately, the InDesign engineers thought of that, and put a command in the Cross-References panel menu to “Delete

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The alert that lets you know that the text of the deleted cross reference will be converted to static text.

Now Adobe intended that this command would convert the variable text for a page number into static, non-variable text, so that, for example, text that referenced page 58 would be converted into a static number.

An x-ref on page 49 that refers to text on page 58.

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But that’s not what happens. Instead, the text is converted to the page number that the x-ref is on (the source, not the destination).

An x-ref on page 49 is converted to static text with the wrong page number—the page number where the x-ref appears.

An x-ref on page 49 is converted to static text with the wrong page number—the page number where the x-ref appears. I’ve posted bug reports about this problem ever since CS4 was released, but it hasn’t been fixed yet. And I recently wrote a note to several friends about this. Mike Rankin saw my note and offered a workaround. I then tested his technique and came up with a few nuances. Here’s how to convert the x-refs without losing the referenced number. First, select the text for the x-ref. You can use the CrossReferences panel or just drag across the text. You don’t have to select just x-ref; you can select text around the x-refs. So, if all your x-refs are contained in one story, just select all the text in the story. Once the text is selected, choose Type > Text Variables > Convert Variable to Text. The page number will be converted into the correct static number. Of course you’re also going to be converting variables to static text, but if you do this at the last point in production, you don’t have to worry. You might also want to save

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a version of the file with live cross-references as a backup or for a future version of the project. You’re going to get a yellow alert that the text has changed. And if you selected all the text, you’re going to get a lot of yellow alerts. Don’t update them! Just highlight all the x-refs in the panel and click the trash icon. Tah-dah! All the x-refs are converted correctly into static text and deleted from the Cross-References panel. The yellow alerts appear in the Cross-References panel after converting the variable to text.

The yellow alerts appear in the Cross-References panel after converting the variable to text.

If your x-refs are scattered in many stories, use the CrossReferences panel to find/select them, invoke the command to

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convert the variable, and then delete the x-ref. You can make keyboard shortcuts for both the convert variable to text and the delete x-ref commands. That makes it easier to deal with many x-refs. This technique works with x-refs to other documents or documents in a book. Yes, it would be more painful to deal with hundreds of x-refs in hundreds of stories and hundreds of documents. And if you select all, the command to convert text variables would destroy any real text variables. But since the commands are there, you might be Feedback able to find a scripter who can automate the process. 

number of DPS SE applications), don’t panic yet—you have some breathing room.

Bob’s Commentary

Editor’s note: This article is in two parts. First, an article by Bob Levine; followed by additional notes by David Blatner.

Before I tell you what this means, let’s see what it doesn’t mean. Digital Publishing Suite will continue as a stand-alone publishing service for both Professional and Enterprise account holders. There are no changes right now to those plans that pertain to Single Edition apps. So, if you’re a Pro or Enterprise customer, you can stop here. If you’re a Creative Cloud subscriber, however, the value of your subscription just went down a bit. When May 1 rolls around, you will no longer be able to create or modify any Single Edition app. That said, five months should be plenty of time to wrap up any current projects, so it’s not like Adobe is pulling the rug out from under your feet with no notice.

Adobe has announced that it will be “retiring” the Digital Publishing Suite Single Edition (DPS SE) from the Adobe Creative Cloud on May 1 (2015) and removing it as a purchasable product from Adobe.com even sooner, on December 4, 2014. However, if you have SE projects already in the pipeline, or you’re a Creative Cloud subscriber (which includes an unlimited

Why is this Happening? While I don’t have any numbers, I don’t think it’s a secret that DPS SE never really caught on. It’s sort of an orphan product anyway. Not really an app, not really a book, not really anything. It’s caught between the worlds of a designer and a developer. I would imagine the cost to maintain the platform for the very few using it, along

Adobe Drops DPS Single Edition Support from Creative Cloud David Blatner and Bob Levine November 24, 2014

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with what is now an excellent, and in some ways a superior alternative, combined to make this move inevitable. Fixed-Layout EPUB Adobe’s announcement points out that fixed-layout (FXL) EPUB has reached a point where it’s a better choice. Having investigated the features in it, I agree with them, especially for those that don’t understand the requirements that Apple has for Single Edition apps (mostly the fact that they need to be very interactive). If Adobe had announced this earlier, I’d have been complaining about it quite loudly—because there was no alternative—but with the October release of InDesign CC 2014, many of the interactive features available to DPS users are now a part of FXL. Even native animations work! (I posted an article about this on my blog last week, before finding out about this announcement.) The biggest drawback to the fixed-layout EPUB solution is the lack of compatible readers for these advanced EPUBs. Of course, the lack of readers is nothing compared to the limits of DPS SE, which is compatible with iPads only. Still Want an App? There are Alternatives The first, and easiest, way around the loss of DPS SE is to find someone with a Pro or Enterprise account or to sign up for one yourself. Absent that, all is not totally lost here. While DPS Single

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Edition is great if you only want to publish on an iPad, it’s been evident from the start that Adobe was more concerned with multiissue publishing. For anyone interested in Android, Amazon, or Windows marketplaces, Single Edition was never a viable choice. Single Edition isn’t even compatible with iPhone! Let’s take a look at the choices for other digital publishing services. The supported features and platforms they offer vary, and in some cases (such as support for InDesign animations by some) are actually superior to DPS. Mag+ Aquafadas Twixl AppStudio eDocker All of the above vary in cost, features, and device support, so I can’t really recommend one over the other. None are free, but they all offer InDesign plug-ins as free downloads and they have free readers, similar to Adobe Content Viewer, available on the supported stores. If you feel strongly that apps are the way to go for your project, do your own homework and pick the service that’s right for you. But… don’t dismiss FXL out of hand. As I already mentioned, it is good choice for many projects such as illustration-heavy books, and it’s very simple to create as well as to view fixed-layout EPUBs.

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In fact, as long as you have a compatible reader on your computer or mobile device, it’s just about as simple as creating a PDF. If you want to learn more about it, Anne-Marie has a wonderful course on lynda.com. I think one of the things that doomed DPS SE was the requirement that you actually had to be a bit of a developer to publish the app. Many users never got past the point of the requirement of having a Mac to create certificates for the app as well as submitting it to Apple. Even if you got past that point, you’re up against Apple’s very inconsistent review and approval/rejection process. This is something you will continue to run into even with other vendors. While the value of Creative Cloud hasn’t diminished all that much—and to the vast majority of users the absence of DPS SE won’t even be noticed—I’m hoping that come May 1, Adobe will be open to helping those who have projects they haven’t quite finished or that need revisions. We’ll have to wait until then to find out.

David’s Commentary It’s never good when a company cuts a product or service, and it’s always worse when it’s something that you use. When the bus company cuts the route you take to work, or the appliance company stops making the replacement items you need to keep

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your vacuum cleaner working, it’s annoying and an inconvenience. So Adobe’s announcement that they’re dropping support for DPS SE from Creative Cloud memberships is frustrating. But… a few things to remember: First, not that many people used DPS SE. If you’re one of the few, then this is terrible, but the vast majority of CC members didn’t make SE apps and probably wouldn’t do so anytime soon. There are a number of DPS users, of course, but my sense is that most people who get excited about DPS end up with the Pro or Enterprise accounts, not SE. Second, compare DPS SE to Fixed Layout EPUB (FXL): DPS SE apps would only run on the iPad. FXL can be viewed on the iPad, iPhone, and any Mac running 10.9+. It can be viewed on Kobo devices, Readium-enabled Chrome browsers, and any Mac or Windows computer running Adobe’s free Digital Editions v4 software. That means your InDesign layouts could have a far wider reach than they could with DPS SE. While FXL from InDesign is not mature yet, it’s getting significantly better, and the fact that Adobe appears to be getting behind this open industry standard is very exciting. There’s no doubt that FXL cannot currently replicate what DPS can, but I think over time it might even be able to do more.

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You can’t get analytics or multi-issue subscriptions with EPUB… but you can’t do that with DPS SE either (you need a higher level Pro or Enterprise DPS account to get that), so there’s no loss there. For all these reasons, and more, I think that FXL is going to be a better publishing solution for many InDesign users… in fact, it may Feedback even replace PDF in a number of cases. 

What’s the Difference Between EPUB, DPS, and PDF? David Blatner | November 26, 2014

I saw this question on Twitter recently: “What is the fundamental difference between EPUB3 and Adobe DPS?” and I realized that I’ve been asked this a lot recently. For example, we had an EPUB track and a DPS track at The InDesign Conference and a lot of people wrote in to ask which one they should attend. Plus, how are those different than PDF? And what’s the deal with FXL and SWF and other digital formats? So, in hopes of clearing the air a bit, here’s My Answer: Document vs. App Do you want to be a software developer or a publisher? Software developers make apps (or applications, or programs, or whatever you want to call them). Publishers publish documents. Documents are files that can be viewed in a Viewer application.

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So, for example, when you create a PDF file, you’re making a document that is going to be viewed in Acrobat or Reader or Preview or a web browser, or some other program. Similarly, when you export an EPUB file, you are making a document. The great thing about documents is that you can move them around: you can email them, post them on a server, put them in a store for downloads, save them to disk, archive them, and so on. As long as there is a viewer, you can read them on any device: desktop, laptop, web browser, iOS, Android, Linux, or whatever. Even better, you can distribute them without someone else (e.g., Apple) saying it’s okay. The great thing about apps is that they are software, so they can do things that only software can do: you can sell them in an app store like a game, you can have in-app purchases, you can optimize for native software speed. But apps have to play by app rules: it’s harder to publish them, they run on just one device type (an iOS app cannot run on Android, etc.), you have to get permission from Apple to publish them to the iTunes store, and so on. But a strange thing has happened over the past few years: there are a lot of apps that look and act like documents; and some apps allow “issues” that are downloaded and read like documents inside the app (for example, monthly magazine subscriptions). Conversely, documents have gained new powers to act like apps. For example,

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you can put interactivity into a fixed-layout EPUB file (FXL) and some PDF files that make them interactive, like an app. DPS If you want to turn your InDesign document into an app, you’ll need special software and a service. Adobe Digital Publishing Suite (DPS) was the first to offer this, and remains the most popular service today. Make no mistake: DPS is not an authoring tool. DPS is, at its heart, an app creation and distribution service. A lot of people tie DPS to InDesign, but that’s just because they’re both from Adobe, and InDesign was the first tool to connect to DPS. You can now use a wide variety of tools and products (even PowerPoint!) to author for DPS. Adobe does offer some tools that help you add some DPS interactivity to your documents, and to help get your InDesign document into their DPS system, but not all InDesign features are natively supported in DPS at this time. Behind the scenes, the DPS system converts your documents into actual software apps. A major part of the DPS ecosystem is its analytics system, which provides insight into what people are reading, how long they’re reading it for, what they tapped/clicked, and more. It’s impressive.

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Other App Makers Fortunately, there are also a number of other players in the “InDesign to App” market, including Twixl and Aquafadas. These companies also offer alternative paths to converting InDesign documents to software apps. And, even better, in many cases they’re very competitive, especially for small to mid-sized companies. (Adobe is currently focusing their DPS efforts on “enterprise” customers—national magazines, larger companies who produce interactive sales materials, government agencies, and so on.) Web Apps and Web Viewers There’s a middle-ground, hybrid solution which is also very interesting: Web Apps or other HTML5 solutions. For example, you can create a richly interactive experience that works in a web browser with eDocker or Ajar Production’s in5, both of which convert your InDesign layout to HTML5. Both systems offer a wide variety of options for what to do with those apps/docs. For example, at this years’ PePcon: The Print + ePublishing Conference, Jerry Silverman showed you could export a document with in5, then use Adobe’s PhoneGap (which is part of a Creative Cloud membership) to quickly and easily convert the HTML5 package into native iOS and Android apps.

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EPUB, PDF, and other Document Formats While people get so excited about making apps, I argue that making documents is often preferable for most publishers and creative pros. For example, many folks have been incredibly frustrated after spending dozens or hundreds of hours of hard work on an app, when they are rejected by Apple’s app store for being too much like a book. Apple doesn’t want just a little bit of interactivity; they want immersive, app-like experiences! It’s tricky. Similarly, it’s much harder to create an app than a document. Making the interactivity in InDesign is fun, but when it comes to taking it to the next step—getting it into the app store—well, I heard a publishing IT guy recently call the process “brutal.” Of course, if you’re doing a multi-issue app, then you only need to submit the app once (well, until the OS changes, and then you typically need to provide updates), and then each “issue” is easier. But compare that to exporting and distributing a document, such as a PDF file. You choose File > Export. Done. The problem with PDF files is that interactive features don’t work very well in them on some devices. For example, buttons and videos often don’t work on iPads; and if you don’t have Flash on your computer, even Acrobat can’t manage a lot of the rich media you can put into a PDF (like audio or video). Fortunately, there’s a new kid on the block: Fixed Layout EPUB (FXL). You can use the newest version of InDesign to make highly

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interactive FXL files (with hyperlinks, video, buttons, animations, slide shows, and so on), and these FXL files are documents that you can distribute in many ways. You can publish them in Apple’s iBookstore, or sell them or give them away on your own website… you can make awesome sales slide presentations and put them on your sales staff’s iPads; you can create children’s books and sell them in a variety of stores… FXL isn’t perfect. It’s still a relatively new format. You can view it on Mac and Windows and iOS and Android, as long as you have modern EPUB3 reader software. For example, Apple’s iBooks, Adobe’s Digital Editions software, Kobo apps, and the Readium Chrome extension, are all free options for reading FXL files. You cannot play it on Kindle because Amazon does not support EPUB (they have their own proprietary format). How to Learn More We are in the middle of a publishing revolution, and nothing is stable. You can stay current and learn “how to” publish in all these ways at PePcon: The Print + ePublishing Conference. I hope to see you there! Other links for learning more about DPS and FXL: »» Anne-Marie Concepcion’s Creating Fixed Layout EPUBs with InDesign CC video title at lynda.com

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»» Mike Rankin’s Adapting a Print Layout for Digital Publishing video title at lynda.com »» Adobe Drops DPS Single Edition Support from Creative Cloud »» More InDesign DPS tips

Secondly, if the data merge contains variable images, there are two more issues to be aware of: 1. InDesign won’t package any of the variable image files. For example, packaging this file:

Feedback

Traps When Packaging Data Merge Files Colin Flashman | November 28, 2014

I often recommend that clients use Adobe InDesign’s “package” feature to collect all assets into one folder to give to another party. While it is not completely foolproof, it is certainly better than providing no links or fonts at all, or wasting time trying to find those assets manually. When packaging a file used for a data merge that hasn’t been merged into a finished InDesign file, there are a few things to be aware of. Firstly, the txt/csv file used for the merge won’t be packaged, regardless of whether the variable data is on a normal page or a master page. This means this asset needs to be collected manually.

will package the following files:

The only exception is if the preview checkbox is toggled on at the time of the package, and in this instance the only variable images to be packaged are the ones that are visible at the time of packaging. So using this example:

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Incidentally, having the full path name is not necessary if the txt/ csv file for the data merge is in the same folder as all of the images Feedback being used in the data merge. 

Arranging Numbered Lists in Separate Frames Sandee Cohen | December 1, 2014

the following files are packaged:

Did you know you can have numbered lists run in a sequence that jumps across separate frames (stories)? Way back in 2007, AnneMarie wrote a terrific column explaining how to use the list feature to set up that type of numbered list. Without going into too much detail, the trick is to define a custom list and then set that list to run across stories. (Read Anne-Marie’s column for more details.) But what she didn’t explain is how to force the numbers to go in a specific order.

2. Because the variable images and the txt/csv file used for the merge would have to be gathered manually as part of the package, there may be issues relinking to the image locations in the data merge, especially if the column that contained the image location references had their full directory location. The New List command in the Edit List dialog box.

Once you have created the new list, you can set the option (already selected by default) to run the list across stories (separate

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frames). These stories can be on the same page, in the same document, or in different documents when they are part of a book.

Set the option to continue numbered lists across stories.

There are two steps to fixing this problem. Open up the Layers panel, and move the frames into the reverse order that you want them numbered. In the case of our states, you would move Texas up to the top of the panel; New York would be next; then Maine, then Illinois, and then California at the bottom. Drag the text frames into the reverse order that they should appear in the numbered list.

Fixing the Order The problem with this is the order of the numbers is controlled by the order that the objects were first put on the page. This may sometimes be correct, but unless you’ve been very careful about how you work, the order on the page is most likely wrong.

The numbered frames as stacked in the layers panel.

An example of how the numbered lists appear on the page in the wrong order. In this case, we want the states to be listed in alphabetical order.

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Once you have the objects stacked, their numbers still won’t be in the correct order. Select all the frames, and cut and then paste in place. The frames automatically appear in the correct order. This is because the paste puts the backmost object on the page first, then the next, and so on. (That’s why you listed them in their reverse order in the Layers panel.) You could cut and paste each object individually, but I like using the Layers panel, because I can see what the text is inside each frame.

move it somewhere else. But how many times would you like the pasted object right where the original was or in the same position on another page? I know most often I want it there. And if I don’t need it there, I can move it as I would with an ordinary paste.  Feedback

Leading as a Character Attribute? I’m a Believer! Sandee Cohen | December 3, 2014

The numbered list rearranged into the correct order on the page.

And speaking of cut and paste, my friend Bob Levine gave me a neat tip recently. He has changed the command for Paste In Place to the ordinary Cmd/Ctrl+V and left the plain Paste as something else. Think about it. How many times do you want a pasted object to appear in the center of the screen? Most likely you will want to

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Ever since I started working with the first beta of InDesign (K2), I’ve been irked by the choice of the engineers to make leading a character attribute. I’d “grown up” with years and years of QuarkXPress and MS Word, where leading is a paragraph attribute. I remember during the InDesign beta, Olav Kvern tried to justify the decision to make leading a character attribute. But his examples were esoteric—or maybe I was just too dense to understand them. I’ve taught hundreds of hours of classes trying to explain to ex-Quarkers why the InDesign engineers chose such an option. But I couldn’t quite convince my students, as I myself wasn’t convinced. Mike Rankin reminded me that using character-based leading was a key method for increasing leading in a line containing a built-up fraction, something you might use thousands of times over the course of producing a math book.

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An example of how character-based leading could be used to fix the leading for a stacked fraction. The fraction on the left needs more leading to fit properly on the line. The fraction on the right has a slight increase in leading.

But since I’ve never laid out a math book, I really didn’t see how important it would be for me. Recently, though, I created a design that required the first two lines of the introductory paragraph of a story to be a larger point size than the rest of the lines in the paragraph. What I wanted is this appearance:

To accomplish this, I knew I could use the Nested Line Styles option to change the size of the text in the first two lines. And it would also allow me to edit the text as needed without ever having to manually reapply the character style. So I created my paragraph style and then a character style that increased the point size of the text. This was the initial setting for the character style:

The character style options for increasing only the point size.

However, since I wasn’t using auto leading, this created a collision between the first and second lines of the paragraph. The leading also had to be increased.

An example of a paragraph where the first two lines are set in a larger point size and leading than the rest of the text.

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The Nested Line Style set to apply the character style to the first two lines of text.

A paragraph where the first two lines of text have had a larger point size applied. However, the leading is not correct.

So I changed the character style to also increase the leading:

Now the Nested Line Style automatically maintains the proper leading. A character style that applies both point size and leading. If leading was a paragraph attribute, this would not be possible to set.

Once this new character style was applied in the Nested Line Styles option of my paragraph style, the first two lines worked perfectly.

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So, almost fifteen years after InDesign was released, I’ve finally become a believer of character-based leading! Olav, you were Feedback right!!! 

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Did You Know InDesign Ignores CMYK Profiles? David Blatner | December 8, 2014

Here’s something every InDesign user should know, but almost none do: InDesign, by default, completely ignores CMYK profiles you have embedded in your images. If you don’t know what that means, let me explain: Let’s say you convert an image to CMYK in Photoshop. (Note that I rarely convert images to CMYK, preferring to leave them in RGB mode when I place them in InDesign. Claudia McCue and I are working on an article that explains why. But anyway, back to the topic at hand… if you do convert to CMYK…) When you save the file, Photoshop will ask if you want to embed the color profile:

By default, this option is selected, and so almost everyone embeds the CMYK profile in their images. The problem with this is that CMYK profiles can add a lot to a file size. Have you ever saved

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a tiny little graphic, like 20K, from Photoshop and the file is 500K on disk? It’s because of that checkbox! A color profile describes the color in the file. For example, a CMYK color profile describes the CMYK colors—that is, what does cyan look like, what does magenta look like, and so on. This is important because there are lots of different cyans, and so on. The cyan on a sheetfed press, printing on coated bright white paper, is going to be really different than the cyan smooshed onto a giant roll of newsprint. But here’s the rub: When you place that CMYK image into InDesign, it almost always just ignores the embedded color profile! And when you print or export a PDF, InDesign almost always just passes the CMYK values through, without making any adjustments for where you’re printing. This is generally okay, and in fact usually a good thing! But if you don’t know InDesign works that way, you may have unreasonable or erroneous expectations. Because InDesign is going to ignore the profile, you can probably turn off that Embed Color Profile checkbox and save a little disk space, especially if the image is small, like an icon or logo. (Caveat: If it’s a photographic image, and you plan on using Photoshop to edit it again in the future, and if you don’t have the original RGB image, then you probably do want to embed the profile. Otherwise, Photoshop won’t know what the CMYK colors in the file mean, and you won’t get an accurate display.)

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Most InDesign users should probably stop reading here, and instead read something interesting and fun. But if you want to learn more about CMYK, profiles, cross-rendering, and so on, let’s go for it… Why InDesign Ignores CMYK Profiles The reason InDesign ignores the embedded profiles is that the default setting for CMYK images is “Preserve Numbers (Ignore Linked Profiles)” in the Edit > Color Settings dialog box:

I strongly recommend you leave this set to the default setting. People get themselves into bad doo-doo when they try to outsmart InDesign and change this to Preserve Embedded Profiles. I’m not saying no one should change it; I’m just saying that only people who really understand color management should change it. Note that if you do change this, you cannot easily change it back, because the Color Settings dialog box does not affect the currently open document, or in fact any InDesign documents you have already made. It only changes documents you create in the future. I wrote up one case study of this getting messed up (along with a painful workaround for fixing it) in this article. How to Force InDesign to Honor Embedded Color Profiles So if you probably shouldn’t change the Color Settings dialog box, then how can you tell InDesign to honor the embedded profiles in CMYK images? Actually, before you ask that, first consider: “Do I really need InDesign to read the color profile?” If you converted the image to the proper CMYK already, then no, you don’t need InDesign to read the embedded profile; it’s better for InDesign to just “preserve numbers” and pass through the CMYK values in the image. If you didn’t convert to the proper CMYK, then honestly, in most cases, it’s far better to just go back to the original RGB image and

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re-convert it to the proper CMYK (and not worry about embedding the color profile). However, if you converted to a particular CMYK… and you know you are printing to a different CMYK… and the two CMYKs are different enough that you’d be able to tell… and you really care about getting the color as good as you can get… and you do not have the original RGB image… then maybe you’d want to tell InDesign to honor the embedded profile. In that rare case, you can force InDesign to honor the embedded profile in two locations: Placing the Image: When you use File > Place to import the image, enable Show Import Options, then click the Color tab:

The Profile pop-up menu is set to Use Document Default. If you click that pop-up menu, the embedded profile is the one at the top of the list, above Use Document Default:

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If there is no embedded profile, but you really know which profile should have been embedded, you can choose it from the bottom of the menu. Image on the Page: If you have already placed the image in InDesign, you can select it on the page and choose Object > Image Color Settings:

This menu works the same way: the embedded profile will be first in the list. I don’t want to get into the tweaky world of Rendering Intent here, but suffice it to say that this gives you fine-grained control over how out-of-gamut colors are handled in the conversion.

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Forcing InDesign to Cross-Render the CMYK Converting the CMYK colors in an image to different CMYK colors is called cross-rendering. Again, InDesign won’t normally do it, because the “Preserve Numbers” setting (in the Export PDF dialog box or the Print dialog box) says “just pass the numbers through.” However, as soon as you force InDesign to honor a profile (using one of the two techniques above), then “Preserve Numbers” is disabled (at least for that image), and InDesign will convert the CMYK numbers. The goal of cross-rendering (and all color management, in fact) is to maintain the color appearance, or as similar an appearance as possible in the new target environment. If you use RGB images, or you convert your RGB images to the proper CMYK to start with, you should never have to cross-render. But sometimes you have to. For example, let’s say you are collecting images for an art book, and 20 photographers have each sent you an image. Some of the images have already been converted to CMYK, and the color profiles are embedded. Because you’re using a custom CMYK profile that your printer gave you, you may want to cross-render their CMYK colors to yours. So when you place those images, use Show Import Options to tell InDesign to honor the embedded profiles.

INDESIGN MAGAZINE  69

January 2015

Of course, it would be even better to go back to the photographers and ask for RGB versions of their images, but that’s Feedback another story… 

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The InDex: InDex Your Key to Our Content Can’t find that article you saw in an earlier issue? Wondering whether we covered that obscure plug-in? Never fear, the InDex is here.

Index for issues 1 through 69 July 2004 — January 2015

MAGAZINE

INDESIGN MAGAZINE  69

January 2015

The first issue of InDesign Magazine was published in July 2004. Since then, we’ve cranked out thousands of pages on hundreds of related topics. While it’s possible to use Acrobat to simultaneously search all past issues of the magazine for one word or phrase, many readers have clamored for a formal index at the back of each issue. However, with 69 issues to account for, that’s not feasible. Instead, the InDex will live as a PDF you can download for free. If you come across a topic you want to know more about, but it’s in an issue you don’t have, you’re not out of luck. We sell back issues at indesignsecrets.com.

If the topic you’re looking for isn’t in the InDex, you have one more way to search: that PDF trick we mentioned. To make it work, all of your magazine issue PDFs must be in one folder. Open any issue in Acrobat, and then press Shift+Command+F (Shift+Ctrl+F on Windows). In the Search window that appears, be sure that you click the radio button that says “All PDF Documents in,” and in the dropdown menu below that, choose the folder in which you placed your magazine issues. You’re on your way to finding anything in any PDF!

Click here to download the InDex.

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While this PDF is just for you, you can tell your friends about this great discount: $10 off a 1-year membership (coupon code: friend) Send them to: indesignsecrets.com/issues

INDESIGN MAGAZINE  69

January 2015

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Idm issue 69