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M A G A Z I N E 57 December 2013 | January 2014

The

Photography Issue


Creative freedom is having access to all the Adobe Creative Suite® 6 tools and more. Creative freedom is storing and sharing your work anywhere. Creative freedom is easily publishing your apps and websites. Adobe Creative Cloud helps you unleash your creativity by putting all the CS6 tools into your hands, plus new apps and services, all through one simple membership. It’s the digital hub that breaks down barriers to the creative process, giving you the freedom to make anything you can imagine.

Create now.

Learn more at adobe.com/go/creativecloud © 2012 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All rights reserved. Adobe, the Adobe logo, the Adobe PDF logo, Creative Cloud, the Creative Cloud logo, and Creative Suite are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Adobe Systems Incorporated in the United States and/or other countries. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

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MAGAZINE

PUBLISHERS David Blatner, Anne-Marie Concepción EDITORIAL Editor in Chief Mike Rankin, mike@indesignmag.com Managing Editor Wendy Katz, wendy@indesignmag.com Senior Editor Sandee Cohen, sandee@indesignmag.com Contributing Writers Khara Plicanic, Pariah Burke, Bart Van de Wiele, Conrad Chavez, Pam Pfiffner, Nigel French, Jeff Gamet DESIGN Jeremy Spiegel Rufus Deuchler, rufus.deuchler.net PRODUCTION Matt Mayerchak, mayerchak.com BUSINESS Contact Information indesignmag.com/contact.php Subscription Information indesignmag.com/purchase.php Published by InDesignSecrets.com, a division of Publishing Secrets, Inc. Copyright 2013 InDesignSecrets.com. All rights reserved. Reproduction and redistribution prohibited without approval. For more information, contact permissions@indesignmag.com. InDesign Magazine is not endorsed or sponsored by Adobe Systems Incorporated, publisher of InDesign. InDesign is a registered trademark of Adobe Systems Incorporated. All other products and services are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners and are hereby acknowledged.

From the Editor in Chief Greetings and welcome to issue 57 of InDesign Magazine, the Photography issue! Whether you’re a professional photographer or an amateur shutterbug, you’re sure to enjoy the five great photography-related articles in this issue. In our main feature, Khara Plicanic describes every aspect of how to build beautiful photo albums in InDesign, with her trademark infectious enthusiasm. Next, we sent Pariah Burke to scour the Internet in search of great InDesign templates for photographers, and he came back with an incredible wealth of templates for all kinds of business and creative uses. We also have a couple of tag team efforts on photography topics. First, Conrad Chavez and Bart Van de Wiele share some great efficiency techniques for placing large groups of photos (and captions) into your InDesign layouts. Then, David Blatner and Sandee Cohen

team up to share everything they know about the best (and worst) file formats for graphics. And for this issue’s InDesigner, Pam Pfiffner spoke with photographer and publisher Brooks Jensen, about LensWork, a dual format (print and PDF) magazine devoted exclusively to black and white photography, and produced entirely with InDesign. Plus, on top of all the cool photography content, we have an interview with a man who may know more about the inner working of InDesign than anyone else: InDesign’s Chief Architect at Adobe, Douglas Waterfall, And we have a superb InType too, in which Nigel French recalls the grungy type of the ’90s, and its roots in the bedlam typography of ’70s punk and turn of the century Futurism. And as always, Jeff Gamet is here share his latest cool finds, including some great holiday gift ideas for the InDesign users on your list. Enjoy!

Photos on pages 1, 5, 22, 59, and 72 courtesy of Fotolia.com

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InSide: Table of Contents  7 Designing Photo Albums in InDesign Khara Plicanic covers everything you need to know to efficiently build beautiful photo albums in InDesign.

60 InDesigner: LensWork Pam Pfiffner looks at magazine devoted to black and white photography.

22 Import More Images in Less Time Conrad Chavez and Bart Van de Wiele detail three ways to quickly add lots of photos to an InDesign layout.

66 InBrief: New & Improved Products Jeff Gamet keeps you up to date on products that are new, improved, and interesting to InDesign users.

30 I nDesign Templates for Photographers Pariah Burke reveals the amazing number and variety of InDesign templates available on the Internet for photographers.

71 InDex to All Past Issues Download the InDex and discover what’s in all the past issues of this magazine.

41 InPerson: Douglas Waterfall David Blatner interviews InDesign’s Chief Architect at Adobe to find out how new features are developed and what’s next for InDesign CC. 46 Fiddling Around with File Formats Sandee Cohen and David Blatner discuss the best (and worst) file formats to use for graphics in InDesign. 54 I nType: More or Less? Nigel French takes a fascinating and fun look back at the grungy type of the ’90s and its ancestors.

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© 2014 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All rights reserved. Adobe, the Adobe logo, InDesign and InCopy are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Adobe Systems Incorporated in the United States and/or other countries. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

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DESIGNING

PHOTO ALBUMS IN

INDESIGN ESSENTIALS FOR

QUICK AND EASY ALBUMS

BY

KHARA PLICANIC

All photos © Khara Plicanic

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nDesign makes it a breeze to design a fully custom 40-page photo album in an hour— or less. (And that’s if you’re starting from scratch.) You can design for any vendor, export to a variety of formats, and wield unparalleled control over every nuance. Plus, you get the convenience of working with a single document. Yet surprisingly, for many photographers and photo enthusiasts, the idea of using InDesign to build photo albums doesn’t come naturally, even for those photographers with design backgrounds and experience using InDesign. Since first becoming aware of this shocking phenomenon, I’ve been on a one-woman mission to save photo book lovers everywhere from masochistically attempting album design with improper tools (a.k.a. Photoshop). Whether you’re entirely new to creating photo albums or you’re just tired of spinning your wheels attempting to do layouts in photo editing software, this overview will show you how to make albums painless—with InDesign.

Getting started Obviously, it’s pretty hard to get started on an album design if you don’t know the size, format, and specifications required for your project. So before doing anything else, you’ll want to: 1. Decide on a vendor 2. Choose which book to make 3. Gather the required file specifications and/or download any related templates

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The range of products offered (album sizes, shapes, and finishing options), turnaround times, cost, and quality can vary dramatically from vendor to vendor. Your best bet? Plan to invest time doing some serious web surfing to get an idea of what your options are. As far as template files and specs go, because many vendors still support the use of Photoshop for albums, they may only

VENDOR RECOMMENDATIONS With so many book vendors out there, it can be tough to know where to start looking. Among the crowd, some of the standouts include: Artifact Uprising AsukaBook Blurb Finao GraphiStudio Miller’s Lab Mpix Pro PinholePro

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provide PSD templates—but don’t let that stop you. Just download their Photoshop templates to get the specs for setting up your own InDesign documents. (And let those vendors know that you’d like an InDesign template!)

Helpful InDesign Preferences

everything back to the default of picas. To do this, go to InDesign > Preferences > Units and Increments (Windows users choose Edit > Preferences > Units and Increments). Set the Horizontal and Vertical Ruler units to Inches (or whatever your project requires), as shown in Figure 1.

having to resize each and every one. The key to making that happen is the default setting related to object fitting. Choose Object > Fitting > Frame Fitting Options. From the drop-down menu next to Fitting, choose Fill Proportionally. For the Align From option, click the center point to select it (Figure 2).

Whether you’re new to InDesign or have worked with it for years, when it comes to photo album production, it’s worth making a couple of tweaks to your preferences. The key to making these changes stick is to make them with no open documents, so close any documents that may be open. Units and Increments InDesign’s default unit of measure is picas, but the file specifications for your book project will likely be in inches or millimeters (depending on what part of the world you’re in). To keep yourself sane, you can change this setting to whatever your project requires, otherwise InDesign will convert

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Figure 1  Changing the preference from picas to something more relevant for albums makes for fewer headaches.

Object Fitting One of the countless benefits to doing album design in InDesign versus using Photoshop is the ability to drop in images and make them fit immediately, without

Figure 2  These two object-fitting settings will make images fill their frames proportionally by default, saving you boatloads of time!

Custom Keyboard Shortcuts When editing and retouching my album designs, I don’t know what I’d do without my two custom keyboard shortcuts (but if I had to guess, I’d say it would probably involve tears of frustration). The two

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keyboard shortcuts I highly recommend can be created by choosing Edit > Keyboard Shortcuts. Next to Product Area, choose Panel Menus, and then scroll down to the corresponding Link commands (Figure 3) to enter your shortcut: 1. Links: Reveal in Bridge (I use Command+Right Arrow/Ctrl+Right Arrow) 2. Links: Edit Original (I use Command+Down Arrow/Ctrl+Down Arrow)

Figure 3  Taking time to create custom keyboard shortcuts will pay impressive dividends down the road.

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Workspace You’re working with images—lots of images. And Adobe has a product that lets you manage those images really easily: Adobe Bridge. One of the great things about designing albums in InDesign is the ability to drag and drop images directly from Bridge into your layouts. Arranging your workspace to accommodate a full column devoted to Bridge makes selecting and placing images almost… blissful. To arrange Bridge into a single column (filmstrip style), make sure Bridge is active, open the Window menu, and remove the check marks next to everything except Path Bar. (If you’re in Bridge CS6 or earlier, just choose View > Compact Mode.) Grab the corner of the window and adjust as necessary (Figure 4). Once your workspace is set to your liking, save it by choosing Window > Workspace > New Workspace.

Figure 4  Arranging your workspace to create room for a full column of photo browsing makes the design process a cinch.

WHY NOT MINI-BRIDGE? While Mini-Bridge has the advantage of running within InDesign itself (as opposed to separately, as Bridge does), there are some trade-offs that just aren’t quite worth it. For one thing, Bridge is more responsive to keyboard navigation. In fact, depending on your software version, MiniBridge may not respond to various keyboard commands at all. But try them both and judge for yourself!

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Document Setup Facing Pages and Bleeds If you’re used to designing things like magazines in InDesign, you’re familiar with the concept of facing pages. But if you’re coming from a photo background (where you’ve only had experience with Photoshop), you’re likely to be more comfortable working with spreads that consist of a single big ol’ page. As mentioned earlier, the photo industry still revolves heavily around Photoshop— even when it comes to multi-page projects like photo books. And because there’s no such thing as facing pages (or bleeds) in Photoshop, nearly all the file specifications, dimensions, and templates you’ll find for albums will refer to spreads rather than individual pages, and bleeds are usually built into the given document dimensions. Thus, if you prefer to work in facing pages (and separate out your bleeds), chances are you’ll have to convert the dimensions as

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necessary. Otherwise, for an album that calls for a total of forty 10x10 pages, you’d set your document up as shown in Figure 5.

Figure 5  Facing pages or no facing pages, as long as the final output meets your vendor’s requirements, go with whatever makes the most sense to you.

The album cover will likely be a different size than the internal pages. Dealing with this is as easy as using the Edit Page Size button at the bottom of the Pages panel (Figure 6). The same trick can be used as a solution for books designed without facing pages, where the first page starts on the right and/or the final page ends on the left. (If using InDesign CS4 or earlier, create a separate document for the cover.)

Figure 6  The Edit Page Size button makes it easy to change the size of select pages for a cover or for a book that starts on the right or ends on the left.

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Guides and Master Pages Even with InDesign’s built-in smart guides and helpful alignment tools, it’s not a bad idea to add a few of your own standalone page guides. Instead of drawing guides over and over again on each page or spread, place them on the A-Master page (Figure 7). And if you’re a fan of color-filled backgrounds, put those on the master page as well. Anything you place on the A-Master will automatically be applied to all the pages in your document (unless you create and apply a different master page). Helloooo time-saver!

Figure 7  Guides created on the master page, calling out the center (fold), 5", and 15" marks INDESIGN MAGAZINE  57

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Image Wrangling When it comes to getting images into your document and combining them into a workable layout, InDesign gives you some great tools to get it done quickly. Here’s a look at a few of my favorites. Drag and Drop Adding images is as simple as using the Rectangle Frame Tool (F) to draw a frame, and then dragging and dropping an image

from Bridge. (You can also drag from any folder in the Mac OS Finder or Windows Explorer, but as you can tell, I like Bridge.) If you want even more simplicity, draw a series of frames, select multiple images in Bridge, and then drag and drop to place them all at once (Figure 8). You can even use the arrow keys to “scroll” through the loaded images appearing within your cursor. (Those software engineers are so dang clever!)

Figure 8  Use the Rectangle Frame Tool to create frames, and then drag and drop from Bridge. Here, I’ve dragged four images in, clicked once to place the image on the left, and the cursor shows me that I have three more to go.

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Size and Resize You can adjust the image within the frame with the white-colored Direct Selection Tool (press A) or by double-clicking with the black Selection tool. (You’ll know you’ve selected the image, and not the frame, when you see a rust-colored frame instead of a blue one.) Hold the Shift key while dragging a corner handle to scale the image proportionally (Figure 9).

Figure 9  Hold Shift while dragging from a corner with the Direct Selection Tool to scale an image proportionally within its frame.

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To scale the frame and the image together as a single unit, select the frame with the Selection tool, then hold Command+Shift/Ctrl+Shift while dragging from a corner. Or, if you get tired of holding down those keys all the time, select the frame and select the Auto-Fit checkbox in the Control panel. Now just dragging any side or corner handle will automatically scale the image, too. For any wayward images too small or too large to fit the frame, fill the frame proportionally by pressing the mother of all keyboard shortcuts: Command+Shift+Option+C/ Ctrl+Shift+Alt+C (where the “C” obviously stands for “convenience”). Grids If you’ve never seen InDesign’s Gridify command in action, it might just blow your socks off. To give it a whirl, use the Rectangle Frame Tool (F) to draw a

frame just as before, only this time, before releasing the mouse button, use your arrow keys to add columns and rows (Figure 10). Take that, Photoshop!

Figure 10  Never before has making a grid of images been this incredibly easy.

Don’t like the spacing between the frames within the grid? It’s based on your current Gutter settings—choose Layout > Margins and Columns, and adjust the Gutter setting to taste (Figure 11, next page), and then draw the grid out again.

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Figure 11  Designate your desired frame spacing within grids via the Gutter setting.

By the way, this works when placing images, too: Drag a bunch of images in from Bridge (which loads up the Place cursor), start dragging, press the arrow keys to create the grid, and then let go of the mouse button— InDesign makes the grid of frames and places the images in them automagically! Combining Frames for Custom Grids Grids are pretty rad in and of themselves, but what if you want to combine a few frames for a more custom look? Reach no farther than your Pathfinder panel! Select the desired frames, and in the Pathfinder panel, click the Add icon to combine them into one shape. If the original

frames weren’t overlapping, you’ve just made a compound frame (one image shows up in all the pieces). If you want to make one big rectangle the size of those combined frames, just click the Convert to Rectangle icon in the panel (Figure 12).

Figure 12  The often over-looked Pathfinder panel makes it easy to turn the simplest of grids into something completely customizable.

Minding the Gaps Once you’ve finished drawing your grid, you can adjust the gaps between frames using—wait for it—the Gap tool (press U). Press and hold the Shift key before clicking and dragging with the Gap tool to isolate vertical or horizontal gaps for even more control (Figure 13). Tip: Normally, the Gap tool just changes the size of the frames, but if you want the images to scale inside the frames as you drag with the Gap tool, turn on that Auto-Fit checkbox I told you about a moment ago. Figure 13  Adjust your gaps with the Gap tool!

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Figure 14  This random mess of images can (thankfully) be cleaned up in a flash using the Align panel.

Alignment and Spacing When putting together a quick layout, I tend to do a lot of copying and pasting from earlier spreads and/or duplicating frames I’ve already drawn (by Option/Altdragging with the Selection tool) until I’m happy with the result. This means I often have a bit of random spacing and alignment on my hands (Figure 14). Thankfully, the Align panel makes it easy to whip a sloppy arrangement into shape with one or two clicks (Figure 15). Swapping Images InDesign is an awesome program, but I wish some features were easier. For example, when laying out a page, I often want to swap two images—leave their frames, but exchange the photos. This should be easy, but it takes eight steps: 1. Select the image inside the first frame (remember you can do that by double-clicking the image).

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Figure 15  With all the frames selected, it takes just one click in the Align panel to align all the top edges, and a second click to evenly distribute the spacing between frames.

2. Cut it to the clipboard (Edit > Cut). 3. Paste it onto the page (InDesign creates a new frame for it). 4. Select the image inside the second frame and cut it to the clipboard. 5. Select the first frame, and choose Edit > Paste Into. 6. Select the first image (the one in the new frame), and cut it to the clipboard.

7. Delete the new frame that InDesign made when you pasted it. 8. Select the second frame, and choose Edit > Paste Into. There are scripts out there that can make this faster, but don’t you think Adobe should just find a way to simplify this?!

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Object Styles If you prefer to add a stroke (outline) to all your images, doing so via an object style allows you to create and apply a consistent “style” to all your images, with the power to globally update and edit the style on all images at once. To get started, select an image frame with the Selection tool (V), and apply the desired stroke (Figure 16) or effect (like a drop shadow). Open the Object Styles panel (Window > Styles > Object Styles), and Option-click or Alt-click the New Style button (Figure 17) to create a new style based on the treatment of the selected object. In the New Object Style dialog box, give the style a name, and be sure to check the option to Apply Style to Selection before clicking OK (Figure 18). This new style can now be applied to any image (or group of images) by simply selecting them and clicking the desired style from within the Object Styles panel.

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WHAT IF I WANT AN OBJECT STYLE APPLIED BY DEFAULT?

Figure 16  A bright orange stroke (with a weight of 6 pts) has been applied to the selected image. Figure 17  Pressing Option/ Alt while clicking to create a new style gives you the opportunity to both name the style and apply it to the currently selected object.

Figure 18  Give the style a name, and be sure to apply it to your current selection before clicking OK.

Creating and designating a default object style isn’t hard, but there is one catch. If you want the stroke to be applied automatically to every frame you create, you’ll need to draw the frames with the Rectangle Tool (M) instead of the Rectangle Frame Tool (F), as frames drawn with the Rectangle Frame Tool (F) can’t have styles applied to them by default. To designate the default style for graphic (image) frames, drag the icon appearing on the far right of the Basic Graphics Frame style to whichever style you want as the new default (Figure 19). Figure 19  Designating a chosen default object style is as simple as dragging and dropping this simple icon.

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Editing and Retouching If you’ve ever created, edited, and retouched an album built in Photoshop, you’re probably cringing from the terrifying memories. Prepare to pick your jaw up off the floor when you see how painless it is in InDesign. Replacing Images When replacing images per a client’s request (or your own aesthetic judgment), use the keyboard shortcut we created earlier (Command+Right Arrow/Ctrl+Right Arrow) to locate the selected image in Bridge almost instantly; then navigate to a suitable replacement. (Remember that pressing the spacebar in Bridge will give you a closer look at any image.) For example, let’s say you finish a design and realize one of the images you already placed has someone with their eyes closed. (At least you caught it before going to print.) Rather than combing through your entire image folder to find similar images, this time-saving shortcut will allow you to cut

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right to the chase. Then—and here’s where it gets really good—you can select the new image in Bridge, and then choose File > Place > In InDesign. Because the frame was already selected in InDesign, the new image replaces it! If you’d rather drag the new image out instead of using the menu feature, you can drag the new image into InDesign. However, by default InDesign will place the new image into its own frame. To avoid this, hold down the Option/Alt key while dropping the replacement image on top of the frame (that forces the image to replace the one that’s there). Retouching InDesign manages placed images via a link to the file’s location on your hard drive (versus actually placing all the pixels inside the document, as Photoshop does). That means that when you retouch an image on disk, InDesign needs to update its link to the file. You can see all the linked images in the

If you prefer to save your retouched images separate from your proofs, just save them in a folder wherever you want, and use the same filenames. Once you’ve finished retouching the entire album, select the whole collection of images in the Links panel (click the first one, then Shift-click the last one), then click the panel’s menu and choose Relink to Folder (Figure 20). Locate the folder containing the retouched files, and click Choose. Easy!

Figure 20  Save your retouched files wherever you want; as long as you save them with the same filenames, you can redirect InDesign’s Links panel to the new location for all the images in your document at once.

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Links panel (Window > Links). If you see a yellow triangle, it means the file on disk has been modified (just double-click that icon to update it). If you see a red alert symbol, it means InDesign can’t find the original, so you’ll need to re-place it. But here’s a trick to speed up the editing process: Just select the image(s) you want to retouch, press Command+Down Arrow/ Ctrl+Down Arrow (or, alternatively, Option/Alt-double-click on an image), and the image opens in Photoshop (assuming it’s a Photoshop image). Then you can edit the photo, and when you’re finished, save the file in the same location with the same name, and close it. When you return to InDesign, the image will automatically update!

Exporting When it comes to photo albums, the most commonly exported file formats are PDF and JPEG. Each exported file is prepared somewhat differently, depending on

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whether it’s intended to be a proof or a production-ready file. Naturally, the format you choose (JPEG, PDF, or otherwise) will depend on several factors. In fact, it’s entirely possible that you might export to one format for proofing, and an entirely different format for production, depending on the needs and requests of your clients and vendors. PDFs To export to PDF, choose File > Export (or simply press Command+E/Ctrl+E). Select the desired name, location, and format, and then click Save (Figure 21). In the Export Adobe PDF dialog box (Figure 22), you’ll see a drop-down menu with various Adobe PDF presets. These presets combine the different settings from the various categories on the left into useful groupings with names like High Quality Print and Smallest File Size. With so many options, how do you know where to start? Happily, the presets tend to

Figure 21  In the Export dialog box, give the file a name, choose a location, and select the desired format from the drop-down menu.

Figure 22  Don’t let all these options scare you; presets make it easy.

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work well for a lot of projects. For example, if you’re making a PDF to email to a client as a proof, just choose the preset for Smallest File Size, decide whether you want to export individual pages or full spreads (irrelevant if you didn’t build your document with facing pages), and click Export. It can really be just that easy. When it comes to production-ready files, your vendor should be able to tell you exactly what settings to use, so check their website or call them for specifics. When in doubt, the High Quality Print preset is a good place to start. (High Quality Print leaves colors as they are, whereas the Press Quality preset will convert to CMYK. Again, check with your vendor to find out which settings are best for your project.) Regardless of which preset you go with, if your document contains a bleed, be sure to open the Marks and Bleeds category, and check the option to Use Document Bleed Settings (Figure 23); otherwise the bleed won’t be included in the export.

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for each page or spread of your book, I recommend creating a folder to house them all, before you click Save. The export options for JPEG are far less overwhelming than for PDF (Figure 24). The biggie is resolution: 300 ppi is the standard recommendation for production-ready files, but always check with your vendor. You may be surprised—some vendors’ servers reject files that don’t have precisely 252 ppi!

Figure 23  Setting up a bleed won’t do you much good if you forget to include it in your export.

Save your settings by clicking the Save Preset button in the bottom left corner so you’ll be able to select it from the list in the future. JPEGs Most album vendors will want your finished design as a collection of JPEGs. Choose File > Export, and then choose JPEG for the format. Because there will be a JPEG created

Figure 24  JPEG options are simple, but it’s still a good idea to check with your vendor for specifics.

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InDesign is funny about file-naming when it comes to the JPEGs it exports, neglecting to put zeros in front of the numbers. To avoid sequencing problems when you send the files to your vendor, use Bridge to do a batch re-name using a 2-digit sequence by selecting the files and pressing Command+Shift+R/Ctrl+Shift+R (Figure 25).

Life Changing Once you get the hang of building albums in InDesign, it’s pretty safe to say you’ll never go back. The freedom and flexibility you gain (not to mention the many hours saved) is undeniable. So help spread the word! Tell your friends, your colleagues, and your neighbor’s cousin’s pet groomer—everyone who will listen.

where creatives go to know

n

Figure 25  Bridge has an easy fix for InDesign’s wonky JPEG file numbering.

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A one-woman show, Khara Plicanic has been dazzling clients with outrageous service and record-breaking turnaround times since photographing her first wedding 14 years ago. Her book, Your Camera Loves You: Learn to Love it Back (Peachpit Press), showcases her unique teaching style and playful sense of humor that continue to endear her to an exponentially growing audience. Following the success of her popular Wicked Fast Workflow Guide, Khara’s latest book, Album Moxie (Peachpit Press), rescues photographers from their workflow woes with the magic of InDesign. When she’s not behind a camera (or at the keyboard), Khara shares her passion, knowledge, and experience speaking at industry conferences and teaching on global platforms including creativeLIVE. She believes in possibility, adventure, and all things covered in chocolate.

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By Conrad Chavez and Bart Van de Wiele

Import More Images in Less Time Need to quickly add lots of photos to an InDesign layout? Here are three ways. If you create photo-intensive publications like catalogs or yearbooks, you already know that it takes too long to import images one at a time using the Place command. But what are the faster alternatives? InDesign gives you several ways to import and place multiple images in a single pass. Depending on the kind of publication you’re creating, one of the three solutions in this article may be just what you need. And while some methods use the trusty Place command to import photos, you’ll see that there are faster ways to get photos into InDesign.

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Semiautomatic: Creating a Photo Grid As You Import Photos If you need to lay out just a few pages of photos as a grid, use this process (often called Gridify) to interactively create a photo grid as you place multiple images. You’ll customize the grid as you first create it, so remember that you’ll need to keep the mouse button held down until the photo grid is the way you want it. Got it? Then let’s go. Choose File > Place and select multiple images in the Place dialog box. (You can do this by clicking one and then Shiftclicking to select contiguous files in the

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Import More Images in Less Time

list. Or Command/Ctrl-click on images to select them.) Now click the Open or Place button to get the loaded graphics icon, and then drag diagonally—​but now, before you release the mouse button, use the arrow keys to customize the grid. Adjust the number of rows by pressing the Up Arrow or Down Arrow key, or adjust the number of columns by pressing the Left Arrow or Right Arrow key (Figure 1). You can also adjust the space between photos vertically by pressing Command/Ctrl+Up Arrow or Command/ Ctrl+Down Arrow, or adjust horizontal spacing by pressing Command/Ctrl+Left Arrow or Command/Ctrl+Right Arrow.

Figure 1: As you drag, press arrow keys to adjust columns and rows.

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Automatic: Flowing Photo Grids with a Script

Figure 2: Completed photo grid

After you release the mouse button, InDesign creates a photo grid made up of separate graphics frames (Figure 2). If you find yourself creating the same grid more than once, simply Command+Shift-drag/ Ctrl+Shift-drag—​InDesign will use the same number of columns and rows that you specified the last time, so all you have to do is drag a rectangle of the same dimensions.

Wouldn’t it be nice to flow photos into InDesign as easily as text, where one click fills lots of pages with formatted content? If you need to create so many pages of photo­ graphs that the previous tip would be too much manual labor, you can use a script to create a grid of photos consistently on many pages in a single import operation. This method uses the Image Catalog script included with InDesign. First create a folder in the desktop or in Adobe Bridge, and add to it all of the images you want to use. In InDesign, open the Scripts panel (Window > Utilities > Scripts). In the Scripts panel, open the Application folder, the Samples folder, and then the JavaScript folder. Scroll down until you see ImageCatalog.jsx (Figure 3, next page), and double-click that script. When asked, select the folder of images, and click OK. You’ll then see options for the script (Figure 4, next page). Here are the main things you should consider:

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Import More Images in Less Time

Figure 3: Double-click ImageCatalog.jsx

Specify the grid layout. The first group of options in the Image Catalog dialog box are fairly self-explanatory. The Number of Rows and Number of Columns options do what they say, and the Offset options control the distance between grid cells. The Fitting options correspond to commands on the Object > Fitting submenu in InDesign,

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Figure 4: Image Catalog script options

and the default settings for these options generally work well. Set up optional text labels. In the second group of options, you can have

the Image Catalog script add text under each image. The Label Type information is retrieved from the metadata associated with each image, so the script can display a selected type of metadata (if the image includes it). For example, if you choose “XMP description” for the label type, the script looks for whatever is entered in the Description (caption) field for that image; you can use Adobe Bridge to verify, enter, or update the metadata for the images you use with the script. It’s a good idea to select Labels for both the Label Style and Layer options. Respectively, these choices will create a paragraph style called Labels, so that you can easily reformat all of the labels at once, and place all labels on their own layer, so that you can easily select or hide them. After the script has run, you’ll find that InDesign has automatically created as many pages as needed to contain the number of photos you selected (Figure 5, next page).

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Import More Images in Less Time

Figure 5: New multi-page document laid out by Image Catalog

Merging ImageCatalog.jsx Pages With Your Document It’s important to note that the Image­Catalog.jsx script does not place images into an existing InDesign document. Instead, it creates a new document using

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the default settings for new InDesign documents, which means the page margins might not match up with the document where you want to use these photo grids. For example, imagine that you’re designing a document that uses a 12-pica top margin for a header, a 6-pica bottom margin for a footer, and 3-pica margins on the sides. The default InDesign page settings (which the ImageCatalog.jsx script will use) create 3-pica margins on all sides of a new document, so that’s not going to work. You can resolve this by changing the default settings for new documents by setting InDesign options when no document is open: Close any documents that are open in InDesign, choose Layout > Margins and Columns, set the margins you want, and click OK. The next time you run the ImageCatalog.jsx script, the pages it creates will use your new default margin settings. Now that the margin settings of the script-generated document match your

template, you can copy all of the pages from the script-generated document into your template without having to reposition any of the frames. After you add the new script-generated pages to your working document, you can then go on to assigning appropriate master pages to them.

More Scripts: Using Data Merge for Bulk Image Imports There are scripts available that tap into the Data Merge capabilities of InDesign, not only flowing images and text into a single story, but allowing them to reflow when you edit or delete content in the story. The details are a bit involved for this article, but two articles by David Blatner on InDesignSecrets.com lay it all out for you: Creating a Contact Sheet or Yearbook Page in InDesign and Data Merge Into Inline Anchored Objects So They Flow in a Story.

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Import More Images in Less Time

Manual: Clicking to Fill Placeholder Frames When you have a page or master page that includes placeholders for photos or other graphics, it’s easy to quickly drop a bunch of photos into the layout—​but you you need to do just a little bit of setup in advance. Unlike the previous examples, this method does not create totally new photo grids, so it’s better for freeform page designs and for pages that are already laid out. A graphics placeholder can be as simple as any empty non-text frame. For this setup to work, the Content type for the frame must be either Graphics or Unassigned. (Choose Object > Content to verify the type of frame.) Set Frame Fitting Options. Select a placeholder frame, and choose Object > Fitting > Frame Fitting Options (Figure 6). Set the Content Fitting options (I chose Fill Frame Proportionally for this layout, although Fit Content Proportionally may work better for others), and click OK. You can

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Figure 6: Setting Frame Fitting Options for placeholder graphics frames

now duplicate this frame for use elsewhere in the layout, or use its attributes as the basis for an object style. This feature ensures that any image you place in the frame will shrink or expand to fill the frame. Fill the frames. Choose File > Place, select multiple images, and click the Place

Figure 7: Click frames with the loaded graphics icon to insert photos.

button. The loaded graphics icon will appear; click once in each placeholder to drop an image into it (Figure 7). After you’ve filled all of the graphics frames, make a second pass through the

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Import More Images in Less Time

document to make any necessary fitting adjustments. If you need to replace an image in a graphics frame with a different one, use the Place command as if you were placing it anew, but this time, Option/Alt-click the frame with the loaded place icon to replace whatever was in the frame. You can also select a single frame first and use the Replace Selected Item option in the Place dialog box.

Adding Captions Of course, images only go so far—​what about adding captions? Don’t feel too bad that the Image Catalog script is the only one of our three methods that generates text labels—​you can easily add descriptive text to any layout using InDesign’s two powerful captions features. Set up the captions. Before you use InDesign’s Static Caption or Live Caption features, you have to specify what the caption should look like by choosing Object >

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Figure 8: Specify caption content.

Bypass the Place Dialog Box In many techniques that use the Place command, you may find drag-and-drop importing to be more intuitive and efficient. Select the images you want to import, and drag them onto an InDesign document window; you’ll get the same loaded graphics icon you would have gotten by selecting multiple images in the Place dialog box. And don’t limit yourself to dragging only from the desktop—​ you can start dragging from any valid dragging source, including the Mini Bridge panel in InDesign, Adobe Bridge, or Adobe Photoshop Lightroom, as long as you select images that are in an InDesign-compatible format.

Captions > Caption Setup (Figure 8). In the Metadata Caption section, you can set up a caption to display as little information as

just the Name (filename). But you don’t have to be that minimal—​you’ll also see that the choices in the Metadata menu are far more

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Import More Images in Less Time

extensive than those provided by the Image Catalog script. You can add more lines of metadata by clicking the + button. Next, set the Position and Style options as needed. Again, to make it easier to edit the look and feel of the captions later, it’s a good idea to apply a paragraph style to all captions and to have all captions on their own layer. When you click OK, you won’t see any change, because the captions themselves are generated in the next step. Generate the captions. Select one or more images on your page, and choose Object > Captions > Generate Live Caption or Generate Static Caption. A live caption automatically changes to display the metadata for the image it’s next to, while a static caption doesn’t change. However, a live caption can only be one line long, while a static caption can “wrap” onto multiple lines. So static captions are usually better for sentence-long descriptions. When you click OK, the captions appear next to the images you selected (Figure 9, next page). Note that

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this only works on one page or spread at a time; if you want to apply captions to many pages of images, see the sidebar “Add All the Captions Fast.” There’s another way to add captions to images: Add them when you’re placing the images themselves. You can do that by

turning on the Create Static Captions checkbox inside the Place dialog box. This way, InDesign adds a text frame with a caption in it automatically, as soon as you place the image. If you plan to add InDesign captions to a photo grid using the semi-automatic Gridify feature or the automatic Image

Add All the Captions Fast The captions features in InDesign are cool, but if you already have dozens or even hundreds of images on multiple InDesign pages, you might be thinking “hmm, I need to select images if I want to add captions, so I guess I will be selecting all the images page per page.” Wrong! Instead, there is one place in InDesign that allows you to target all the images in the file at the same time and apply captions to them? But where . . . ? Give up? The correct answer is the Links panel. This panel not only lists all of the images in your file but also lets you add captions to all these images. First, set up the captions for this document using the exact same method as before (choosing Object > Captions > Caption Setup). Then open the Links panel (Window > Links) and select all your links (you can click on one and Shift-click on the last one). Finally, choose Captions > Generate Static Caption from the Links panel menu. Voilà, all the captions are added, across all your pages.

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Import More Images in Less Time

n Conrad Chavez writes books, articles, and training materials with a focus on digital imaging using Adobe Creative Cloud tools. He is the author of books such as Real World Adobe Photoshop CS5 for Photographers, and is also a fine art photographer. You can find out more about Conrad at his website, http://conradchavez.com.

Figure 9: Generated captions

Bart Van de Wiele is a digital publishing trainer and consultant from Belgium focusing on Adobe’s print workflow products and the Digital Publishing Suite. He is certified as an Adobe Certified Instructor, and Adobe Design Master. He’s also a contributing author for InDesignSecrets, wrote the Adobe DPS ExamAid studyguide, and co-authored the InDesign CS6 ExamAid studyguide. Follow him on Twitter @bartvdwiele.

where creatives go to know

Catalog script, as you create the grid be sure to specify additional space between rows to leave enough room for the captions. Sure, photo-intensive layouts can take a lot of time, even the ones with a rigid structure. But they don’t always have to take as much time as you might think. And these methods for automating and standardizing your process help you work smarter, and leave you more time for taking the photos in the first place.

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By Pariah S. Burke

InDesign Templates for Photographers, Their Clients, and Their Businesses

Which part of your job do you like better—creating awesome content, or worrying about the size, pattern, color, margins, caption style, orientation, etc. of the pages that will subsequently hold that awesome content? Yeah, I thought you’d say that. Templates sometimes get a bad reputation, as if using them is “cheating” or “lazy” in some way. But why should you have to reinvent the wheel for every client or self-promotion project? High-quality InDesign templates—​and template-generating scripts—​abound for photographers to use in their businesses. From coordinated photography business

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collateral templates to photobook, portfolio, and album templates you can use to present your own work and clients’ photobooks, a plethora of ready-to-use InDesign templates is just waiting for you to drop in your photos. Use them as is, or customize them to match your brand, your aesthetic, and your client’s event.

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InDesign Templates for Photographers

Herein I present more than 30 top-quality InDesign templates in four categories: »» Photography and Portfolio Book Templates »» Highly Customizable Scripts and Plug-ins »» Printer-Specific Tools »» Business of Photography Templates

Wedding Album with Rounded Frames Price: $7 Notes:  16 page styles. 200×200 mm + 5 mm bleed. Master pages. Paragraph, character, and object styles. PSD included.

Photography and Portfolio Book Templates

Plicanic Wedding Album

An essential part of any photographer’s repertoire is a portfolio book. Moreover, an important offering for most photographers is the ability to make photo books of various types for clients. While Lightroom offers a few photobook and album layout options, to really differentiate yourself from the competition, you should consider using (and/or offering to clients) one or more of the following InDesign photobook and templates.

Free InDesign Album Template Pack

Izzatunnisa Photo Album Price: $11 Notes:  12 page styles. 300 DPI. 210×148 mm + 3 mm bleeds. INDD and IDML formats. Includes layers.

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Price: Free Notes:  10 x 10 inches. 20 page styles.

Price: Free Notes:  20 album templates in 10 x 10 inch format. Downloading requires joining the site’s free Photography Concentrate Explorers Club.

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InDesign Templates for Photographers

Wedding Photobook Price: €19 Notes:  7 x 5 inches. 12 page styles. Half-fold. Includes ribbons and lace vector graphics in Adobe Illustrator AI format. Can be adapted for other occasions (birthday, graduation, baby memory, etc.).

Blik Design Professional Photobook Price: $9 Notes:  9.5 x 11 inches. 24 page styles. Master pages. B&W and color schemes. Includes instruction manual in PDF.

Fresh Wedding Photo Album Price: $12/$600 Notes:  7.8 x 7.8 inches + bleed. $12 license is for use by you or your client in a single product not for resale. $600 license allows for unlimited products and for-sale books.

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InDesign Templates for Photographers

Creative Photographer Album Colorful Photo Album Price: $10/500 Notes:  8.3 x 8.3 inches + 3 mm bleed. Includes Adobe Illustrator AI vector graphics file. $10 license is for use by you or your client in a single product not for resale. $500 license allows for unlimited products and for-sale books.

Price: $11/550 Notes:  11.6 x 8.2 inches + 3 mm bleed. 12 page styles. $11 license is for use by you or your client in a single product not for resale. $550 license allows for unlimited products and for-sale books.

Photographer Photo Album Vol. 2 Price: $10/500 Notes:  210 x 148 mm (A5) + 3 mm bleed. 16 page styles. $10 license is for use by you or your client in a single product not for resale. $500 license allows for unlimited products and for-sale books.

Family Photo Album Price: $12/600 Notes:  11.7 x 8.3 inches (A4). 18 page styles. $12 license is for use by you or your client in a single product not for resale. $600 license allows for unlimited products and for-sale books.

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InDesign Templates for Photographers

Elegant Wedding Album

Bride Magic Album

Price: $16/800 Notes:  8 x 8 inches. 30 page styles. Includes Photoshop PSD. Includes InDesign layers. Uses clipping masks. $16 license is for use by you or your client in a single product not for resale. $800 license allows for unlimited products and for-sale books.

Price: $2/100 Notes:  12 x 12 inches. 12 page styles. Includes 3 optional background images. $2 license is for use by you or your client in a single product not for resale. $100 license allows for unlimited products and for-sale books.

Alpha-100 Photo Album Price: $13 Notes:  12 x 16 inches. 20 page styles. Includes layered Photoshop PSD.

Travel Photo Album Catalogue (Square) Price: $14/700 Notes:  8.5 x 8.5 inches + 3 mm bleed. 60 page styles. $14 license is for use by you or your client in a single product not for resale. $700 license allows for unlimited products and for-sale books.

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InDesign Templates for Photographers

Photographer Photo Album Vol. 1

White Dream Album Price: $7/350 Notes:  15 x 15 inches. 24 pages styles. Includes layered Photoshop PSD. $7 license is for use by you or your client in a single product not for resale. $350 license allows for unlimited products and for-sale books.

Price: $8/400 Notes:  210 x 148 mm + 3 mm bleed. 12 page styles. Includes separate documents for InDesign CS6, CS5.5, CS5, CS4, CS3, CS2, and CS. $8 license is for use by you or your client in a single product not for resale. $400 license allows for unlimited products and for-sale books.

Pro_Design Photo Portfolio Price: $16 Notes:  8.27 x 11.69 inches (A4) + 3 mm bleed. 16 page styles. Layered InDesign document.

AtoZ Album Price: $12/600 Notes:  210 x 210 mm + 3 mm bleed. 28 page styles. $12 license is for use by you or your client in a single product not for resale. $600 license allows for unlimited products and for-sale books.

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InDesign Templates for Photographers

Exclusive Photography Portfolio Album Price: $11/550 Notes:  8.3 x 5.8 inches with 1/8-in bleed. 20 page styles. $11 license is for use by you or your client in a single product not for resale. $550 license allows for unlimited products and for-sale books.

Eternity Photo Album Price: $9/450 Notes:  8 x 8 inches. 22 page styles. Includes Photoshop PSD and clipping masks. $9 license is for use by you or your client in a single product not for resale. $450 license allows for unlimited products and for-sale books.

PhotoAlbum Vol. 4 – A4 Portrait Price: $6/300 Notes:  8.27 x 11.69 inches (A4) + 5 mm bleed. 11 page styles. Layered InDesign document. $6 license is for use by you or your client in a single product not for resale. $300 license allows for unlimited products and for-sale books.

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Photo Album Vol. 5 – A4 Landscape Price: $10/500 Notes:  8.27 x 11.69 inches (A4) + 5 mm bleed. 15 page styles. Layered InDesign document. $10 license is for use by you or your client in a single product not for resale. $500 license allows for unlimited products and for-sale books.

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InDesign Templates for Photographers

Modern Photo Album 02 Price: $8/400 Notes:  8.27 x 11.69 inches (A4) + 1/8-inch bleed. 14 page styles. $8 license is for use by you or your client in a single product not for resale. $400 license allows for unlimited products and for-sale books.

Highly Customizable Scripts and Plug-ins As amazing as the above templates are, you might find yourself needing something they don’t offer. That’s where you can use more advanced tools that build templates for you, inside InDesign, and to your exact specifications. For example, check out Braxton Sheehy’s AlbumFlow!

Portfolio Book Presenter Price: Free Notes:  8.27 x 11.69 inches (A4). 8 page styles.

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Fully Scalable 150 Layouts by Rock Your Workflow Price: $150 Notes:  Three formats: horizontal, square, and vertical. Script-based system promises that all three formats are 100% adjustable to whatever size book you want to make. An instructional video is included on the website.

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InDesign Templates for Photographers

AsukaBook InDesign Tool (ABId)

InDesign Photo Book Template Scripts Price: Free Notes:  Script- and Library-based system includes feature-rich dialog boxes to define with granular precision the exact layout for your photo book. Options include numbers of rows and columns of photo frames, image scaling, image alignment, distance from margins, gap size between grid images, optional caption text frame creation with frame height and gap options, split-panes, and page bleed alternatives. Floating Library panels offer dozens of drag-ndrop photo arrangements.

Printer-Specific Tools When it comes to getting your work into print, you can choose among thousands of service providers. And dozens of them specifically gear their services to the needs of photographers and designers rather than the general public. A few of these providers even offer excellent, InDesign-based templates and tools to help you use their services. Whether you ultimately print with them or not, consider the potential time- and cost-savings of using their templates over building print projects from scratch.

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Price: Free Notes:  AsukaBook produces books exclusively for professional photographers and designers. The script-based AsukaBook InDesign Tool (ABId) helps you build photobooks inside InDesign that match the exact specifications of AsukaBook formats. An AsukaBook account is required to use this software.

UBYU Bespoke Books Templates Price: Free Notes:  Use when printing through UBYU. 9 book formats. Templates include optional finishing elements such as foiling and debossing.

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InDesign Templates for Photographers

Business of Photography Templates When it’s time to promote your business, turn to StockLayouts.com, where you’ll find professionally designed templates in cohesive styles for all your marketing and identity needs.

Photography Business Price:  $39–99 each or $299 to download 50 templates per month Notes:  Includes templates for brochures, flyers, postcards, ads, letterheads, envelopes, and business cards.

Photography Studio Price:  $39–99 each or $299 to download 50 templates per month Notes:  Includes templates for brochures, flyers, postcards, ads, letterheads, envelopes, business cards, rack cards, and a PowerPoint presentation.

Formal Fashions Price:  $39–99 each or $299 to download 50 templates per month Notes:  Although this set of designs is intended for a fashion or jewelry boutique, it strikes me as perfectly suited to represent a glamor or boudoir photography studio. Includes templates for brochures, flyers, postcards, ads, letterheads, envelopes, and business cards.

Photographer Price:  $39–99 each or $299 to download 50 templates per month Notes:  Includes templates for brochures, flyers, postcards, ads, letterheads, envelopes, and business cards.

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n Pariah Burke (@iampariah) is a creative professional trainer and a design, publishing, and digital publishing workflow expert and consultant whose passion is helping creatives be creative while reducing frustrations and impediments to creativity. He is the author of ePublishing with InDesign and more than 450 tutorials and articles. When not traveling, Pariah lives in Boston where he writes (a lot) and creates (many) projects and publications for Inspiring, Informing, and Empowering Creative Professionals™.

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By David Blatner

Interview with Douglas Waterfall

Douglas Waterfall is the InDesign Chief Architect at Adobe Systems. We recently sat down and talked about how new features are developed and what’s around the corner for InDesign CC. David Blatner: Tell us about yourself . . . first your title here at Adobe. Douglas Waterfall: My role is architect—​ InDesign Engineering Architect. David: What does that mean?! Douglas: Well, what it’s meant for me, over the last three years, has been to be an interface between the engineers and the product manager, Chris Kitchener. I’m the Senior Engineer who’s seen a lot of stuff—​ I know where the bodies are buried. We have a split team, part in India, part here [in Seattle]. So I try to do a lot of discussion

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with all the parties. Chris says, “I want to have that.” I say, “You can’t have that, but you can have this,” and then we negotiate to arrive at something that is both workable and also meets Chris’s needs. That’s what the architect brings and what I did for CS6 and CS7 (CC). Then, for the past year, I’ve morphed into a pseudoproduct manager for EPUB. Right now, at this point, I have five people that I drive; that is, I specify what I want them to go off and do. I don’t manage them, but I say, “Here are the tasks. Here are the stories we want to do. Here’s the path we’re going to follow.”

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InPerson: Douglas Waterfall

David: You also talked about how you know where the bodies are buried. [laughs] Tell us a little bit about what you have done. What were you doing before this role? Douglas:  I joined Adobe to work on InDesign in 1998, one year before InDesign 1.0 shipped. At that time I worked entirely in the text subsystem. David: In the what? Douglas: The text subsystem. I didn’t do all the line-breaking code. That was Eric Menninga. [Editor’s note: See interview, InDesign Magazine Issue #2.] Line breaking—​ figuring out which characters end up on the line—​is a certain kind of task. I worked on things like vertical justification, text wrap, tables composition, straddle heads—​what InDesign calls Span Columns. All this code wraps around line breaking. So, in some sense, the paragraph composer doesn’t know that it’s composing inside a table cell or in a text frame, or as

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“It’s been, for me, a very long march towards these things. The things that we were able to do in CS5 . . . those are a result of this long investment and the series of features that we’ve worked on.” part of a straddle head, or as a footnote. It doesn’t care. It just says, “Oh. Here’s a box, a zone. I’ll go off and compose the text.” I was part of the original tables team. I did the tables composer and I taught the text system how to have a table in it, and then I had to teach tables how to have text in cells. That actually required an enormous amount of change to the architecture. David: There seem to be different rules regarding text in tables. For example, text in a cell doesn’t really deal with text wrap from outside the table. Douglas: Correct. The table is partially affected by the text wrap of the frame it’s in, but the cell itself is a little tiny protected

kind of world. In CS5, I taught table cells how to deal with inline objects with text wrap. That itself was a huge challenge. David: Were footnotes a similar challenge? A way of creating these zones, or blocks? Douglas: With both tables and footnotes, we started to say, “let’s start being able to dynamically create geometry to put text in.” You think about a footnote: it is a movable, mushable geometry piece; it’s a box that changes in height—​whereas a text frame is fixed. Now you have something that’s moving. A table cell has autogrow. How do we compose it so it grows? How big is it? You know, “It’s not that big now, but it’s going to be big

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InPerson: Douglas Waterfall

later.” Those things all made us rethink the way we looked at certain kinds of text flow problems and provide more flexibility and more abstraction. It’s been, for me, a very long march towards these things. The things that we were able to do in CS5 around straddle heads and balance columns and vertical justification in non-rectangular text frames . . . those are a result of this long investment and the series of features that we’ve worked on. That is, for me, when I think about the bodies being buried, it’s really about trying to say, “I know where the opportunities are.” David: When you talk about how complex this is and how much time it takes, I remember at some point you told me you were working on some Keep Options problems. To we users, it just seemed like a bug that could be fixed in an hour or two. Douglas: [laughs] Right! We have a very complex Keep situation. You can say, “I want

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“You can’t have it be infinite. . . . You have to be able to say, ‘Here’s the set of rules. Go.’ ” the first two lines to stay together,” or “the last N lines.” But what happens when you have something like straddle heads in a multi-column text frame?! In CS5, the Keeps rule that we had basically said the geometry is fixed. That is, “If the text doesn’t fit in this space, we’ll put it someplace else.” But straddle heads introduced the notion of a dynamic layout. Actually, footnotes were earlier. As the size of the footnote gets bigger, the space in the text frame gets smaller—​I’ve got to recompose everything—​which may change the position of the footnote . . . David: It becomes like an infinite loop.

Douglas: But you can’t have it be infinite. You have to come up with strategies where you always feel like you’re moving forward toward a conclusion. Straddles are the same sort of thing. You have to be able to say, “Here’s the set of rules. Go.” And the right thing occurs. So, CS5 introduced the notion of iterative composition. That is, you would compose something and you would look at the outcome and you’d say, “It’s good,” or “It’s bad, let me do something else.” Balanced columns are like that, too. That was a huge complexity in CS5. Once we were finished, we realized the Keeps rules weren’t good enough. In CS6, we knew the strategy we had before had to change. I had to go off—​and essentially to customers it was a bug fix—​ but it took me three or four months to figure it out. David: You mention the idea of iterative composition . . .

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InPerson: Douglas Waterfall

Douglas: It doesn’t technically do iterative composition. What it does is conceptually describe a tree of possibilities. Then it says, “I’m going to wander through the tree and find the best outcome.” We can get away with this now, but couldn’t 10 or 15 years ago because we didn’t have the desktop computing power. Sure, FrameMaker has had straddle heads for a long time, but they only have rectangular text frames . . . they don’t have the same kinds of text wrap situations that we have. David: Let me switch to a totally different subject: Are there features that you’re particularly pleased with, either yours or others, in the program? Douglas: I think that I’m probably still the proudest of tables and footnotes, because they represented an enormous change to internal policies . . .  they represent really large changes to the code base. We had to go backwards a huge amount in order to go forward in a new direction.

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“EPUB is a maddening problem for an InDesign person, because of all the things people are used to. . . . there’s only a fraction of what we can do in InDesign that can be expressed that way. How do we do that?!” David: Are there features that you wish you could just go off for 3 months or a year and tinker with? Douglas: I would like to do split row tables—​you know, divide rows across page or column boundaries. There is actually some code in there from when I did tables 10 years ago to do that, and we never went back to implement it. These are things that I have sort of planned for and put in place, in my personal coding area, that I want to see to fruition. Here’s another one: People have complained for a long time about variables. Variables are implemented, for historical reasons, as a single character in InDesign. And that works great for things like page

numbers; but it doesn’t work so well for variables like custom text, or running heads. I’d like to change the variable architecture to use some technology we built when we redid cross-references. Then you could have line-breaking variables. David: But that takes time. Douglas: That’s the challenge. Managers have to decide where to put their money, where to put their resources, put the time. Things that I’ve always thought were exciting may not be as applicable to quite enough people to go off and do. David: Now your job is shifting gears dramatically to thinking about EPUB, which doesn’t really even have frames!

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InPerson: Douglas Waterfall

Douglas: EPUB is a maddening problem for an InDesign person, because of all the things people are used to. You understand spreads and text frames and text wrap. Then you look at HTML and EPUB and you say: There’s only a fraction of what we can do in InDesign that can be expressed that way. How do we do that?! Our challenge has been, well, what attributes do we have in InDesign that map well? How do we express those? How do we give people control, and how much control should we give them? What do we do about images? Objects? What about anchored objects and inlines? How do we help customers get their documents to those devices in a way that’s more predictable to them? I don’t want to hide the reality that EPUB readers have these kinds of problems. But how do I give you some more control so you can navigate that yourself? That is a big challenge. David: What are you working on now?

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“I’m excited about the CC model, because it allows us to not wait 18 months to be able to deliver stuff—we can release it as quick as we can make it.” Douglas: In CC . . . Internally, we’re calling the first release of CC R0 . . . So we revised a bunch of EPUB work from CS6 to CC R0. In fact, there’s a document on the web on the Adobe site that talks about all the things we did in CC R0. We’re continuing those refinements, we’re fixing problems, we’re adding some new features. We’re focusing on reflowable EPUB, because that covers most of what people are doing. But reflowable doesn’t really work well for some kinds of documents. If you have a beautiful picture book or you have some very complex layout, like a textbook,

where you want to have specific relationships between the image and text . . . it’s difficult to do that well in reflowable EPUB. But fixed layout EPUB, or EPUB3 . . . we’re interested in trying to support that out of InDesign. It plays very well to our strengths. There’s still much more stuff for us to do. I’m excited about the CC model, because it allows us to not wait 18 months to be able to deliver stuff—​we can release it as quick as we can make it. That allows us, I think, to be more accurate with our guesses, get feedback about what we’re doing, and fix things quickly. When you have to plan for an 18 month cycle, you tend to concentrate on exciting things, the flashy things, and it’s easy to forget about the little things. I like this pattern, it’s very rewarding.

n David Blatner is co-publisher of InDesign Magazine and the co-creator of PePcon: The Print + ePublishing Conference.

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By Sandee Cohen and David Blatner

Fiddling Around with File Formats

Which is the best file format to use for graphics in InDesign? David Blatner and Sandee Cohen share the wisdom gathered from over 50 years* of teaching and working in DTP.

S

ome designers who grew up in the days before InDesign were taught to only use EPS or TIFF files. Others, who grew up in the days of the web and smartphone cameras, can’t imagine anything except JPEG or PNG. Is there a best file format to use for everything? Unfortunately, no. Instead, the “right choice” depends on the image, how you’re using it, and a host of other concerns. Fortunately, choosing a file format to use is not rocket science, and we’re going to lay out the pros and cons of each format for you here.

BFF Files While there are over a dozen file formats in which you can save your images and graphics, there are some we like to call BFF formats—the ones that work the best with InDesign. You get the most opportunity for control when working with these types of files.

*25 years each!

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Feature: Fiddling Around with File Formats

Photoshop (PSD) Native Photoshop (PSD) files are the most useful for working with bitmapped images in InDesign. InDesign honors the transparency in the PSD file. It also lets you turn the layers on and off from right within InDesign. You can use Photoshop’s layer comps to turn layers as well as adjustment layers on and off from within InDesign. You can create spot color or bump plates for special print effects. You can even save duotones, tritones, or quadtone images in the PSD file format. There are only a couple of significant limitations when working with PSD files. First, while you can create a duotone with transparency in Photoshop, you can’t actually save it in any format that InDesign will recognize (it is always flattened with an opaque background). Second, and more importantly: You can create vector text and “shapes” in Photoshop, but if you save your file in the PSD file format, that information will be rasterized (turned into pixels) when

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Place vs. Paste Why even bother to save your images in any of these formats and then use InDesign’s Place feature? Why not just copy and paste them into InDesign? The answer depends on what kind of graphic you have. You can copy vector artwork from Illustrator and paste it into InDesign, but it doesn’t always work. So we use these rules: »» You can copy and paste simple vector objects (such as basic paths and shapes). Complex graphic elements (gradient meshes, special effects, and so on) may be altered or get stripped out; or the objects may get converted into a format you won’t be able to edit anymore, so it’s just not worth the hassle. »» Only copy and paste objects from Illustrator if you need to; that is, if you need the outlines in InDesign because you’re going to edit them further or use them as InDesign frames. Otherwise, save as PDF or AI and then place the file in InDesign. On the other hand, we very rarely copy and paste pixels from Photoshop into InDesign! It’s generally not a good idea for several reasons. First, pixel data is large (often very large), and pasting it into InDesign bloats your file size. Second, you have very little control over how this image data will print; the color may change in unexpected ways. Third, it’s really hard to edit the image later. While we might copy and paste a small bitmapped icon (especially if we’re creating an interactive document in InDesign, rather than a print doc), in general, it’s usually a much better idea to save it in a file format such as PSD or JPEG and then use File > Place to import it into your document.

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you print or export as PDF from InDesign. Instead, if you have a Photoshop document that has vector information (such as type layers), you need to use a Photoshop PDF to maintain that information. By the way, you may have seen Large Document Format (PSB, or Photoshop Big) files. PSB is a special format that supports files as large as 300,000 x 300,000 pixels. (At print resolution, that’s about 34 meters, or 111 feet, wide.) However, InDesign can’t handle PSB files. In order to place one in InDesign, you need to resample the image to no more than 30,000 x 30,000 pixels and save it as PSD. Illustrator (AI) Native Illustrator (AI) is the best vectordrawing format for InDesign. Like its Photoshop PSD cousin, the AI file format offers a lot of flexibility. For example, InDesign lets you quickly hide or show the layers of an Illustrator file. When you save as an Illustrator file, make sure you select the

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Camera Raw Camera Raw or Digital Negative (DNG) files are the highest quality files you can get from a digital camera—​no information is resampled or lost when captured. The cool thing about camera raw is that you can manipulate color, tones, sharpening, and a whole slew of other enhancements to the image and then go back to the original image at any time without loss of quality. Unfortunately, InDesign doesn’t support placing Camera Raw files. David wrote up a technique that he saw Mike McHugh present at the InDesign Conference a few years ago. The basic trick is to open the DNG file as a Smart Object in Photoshop and then save the document as a PSD. Since InDesign is a BFF with PSD files, you can place it. The Camera Raw file is embedded into the PSD file and can be modified at any time. Create PDF Compatible File option. (It’s on by default, fortunately.) This adds the information that InDesign uses to display and print the file. Without that setting, you won’t be able to see the file on your InDesign page! PDF The PDF file format is almost ubiquitous now—​you can save it from most programs and you can import it almost anywhere.

InDesign is no exception, of course. That makes PDF very flexible and tempting as a file format when working in InDesign. However, make sure you understand the following tidbits when working with PDF. Photoshop PDF files: It’s rare to save a PDF from Photoshop, but as we mentioned earlier, PDF has an important use, especially for us InDesign users: PDF files maintain the vector information in text and shape layers,

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where PSD does not. So does this mean you have to save both the original Photoshop PSD file and the Photoshop PDF? No, as long as you’ve enabled Preserve Photoshop Editing Capabilities in the Save Adobe PDF dialog box, you can open the PDF back up in Photoshop as you would the original Photoshop document. Illustrator PDF files: If you’re only importing your artwork into InDesign, then saving an Illustrator document as a PDF has no real advantage. You might as well just save it as an AI file. That said, there are two reasons you might want to save Illustrator files as PDF. First, if you may need to place the graphic in other programs (Word, etc.), then PDF gives you more options. If you do this, be sure to enable the Preserve Illustrator Editing Capabilities checkbox when saving the PDF; that way you can reopen the PDF in Illustrator without losing any information (you’ve got the complete Illustrator file inside the PDF). A second reason is that you can make the PDF much

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smaller than an AI file, by turning off that Preserve Illustrator Editing Capabilities checkbox. However, if you do that, you can still place the PDF in InDesign just fine, but you can’t really edit it properly back in Illustrator again later—​you lose all your swatches, brushes, groups, live effects, and other goodies inside the original Illustrator file. It’s the closest thing you have to “flattening” an Illustrator file. Other PDF files: As we said earlier, almost any program can save a PDF, and that means this file format is typically the best way to place information from primitive

or out-of-date software. For instance, you may want to use the charts and graphs from Excel in your InDesign layout. Saving those files as PDF is the best way to get the artwork into InDesign. Warning: there may be color shifts, as Excel works in RGB. Note: If you’re going to be making PDF files from other programs such as Excel, we recommend you not use the Save as PDF command at the bottom of the Mac OS Print dialog box. Instead, install Acrobat Pro and use the Save as Adobe PDF command. This creates a higher-quality PDF, suitable for professional printing.

Placing a Transparent Background When you import an AI, Adobe PDF, or INDD file into InDesign, it usually comes in with an opaque background. However, you can turn on the Show Import Options checkbox in the Place dialog box, and when you open the file, InDesign lets you control the import more precisely. For example, you can choose which pages you want to import. And you can select the Transparent Background checkbox to avoid importing the white area behind your artwork.

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InDesign (INDD) InDesign makes it easy to repurpose pages from one InDesign document into another: You can simply place one InDesign (INDD) file into another as though it were a graphic! For instance, many companies use the same reply card for all their ads and brochures. Instead of copying and pasting the frames from one document to another, you can just make one reply card file, and then place that file into your other InDesign documents.

The Also-Goods While we generally recommend the BFF formats, there are several other formats that are also reasonable to use in professional workflows. JPEG (JPG) What makes JPEG special is file size: This format is phenomenal when it comes to compressing bitmapped images to their smallest possible size. For example, a 30.2

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MB PSD file saved as a low quality/small file JPEG might be only 178 K. However, the key phrase is “low quality”—​JPEG is able to achieve these sizes because it’s a “lossy” format. That is, the more you compress your file, the more image degradation you see. When you save a JPEG you can choose a balance between quality and compression. At lower quality settings, you have to be careful of artifacts, such as halos around the edges of objects in your images. At higher-quality settings, you get very few noticeable artifacts, but you can still save a lot of space. JPEG is also the format that most digital cameras use. You have the choice as to the size and compression of those images. Watch out: The default settings for those

cameras can apply more compression than you expect. We know plenty of people who say you should never use JPEG files for print. Ignore them. There’s nothing wrong with using JPEG files saved at Excellent/Maximum quality for print—​you save a huge amount of space on disk (and transmission time across the internet), and it’s extremely unlikely that you’re going to see any image degradation. You can even save CMYK images in the JPEG format. However, JPEG isn’t so good if you’re going to be editing and saving the file repeatedly in Photoshop. It’s really a final-version file format. Also, JPEG doesn’t support Photoshop layers, transparency, spot colors, or vectors; it’s a pixel-only format designed for photographs. By the way, there is a cooler version of JPEG, called JPEG 2000, that handles compression even better than JPEG files. That means better quality at even smaller sizes. Unfortunately, InDesign doesn’t support it yet, so it hasn’t really caught on.

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PNG While JPEG offers terrific compression for photographic images, PNG is usually a better format for synthetic images, such a screen captures or images that have large areas of solid color (like type on a white background). And, unlike JPEG, PNG files support transparency! We save all our screen shots for InDesign Magazine as PNG files. For the longest time, PNG was seen as an on-screen-only format, used almost exclusively for websites, interactive PDFs, tablet apps, and so on. However, there is nothing wrong with using PNG for print. Yes, PNG is a pixel-only format, and only supports RGB (no CMYK); but you can save and place high-resolution PNG files into InDesign and they’ll print just as well as PSD or TIFF. So, if file size and transparency are important, consider PNG.

Older Formats These are the formats that were top of their game years ago, but have been knocked out

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of the running. It’s not that there’s anything wrong with these files, it’s just they’re not as helpful as the preferred formats nowadays. EPS EPS (Encapsulated PostScript) files used to be important, but this is considered a legacy or deprecated format now. There are two types of EPS files: the vector graphics created by Illustrator (or Freehand or CorelDraw), and the bitmapped images created by Photoshop. Years ago, the only way to silhouette an image (create transparent

areas) was with a hard-edge clipping path saved in an EPS file. Today, InDesign can use any path in a PSD as a clipping path. However, most designers prefer to use transparency channels (like soft-edged masks) rather than clipping paths. The crazy thing is that there are still many printers and companies that insist on everyone using EPS. However, when pressed, they admit that they do this because “that’s the way we’ve always done it.” While there’s technically nothing wrong with EPS, you should really move away from them if you can. (If you already have artwork saved as EPS, it’s probably okay to leave it that way. But don’t save new images in this dying format.) By the way, the new QR codes in InDesign CC and the patterns made by the PatternMaker plug-in are actually EPS files that are placed and embedded into your layout. Don’t worry about it; it’s just that it’s sometimes technically easier to write EPS than other formats.

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TIFF TIFF (Tagged Image File Format) used to be the most popular format for raster images but has been supplanted by PSD files. But why? TIFF offers almost all the same features as PSD files: you can save transparency and layers, use paths as clipping paths, and both formats have lossless compression to keep the files small without artifacts. The only major difference is that you can turn layers on and off and read layer comps from within InDesign for PSD files—​but not TIFF images. Yes, there are some programs that can’t read Photoshop files, but there are fewer and fewer of those. (Even PowerPoint can import Photoshop files.) So there is nothing wrong with using TIFF, but we generally just stick to PSD now.

“You’ve got to be kidding!” formats There are some formats that InDesign can technically read, but they’re just not worth using. You might not even have heard of

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some of these. We’ll mention them just in case you come across a floppy disk that contains them. Think of it like your grand­ parents telling you stories about the first time they saw a television. Desktop Color Separations (DCS) files were invented by Quark Inc. and used for applying spot colors to graphics. They separate the art into individual files for each color channel. We don’t know anyone who uses them—​not even our friends who are still using QuarkXPress.

Graphics Interchange (GIF) format was created for web pages. They’re based on “indexed color” so they contain no more than 256 colors (generally, the fewer the colors, the smaller the file). They are best used for solid images such as logos or spot illustrations, not photographs. The creator of the GIF format has stated that the correct pronunciation is with a soft “g” as in “Jif” peanut butter. GIF has only one clever trick that sets it apart: you can create a multi-frame animation. The only reason to use a GIF with InDesign is (and we’re stretching here): You could place an animated GIF into InDesign and then export it as HTML to be viewed in a web browser. PICT (it doesn’t stand for anything) files were the original file format for Macintosh computers. A cross between vector and bitmapped data, they offered limited text support and had trouble printing. With the development of OSX, PICT graphics were replaced by PDF. Believe it or not, we still have PICT files on our Macs from the late 1980s, so we can confirm that

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InDesign can place them, but it’s little more than a curiosity now.

In Conclusion There are even more formats we haven’t mentioned here. Some are for extremely specialized workflows. Others are ancient history that has gone the way of the horse and buggy. In general, stick with InDesign’s BFF formats—​those “native” formats such as PSD, AI, and PDF. If you’re working with a vendor who asks for certain types of files, you should be able to explain why you do or don’t want to use that format. And if you find an old logo that needs converting, you’ll know what to do.

n Sandee Cohen is the author of the InDesign CC Visual QuickStart Guide as well as the co-author, with Diane Burns, of the new book Digital Publishing with Adobe InDesign CS6. David Blatner is the co-host of InDesignSecrets.com and co-author of Real World InDesign (Peachpit Press).

The InDesign Conference

is now part of the InDesignSecrets.com family! Dear InDesign Magazine reader, We have some big news to share with you: We have acquired The InDesign Conference from MOGO Media! As Barry Anderson, founder of MOGO, said about the deal: “It’s my pleasure to hand over the reins of The InDesign Conference to the two people who truly represent the world’s biggest independent resource for InDesign users, David Blatner and Anne-Marie Concepción. We’ve all known each other for many years, and I’m confident that under their guidance, The InDesign Conference will be better than ever.” The InDesign Conference is now a “sister” to InDesign Magazine, PePcon: The Print + ePublishing Conference, CreativePro.com, and InDesignSecrets.com. All together, these make up The Creative Publishing Network. We look forward to producing our first InDesign Conference—perhaps in late 2014, if we can obtain a venue quickly enough! In the meantime, we look forward to seeing you at PePcon: The Print + ePublishing Conference in Chicago, June 15–18. —David & Anne-Marie

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MAGAZINE

The InDesign Conference

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By Nigel French

InType: More or Less?

Revisiting the age(s) of typographic bedlam

You are here Vous êtes ici

Figure 1: The bare essentials

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In this age of Apple-inspired minimalism where white space is king, do you ever find yourself looking at all that luxurious space, those cool sans serifs, that carefully constructed grid—and want to mess it up? Ever wish that more, rather than less, was actually more? Want to put on some flannel, crank up the Pearl Jam, and get down ’n’ dirty with the type, explode that grid into a thousand tiny pieces? Let’s take this simple piece of way-finding typography as our case study. In the hands of the gridmeisters it might look something like Figure 1. Everything that is needed and nothing more. But what if we were to step back in time—to, say, the mid ’90s, when grunge

typography was all the rage. Maybe it would look something like Figure 2. I made this in Photoshop—compulsive repetition, multiple layers, blending modes and transparency, and of course a distressed texture (courtesy of Texture Palace). Not to

Figure 2: Grunge type

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InType: More or Less?

Figure 3: Some examples of Grunge typography, including a cover of Raygun magazine, designed by David Carson (www.davidcarsondesign.com)

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mention a Jonathan Barnbrook typeface, Exocet, that graced many a magazine and CD cover during that era (Figure 3). Cynics might say that part of grunge’s appeal was that you didn’t need to worry about getting things “right.” Around this time I taught graphic design at a large college in San Francisco where the work of the students was heavily influenced by grunge. It wasn’t always good to discern the good from the bad. At its best, grunge designers were (consciously or instinctively) challenging the rules of what had come before. At its worst, they were trying to pass off their sloppiness as rule bending. By the late ’90s the style had filtered down to anyone with a computer (and a few dodgy fonts) and was being used to sell anything from beer to lottery scratch tickets. Grunge, once so anti-formula, started to look formulaic, expected, and safe. Grunge was a backlash to the perceived stodginess and rule-bound typography of modernism, which had ruled the roost since the end of the Second World War (Figure 4,

next page). Self-indulgence was something to be celebrated, not dampened. Rather than subsume your personality in the neutrality of the type, you were free to be as expressive and as interpretative as your imagination allowed. Having a bad day?—let your type reflect that. Gone was the orthodoxy that typography should be a Crystal Goblet1—unobtrusive and elegant—to hold the language. With grunge you got to blow your own goblet, and decorate it with spray paint, marker pens, and stickers. The medium was the message.

One Step Back But grunge wasn’t exactly new. It had its precursor in the punk design of the late ’70s and early ’80s. Inspired by the punk music from which it took its name, punk design is less about a unifying style and more about an attitude and sensibility. In the

1

T aken the from the title of Beatrice Warde’s 1930 essay on typography

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InType: More or Less?

Figure 5: Cover artwork designed by Jamie Reid for the Sex Pistols

Queen’s Silver Jubilee—God Save The Queen (Figure 5). Reid wasn’t the first to use ransom note graphics, but his work has become synonymous with them. If Jamie Reid were

Figure 4: A grid-based example of the “old guard” designed by Joseph Müller Brockmann

shorthand of our memories, when we think punk, we think Sex Pistols, and when we think Sex Pistols, we think Jamie Reid, the influential designer of the iconic covers for Never Mind The Bollocks and the single that scandalized polite society in the year of the

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designing our simple way-finding informational message, perhaps it would look something like Figure 6. In this blatant ripoff of the Bollocks back cover, I’ve used Illustrator’s new Touch Type tool, which, combined with mixing a few typefaces popular during the ’70s, makes it a breeze to create ransom note text.

Even Further Back

Figure 6: Imitation done with Illustrator’s Touch Type tool

Tracing things back further, punk in turn owes a debt to the Futurist typography of the early twentieth century. Every bit as aesthetically challenging as punk or grunge, the Futurists too called for the destruction

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of outdated modes of communication. This was the age of the manifesto, and none of these was wider in scope than Filippo Tomasso Marinetti’s Futurist Manifesto (1909) (Figure 7). Painting, sculpture, literature, architecture, theatre, cinema, and music were all part of the package. Typography— until then a minor player in the arts—was integral to Marinetti’s program. Though the term had yet to be coined, Marinetti wouldn’t have had any use for crystal goblets. He was profoundly against elegance and typographic harmony, wanting instead to set the words “free” and hurl them in the reader’s face. If Marinetti had been working on this project, it might have looked something like Figure 8: sans serif types of different sizes and weights, the perennial pointing finger, and—radical and very hard to do with the technology of the day—rotated text and type around an arc. Part of the reason the Futurists were not more widely imitated was that the limited

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Figure 8: Marinetti imitation using today’s technology

Figure 7: “Futurist” typography from Tomasso Marinetti

technology of the time made it so hard to do so. With punk, imitation and homage was a lot easier—Letraset type, marker pens, scissors and paste were all accessible— but design in a wider sense still remained the domain of the art school kids. It took another generation for the “have a go” ethos of punk to filter down to a wider user group and audience. Desktop publishing made grunge an easy style to imitate—or at least an easy style to imitate badly. For the music, all you’d needed was a guitar and three chords; now for the design all you needed was a computer and basic knowledge

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of PageMaker, QuarkXPress, or Ventura Publisher. So was grunge just a momentary blip in the continuum2? Did grunge die, or did it mutate into something else? After nearly a decade of making things broken, by the end of the last century, the pendulum had swung back to Teutonic, grid-based design. After working so long without rules, the constraints of time-honored conventions felt liberating. Concepts like readability and rules for kerning and leading were considered once again useful things to know. Today, handmade type and design that incorporates elements of predigital craft is increasingly popular, and it is perhaps in this fascination for the less-than-perfect that the spirit of grunge and its forebears lives on. Strictly speaking, lettering is not typography and typography is not lettering, but the two fields are related and overlapping, perhaps now more than ever. We find 2

The title of Robin Williams’ book on the subject

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ourselves in the craft-inspired, steampunkflavored, Art Nouveau-influenced Age of the Squiggly—​a term coined by graphic design historian Steven Heller. Today our type is frequently decorated with florid embellishments and swirls (Figure 9). Designed in such a style, our signage might look something like Figure 10. Here I’ve used various customized instances of an Illustrator Symbol from the Florid Vector pack that comes in the standard install. To combine this with the type

Figure 9 Top: Flames of Love by Sebastian Lester (www.seblester.co.uk) Bottom: Opportunities by Marian Bantjes (www.bantjes.com)

Figure 10: Embellished type

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(Coquette from Typekit), I used the Eraser and the Pathfinder commands. My attempts at emulating these styles are second-rate pastiches, but all the same there’s something to be learned from emulating historical design styles. With the power of modern creative apps at our fingertips, it’s both enlightening and humbling to see how easy it is to get the mechanics—but how hard to really get the style. No doubt the cool-headed, quiet and clear visual missives from Apple, Google, and so many other minimalist messengers are influential in their effort to sell another fill-in-the-blank. But perhaps the wide, blank spaces they leave are even today inviting another generation of bedlam typographers, just itching to draw in the margins and kick out the jams.

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n Nigel French is a graphic designer, photographer, author, and teacher living in Brighton, UK. He is the author of InDesign Type and Photoshop Unmasked, both from Adobe Press, as well as several titles in the lynda.com online training library, including InDesign Typography.

where creatives go to know

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InDesigner: Lenswork

By Pam Pfiffner www.lenswork.com

B

n Pamela Pfiffner is a freelance writer, editor and producer of print and digital content in Portland, OR. She was founding editor of InDesign Magazine.

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rooks Jensen is one busy man. As the publisher of LensWork, he and his staff of three produce a staggering amount of content—​a print magazine, an interactive PDF edition with mobile-device counterparts, a web page that includes a members-only area with additional content, digital bonuses like audio artist interviews and creativity- focused videos, as well as fine-art prints, photographer monographs, and instructional materials. Although Jensen says that his team “keeps plenty busy,” what allows them to streamline the creation of content for print, web, and mobile is Adobe InDesign. A photographer whose passion is blackand-white photography, Jensen started LensWork magazine 20 years ago with his co-editor and wife, Maureen Gallagher. He saw that most magazines for shutterbugs showcased equipment rather than

creativity. Using then-nascent desktop publishing technology, he realized that he could create the kind of magazine he wanted, one that focused on black-and-white images and the creative thinking behind them. Inspired by Bill Gates’ 1995 book The Road Ahead that advised publishers to revise content to take advantage of digital technologies, Jensen dipped his toe in the interactive format when he launched LensWork Multimedia in 1998. The effort met with a cool yet curious reception. “We spent most of our time explaining to our readers what a PDF was,” he remembers. Fast forward to 2005, when Jensen launched LensWork Extended, an interactive version of the magazine. This time readers embraced the PDF format. While LensWork the print magazine remains Jensen’s pride and joy, he is enthusiastic about the PDF publication. It enables him to expand the scope of

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InDesigner: Lenswork

LensWork magazine, published by Brooks Jensen and Maureen Gallagher, features black-and-white photographs and the inspiration, process, and strategic thinking behind them. “The focus of LensWork is ideas and images rather than technique, imagination rather than imitation, and an understanding of photography beyond the craft,” according to the magazine’s mission statement. The magazine’s format is 8.5 inches tall by 7 inches wide, or half-legal size, a size that dates back to the magazine’s first issue. “We printed the earliest issues in our garage on a small duplicator press,” Jensen explains. “The largest sheet size it would accommodate was legal size. We printed 2-up and cut them in half before collating. Years later, Ingram Periodicals complimented us on our brilliant marketing by making our magazine smaller than the rest which would mean it would be displayed in front. We smiled and neglected to tell them the real reason.” The fonts are Trajan Pro, Minion Pro, and Myriad Pro.

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the magazine beyond the parameters of the print publication by adding more content. “Digital also gives us the ability to stay in stock on all back issues—​we never have to go back and reprint when they sell out,” he says. Click here to see retailers that carry LensWork.) And they do sell out. Because the publication is focused on creative process, strategies, and logistics rather than on equipment that will soon be eclipsed by new models, Jensen states that the content never goes out of date: “The stuff we published in LensWork No. 1 in 1993 is still valid today.” The relationship between print magazine and interactive PDF is symbiotic. The print magazine was redesigned for the horizontal format, thus creating a more unified look and feel between the two as well as making it easier to convert the paper publication to its pixel-based sibling. The print magazine in turn is the foundation document from which the digital versions are derived. This strategy creates a single PDF that translates easily from print to screen.

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InDesigner: Lenswork

Jensen likes to do as much as he can in InDesign, and that includes tonal adjustments. Although a black-andwhite magazine, Jensen converts all color swatches to LAB because, he says, “We often want to tweak a little lighter or darker without shifting the hue. LAB and HSL are ideal for this, but only LAB is supported in InDesign.”

Recently, Jensen has added iPad and Android-based versions to the LensWork canon. Those magazines remain in PDF format as well. “The iPad and Android versions are variations of the PDF we produce for disc and download,” he says. “I suppose that puts us out of step with the rest of the digital

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In the print magazine, the title page of a series of photographs by Alexandra de Steiguer places the photograph in a sea of white space that includes conventional typographic treatments. At the bottom of the page is an invitation to explore the digital version that contains more images as well as an audio interview with the photographer.

world that is so hot-to-trot for the EPUB format, iPad app, etc. We’ve found PDF to be such an ideal distribution format. We don’t feel a need to get into the Digital Publishing

Suite and learn all that new cutting-edge stuff.”  Whether or not that changes in the future is yet to be seen. But Jensen is sure of his decision to not to do iPad apps, because

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InDesigner: Lenswork

development is expensive and must be outsourced. Producing PDF files for print in InDesign is the industry standard, ​but InDesign is front and center when creating interactive PDFs, too. Rather than add navigation buttons, video, and MP3 files in Acrobat, they create interactive elements within InDesign itself. “All media that goes into the PDF goes through InDesign,” he says. “That tool has saved us a tremendous amount of time so we don’t have to do all that work in Acrobat on the finished document.” To that end, Jensen poses this question for Adobe: “Why are there no presets for interactive PDFs?” In producing LensWork, Jensen relies on such InDesign mainstays as templates and style sheets, as well as collaborative tools like Lightroom for image selection, InCopy for editing, and Acrobat’s shared review features for proofing. Preflight, too, is done in InDesign before export to PDF. But behind all the technology, elegant black-and-white photography is at the

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The cover of LensWork Extended online gives the photograph more room, thereby drawing focus to the image. Without page constraints, the digital issue can showcase not only more images from photographers featured in the print magazine but also can include the work of more photographers than are seen in the print publication.

heart of LensWork. At one point Jensen asked the readers of the print magazine if they wanted LensWork to showcase color images in its pages. “Overwhelmingly the response was ‘no,’” Jensen says. While color

design elements and images are welcome in LensWork Extended, the print magazine will stay true to its mission: “Black and white was before LensWork, and black and white will be here after LensWork.”

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InDesigner: Lenswork

“We publish projects of work that are intended to be seen as a unified experience exploring some particular theme, place, or idea. In the magazine we tend to refer to them as portfolios. In LensWork Extended, we’ve codified the term ‘Media Monograph’ as an alternative to the more common term ‘PDF.’ Lots of folks are using the terms PDF, ePub, etc. for various digital stuff, but these are not really anything more than a delivery format. The roots of this problem are in the term ‘book.’ Does book refer to the pages, binding, and ink, or to the story contained therein? A book can contain a novel, but it can also be something else entirely, e.g., a dictionary. A novel can be a book, but now it can also be a PDF, an ePub, or an HTML file. When you buy a collection of songs, is it an album or a CD? It’s neither, but we still use those terms even if the delivery is via downloadable MP3 files. Lots of fuzzy lines here in the digital age between vessels and cargo. ‘Media Monograph’ is a term we felt was independent of format or device, a body of work, to be seen as a whole, including audio, video, or other media.” —Brooks Jensen

The print version of LensWork (top) shows 20 images, while the online edition (bottom) allows nearly twice as many, interspersed with screens featuring quotes from photographer Alexandra de Steiguer’s book, Small Island, Big Picture—text not included in the print magazine.

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InDesigner: Lenswork

Elements such as rollovers are graphically rich means to access content. Here Jensen uses SWF Preview to test the rollover buttons that appear on the right-hand page. Not only does LensWork Extended allow the inclusion of more images, it also enables Jensen to add other types of images, such as color photographs.

For the interactive PDF that will appear both online and on disc, Jensen adds all navigational aides in InDesign itself rather than in Acrobat. This approach lessens the need to jump back and forth between the two applications. In the lower left corner, a speaker icon placed in InDesign indicates access to an audio file of an interview with the photographer.

LensWork Extended is now available for the iPad and Androidbased devices. The files are the same as those found in the online PDF, but formatted to a 4:3 screen ratio.

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By Jeff Gamet

InBrief: New & Improved Products

It’s the holiday season again, which means it’s time to find just the right gift for your design-savvy friends — ​ or maybe something special for yourself. We scoured the Internet for gifts worthy of InDesign and graphics pros everywhere and bundled them up just for you. Even if you aren’t into the holiday thing, there are some great gift ideas that’ll work all year long. Fork and Cream Sauce Cable Organizer Lufdesign, $12 www.lufdesign.com Organizing the cables on your desk (or even keeping them from falling out of reach) doesn’t have to be just a utilitarian thing. With the Fork and Cream Sauce cable

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organizer you can keep your wires under control while at least looking like you eat every now and then. The cable organizer looks exactly like it sounds: wind your cables through the fork’s tongs, and then stand it in the plastic cream sauce base. Lufdesign gives the proceeds from the cable organizer to the Save the Children organization, so your purchase helps feed a hungry child, too.

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InBrief: New & Improved Products

Merry Cloud Tape Dispenser

iCalc Bluetooth Calculator Keypad

Lufdesign, $14 www.lufdesign.com

SMK Link, $59.99 www.smklink.com

You’re probably storing documents in the cloud, so why not your tape, too? The Merry Cloud tape dispenser from Lufdesign brings the cloud to your desk without the worry of network outages because all it does is hold a roll of tape. It’s available in white or sky blue. Or if you prefer clouds with silvery linings, you can get a chrome version for $18.

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Apple’s MacBook Pro and MacBook Air laptops are great examples of industrial design, but they’re missing something that’s critical for many InDesign users: a numeric keypad. SMK Link has a solution to that problem thanks to its iCalc wireless numeric keypad. The keypad connects to your Mac via Bluetooth, and it can attach to the side of an Apple external keyboard magnetically. It sports full-size keys and an LCD display, so you can use it as a stand-alone calculator, too.

Serif Tote Bag Little Factory, $45 www.littlefactory.com As a designer, there’s a good chance you appreciate typography and know other people that do, too. The Serif Tote Bag from Little Factory lets you flaunt your typographic love in a subtle way by casually slinging it over your shoulder. The bag measures 33 cm x 40 cm, is handmade from 100 percent cotton-waxed canvas, and is clearly kerned to be sure the serif at the end of the handle strap shows. It’s available in white with a black strap, and black with a white or yellow strap.

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InBrief: New & Improved Products

Agrafie

Icon Notebook

Mandevilla

Linotype, $29 www.fonts.com

BrigadaCreativa, $11.05 www.etsy.com

Laura Worthington, $29/$75 (complete family) www.fonts.com

Agrafie from Linotype is a fun decorative handwriting font that’s a dead ringer for Calvin’s handwriting in the classic cartoon strip “Calvin and Hobbes.” Designed by Roland John Goulsbra, this OpenType font has a fun and whimsical feel, just like you would expect from a rambunctious little boy who’s smart and creative. It’s great for simple callouts and short text blocks that need a child-like feel, and perfect for the holiday season.

In our digital world it’s easy to spot which items are documents because of the telltale paperwith-a-folded-corner icon. And now you can find your documents the same way in the real world, thanks to the Icon Notebook from BrigadaCreativa. The A5-size handmade notebooks include 80 pages, heavy covers, and considering they’re real world documents instead of digital ones, the resolution can be as high as you like—no special video card required.

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Mandevilla is a friendly decorative font that works well for the holiday season as well as the rest of the year. It’s an easy-to-read OpenType font with flourishes in just the right places and an old-style family feel, too. Designed by Laura Worthington, it carries the approachable and flexible style of all of her designs. Mandevilla is available in Light, Regular, and Bold typefaces.

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InBrief: New & Improved Products

House Archive Boxes

8-bit Sleeve for MacBook, iPad

House Industries, $38 www.houseind.com

Big Big Pixel, $29.95 www.bigbigpixel.com

Everyone needs boxes, and designers deserve boxes that show off their style. House Industries has you covered with their archive box set. The pack includes three boxes each with a different design: letters, numbers, and brackets. The boxes all measure 15 3/4 x 12 3/4 x 10 inches, are made from recycled double-wall corrugated cardboard, and include matching lids. They’re just the right size to leave out where everyone can admire them, or tuck away on a closet shelf.

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Ampersand Pillow Cafe Press, $19.99 www.cafepress.com Need a place to rest your head after working on holiday designs for your clients? The Ampersand Pillow from Timmy and the Cat might be just the thing for you. This throw pillow measures 18 inches by 18 inches, is made from soft twill and canvas, and the cover is removable for washing. The red and white ampersand makes for a nice splash of color and looks great in your office even when it isn’t holding your head after a late-night deadline.

High-resolution and retina displays may be all the rage, which makes the 8-bit Sleeve from Big Big Pixel that much cooler. It adds a decidedly low-resolution look to your laptop or tablet, complete with jaggy pixel edging. The sleeve is available in sizes to fit the iPad and iPad mini, as well as the 11-inch and 13-inch MacBook Air. It’s made from synthetic leather, has a matte finish, and is lined to keep your high-rez gear from scratching.

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InBrief: New & Improved Products

I Just Cropped Myself T-Shirt Cafe Press, $26.99 www.cafepress.com Show off your image editing skills (or lack thereof ) with the I Just Cropped Myself t-shirt from Cafe Press. The shirt is available in several men’s and women’s sizes in charcoal grey, red, blue, black, and a handful of other colors, too. It’s made from 50 percent pre-shrunk cotton and 50 percent polyester so you won’t have to worry about it being too small even if your crop window is.

n Jeff Gamet is The Mac Observer’s Managing Editor, contributing editor for Design Tools Monthly, and the author of “The Designer’s Guide to Mac OS X.” You can find him on several podcasts including Apple Context Machine and We Have Communicators, too. For a free issue of Design Tools Monthly, visit www.design-tools.com.

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The InDex: Your Key to Our Content Can’t find that article you saw in an earlier issue? Wondering whether we covered that obscure plug-in? Never fear, the InDex is here.

Index for issues 1 through 57, July 2004 through January 2014

MAGAZINE

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The first issue of InDesign Magazine was published in July 2004. Since then, we’ve cranked out thousands of pages on hundreds of related topics. While it’s possible to use Acrobat to simultaneously search all past issues of the magazine for one word or phrase, many readers have clamored for a formal index at the back of each issue. However, with 57 issues to account for, that’s not feasible. Instead, the InDex will live as a PDF you can download for free. If you come across a topic you want to know more about, but it’s in an issue you don’t have, you’re not out of luck. We sell back issues at indesignmag.com.

If the topic you’re looking for isn’t in the InDex, you have one more way to search: that PDF trick we mentioned. To make it work, all of your magazine issue PDFs must be in one folder. Open any issue in Acrobat, and then press Shift+Command+F (Shift+Ctrl+F on Windows). In the Search window that appears, be sure that you click the radio button that says “All PDF Documents in,” and in the dropdown menu below that, choose the folder in which you placed your magazine issues. You’re on your way to finding anything in any PDF!

Click here to download the InDex.

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While this PDF is for your eyes only, you can tell your friends about the great discounts they can enjoy right now: $10 Off a 1-year subscription (coupon code friend) $15 Off a 2-year subscription (coupon code friend2) Send them to indesignmag.com/ purchase.php

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Idm issue 57